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Indian

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Indian
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9


91


The Super-Connie is captured on film as it lands on Naval Air Station runway on first test flight,


QAe


Vol. VI, No. 17 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 24 October 1953


Naval Base Printers Two & One Half Hour Super-Connie Test Flight Commended by Admiral Swim Saves Buddies Lad~ ccesflyat A fr iu;LnsS-c sT y at-lAS


lUl uUniilI IIIu IIIOIUI,

ADM MURPHY COMMENDS
LOCAL PRINTERS FOR "INTEREST AND PRIDE"

Several Navy Printing Service personnel at Guantanamo Bay have received letters of commendation from RADM M.E. Murphy, USN for service beyond the call of regular duty in the publication of Admiral Murphy's history of the Naval Base.
In a letter written at Yokosuka, Japan on 22 September 1953 to Chief Printer George Alvin Floyd, USN, Admiral Murphy stated:
"1. It has come to my attention that the personnel of the Navy Printing Service, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba took a particular interest and pride in their work incident to publication of "The History of Guantanamo Bay," often working late at night in the accomplishment of this project. The interest and meticulous care which was exercised by you, as head of the printing office, is reflected in the fine appearance of the finished product.
"2. I hereby extend to you a commendation for the special efforts exerted, and my appreciation for a job well done."
Similar commendatory letters were received by Ralph Rust, PI1, James P. Delle Monache, P13, Kenneth R. Thompson, PI3, Rosario Naccarato, SN, and Vincent SanFelippo, SN.
Admiral Murphy, who was Commander of the Naval Base for two years prior to January 1953, is now Commander Service Squadron Three.


A daring two-and-a-half hour swim through night-blackened waters by one man set in motion successful efforts to rescue two others who were drifting to sea in an open boat.
E. P. DeDeyn, BM2, G. P. Shortall, BM3 C. H. McElroy, EN3, were fishing off Leeward Point Saturday afternoon, 17 October. Just before sunset they beagn to make their way back to the Naval Station boat shed. The motor of their skimmer stopped twice on the way, but they managed to get it running again. The third time it stopped, efforts to put it back in operation failed. Their attempts to attract attention failed and the boat started drifting toward the open sea.
DeDeyn, taking one of the life rings from the boat, slipped over the side about 1930 and began to make his way to the USS Cabot, the closest vessel. The wind and tide were against him and progress was slow. Finally, realizing he could not make it to the Cabot, DeDeyn turned and began to swim toward the shore. The current carried him out of the harbor mouth, and he came ashore at Phillips Park where he telephoned Port Operations office and informed them of the plight of the drifting boat with its two occupants. Port Operations immediately dispatched the NAS Crash Boat to search for the skimmer. The YTB 523 was also pressed into the search, and the Naval Air Station alerted a plane and began to make preparations to join in the hunt. The skimmer with Shortall and McElroy aboard was finally located by radar about 2Y2 miles to sea and the YTB picked up the two men and took the boat in tow returning to port about 0030.


Unheralded and practically unnoticed a giant plane slid out of the sky and braked to a stop in front of FLAW headquarters, Guantanamo, one night last week, and, thus, initiated the first Super-Constellation FLAW run between the Naval Base and the states.
Piloted by LCDR D. L. Gex with
CDR H. P. Cooy, Operations Officer,
N M ER-i as co-pilot and observer the Super-Connie was brought into the
FLAW terminal here as a practical
test of facilities available for future flights. Artificial weight-testing of the runways at the air
station was completed several
weeks ago.
Washington (AFPS)-The Navy The super-connie which arrived has announced that all advance- last week carried only mail and ment in enlisted ratings, with the cargo on the initial trip, but the exception of chief petty officer, will return trip was made with pasbe considered permanent in the sengers. future. No immediate comment from the
The change in present construc- pilots was available but indications tion governing advancement in were that the runway was of suffiratings by naval personnel pro- cient length to accommodate future vides that all promotions to first Super-Constellation flights. and second class (E-5, E-6) dur- The inauguration of the giant ing the calendar year 1953 are to planes on the FLAW flights, if be confirmed as permanent, affected, will relieve a pressing Previously only advancement to burden on the facilities now availpay grades E-2 through E14 were able. The Super- Constellation, confirmed as permanent. Advance- have a passenger capacity of 97 ment to CPO (E-7) will continue persons, plus crew. to be temporary. It is expected that if all reports
The change is outlined in Bureau are favorable, the Super-Constelof Personnel Notice 1443 dated lations will be authorized within Oct. 2, 1953. two months.


United Nations Day, October 24

In a proclamation issued by President Dwight D. Eisenhower October 24th has been designated as United Nations Day. The president, in the proclamation, urges all citizens of this nation to observe United Nations Day by " ... learning more about the United Nations and its members, and by essing confidence in the United Nations .....


d






9


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 24 October 1953


American Legion Post MSTS Celebrates


Editorial . S. Naval Base Plans Turkey Shoot Fourth Birthday
Special Services Department


Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 24 October 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT G. M. Holley
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Jack M. Howell Commanding Officer
Editorial Staff
Lieutenant E. A. Sandness_Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOC ------ Managing Editor Al Henderson, JOS ---------- News Editor J. C. Dierks, JOS ------------------ Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN --------- Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.

TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
By Barbara Burke
The forthcoming Halloween
Dance sponsored by the Student Council should really give the teen agers a chance to let some of their suppressed feelings and desires off. It's to be a costume ball, and I wouldn't be too surprised at some of the outfits that will show up. Stuch and Margo have a mysterious concoction brewed up that they won't reveal to anyone. One guy that has me stymied is Pierce Lehmbeck. Who knows what he'll show up in with that foot in a cast. Maybe "Long John Silver."
The Junior dance given last Friday was a big success. They made about fifty dollars. Here's hoping they have many more dances that are a lot of fun, like this one was. DID YOU SEE: Jimmy walking home last Saturday night. ... All the gals giving Carol a going away dinner ... Flip learning to do the planet cheer the right way. . . . Irma demonstrating how to do the splits ... The boys basketball thinking that they can go to Santiago without the cheerleaders.


The Tenth of October

By Henry Garcia
Two Saturdays ago was a holiday for the Cubans. It was a patriotic holiday, commemorating the 10th of October, 1868, when Cuba's "Father of the Country" Carlos Manuel de Cespedes gathered his slaves at the sugar mill "La Demajagua", near the city of Bayamo, and set them free, so that they were able to fight body and soul for the cause of the independence of Cuba.
This marked the outbreak of the so called "Ten Years War". Shortly after that Bayamo was being attacked by Spanish troops, but the heroic inhabitants of this city, foreseeing their arrival, set their houses on fire, sacrificing their properties to prevent their falling in the enemy's hands. When the Spanish Captain Valmaseda arrived at Bayamo with his overwhelming troops, he found only ruins, ashes and smoke. The first great moral victory of the war had thus been achieved by the Cubans.


Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1, under it's new officers is starting off with a literal 'bang'. Our local American Legion Post takes pleasure in announcing that a 'Turkey Shoot' will be held Saturday, November 21st, 1953, at the Naval Base Rifle Range, from 1300 to 1600.
Weapons to be used will be 16 ga. shotguns, with a special event for owners of 'sporting' rifles. The shotguns will be furnished with ammunition, but rifle shooters will supply their own weapons and ammo. Each relay will consist of a specified number of shooters who will shoot one shot for a prize. There is no limit to relays, or times each shooter may compete. The fee will be $1.00 for each entry. Explicit details will be furnished to the INDIAN at a later date. The prizes will be turkeys weighing approximately 8 lbs.
The new officers of the American Legion Guantanamo Bay Post No. One, are: Post Commander J. E. Roembke, Post Vice-Commander H. L. Broughton, Post Adjutant R. R. Robison, Post Chaplain H. H. Cole, Finance Officer R. E. Zaiser, and Sgt.-At-Arms R. W. Ramsey, and from the looks of the first item on their new program, it seems as though the American Legion is starting another typical Legion Year.

Deep-Sink Down the Drain As

Dishwasher Takes Over
By Peter Sudarsky

Now, it may be possible that you have had better food than that you will find at Guantanamo's Bay Hill Galley. After all, this isn't the Hotel Astor. Nevertheless, you haven't eaten off cleaner trays. At least that's the situation since the new dishwasher, a $3,500 package of magnetos, valves, pressure gauges and water pumps, was installed at the galley last week.
The new machine disgorges trays at the rate of 40 per minute, bowls at double this figure and cups at close to 200 per minute. What's more, every eating utensil which negotiates the treacherous one minute journey through the dishwashing wonder is sujected to a sterilizing water-steam rinse at from 180 to 220 degrees farenheit.
Most important news to the men who man the scullery is that the back-bending deep-sink job has been all but eliminated. No longer must 900 trays be washed by hand every meal time. Says Galley Master-at-Arms Joseph Devost, CS1, the 60 lbs. per square inch water pressure thrown by the machine removes food particles thoroughly. He points out, however, that egg yolks, which may solidify from heat, must still be rinsed by hand before trays are put through the washer.
If the galley seems quieter and more relaxed lately the reason is the quiet operation of the Philadelphia-manufactured dishwasher in sharp contrast to the screeching clatter of the former machine. New Commissary Officer LT James E. M. Coughlin states that the dishwasher is the first step in a plan to better the service and atmosphere for those who eat at the Bay Hill Galley.


October marks the fourth birthday of the Military Sea Transportation Service-the ships which have carried eight million passengers and 93 million tons of cargo since their inception in 1949.


Sunday, 25 October 1953 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on


Carrying everything from bom- Sunday.
bers to babies and DP's to VIP's, Protestant Services the MSTS network has become one of the biggest and busiest shipping Sunday: 0930-Sunday School concerns in the world. 1009-Adult Bible Class
The MSTS fleet, with their blue 1100-Divine Worship and gold striped smokestacks, 1930-Christian Fellowconsists not only of Navy ships but ship also commercial ships operating Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week under charter. There are the tiny Prayer AKL's, the large twin-stack liners, ice-breakers, reefers to carry Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal frozen meats and even baby air- Chaplains at this Activity craft carriers to haul aircraft to CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN NATO nations. LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
The huge job of providing ocean (Protestant)
supply for the Korean war was LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN handed to the new outfit when it (Catholic) was only nine months old, but it took it in its stride delivering more than 90% of all the cargo and men The Chaplain's Corner that were sent to the korean area.
Cold statistics, though, do not
reveal the more human stories If only the tongue of man were behind the gray hulls of the MSTS. For instance, at the evacua- controlled, many a trouble could tion of Hungnam 14,000 Koreans be bridged over, and the ugly, waited for evacuation. Their only sometimes terrible, effects averted. hope was the MSTS ship, Meredith For in most cases, family and social Victory, a cargo ship. The skipper, troubles begin with the imprudent Captain L. P. LaRue, realized that or offensive remarks of some indihis ship was their only means of vidual. Not without reason has the escape. He ordered "Load them on tongue been compared to a sword; unti she can' e" draw a 'sword, a d seewhat hapShe-took them idl. . 'hear comlThen, there was the time a plaints about the decline of the transport pulled away from the family; but often one of the most dock on schedule but without sev- influential causes thereof is foreral thousand diapers that had gotten, or too easily overlooked, failed -to reach the ship on time. the tongue. The skipper, harried by hundreds I Every family is dependent, to a of anxious mothers, finally got the great extent, on the tongue. Coindiapers aboard via the pilot boat. pare family society with society
One of the proudest achieve- in the world. A man can be a perments of MSTS has been its record fect gentleman in the world, and of rescues at sea. Perhaps the shape his words without offense, most spectacular was when the but at home he can be a most untransport Greely took 37 persons mannered speaker. His good bearfrom the ill-fated Flying Enter-. ing in the exterior pale of society prise. A few months later another helps his business and pleases MSTS ship directed the rescue of others; but his unbridled tongue at both ends of the freighter Fort home tears down the very bulwarks Mercer which had split in half. of society. Again, society outside is
MSTS, its growing pains finish- full. of noise and excitement, and ed after four enviable years, is the tongue has almost unlimited looking forward to jobs coming up freedom, if it likes; but in the future years. family must reign a certain dignity and composure, and the tongue must restain itself.
Imagine your own home converted into a fairly good copy of the family life of Nazareth. Suppose the father's words were always considerate, and never excessive; the mother's always
well-chosen, although firm; the children's showing .the marks of good breeding, and when not, immediately finding a moderate but timely correction. How much more joy and happiness would be yours!
One point that parents often
forget is this: they leave God in Church. Is this right? By no means. God should also be in the midst of the family life at Nazareth. in Church in a most special manner, still He is just as well present in the family. Why not make this presence felt and seen? This would give your home a refined, virtuous atmosphere, one of retirement from the noise and distraction of PFC S. C. Howard displays the world; it would become a haven 9-foot rock python he killed at the of rest for you and yours. northeast boundary line. William J. Spinney


Page Two






O


aturdav. 24 October 1953


THE INDIAN


Fishing Contest


Winners

LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Marcinuk, P. --------------23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Quinter, R. M. 20 lbs. Richter, Mrs. R. F.---------19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Grouper
Dupree, W. L. -------------22 lbs.
Marcinuk, P. ---------------7 lbs. 13 ozs.
Leverett, W. R.----------4 lbs. 6 ozs.
Jacks
Whitmore, F. M .----------- 17 lbs. 8 ozs.
Beman, J. A. --------------15 lbs. 9 ozs.
Vicari, V. F. ---- 14 lbs. 14 ozs.
Mackerel (K5i)
McNeil, D. A. -------------30 lbs.
Snapper
Davidson, H. ---------------47 lbs.
Dupree, W. L. -------------43 lbs. 8 ozs.
Kelly, C. L .--------------- 33 lbs. 4 ozs.
Snook
Loenwenhagen, A. H .-....13 lbs.
Tarpon
Brock, R. -----------------26 lbs.
Ciecarelli, B. --------------23 lbs.
Mackerel (Spanish and Common)
Zwatschka, J. R; -----------4 lbs. 7 ozs.
BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Ray, C. F. ----------------32 lbs.
Hardin, J. ---------------22 lbs. 8 ozs.
Suslick, A. D. -------------19 lbs.
Grouper.
Rodgers, J. L. -------------64 lbs.
Jacks Jacks
Loewenhagen, A. H .--------- 13 lbs. 8 ozs.
Brock, R. ----------------11 lbs. 6 ozs.
Suslick, A. D. --------------6 lbs.
Mackerel (Spanish and Common)
Scott, B.R ----------------9 lbs. 8 ozs.
Shepherd, M. ---------------3 lbs..
Snapper
Pass, J. S.----------------41 lbs. 4 ozs.
Lightfoot, L. H. ------------35 lbs.
Gennaria, R. H. ------------32 lbs.
Snook
Gennaria, R. L. ------------19 lbs.
Leverett, W. R. ------------14 lbs. 8 ozs.
Blount, J. M. --------------15 lbs.
Tarpon
Loomis, C. E. -------------47 lbs. 12 ozs.
Lightfoot, L. H. ------------30 lbs.
Beman. E. F. --------------25 lbs.


Hole-in-One Special Services Cops NAS Title

Tom Cofield, MU3, Naval Base band member used a five iron to the best advantage last week on the 154-yard 14th hole of the back nine here at the local links. Looking around for the ball after the shot Tom and the rest of the party had just about decided to give it up for lost when someone happened to look in the cup. The trumpeter had dropped it in on the first try for golfing's greatest thrill.


SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Chandler, C. A. -------------4 lbs. 8 ozs
Croakers
Williams, H. H. - - 2 lbs. Zwatshaka, Mrs. -----------1 lb. 9 ozs.
Cole, J. --------------------1 lb. 8 ozs.
Parrotfish
Nixon, R. M. ---------------1 lb. 14 ozs.
Sanborn, J. - - 7 ozs.
Pompano
French, C. D. --------------16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Hinkle, R. A. ---------------9 lbs.
Greaner, S. W-----------4 lbs.
Shark
Quinter, R. M. ------------222 lbs.
Hummel, C. A. ------------200 lbs.
Chelf, R. L .-------------- 140 lbs.
Triggerfish
McCarthy, T.E. ------------8 lbs. 12 ozs.
Borborian, S. Jr .----------- 3 lbs. 8 ozs.
SPEARFISHING DIVISION
Grouper
Nichols, E. M. -------------67 lbs. 8 ozs.
Kropack, J. A. -------------24 lbs.
Ekholm, L. A. -------------11 lbs. 8 ozs.
Jacks
Nichols, E. M. -------------19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Matson, J. F. --------------14 lbs.
Prejean, J. W. ----------13 lbs. 9 ozs.
Snapper
Foster, R. D. --------------19 lbs.
Abbott, G. H. --------------18 lbs.
Tarpon
Foster, R. D. --------------26 lbs. 8 ozs.
Rosendahl, G. A .----------- 20 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mareinuk, P. --------------20 lbs.
Hogfish
Prejean, J. W. --------------7 lbs.
Morales, R. ----------------7 lbs.
Foster. R. D. ---------------6 lbs.


Burton of Leeward Point takes one of Special Services hurler Yarborough's fast ones for a third strike at the Air Station softball championship playoff game at Hatuey Field Monday night. The catcher is O'Connor of Special Services and the plate umpire Seward. Special Services took the final game and the championship 2-1 with Yarborough throwing a neat two-hitter.


Dierks Stays with Princeton Despite Navy


Clobber; Ohio State, Duke, SoCal Favored

in Week-end Frays
By Jack Dierks

I've been walking around with a red face for about a week now, due to Navy's rousing 65-7 victory over Princeton (I picked the Tigers) and I apparently underestimated the Middies' point producing power. It'll probably take a couple of weeks of phenomenal forecasting to quiet the gibes hurled at me by virtue of this faux pas so I may as well begin by picking them all right this week.


Richard L. Berg, Navy dental technician at Great Lakes NTC, is officially congratulated by Mayor Vincent Impellitteri of New York after breaking the cross-country bicycle record. The 22-year-old sailor started from Santa Monica, Calif., rolled through Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma, northeast through Missouri and Ohio, then across Pennsylvania to New York-3,200 miles. The time: 14 days, 16 hours and 45 minutes. The previous record was 20 days, seven hours and 29 minutes.


EAST
Army tackles Columbia, and we think that the team .which stopped the previously unbeaten Duke Blue Devils last Saturday will come out on top of the Lions. I may be sticking my neck out again but Princeton can't be as bad as all that and they should bounce back
to take Cornell. Navy, who seems to shape up stronger than anyone was giving them credit for looks better than Penn, and we think that Penn State will hand the visiting T.C.U. Horned Frogs a loss. Other games: Holy Cross over Brown, Yale over Colgate, Harvard to take Dartmouth, and Rutgers to down the Fordham Rams.
MIDWEST
The game of the week in this area seems to be the Notre DameGeorgia Tech contest at South Bend. The Irish came from behind with 16 points in the second half to top Pitt 23-14 in their last game while Tech was rolling over Auburn 36-6. It should be a good one and we're casting a vote for Frank Leahy's lads this time. I think they're about- a touchdown better than Tech. Michigan State takes on Purdue and we've got to take the Spartans. They seem to be about the class of the Big Ten this year. Ohio State should knock off the Badgers from Wisconsin while Michigan is snatching that little brown jug from Minnesota, and we're giving the nod to the Northwestern Wildcats in a game with Pitt that could easily be the other way around. Illinois, playing at Champaign, looks a little too tough for Syracuse, and the Iowa Hawkeyes are seeking a win over
0


the Hoosiers from Indiana. They have a good chance to rack it up.
SOUTH
Duke is smarting from that 14-13 loss to Army and will probably take it out this week on North Carolina State. Alabama and Mississippi State should have a whale of a battle and we're sticking with the Crimson Tide. Maryland will probably prove too much for Miami as will North Carolina for Georgia, and Auburn will show a lot more against Tulane than they did against Georgia Tech last week. Other games in the south; South Carolina over Clemson, LSU to beat Florida, Arkansas to fall prey to Mississippi, Kentucky over Villanova, and Vanderbilt to knock off Virginia.
SOUTHWEST
Rice, dropping one to SMU Saturday will be out to prove that one was a fluke by beating the tar out of the Texas Longhorns. I think they'll snap back by taking Texas. Baylor shouldn't have too much trouble with Texas A & M, and Houston considers Tempe State a breather.
WEST' COAST
The big game out here this week will bring together California and Southern Cal, two west coast titans. It's a tossup in my book, but it's being played on the Golden Bears' home field so I'll give them the edge. I wouldn't bet any money on this one. UCLA shouldn't have a great deal of difficulty with Washington State, and likewise Stanford has shown a little more promise than Washington. Other games: Oregon over San Jose State and Montana over New Mexico.


Page Three


Saturday 24 October 1953







9


Navy-1ONDPPO-Gtmo. 4239-D


THE INDIAN


WGBY Program Schedule


Judy "Drop Dead" Holliday will appear in her first musical in Columbia's Technicolor, "My Sister Eileen." Judy should feel right at home though; she was known for song and dance performances on Broadway before Hollywood beckoned . . . Eric Sevareid, chief W a s h i n g t o n correspondent for CBS-Radio, was presented the Quartermaster Association's first annual Award of Distinction. The award is presented "to that member of the press, magazine, radio or TV industry who has made the most significant contribution toward presenting to the public a clear, factual and objective view of the activities of the Army in general and the QMC in particular."
Depreciation With Age
Warner Bros. casting department has informed us that actors working as extras are paid less the older they get. An infant, 15to 30-days old, gets $75 for a maximum work day of 20 minutes. Between ages one and three months, junior gets $50 a day for two hours work. After six months mother's pride and joy has depreciated to $18.50 a day, the standard pay rate for grown-up extras.
Disciplinary Action?
Olivia de Havilland, twice an Academy Award winner, makes her first appearance for Columbia in "The Human Beast," in the role originally slated for Rita Hayworth, now under suspension.".



WAY BACK HOME


On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon.
Monday, Oct. 26-Bedford, Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Framingham, Massachusetts.
Tuesday, Oct. 27- Lakeland, Florida; Lagrange, Georgia; St. Johnsbury, Vermont.
Wednesday, Oct. 28- Center, Texas; Marietta, Ohio; Lebanon, Pennsylvania.
Thursday, Oct. 29-Peekskill,, New York; Barnesville, Minnesota; Chicago, Illinois.
Friday, Oct. 30-Hollywood, California; West Yarmouth, Massachusetts; Charleston, West Virginia, Alamagordo, New Mexico.


0700 Morning Caravi 0715 News 0730 Morning Carava 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 Solitary Singer 0830 Bob and Ray 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 John Conte 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwags 1200 Way Back Horn

Monday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Behind the Stor 1345 Inside Track 1505 Parade of Spori 1715 Storyteller Tim 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 You and the W 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Broadway's My 2130 Fibber McGee a 2200 Symphonette

Tuesday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1345 Sports Answer 1505 Parade of Spor 1715 Storyteller Time 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain 2000 The Lineup 2100 Dancing Party 2030 Name That Tun 2055 Phillip Norman 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. N 2200 American Music

Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Behind the Stor 1345 Inside Track 1505 Parade of Sport 1715 Storyteller Time 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 You and the Wo 2000 Arthur Godfrey 2030 My Friend Irma 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Gunsmoke 2130 Judy Canova 2200 Howard Barlow

Thursday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1345 Sports Answer 1505 Service Football 1515 Boxing 1605 Guest Book 1615 Pro Football Sp 1630 Bookshelf of the 1655 Sam Balter 1700 American Herita 1725 Sam Baiter 1730 Storyteller Time 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Discovery 2000 What's My Line 2030 The American 'V 2055 Phillip Norman 2100 Stars From Par 2130 FBI in Peace A 2200 Enchanted Hour

Friday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Behind the Stor 1345 Inside Track 1505 Sports Lineup 1515 Football Prophe 1530 Pigskin Parade 1605 Guest Book 1615 Rod and Gun C 1630 Call Me Freedo


Regular Programs - Monday through Friday

an 1215 News 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree an 1330 Jack Kirkwood 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 News
1600 News
1800 News
1845 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Serenade 2025 This I Believe 2155 News
2230 Sandman Show on 2400 Sign Off
e

1655 Sam Baiter 1700 Invitation to Learning y 1725 Sam Balter 1730 Storyteller Time �bs 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 You and the World 2000 The Whistler orld 2030 My Little Margie 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Meet Millie 2130 Stan Kenton Beat 2200 Music For You nd Molly
Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program Man 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers Speaks 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 Adventures in Research e 1130 Encore 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
orth 1230 Saturday Swing Session Hall 1400 Mr. President 1430 Portrait of a City 1500 Parade of Sports 1600 News
1730 Jubilee Y 1800 News 1815 Dinah Shore
s 1830 Tales of Tomorrow 1300 Jane Pickens 1930 Twilight Serenade orld 2000 Amos 'N' Andy 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae 2055 Phillip Norman 210G Escape 2130 Grand Ole Opry Presents 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show


Man Sunday News 0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News
0830 Robert Armbruster otlight 0900 Journey into Song World 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony age 1045 Sports Forum 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 New York Philharmonic ay 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 There's Music in the Air is 1500 Parade of Sports nd War 1600 News 1730 Family Theater 1800 News
1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Cinema Music Hall 1900 Red Skelton y 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Martin and Lewis 2030 Music From America t 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News
lub 2200 Hollywood Radio Theater n 2300 Orchestras of the West


9


Saturday, 24 October 1953.


Trick or treat? Peggy Knudsen
-the big sister on radio's "Junior Miss"-models a "Daisy May" costume to remind you that Halloween is just around the corner.




Hospital Notes


Reporting for duty 14 October was B. W. Cox, HM3. Mr. Cox was formerly attached to the Naval Hospital at Key West, Florida.
CDR J. J. Timmes returned from TAD from -Chicago. While away CDR Timmes attended the conference of the American College of Surgeons.
Enjoying a week-end recreational trip to Port-Au-Prince were several members of the hospital staff, including: LT and Mrs. Delaney, LTJG and Mrs. R. J. Hanavan, LT Prescott, NC, and LTJG Hundley, NC. From the Personnel Office were F. E. Bentley, HM1, and T. C. Boesel, HM3, as well as G. D. Hollum, HM3 from the Admission Desk. All report a most enjoyable trip.
Heirport News: AD3 and Mrs. Robert A. Och announce the birth of Robert Andrew Jr. on 14 October. William Francis, Jr., born 16 October, is the son of FN and Mrs. William F. DeAngelo. A son was born to MR2 and Mrs. Eleno M. Pacho on 18 October and has been named Daniel Lee.


Doctor: "Is your cold any better ?"
Patient: "Naw."
Doc: "Did you drink the orange juice after the hot bath?"
Patient: "Naw. After drinking the hot bath, I couldn't get the orange juice down.

Everything I see a bald headed man sporting a mustache, I keep wondering whether it is a case of overproduction or just poor distribution.

Cactus Ike, as he dismounts: "Gal, I've been ridin' like the wind for miles and miles, just achin' to git here."
Annabelle: "You have?"
Cactus Ike: "Yes-hour after hour-I've been ridin' like the wind, achin' to see you."
She: "Well sit down."
He: "Can't. That's where I'm achin'."


o




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9 9The Super-Connie is captured on film as it lands on Naval Air Station runway on first test flight, Vol. VI, No. 17 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 24 October 1953 Naval Base Printers Commended by Admiral for Guantanamo History ADM MURPHY COMMENDS LOCAL PRINTERS FOR "INTEREST AND PRIDE" Several Navy Printing Service personnel at Guantanamo Bay have received letters of commendation from RADM M. E. Murphy, USN for service beyond the call of regular duty in the publication of Admiral Murphy's history of the Naval Base. In a letter written at Yokosuka, Japan on 22 September 1953 to Chief Printer George Alvin Floyd, USN, Admiral Murphy stated: "1. It has come to my attention that the personnel of the Navy Printing Service, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba took a particular interest and pride in their work incident to publication of "The History of Guantanamo Bay," often working late at night in the accomplishment of this project. The interest and meticulous care which was exercised by you, as head of the printing office, is reflected in the fine appearance of the finished product. "2. I hereby extend to you a commendation for the special efforts exerted, and my appreciation for a job well done." Similar commendatory letters were received by Ralph Rust, PH1, James P. Delle Monache, PI3, Kenneth R. Thompson, PI3, Rosario Naccarato, SN, and Vincent SanFelippo, SN. Admiral Murphy, who was Commander of the Naval Base for two years prior to January 1953, is now Commander Service Squadron Three. Two &One Half Hour Super-Connie Test Flight Swim Saves Buddies Lands Successfully at NAS A daring two-and-a-half hour swim through night-blackened waters by one man set in motion successful efforts to rescue two others who were drifting to sea in an open boat. E. P. DeDeyn, BM2, G. P. Shortall, BM3 C. H. McElroy, EN3, were fishing off Leeward Point Saturday afternoon, 17 October. Just before sunset they beagn to make their way back to the Naval Station boat shed. The motor of their skimmer stopped twice on the way, but they managed to get it running again. The third time it stopped, efforts to put it back in operation failed. Their attempts to attract attention failed and the boat started drifting toward the open sea. DeDeyn, taking one of the life rings from the boat, slipped over the side about 1930 and began to make his way to the USS Cabot, the closest vessel. The wind and tide were against him and progress was slow. Finally, realizing he could not make it to the Cabot, DeDeyn turned and began to swim toward the shore. The current carried him out of the harbor mouth, and he came ashore at Phillips Park where he telephoned Port Operations office and informed them of the plight of the drifting boat with its two occupants. Port Operations immediately dispatched the NAS Crash Boat to search for the skimmer. The YTB 523 was also pressed into the search, and the Naval Air Station alerted a plane and began to make preparations to join in the hunt. The skimmer with Shortall and McElroy aboard was finally located by radar about 2/2 miles to sea and the YTB picked up the two men and took the boat in tow returning to port about 0030. Unheralded and practically unnoticed a giant plane slid out of the sky and braked to a stop in front of FLAW headquarters, Guantanamo, one night last week, and, thus, initiated the first Super-Constellation FLAW run between the Naval Base and the states. Navy Makes E-2 to E-6 Ranks Permanent Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced that all advancement in enlisted ratings, with the exception of chief petty officer, will be considered permanent in the future. The change in present construction governing advancement in ratings by naval personnel provides that all promotions to first and second class (E-5, E-6) during the calendar year 1953 are to be confirmed as permanent. Previously only advancement to pay grades E-2 through E'4 were confirmed as permanent. Advancement to CPO (E-7) will continue to be temporary. The change is outlined in Bureau of Personnel Notice 1443 dated Oct. 2, 1953. Piloted by LCDR D. L. Gex with CDR H. P. Cooy, Operations Officer, VR-1, as co-pilot and observer the Super-Connie was brought into the FLAW terminal here as a practical test of facilities available for future flights. Artificial weight-testing of the runways at the air station was completed several weeks ago. The super-connie which arrived last week carried only mail and cargo on the initial trip, but the return trip was made with passengers. No immediate comment from the pilots was available but indications were that the runway was of sufficient length to accommodate future Super-Constellation flights. The inauguration of the giant planes on the FLAW flights, if affected, will relieve a pressing burden on the facilities now available. The Super -Constellations have a passenger capacity of 97 persons, plus crew. It is expected that if all reports are favorable, the Super-Constellations will be authorized within two months. United Nations Day, October 24 In a proclamation issued by President Dwight D. Eisenhower October 24th has been designated as United Nations Day. The president, in the proclamation, urges all citizens of this nation to observe United Nations Day by ". learning more about the United Nations and its members, and by dressing confidence in the United Nations." 9Ae

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Saturday, 24 October 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 24 October 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT G. M. Holley Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Jack M. Howell Commanding Officer Editorial Staff Lieutenant E. A. Sandness--Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOCManaging Editor Al Henderson, J03-------News Editor J. C. Dierks. JOS-----------Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSN--Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Omantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Strcot. New York 14, New York. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Barbara Burke The forthcoming Halloween Dance sponsored by the Student Council should really give the teen agers a chance to let some of their suppressed feelings and desires off. It's to be a costume ball, and I wouldn't be too surprised at some of the outfits that will show up. Stuch and Margo have a mysterious concoction brewed up that they won't reveal to anyone. One guy that has me stymied is Pierce Lehmbeck. Who knows what he'll show up in with that foot in a cast. Maybe "Long John Silver." The Junior dance given last Friday was a big success. They made about fifty dollars. Here's hoping they have many more dances that are a lot of fun, like this one was. DID YOU SEE: Jimmy walking home last Saturday night. ...All the gals giving Carol a going away dinner. .. Flip learning to do the planet cheer the right way. ...Irma demonstrating how to do the splits. The boys basketball thinking that they can go to Santiago without the cheerleaders. The Tenth of October By Henry Garcia Two Saturdays ago was a holiday for the Cubans. It was a patriotic holiday, commemorating the 10th of October, 1868, when Cuba's "Father of the Country" Carlos Manuel de Cespedes gathered his slaves at the sugar mill "La Demajagua", near the city of Bayamo, and set them free, so that they were able to fight body and soul for the cause of the independence of Cuba. This marked the outbreak of the so called "Ten Years War". Shortly after that Bayamo was being attacked by Spanish troops, but the heroic inhabitants of this city, foreseeing their arrival, set their houses on fire, sacrificing their properties to prevent their falling in the enemy's hands. When the Spanish Captain Valmaseda arrived at Bayamo with his overwhelming troops, he found only ruins, ashes and smoke. The first great moral victory of the war had thus been achieved by the Cubans. American Legion Post MSTS Celebrates Plans Turkey Shoot Guantanamo Bay Post No. 1, under it's new officers is starting off with a literal 'bang'. Our local American Legion Post takes pleasure in announcing that a 'Turkey Shoot' will be held Saturday, November 21st, 1953, at the Naval Base Rifle Range, from 1300 to 1600. Weapons to be used will be 16 ga. shotguns, with a special event for owners of 'sporting' rifles. The shotguns will be furnished with ammunition, but rifle shooters will supply their own weapons and ammo. Each relay will consist of a specified number of shooters who will shoot one shot for a prize. There is no limit to relays, or times each shooter may compete. The fee will be $1.00 for each entry. Explicit details will be furnished to the INDIAN at a later date. The prizes will be turkeys weighing approximately 8 lbs. The new officers of the American Legion Guantanamo Bay Post No. One, are: Post Commander J. E. Roembke, Post Vice-Commander H. L. Broughton, Post Adjutant R. R. Robison, Post Chaplain H. H. Cole, Finance Officer R. E. Zaiser, and Sgt.-At-Arms R. W. Ramsey, and from the looks of the first item on their new program, it seems as though the American Legion is starting another typical Legion Year. Deep-Sink Down the Drain As Dishwasher Takes Over By Peter Sudarsky Now, it may be possible that you have had better food than that you will find at Guantanamo's Bay Hill Galley. After all, this isn't the Hotel Astor. Nevertheless, you haven't eaten off cleaner trays. At least that's the situation since the new dishwasher, a $3,500 package of magnetos, valves, pressure gauges and water pumps, was installed at the galley last week. The new machine disgorges trays at the rate of 40 per minute, bowls at double this figure and cups at close to 200 per minute. What's more, every eating utensil which negotiates the treacherous one minute journey through the dishwashing wonder is sujected to a sterilizing water-steam rinse at from 180 to 220 degrees farenheit. Most important news to the men who man the scullery is that the back-bending deep-sink job has been all but eliminated. No longer must 900 trays be washed by hand every meal time. Says Galley Master-at-Arms Joseph Devost, CS1, the 60 lbs. per square inch water pressure thrown by the machine removes food particles thoroughly. He points out, however, that egg yolks, which may solidify from heat, must still be rinsed by hand before trays are put through the washer. If the galley seems quieter and more relaxed lately the reason is the quiet operation of the Philadelphia-manufactured dishwasher in sharp contrast to the screeching clatter of the former machine. New Commissary Officer .LT James E. M. Coughlin states that the dishwasher is the first step in a plan to better the service and atmosphere for those who eat at the Bay Hill Galley. Fourth Birthday October marks the fourth birthday of the Military Sea Transportation Service-the ships which have carried eight million passengers and 93 million tons of cargo since their inception in 1949. Carrying everything from bombers to babies and DP's to VIP's, the MSTS network has become one of the biggest and busiest shipping concerns in the world. The MSTS fleet, with their blue and gold striped smokestacks, consists not only of Navy ships but also commercial ships operating under charter. There are the tiny AKL's, the large twin-stack liners, ice-breakers, reefers to carry frozen meats and even baby aircraft carriers to haul aircraft to NATO nations. The huge job of providing ocean supply for the Korean war was handed to the new outfit when it was only nine months old, but it took it in its stride delivering more than 90% of all the cargo and men that were sent to the korean area. Cold statistics, though, do not reveal the more human stories behind the gray hulls of the MSTS. For instance, at the evacuation of Hungnam 14,000 Koreans waited for evacuation. Their only hope was the MSTS ship, Meredith Victory, a cargo ship. The skipper, Captain L. P. LaRue, realized that his ship was their only means of escape. He ordered "Load them on until she can't take any more." She took them all. Then, there was the time a transport pulled away from the dock on schedule but without several thousand diapers that had failed to reach the ship on time. The skipper, harried by hundreds of anxious mothers, finally got the diapers aboard via the pilot boat. One of the proudest achievements of MSTS has been its record of rescues at sea. Perhaps the most spectacular was when the transport Greely took 37 persons from the ill-fated Flying Enterprise. A few months later another MSTS ship directed the rescue of both ends of the freighter Fort Mercer which had split in half. MSTS, its growing pains finished after four enviable years, is looking forward to jobs coming up future years. PFC S. C. Howard displays 9-foot rock python he killed at the northeast boundary line. 94 Sunday, 25 October 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) The Chaplain's Corner If only the tongue of man were controlled, many a trouble could be bridged over, and the ugly, sometimes terrible, effects averted. For in most cases, family and social troubles begin with the imprudent or offensive remarks of some individual. Not without reason has the tongue been compared to a sword; draw a sword, and see what happens. Everywhere*e hear complaints about the decline of the family; but often one of the most influential causes thereof is forgotten, or too easily overlooked, the tongue. Every family is dependent, to a great extent, on the tongue. Compare family society with society in the world. A man can be a perfect gentleman in the world, and shape his words without offense, but at home he can be a most unmannered speaker. His good bearing in the exterior pale of society helps his business and pleases others; but his unbridled tongue at home tears down the very bulwarks of society. Again, society outside is full of noise and excitement, and the tongue has almost unlimited freedom, if it likes; but in the family must reign a certain dignity and composure, and the tongue must restain itself. Imagine your own home converted into a fairly good copy of the family life of Nazareth. Suppose the father's words were always considerate, and never excessive; the mother's always well-chosen, although firm; the children's showing the marks of good breeding, and when not, immediately finding a moderate but timely correction. How much more joy and happiness would be yours! One point that parents often forget is this: they leave God in Church. Is this right? By no means. God should also be in the midst of the family life at Nazareth. in Church in a most special manner, still He is just as well present in the family. Why not make this presence felt and seen? This would give your home a refined, virtuous atmosphere, one of retirement from the noise and distraction of the world; it would become a haven of rest for you and yours. William J. Spinney Page Two 9 THE INDIAN

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" Saturday. 24 Octobe 153 9 Page Three Fishing Contest Winners LAND DIVISION Barracuda Marcinuk, P. --23 lbs. 8 ozs. Quinter, R. M. --20 lbs. Richter, Mrs. R. F. 19 lbs. 8 ozs. Grouper Dupree, W. L. --22 Ibs. Marcinuk, P. ---7 lbs. 13 ozs. Leverett, W. R. 4 lbs. 6 oss. Jacks Whitmore, F. M. 17 lbs. 8 ozs. Beman, J. A.15 lbs. 9 ozs. Vicari, V. F. --14 lbs. 14 ozs. Mackerel (King) McNeil, D. A.--30 lbs. Snapper Davidson, H. --47 lbs. Dupree, W. L. -43 lbs. 8 ozs. Kelly, C. L.--33 lbs. 4 ozs. Snook Loenwenhagen, A. H. -13 lbs. Tarpon Brock, R. ---26 lbs. Ciccarelli, B. -------23 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Zwatschka, J. R.--. .4 lbs. 7 ozs. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Ray, C. F. ___ -32 lbs. Hardin, J. --22 lbs. 8 ozs. Suslick, A. D. ---19 lbs. Grouper. Rodgers, J. L. __ --64 lbs. Jacks Jacks Loewenhagen, A. H. -13 lbs. 8 ozs. Brock, R. ---__ 11 lbs. 6 ozs. Suslick, A. D. ------------6 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Scott, B. R. ---9 lbs. 8 ozs. Shepherd, M. ---3 lbs. Snapper Pass, J. S. ---41 lbs. 4 ozs. Lightfoot, L. H. --5 lbs. Gennaria, R. H. --32 lbs. Snook Gennaria, R. L. --19 lbs. Leverett, W. R. --14 lbs. 8 ozs. Blount, J. M. --15 lbs. Tarpon Loomis, C. E. --47 lbs. 12 ozs. Lightfoot, L. H.--30 lbs. Beman. E. F. -25 lbs. Hole -in -One Special Services CopsN AS Title Tom Cofield, MU3, Naval Base band member used a five iron to the best advantage last week on the 154-yard 14th hole of the back nine here at the local links. Looking around for the ball after the shot Tom and the rest of the party had just about decided to give it up for lost when someone happened to look in the cup. The trumpeter had dropped it in on the first try for golfing's greatest thrill. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Chandler, C. A. __ 4 lbs. 8 os. Croakers Williams, H. H. --2 lbs. Zwatshaka, Mrs. --1 lb. 9 ozs. Cole, J. ---1 lb. Sozs. Parrotfish Nixon, R. M. --1 lb. 14 ozs. Sanborn, J. ----7 ozs. Pompano French, C. D. --16 lbs. 8 ozs. Hinkle, R. A. --9 lbs. Greaner, S. W. --4 lbs. Shark Quinter, R. M. --222 lbs. Hummel, C. A.--200 lbs. Chelf, R. L. --140 lbs. Triggerfish McCarthy, T. E. -3 lbs. 12 ozs. Borborian, S. Jr. -3 lbs. 8 ozs. SPEARFISHING DIVISION Grouper Nichols, E. M. --67 lbs. 8 ozs. Kropack, J. A. --24 lbs. Ekholm, L. A. --11 lbs. 8 ozs. Jacks Nichols, E. M. --19 lbs. 8 ozs. Matson, J. F. --14 lbs. Prejean, J. W. 1--lbs. 9 ozs. Snapper Foster, R. D. --19 lbs. Abbott, G. H. --18 lbs. Tarpon Foster, R. D. --26 lbs. 8 ozs. Rosendahl, G. A. 20 lbs. 8 ozs. Marcinuk, P. --20 lbs. Hogfish Prejean, J. W. --7 lbs. Morales, R. ---7 lbs. Foster. R. D. --6 lbs. Richard L. Berg, Navy dental technician at Great Lakes NTC, is officially congratulated by Mayor Vincent Impellitteri of New York after breaking the cross-country bicycle record. The 22-year-old sailor started from Santa Monica, Calif., rolled through Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma, northeast through Missouri and Ohio, then across Pennsylvania to New York-3,200 miles. The time: 14 days, 16 hours and 45 minutes. The previous record was 20 days, seven hours and 29 minutes. L Burton of Leeward Point takes one of Special Services hurler Yarborough's fast ones for a third strike at the Air Station softball championship playoff game at Hatuey Field Monday night. The catcher is O'Connor of Special Services and the plate umpire Seward. Special Services took the final game and the championship 2-1 with Yarborough throwing a neat two-hitter. Dierks Stays with Princeton Despite Navy Clobber; Ohio State, Duke, SoCal Favored in Week-end Frays By Jack Dierks I've been walking around with a red face for about a week now, due to Navy's rousing 65-7 victory over Princeton (I picked the Tigers) and I apparently underestimated the Middies' point producing power. It'll probably take a couple of weeks of phenomenal forecasting to quiet the gibes hurled at me by virtue of this faux pas so I may as well begin by picking them all right this week. EAST Army tackles Columbia, and we think that the team which stopped the previously unbeaten Duke Blue Devils last Saturday will come out on top of the Lions. I may be sticking my neck out again but Princeton can't be as bad as all that and they should bounce back to take Cornell. Navy, who seems to shape up stronger than anyone was giving them credit for looks better than Penn, and we think that Penn State will hand the visiting T.C.U. Horned Frogs a loss. Other games: Holy Cross over Brown, Yale over Colgate, Harvard to take Dartmouth, and Rutgers to down the Fordham Rams. MIDWEST The game of the week in this area seems to be the Notre DameGeorgia Tech contest at South Bend. The Irish came from behind with 16 points in the second half to top Pitt 23-14 in their last game while Tech was rolling over Auburn 36-6. It should be a good one and we're casting a vote for Frank Leahy's lads this time. I think they're about a touchdown better than Tech. Michigan State takes on Purdue and we've got to take the Spartans. They seem to be about the class of the Big Ten this year. Ohio State should knock off the Badgers from Wisconsin while Michigan is snatching that little brown jug from Minnesota, and we're giving the nod to the Northwestern Wildcats in a game with Pitt that could easily be the other way around. Illinois, playing at Champaign, looks a little too tough for Syracuse, and the Iowa Hawkeyes are seeking a win over 0 the Hoosiers from Indiana. They have a good chance to rack it up. SOUTH Duke is smarting from that 14-13 loss to Army and will probably take it out this week on North Carolina State. Alabama and Mississippi State should have a whale of a battle and we're sticking with the Crimson Tide. Maryland will probably prove too much for Miami as will North Carolina for Georgia, and Auburn will show a lot more against Tulane than they did against Georgia Tech last week. Other games in the south; South Carolina over Clemson, LSU to beat Florida, Arkansas to fall prey to Mississippi, Kentucky over Villanova, and Vanderbilt to knock off Virginia. SOUTHWEST Rice, dropping one to SMU Saturday will be out to prove that one was a fluke by beating the tar out of the Texas Longhorns. I think they'll snap back by taking Texas. Baylor shouldn't have too much trouble with Texas A & M, and Houston considers Tempe State a breather. WEST COAST The big game out here this week will bring together California and Southern Cal, two west coast titans. It's a tossup in my book, but it's being played on the Golden Bears' home field so I'll give them the edge. I wouldn't bet any money on this one. UCLA shouldn't have a great deal of difficulty with Washington State, and likewise Stanford has shown a little more promise than Washington. Other games: Oregon over San Jose State and Montana over New Mexico. THE INDIAN ,aura 24Otbr15

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Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4239-D 9 THE INDIAN Saturday, 24 October 1953. Judy "Drop Dead" Holliday will appear in her first musical in Columbia's Technicolor, "My Sister Eileen." Judy should feel right at home though; she was known for song and dance performances on Broadway before Hollywood beckoned ...Eric Sevareid, chief Washington correspondent for CBS-Radio, was presented the Quartermaster Association's first annual Award of Distinction. The award is presented "to that member of the press, magazine, radio or TV industry who has made the most significant contribution toward presenting to the public a clear, factual and objective view of the activities of the Army in general and the QMC in particular." Depreciation With Age Warner Bros. casting department has informed us that actors working as extras are paid less the older they get. An infant, 15to 30-days old, gets $75 for a maximum work day of 20 minutes. Between ages one and three months, junior gets $50 a day for two hours work. After six months mother's pride and joy has depreciated to $18.50 a day, the standard pay rate for grown-up extras. Disciplinary Action? Olivia de Havilland, twice an Academy Award winner, makes her first appearance for Columbia in "The Human Beast," in the role originally slated for Rita Hayworth, now under suspension." WAY BACK HOME On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon. Monday, Oct. 26-Bedford, Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Framingham, Massachusetts. Tuesday, Oct. 27Lakeland, Florida; Lagrange, Georgia; St. Johnsbury, Vermont. Wednesday, Oct. 28 -Center, Texas; Marietta, Ohio; Lebanon, Pennsylvania. Thursday, Oct. 29Peekskill,, New York; Barnesville, Minnesota; Chicago, Illinois. Friday, Oct. 30Hollywood, California; West Yarmouth, Massachusetts; Charleston, West Virginia, Alamagordo, New Mexico. WGBY Program Schedule Regular Programs -Monday through Friday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 Solitary Singer 0830 Bob and Ray 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 John Conte 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home Monday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Behind the Story 1345 Inside Track 1505 Parade of Sports 1715 Storyteller Time 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 You and the World 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee and Molly 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1345 Sports Answer Man 1505 Parade of Sports 1715 Storyteller Time 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 The Lineup 2100 Dancing Party 2030 Name That Tune 2055 Phillip Norman 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Behind the Story 1345 Inside Track 1505 Parade of Sports 1715 Storyteller Time 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 You and the World 2000 Arthur Godfrey 2030 My Friend Irma 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Gunsmoke 2130 Judy Canova 2200 Howard Barlow Presents Thursday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1345 Sports Answer Man 1505 Service Football News 1515 Boxing 1605 Guest Book 1815 Pro Football Spotlight 1630 Bookshelf of the World 1055 Sam Balter 1700 American Heritage 1725 Sam Balter 1720 Storyteller Time 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Discovery 2000 What's My Line 2030 The American Way 2055 Phillip Norman 2100 Stars From Paris 2130 FBI in Peace And War 2200 Enchanted Hour Friday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Behind the Story 1345 Inside Track 1505 Sports Lineup 1515 Football Prophet 1530 Pigskin Parade 1605 Guest Book 1615 Rod and Gun Club 1630 Call Me Freedom 1215 News 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 Jack Kirkwood 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 News 1600 News 1800 News 1845 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Serenade 2025 This I Believe 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off 165 Sam Balter 1700 Invitation to Learning 1725 Sam Balter 1730 Storyteller Time 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 You and the World 2000 The Whistler 2030 My Little Margie 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Meet Millie 2130 Stan Kenton 2200 Music For You Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 Adventures in Research 1130 Encore 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Portrait of a City 1500 Parade of Sports 1600 News 1730 Jubilee 1800 News 1815 Dinah Shore 1830 Tales of Tomorrow 1900 Jane Pickens 1980 Twilight Serenade 2000 Amos 'N' Andy 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae 2055 Phillip Norman 210t Escape 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show Sunday 0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News 0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 Sports Forum 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 There's Music in the Air 1500 Parade of Sports 1600 News 1730 Family Theater 1800 News 1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Cinema Music Hall 1900 Red Skelton 19830 Twilight Serenade 2000 Martin and Lewis 2030 Music From America 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theater 2300 Orchestras of the West Trick or treat? Peggy Knudsen -the big sister on radio's "Junior Miss"-models a "Daisy May" costume to remind you that Halloween is just around the corner. Hospital Notes Reporting for duty 14 October was B. W. Cox, HM3. Mr. Cox was formerly attached to the Naval Hospital at Key West, Florida. CDR J. J. Timmes returned from TAD from Chicago. While away CDR Timmes attended the conference of the American College of Surgeons. Enjoying a week-end recreational trip to Port-Au-Prince were several members of the hospital staff, including: LT and Mrs. Delaney, LTJG and Mrs. R. J. Hanavan, LT Prescott, NC, and LTJG Hundley, NC. From the Personnel Office were F. E. Bentley, HM1, and T. C. Boesel, HM3, as well as G. D. Hollum, HM3 from the Admission Desk. All report a most enjoyable trip. Heirport News: AD3 and Mrs. Robert A. Och announce the birth of Robert Andrew Jr. on 14 October. William Francis, Jr., born 16 October, is the son of FN and Mrs. William F. DeAngelo. A son was born to MR2 and Mrs. Eleno M. Pacho on 18 October and has been named Daniel Lee. Doctor: "Is your cold any better?" Patient: "Naw." Doc: "Did you drink the orange juice after the hot bath?" Patient: "Naw. After drinking the hot bath, I couldn't get the orange juice down. Everything I see a bald headed man sporting a mustache, I keep wondering whether it is a case of overproduction or just poor distribution. Cactus Ike, as he dismounts: "Gal, I've been ridin' like the wind for miles and miles, just achin' to git here." Annabelle: "You have?" Cactus Ike: "Yes-hour after hour-I've been ridin' like the wind, achin' to see you." She: "Well sit down." He: "Can't. That's where I'm chinn'" STUFFY AFW* II F PAtKIN6PROLE