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Indian

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Indian
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Fire Prevention Week-Oct. 4-10













Vol. V, No. 55 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 October 1953


Dental Service For Civilians Established Here


Dr. Raymond C. Pepin
Fostered bv the need for dental care of civilians on the base a new and almost revolutionary service has been established here at the base on Bay Hill in the building occupied by the Naval Dental Clinic. A civilian dentist has nailed up his shingle over a 5-room suite of offices and is accepting appointments from U.S. civilians, their, dependents, the dependents of military personnel, and, in some cases, military personnel themselves.
Unique to Gitmo
Dr. Raymond C. Pepin, Longview, Wash., came to the base and opened his offices under the auspices of the Navy Exchange. The policy of a civilian dentist practicing on a naval base is unprecedented, as far as is known, and according to CAPT M.A. Moon, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, is "totally unique to this base." According to regulation Navy dental officers cannot treat civilians except in emergency, therefore U.S. civilians on the base had to have their dental needs taken care of prior to their departure from the states and could not count on any further treatment until they returned.
Graduate of U of Oregon
Dr. Pepin is a graduate of the University of Oregon School of Dentistry. He spent three years in the Army from 1942 until 1945 when he returned to civilian practice. He also returned to the University as an instructor in dentistry. From 1946 he remained in Longview until this year.
The doctor brought with him almost $10,000 worth of the latest dental equipment. Two operating rooms, one laboratory, one dark
(Continued on next Page)


CAPT G M Holley New NAS Mercy Flight Saves Life


WIWI~ UI 0lill

Capt. George M. Holley, USN, relieved CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson, USN, as Chief of Staff to Commander, Naval Base on Thursday, 1 October 1953.
Captain Holley graduated from the Naval Academy with the class of 1930 and began his sea service on the USS Memphis. When World War II broke out, he was command ing the submarine S-41. From 1943 to 1944 he was with Service Force, Pacific, and in 1948 and 1949 commanded the USS Whitley (AKA91). Just prior to reporting to Guantanamo Bay he was commanding officer of the USS Mazama, an ammunition ship.
Captain Holley did post-graduate work in marine engineering and is presently a member of the Engineering Society of Detroit.
The captain, his wife, Cynthia and son Christopher, are occupying quarters on the base....
Captain Wilkinson has served as Chief of Staff since 1951. His new assignment makes him commanding officer of the USS Navarro (APA-215).


Sea Queens Targets

'Operation Mariner'

Norfolk, Va. (AFPS)--"Operation Mariner," the largest peacetime sea-air maneuver ever staged, is underway and will continue until Oct. 4 under the direction of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
One part of the exercise will involve the use of several of the largest passenger liners in the world. This phase will particularly concern the SS United States and the Queen Elizabeth.
Submarines and land-based airplanes will make simulated "enemy" attacks on the liners and the skippers of the sea queens will radio messages as if they actually were involved in a war. However, the big ships will not deviate from their scheduled courses.
Other phases include convoying supply ships through the enemy submarines, repelling both surface and submarine forces in the Denmark Strait, and using a deserted icelandic island for live aerial gunnery practice.
Washington (AFPS) - Promotion of 55,000 Navy enlisted men to grades E-4, E-5 and E-6 following examinations held last month is planned by Bureau of Personnel. Promotions w ill b e effective Nov. 16.
Lists of successful candidates from the 200,000 men who took the exams will be mailed to commands in October. The breakdown for promotion is: E-6, 5000; E-5, 18,000 nd E-4, 32,000.


of Critically Injured Nurse

The flight of a Naval Air Station Albatross on an 800-mile mercy mission to save the life of a British nurse was revealed recently by the NAS Public Information Officer.


Crew of the mercy flight to Grand Cayman Island: (Standing) LCDR J. N. Parker, LT F. A. Dandrea, LT A.D. Nelson (MC); (Kneeling) S. J. Clark, J. W. Gherrity, R. A. Brown.


Third Large Carrier


Due for Construction


In 1954 Program

Washington (AFPS)-Announcing the Navy's fiscal 1954 ship construction and conversion program, Secretary of the Navy Robert B. Anderson said recently that a third attack aircraft carrier of the Forrestal class, 14 other ships, and 150 landing craft will be built in private shipyards.
The three carriers of the Forrestal class have been redesigned to incorporate the new angled flight deck and other improvements
-a move expected to cut construction costs of the USS Forrestal alone by $3,000,000 without delaying its completion date. All qualified private yards have been invited to bid on the 1954 work which will include the building of three destroyers, two escort vessels, four 165-foot minesweepers, one mine hilter two ammunition ships and two landing ships.
9


The plane with a medical crew aboard was alerted and sent on the emergency flight by a telephone message from the American Consul General in Kingston, Jamaica.
Receives Message
On Saturday, 19 September, the NAS duty officer was informed that a British government nurse was critically ill on the Grand Cayman Island, about 360 miles southwest of here, and was not expected to survive longer 'than 12 hours unless she could be taken to the hospital in Kingston. The medical facilities on Grand Cayman Island were incapable of coping with the nurse's injuries, sustained in an auto accident.
UF-1 Crew Alerted
The Air Station immediately alerted its UF-1 crew, and within minutes, the Grumann Albatross was airborne piloted by LT F. A. Dandrea with LCDR J. N. Parker as co-pliot. LT A. D. Nelson, flight surgeon, and S. J. Clark, HM3, were the medical team and J. W. Gherrity, ALl, and R. A. Brown, AD3, made up the crew. Dr. Nelson carried intravenous solutions and oxygen with him along with other necessary medical equipment which was lacking on Grand Cayman.
The rapidly sinking nurse, Hersie Blair, was put on board the
(Continued on next Page)







THE INDIAN


9


Saturday, 3 October 1953


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 3 October 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay. Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdah]
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer Editorial Staff
Lieutenant E. A. Sandness--Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOC ------ Managing Editor Al Henderson, JOS ---------- News Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3 ----------------Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN --------- Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-85 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.

A Message from Garcia ....

Bayamo's Cattle Fair

By Henry Garcia
Tunas' County Fair just finished and another big "fiesta" is coming up in Cuba. It is Cuba's popular Bayamo's Cattle Fair, about which I have written before. Bayamo's Cattle Fair was due early in September, but it was suspended by the Cuban Government. Now that authority has been granted to celebrate the Fair, it will take place from 6-11 October 1953.
Americans living on the Base know how to get to Santiago de Cuba. By airplane it takes about 30 minutes to get there, leaving from Guantanamo city. The fare for the round trip costs around $12.00, and there are two planes leaving daily from Guantanamo to Santiago. One in the morning and the other in the afternoon.
Upon arrival to Santiago, visitors to Bayamo could go in the car provided by the Airline Company (Compania Cubana de Aviacion) directly to whatever bus is leaving right away. Two hours of riding through picturesque places, in comfortable buses that charge less than $3.00 for the one way trip, and then Bayamo, the most historical city in Cuba. The hometown of Perucho Figueredo, composer of Cuba's National Anthem. The land of music romance and sentiment.
The most popular Cuban orchestras, including the most famous ones from night clubs of Havana go to the Fair and all of them play typical dances, while practically everybody dances them.
Wait till you see the "Beauty Cavalry" the most beautiful girls in town riding on magnificent horses-and you won't be so sure you had seen real beauty before!

USAFI can offer you correspondence courses at high school, technical school and college levels that will help you to employ your leisure time profitably and which will be useful in preparing you for further schooling in the future.
For information concerning USAFI's many benefits call 9-564.


Eight weeks of conscientious study are rewarded as Captain O L. Livdahl, commanding officer of the Naval Station, presents Victor L. Dittman, CS2 (left) and Larry R. Slagle, FN, with certificates for successful completion of the USAFI course "Mechanics of English." Also completing the course were Dean L. Faulkender, AD3 of the Naval Air Station, Arthur N. Devince, BM1 of the Fleet Boat Pool, Thomas D. Bradford, SN of the Fleet Boat Pool and David J. Griffiths, DC1 of the Fleet Training Group.


Mercy Flight...
(Continued from Page One)
Albatross and landed in Kingston five hours after the urgent message was received at the Air Station. She was immediately transferred to the hospital in Kingston. During the flight from Grand Cayman to Kingston Dr. Nelson and Clark administered the intravenous solutions and oxygen. An ambulance was waiting at the air field in Kingston, and Miss Blair was rushed to the hospital where she now has a better than even chance for recovery.
The mercy flight of the Albatross was credited with saving the life of the nurse. A message from the governor of Jamaica, Hugh Foot, to RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, Base Commander, states: "I wish to convey to you a message of the most sincere gratitude and 'appreciation for the despatch of special aircraft . . . to bring a nurse who was dangerously ill to Kingston. In particular would be grateful if you would convey my appreciation to ... Dr. Nelson and the crew


Dental Service...
(Continued from Page One)
room and a waiting room comprise the 5-room suite.
The doctor is available for treatment to the following:
(1) U. S. civilian contractors and their dependents
(2) U. S. Civil Service employees
(3) U. S. citizens employed by a civilian contractor
(4) U. S. military personnel and their dependents
(5) Emergency treatment for the relief of pain and/or accidents involving the dental structures.
The above listing is not in order of precedence. Treatment will be provided on an appointment-made basis.

of the aircraft. The very prompt and efficient action which was taken by those under your command undoubtedly saved the life of the nurse. . . . The readiness to help and the speed of the action taken has made a great impression here . . ."


FIND THIS HOUSE ON THE BASE AND WATCH IT! It will disappear before your eyes next Saturday in a live demonstration of carelessness in observance of Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10.
9 9p


Sunday, 4 October 1953
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: Saturday, 17301800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W.J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)

Tiny Tot Bible Time

By B. J. Sutherling
A LITTLE BOY SHARES
HIS LUNCH
John 6:1-13
One day JESUS talked with many
people.
JESUS told the mothers and
daddies how to share.
He told the boys and girls how to
share.
JESUS told everybody how to
share with others.
The people listened to JESUS a
long long time.
It was time to eat and they were
hungry.
JESUS said to His helpers; "We
must give the people some food to eat." I
The helpers had no food.
The mothers and daddies had no
food.
One little boy had his lunch-a
basket of bread and fish.
"I will share my lunch," the little
boy said.
I will share it with the people
and
I will share it with JESUS."
The little boy carried his lunch
to JESUS.
JESUS held the little boy's lunch
in His hands.
He told all the mothers and
daddies and
children to sit down on the soft
green grass.
JESUS closed His eyes, bowed
His head
and thanked GOD for the food.
JESUS thanked GOD for the
little boy
who wanted to share his lunch.
The helpers gave the bread and
fish to the people
to eat. There was enough for
everybody!
The little boy was glad he gave
his lunch to JESUS.
He was glad he shared his lunch
with the people!
Copyright GLP 1952
Thank You, GOD,
for food so good;
And help us share
The things we should.
Amen.
Bible Thought:
"SHARE WHAT YOU HAVE"
fr. Heb. 13:16


Page Two






O


Saturday, 26 September 1953


THE INDIAN


Rainy Weather Slows Softball As

Teams Near End of Season


Air Station
NAS Cooks & Bakers won two games during the week and currently are the hottest team on the Air Station Rain washed out the crucial and final game of the regular season Wednesday night between Leeward Point and the Cooks & Bakers. Leeward Point is leading the loop with a 6-1 record whereas the Cooks & Bakers are crowding them with a 5-2 standing. Should the Cooks & Bakers defeat Leeward Point on Tuesday, 7 October at 1800 the second half will wind up in a four way tie. In this event the Shaugnessy playoff system will prevail. with their able backstop Tibbs were Murray and Ciccarelli, along outstanding in both of the --Cooks CAPT Adelbert Althouse, USN, (ret.), 84, inspires the Annapolis & Bakers' victories.
varsity with the tale of Navy's 24-0 victory over Army in 1890-the Leeward Point defeated Supply first game in that series. The captain was a fullback on that historic 9-3. Shea pitched steady ball and team. Navy gridders enjoying the pep-talk are, left to right, halfback had fine support. O'Brien pitched Jimmie Jackson, halfback J..P. Monahan, and fullback Joe Gattuso. for Supply and gave up several clean hits but the bulk of the


Parade of Sports Skies Rain Footballs As


Fills Local Air

Sports fans in Guantanamo Bay have been kept right up to date with latest events in the world of sports over WGBY, the local Armed Forces Radio Station.
On the 25th of last month, WGBY listeners heard and exclusive blow-by-blow description from ringside of the World's Heavyweight Championship Fight between Rocky Marciano and Roland LaStarza. Stateside there was no radio or television coverage of the event and WGBY carried the only broadcast allowed for overseas military personnel.
This week, WGBY is bringing you a daily broadcast of the 1953 World Series direct from Yankee Stadium and Ebbet's Field along with exclusive interviews with the stars of each day's game. The top sportscasters in the nation are bringing you these exciting word pictures of all the action.
But the World Series is only the beginning of the fall schedule of sports events to be presented on the AFRS Parade of Sports. The top college and professional football games, such as Notre Dame - Oklahoma, Pennsylvania California, Tennessee-Alabama, the Army-Navy and season ending Bowl games have always been stand-out attractions on the Parade of Sports and will'be brought to you again this year.
To present a complete and wellrounded football broadcast coverage, use will be made of the facilities of the major radio networks in addition to the ace sports reporting crews of AFRS, New York and Los Angeles. Watch the WGBY program schedule in the INDIAN for the AFRS Parade of Sports, presented seven days a week over WGBY, 1450 on your dial.


Nation's Elevens Begin

8-Week Schedule
By Jack Dierks


Last Saturday the skies up north in the temperate zones were raining footballs as the country's top teams, squared off to butt heads in their initial games of 1953. These days when everyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the game feels himself qualified to make predictions are the days of the barber shop pool and the sportswriters' crystal ball contest, and I wouldn't feel I was getting my peso's worth if I don't crawl out on that overpopulated limb myself and hope that Podunk doesn't saw it off' behind me by upsetting some national contender. So here goes:
EAST
Columbia tangles with Princeton this week but doesn't look strong enough to knock off the Tigers. Look for Princeton to take their second game. Penn will meet Penn State and we'll have to cast our vote with State. The Nittany Lions aren't as bad as that 20-0 loss to Wisconsin would indicate. A toughie to pick is the PittsburghOklahoma contest, a game bringing together two powerhouses from different sections of the country. Pitt has a good chance to down the Sooners, especially since the two teams will meet on the Panthers' home field.
Other games in the East: Boston College over LSU, Holy Cross over Colgate, Navy over Dartmouth, and Yale over Brown.
MIDWEST
Army figures to be'a little tough for a too-average Northwestern eleven, Michigan State should follow up last week's victory over Tennessee with another over Minnesota, and Michigan won't have too much trouble with Tulane at
9


Ann Arbor. Illinois, heated up over a tie with Nebraska will show enough pep to outscore a mediocre Stanford team, and Notre Dame is seeking, and should find their second win at the expense of the Purdue Boilermakers.
Iowa over Washington State, Kansas over Iowa State, Nebraska over Kansas State, Wisconsin over Marquette and Missouri over Colorado.
ROCKY MOUNTAINS
Arizona should have a fairly easy win over New Mexico A & M, and if Utah is in usual form they should give Hawaii a warm reception and defeat the islanders. We're taking New Mexico over Brigham Young, and Wyoming over Utah State also.
WEST COAST
Ohio State at California should be a slam bang donnybrook, but I'm going along with the Buckeyes on this one. State looked good in beating Indiana and may very well be the class of the Big Ten. At any rate, I think they've got a little too much for the Golden Bears. The Southern Cal-Indiana game will probably be a different story. West Coast ball seems to be improving and the Trojans, along with U.C.L.A., the big wheels out California way. Southern Cal ought to hand the Hoosiers another loss. U.C.L.A. figures to have a breather in Oregon and I'nm picking Washington and Montana over Oregon State and Idaho, respectively, which about winds it up for this week. Let's see how I stack up with Grantland, Arch, and the rest of the boys!


scoring was due to a number of miscues by his teammates.
Standings as of 30 September: Team Won Lost Leeward Point ---------------6 1
Boatshed 6 2 Special Services --------------6 2
Cooks & Bakers --------------5 2
Gas Shop --------------------4 4
Aerology --------------------3 5
Operations -------------------2 6
Supply ----------------------2 6
Communications --------------0 8
Naval Station
Monday night the Bay Hill Cooks & Bakers behind the pitching of Horne and two homeruns by Roos downed the High School in A 13-12 slugging match. McGill homered for the losers and MacMichael was charged with the pitching loss. In the nightcap Graham- and Hottinger put the wood to a couple of homers that accounted for most of the runs for the FCP-RPIO team to down the ARD16-AFDL 1 by the score of 11-5, Bishop was the winning pitcher. Tuesday night the Commissary Store picked up a 7-0 forfeit from the 3rd and 7th Division who have dropped from the schedule. The regularly scheduled games for Tuesday and Wednesday were rained out and will be rescheduled.
Standings as of Wednesday are as follows:
Team Won Lost PCT GB 2nd Division --------- 9 1 .900 5th Division -------- 8 2 .800 1 ARD 16-AFDL 1 - ..... 8 2 .800 1 11th Division -------- 8 3 .727 1% FCP-RPIO ---------6 3 .666 2
9th Division ---------5 4 .556 3 1st Division ---------- 5 4 .556 8%
AFDL 47 -------------4 5 .444 4%
High School-------- 3 6 .333 5/2 Commissary Store 3 6 .333 5% Flag Division -------- 3 8 .273 6% 3rd & 7th Division --- 2 9 .182 7% 6th Division --------- 0 11 .000 91%2


James Prejean, AL3 of VU10 (left) and Richard Munsell, AN of the NAS Supply Depot pose with a five-foot 158 lb. great grouper caught near the Coast Guard lighthouse Sunday morning. The fish, encountered in 60 ft. of water was shot five times by the skindivers' spear gun before he finally got the point and gave up the struggle. The big grouper is ineligible for the present fishing contest as an aqualung was used in bringing him up.


Page Three






0


Navy-l10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4181E


9


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 3 October 1953


MISS AMERICA 1954


Miss America honors this year went to Evelyn Margaret Ay, entered as Miss Pennsylvania. The 20-year-old ash blonde, selected over 51 other lovelies, also won the bathing suit contest in the preliminaries.



Hospital Notes


Heirport News: PH1 and Mrs. James R. Bertine announce the birth of daughter, Pamela Elaine, on 24th September.
ENS and Mrs. J. J. Byer are the proud parents of a baby daughter born 26 September. She has been named Cathy Jane.
A son arrived at the home of BM1 and Mrs. James G. Tallant 29 September, and has been named Sam George.
Mary Dee, born 28 September, is the daughter of CDR and Mrs. Walter G. Winslow.

Circus Actress: "You know sir, this is my first day with the circus. You'd better tell me what to do to keep from making mistakes."
Manager: "Well, for one thing, don't ever undress in front of the bearded lady."


WGBY Program Schedule

Regular Programs -Monday through Friday
0700 Morning Caravan 1280 Hillbilly Jamboree 0715 News 1330 Jack Kirkwood 0730 Morning Caravan 1345 Behind the Story 0800 Lucky U Ranch 1400 Musical Matinee 0825 Solitary Singer 1500 Parade of Sports 0830 Bob & Ray 1700 Storyteller Time 0900 House of Music 1755 Sam Balter 1000 Curt Massey 1800 News 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1845 Requestfully Yours 1030 Bob Hope 1930 Twilight Serenade 1040 John Conte 2025 This 1 Believe 1100 Startime 2055 Knox Manning 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 2155 News 1200 Way Back Home 2230 Sandman Show 1215 News


Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 You And The World 1130 Met. Opera Auditions 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Adventures in Research 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 News
1815 Dinah Shore
1830 Tales of Tomorrow 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Amos 'N' Andy 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Escape
2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Hymns of the W,,rld 0815 News
0830 Robert Armbrusm, 0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religions Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 You and the World 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Piano Playhouse
1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 Discovery
1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story Ever Told 1800 News
1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Cinema Music Hall 1900 Red Skelton 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Martin and Lewis 2030 Music from America 2100 Charlie McCarthy


2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off
Monday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Cavalcade of America 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette
Tuesday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 The Lineup 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall

Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Portrait of a City 1815 Jo Stafford
1.830 Sports Forum 2000 Arthur Godfrey 2030 My Friend Irma 2100 Gunsmoke
2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents
Thursday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 American Heritage 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 What's My Line 2030 Horace Heidt 2100 Stars from Paris 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Enchanted Hour

Friday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation to Learning 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track
2000 Suspense
2030 My Little Margie 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace And War 2200 Music for You


WAY BACK HOME


On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon.
Monday, Oct. 5-Los Angles, California; Manitowoc,, Wisconsin; West Springfield, Massachusetts; Grenada, Mississippi.
Tuesday, Oct. 6- Pottstown, Pennsylvania; Billings, Montana; Midland, Texas; Baldwin Park, Californa.


Wednesday, Oct. 7-Oak Hill, West Virginia; Walla Walla, Washington; Manhattan, Kansas.
Thursday, Oct. 8-Boston, Massachusetts; Champaign - Urbana, Illinois; Clarksdale, Mississippi; Laurinburg, North Carolina.
Friday, Oct. 9-Seattle, Washington; Ithaca, New York; Bristol, Virginia.


MRS. AMERICA 1954


Only 24 hours after another Pennsylvania beauty was crowned Miss America, Erna Snyder, mother of two sons, was awarded the title of Mrs. America at Asbury Park, N. J. In addition to her title, the lovely Mrs. Pennsylvania wins $10,000 in prizes and a trip to Guatemala with her husband.

She: "How about giving me a diamond bracelet?"
He: "My dear, extenuating circumstances necessitate my excluding you from such a bauble of extravagance."
She: "I don't get it."
He: "That's what I said."


A westerner entered the saloon with his wife and six-year-old boy and ordered two whiskeys.
"Ain't ma drinking?" asked the boy.

The old mountaineer was discussing domestic relationships with his moonshining wife: "I guess, Zeke, I ought to be ashamed of myself. With all her faults I love her still."


9 9




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PAGE 1

Fire Prevention Week -Oct. 4 -10 Vol. V, No. 55 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 October 1953 Dental Service For Civilians Established Here Dr. Raymond C. Pepin Fostered by the need for dental care of civilians on the base a new and almost revolutionary service has been established here at the base on Bay Hill in the building occupied by the Naval Dental Clinic. A civilian dentist has nailed up his shingle over a 5-room suite of offices and is accepting appointments from U.S. civilians, their dependents, the dependents of military personnel, and, in some cases, military personnel themselves. Unique to Gitmo Dr. Raymond C. Pepin, Longview, Wash., came to the base and opened his offices under the auspices of the Navy Exchange. The policy of a civilian dentist practicing on a naval base is unprecedented, as far as is known, and according to CAPT M. A. Moon, Commanding Officer, Dental Clinic, is "totally unique to this base." According to regulation Navy dental officers cannot treat civilians except in emergency, therefore U.S. civilians on the base had to have their dental needs taken care of prior to their departure from the states and could not count on any further treatment until they returned. Graduate of U of Oregon Dr. Pepin is a graduate of the University of Oregon School of Dentistry. He spent three years in the Army from 1942 until 1945 when he returned to civilian practice. He also returned to the University as an instructor in dentistry. From 1946 he remained in Longview until this year. The doctor brought with him almost $10,000 worth of the latest dental equipment. Two operating rooms, one laboratory, one dark (Continued on next Page) CAPT G. M. Holley New NAS Mercy Flight Saves Life Chief of Staff Capt. George M. Holley, USN, relieved CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson, USN, as Chief of Staff to Commander, Naval Base on Thursday, 1 October 1953. Captain Holley graduated from the Naval Academy with the class of 1930 and began his sea service on the USS Memphis. When World War II broke out, he was commanding the submarine S-41. From 1943 to 1944 he was with Service Force, Pacific, and in 1948 and 1949 commanded the USS Whitley (AKA91). Just prior to reporting to Guantanamo Bay he was commanding officer of the USS Mazama, an ammunition ship. Captain Holley did post-graduate work in marine engineering and is presently a member of the Engineering Society of Detroit. The captain, his wife, Cynthia and son Christopher, are occupying quarters on the base. Captain Wilkinson has served as Chief of Staff since 1951. His new assignment makes him commanding officer of the USS Navarro (APA-215). Sea Queens Targets 'Operation Mariner' Norfolk, Va. (AFPS)-"Operation Mariner," the largest peacetime sea-air maneuver ever staged, is underway and will continue until Oct. 4 under the direction of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. One part of the exercise will involve the use of several of the largest passenger liners in the world. This phase will particularly concern the SS United States and the Queen Elizabeth. Submarines and land-based airplanes will make simulated "enemy" attacks on the liners and the skippers of the sea queens will radio messages as if they actually were involved in a war. However, the big ships will not deviate from their scheduled courses. Other phases include convoying supply ships through the enemy submarines, repelling both surface and submarine forces in the Denmark Strait, and using a deserted icelandic island for live aerial gunnery practice. Washington (AFPS) -Promotion of 55,000 Navy enlisted men to grades E-4, E-5 and E-6 following examinations held last month is planned by Bureau of Personnel. Promotions w ill b e effective Nov. 16. Lists of successful candidates from the 200,000 men who took the exams will be mailed to commands in October. The breakdown for promotion is: E-6, 5000; E-5, 18,000 nd E-4, 32,000, 9 of Critically injured Nurse The flight of a Naval Air Station Albatross on an 800-mile mercy mission to save the life of a British nurse was revealed recently by the NAS Public Information Officer. Crew of the mercy flight to Grand Cayman Island: (Standing) LCDR J. N. Parker, LT F. A. Dandrea, LT A. D. Nelson (MC); (Kneeling) S. J. Clark, J. W. Gherrity, R. A. Brown. Third Large Carrier Due for Construction In 1954 Program Washington (AFPS)-Announcing the Navy's fiscal 1954 ship construction and conversion program, Secretary of the Navy Robert B. Anderson said recently that a third attack aircraft carrier of the Forrestal class, 14 other ships, and 150 landing craft will be built in private shipyards. The three carriers of the Forrestal class have been redesigned to incorporate the new angled flight deck and other improvements -a move expected to cut construction costs of the USS Forrestal alone by $3,000,000 without delaying its completion date. All qualified private yards have been invited to bid on the 1954 work which will include the building of three destroyers, two escort vessels, four 165-foot minesweepers, one mine hunter two ammunition ships and two landing ships. The plane with a medical crew aboard was alerted and sent on the emergency flight by a telephone message from the American Consul General in Kingston, Jamaica. Receives Message On Saturday, 19 September, the NAS duty officer was informed that a British government nurse was critically ill on the Grand Cayman Island, about 360 miles southwest of here, and was not expected to survive longer than 12 hours unless she could be taken to the hospital in Kingston. The medical facilities on Grand Cayman Island were incapable of coping with the nurse's injuries, sustained in an auto accident. UF-1 Crew Alerted The Air Station immediately alerted its UF-1 crew, and within minutes, the Grumann Albatross was airborne piloted by LT F. A. Dandrea with LCDR J. N. Parker as co-pliot. LT A. D. Nelson, flight surgeon, and S. J. Clark, HM3, were the medical team and J. W. Gherrity, AL1, and R. A. Brown, AD3, made up the crew. Dr. Nelson carried intravenous solutions and oxygen with him along with other necessary medical equipment which was lacking on Grand Cayman. The rapidly sinking nurse, Hersie Blair, was put on board the (Continued on next Page)

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Saturday, 3 October 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 3 October 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Lieutenant E. A. Sandness Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOCManaging Editor Al Henderson, JOSNews Editor J. C. Dierks, J03-------Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSN---Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. A Message from Garcia Bayamo's Cattle Fair By Henry Garcia Tunas' County Fair just finished and another big "fiesta" is coming up in Cuba. It is Cuba's popular Bayamo's Cattle Fair, about which I have written before. Bayamo's Cattle Fair was due early in September, but it was suspended by the Cuban Government. Now that authority has been granted to celebrate the Fair, it will take place from 6-11 October 1953. Americans living on the Base know how to get to Santiago de Cuba. By airplane it takes about 30 minutes to get there, leaving from Guantanamo city. The fare for the round trip costs around $12.00, and there are two planes leaving daily from Guantanamo to Santiago. One in the morning and the other in the afternoon. Upon arrival to Santiago, visitors to Bayamo could go in the car provided by the Airline Company (Compania Cubana de Aviacion) directly to whatever bus is leaving right away. Two hours of riding through picturesque places, in comfortable buses that charge less than $3.00 for the one way trip, and then Bayamo, the most historical city in Cuba. The hometown of Perucho Figueredo, composer of Cuba's National Anthem. The land of music romance and sentiment. The most popular Cuban orchestras, including the most famous ones from night clubs of Havana go to the Fair and all of them play typical dances, while practically everybody dances them. Wait till you see the "Beauty Cavalry" the most beautiful girls in town riding on magnificent horses-and you won't be so sure you had seen real beauty before! USAFI can offer you correspondence courses at high school, technical school and college levels that will help you to employ your leisure time profitably and which will be useful in preparing you for further schooling in the future. For information concerning USAFI's many benefits call 9-564. Eight weeks of conscientious study are rewarded as Captain O. L. Livdahl, commanding officer of the Naval Station, presents Victor L. Dittman, CS2 (left) and Larry R. Slagle, FN, with certificates for successful completion of the USAFI course "Mechanics of English." Also completing the course were Dean L. Faulkender, AD3 of the Naval Air Station, Arthur N. Devince, BM1 of the Fleet Boat Pool, Thomas D. Bradford, SN of the Fleet Boat Pool and David J. Griffiths, DC1 of the Fleet Training Group. Mercy Flight. (Continued from Page One) Albatross and landed in Kingston five hours after the urgent message was received at the Air Station. She was immediately transferred to the hospital in Kingston. During the flight from Grand Cayman to Kingston Dr. Nelson and Clark administered the intravenous solutions and oxygen. An ambulance was waiting at the air field in Kingston, and Miss Blair was rushed to the hospital where she now has a better than even chance for recovery. The mercy flight of the Albatross was credited with saving the life of the nurse. A message from the governor of Jamaica, Hugh Foot, to RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, Base Commander, states: "I wish to convey to you a message of the most sincere gratitude and appreciation for the despatch of special aircraft ...to bring a nurse who was dangerously ill to Kingston. In particular would be grateful if you would convey my appreciation to ...Dr. Nelson and the crew Dental Service .. (Continued from Page One) room and a waiting room comprise the 5-room suite. The doctor is available for treatment to the following: (1) U. S. civilian contractors and their dependents (2) U. S. Civil Service employees (3) U. S. citizens employed by a civilian contractor (4) U. S. military personnel and their dependents (5) Emergency treatment for the relief of pain and/or accidents involving the dental structures. The above listing is not in order of precedence. Treatment will be provided on an appointment-made basis. of the aircraft. The very prompt and efficient action which was taken by those under your command undoubtedly saved the life of the nurse. ...The readiness to help and the speed of the action taken has made a great impression here .." FIND THIS HOUSE ON THE BASE AND WATCH IT! It will disappear before your eyes next Saturday in a live demonstration of carelessness in observance of Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10. 9 9 Sunday, 4 October 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Tiny Tot Bible Time By B. J. Sutherling A LITTLE BOY SHARES HIS LUNCH John 6:1-13 One day JESUS talked with many people. JESUS told the mothers and daddies how to share. He told the boys and girls how to share. JESUS told everybody how to share with others. The people listened to JESUS a long long time. It was time to eat and they were hungry. JESUS said to His helpers, "We must give the people some food to eat." The helpers had no food. The mothers and daddies had no food. One little boy had his lunch-a basket of bread and fish. "I will share my lunch," the little boy said. I will share it with the people and I will share it with JESUS." The little boy carried his lunch to JESUS. JESUS held the little boy's lunch in His hands. He told all the mothers and daddies and children to sit down on the soft green grass. JESUS closed His eyes, bowed His head and thanked GOD for the food. JESUS thanked GOD for the little boy who wanted to share his lunch. The helpers gave the bread and fish to the people to eat. There was enough for everybody! The little boy was glad he gave his lunch to JESUS. He was glad he shared his lunch with the people! Copyright GLP 1952 Thank You, GOD, for food so good; And help us share The things we should. Amen. Bible Thought: "SHARE WHAT YOU HAVE" .fr. Heb. 13:16 Page Two THE INDIAN 9

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9 Saturday, 26 September 1953 OLD TIMER THE INDIAN Page Three Si'or/st Rainy Weather Slows Softball As Teams Near End of Season CAPT Adelbert Althouse, USN, (ret.), 84, inspires the Annapolis varsity with the tale of Navy's 24-0 victory over Army in 1890-the first game in that series. The captain was a fullback on that historic team. Navy gridders enjoying the pep-talk are, left to right, halfback Jimmie Jackson, halfback J. P. Monahan, and fullback Joe Gattuso. Last Saturday the skies up north in the temperate zones were raining footballs as the country's top teams, squared off to butt heads in their initial games of 1953. These days when everyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the game feels himself qualified to make predictions are the days of the barber shop pool and the sportswriters' crystal ball contest, and I wouldn't feel I was getting my peso's worth if I don't crawl out on that overpopulated limb myself and hope that Podunk doesn't saw it off behind me by upsetting some national contender. So here goes: EAST Columbia tangles with Princeton this week but doesn't look strong enough to knock off the Tigers. Look for Princeton to take their second game. Penn will meet Penn State and we'll have to cast our vote with State. The Nittany Lions aren't as bad as that 20-0 loss to Wisconsin would indicate. A toughie to pick is the PittsburghOklahoma contest, a game bringing together two powerhouses from different sections of the country. Pitt has a good chance to down the Sooners, especially since the two teams will meet on the Panthers' home field. Other games in the East: Boston College over LSU, Holy Cross over Colgate, Navy over Dartmouth, and Yale over Brown. MIDWEST Army figures to be a little tough for a too-average Northwestern eleven, Michigan State should follow up last week's victory over Tennessee with another over Minnesota, and Michigan won't have too much trouble with Tulane at 9f Air Station NAS Cooks & Bakers won two games during the week and currently are the hottest team on the Air Station. Rain washed out the crucial and final game of the regular season Wednesday night between Leeward Point and the Cooks & Bakers. Leeward Point is leading the loop with a 6-1 record whereas the Cooks & Bakers are crowding them with a 5-2 standing. Should the Cooks & Bakers defeat Leeward Point on Tuesday, 7 October at 1800 the second half will wind up in a four way tie. In this event the Shaugnessy playoff system will prevail. with their able backstop Tibbs were Murray and Ciccarelli, along outstanding in both of the Cooks & Bakers' victories. Leeward Point defeated Supply 9-3. Shea pitched steady ball and had fine support. O'Brien pitched for Supply and gave up several clean hits but the bulk of the Parade of Sports Skies Rain Footballs As Fills Local Air Sports fans in Guantanamo Bay have been kept right up to date with latest events in the world of sports over WGBY, the local Armed Forces Radio Station. On the 25th of last month, WGBY listeners heard and exclusive blow-by-blow description from ringside of the World's Heavyweight Championship Fight between Rocky Marciano and Roland LaStarza. Stateside there was no radio or television coverage of the event and WGBY carried the only broadcast allowed for overseas military personnel. This week, WGBY is bringing you a daily broadcast of the 1953 World Series direct from Yankee Stadium and Ebbet's Field along with exclusive interviews with the stars of each day's game. The top sportscasters in the nation are bringing you these exciting word pictures of all the action. But the World Series is only the beginning of the fall schedule of sports events to be presented on the AFRS Parade of Sports. The top college and professional football games, such as Notre Dame -Oklahoma, Pennsylvania California, Tennessee-Alabama, the Army-Navy and season ending Bowl games have always been stand-out attractions on the Parade of Sports and will be brought to you again this year. To present a complete and wellrounded football broadcast coverage, use will be made of the facilities of the major radio networks in addition to the ace sports reporting crews of AFRS, New York and Los Angeles. Watch the WGBY program schedule in the INDIAN for the AFRS Parade of Sports, presented seven days a week over WGBY, 1450 on your dial. Ann Arbor. Illinois, heated up over a tie with Nebraska will show enough pep to outscore a mediocre Stanford team, and Notre Dame is seeking, and should find their second win at the expense of the Purdue Boilermakers. Iowa over Washington State, Kansas over Iowa State, Nebraska over Kansas State, Wisconsin over Marquette and Missouri over Colorado. ROCKY MOUNTAINS Arizona should have a fairly easy win over New Mexico A & M, and if Utah is in usual form they should give Hawaii a warm reception and defeat the islanders. We're taking New Mexico over Brigham Young, and Wyoming over Utah State also. WEST COAST Ohio State at California should be a slam bang donnybrook, but I'm going along with the Buckeyes on this one. State looked good in beating Indiana and may very well be the class of the Big Ten. At any rate, I think they've got a little too much for the Golden Bears. The Southern Cal-Indiana game will probably be a different story. West Coast ball seems to be improving and the Trojans, along with U.C.L.A., the big wheels out California way. Southern Cal ought to hand the Hoosiers another loss. U.C.L.A. figures to have a breather in Oregon and I'm picking Washington and Montana over Oregon State and Idaho, respectively, which about winds it up for this week. Let's see how I stack up with Grantland, Arch, and the rest of the boys! scoring was due to a number of miscues by his teammates. Standings as of 30 September: Team Won Lost Leeward Point6 1 Boatshed ---6 2 Special Services ---6 2 Cooks & Bakers ---5 2 Gas Shop _------4 4 Aerology ----3 5 Operations ---------2 6 Supply ---------2 6 Communications ------0 8 Naval Station Monday night the Bay Hill Cooks & Bakers behind the pitching of Horne and two homeruns by Roos downed the High School in a 13-12 slugging match. McGill homered for the losers and MacMichael was charged with the pitching loss. In the nightcap Graham and Hottinger put the wood to a couple of homers that accounted for most of the runs for the FCP-RPIO team to down the ARD16-AFDL 1 by the score of 11-5, Bishop was the winning pitcher. Tuesday night the Commissary Store picked up a 7-0 forfeit from the 3rd and 7th Division who have dropped from the schedule. The regularly scheduled games for Tuesday and Wednesday were rained out and will be rescheduled. Standings as of Wednesday are as follows: Team Won Lost PCT GB 2nd Division ---9 1 .900 5th Division -----5---8 2 .800 1 ARD 16-AFDL 1 --8 2 .800 1 11th Division -8 3 .727 11/ FCP-RPIO --------6 3 .666 21/ 9th Division -5 4 .556 3/ 1st Division -5 4 .556 32 AFDL 47 --4 5 .444 41, High School -3 6 .333 51% Commissary Store 3 6 .333 51 Flag Division -3 8 .273 61/ 3rd & 7th Division 2 9 .182 71/2 6th Division ---0 11 .000 9/. James Prejean, AL3 of VU-10 (left) and Richard Munsell, AN of the NAS Supply Depot pose with a five-foot 158 lb. great grouper caught near the Coast Guard lighthouse Sunday morning. The fish, encountered in 60 ft. of water was shot five times by the skindivers' spear gun before he finally got the point and gave up the struggle. The big grouper is ineligible for the present fishing contest as an aqualung was used in bringing him up. Nation's Elevens Begin 8-Week Schedule By Jack Dierks

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9 Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4161E1 THE INDIAN Saturday, 3 October 1953 MISS AMERICA 1954 f7 t.AFPS 1J1 Phws Miss America honors this year went to Evelyn Margaret Ay, entered as Miss Pennsylvania. The 20-year-old ash blonde, selected over 51 other lovelies, also won the bathing suit contest in the preliminaries. Hospital Notes Heirport News: PHI and Mrs. James R. Bertine announce the birth of daughter, Pamela Elaine, on 24th September. ENS and Mrs. J. J. Byer are the proud parents of a baby daughter born 26 September. She has been named Cathy Jane. A son arrived at the home of BM1 and Mrs. James G. Tallant 29 September, and has been named Sam George. Mary Dee, born 28 September, is the daughter of CDR and Mrs. Walter G. Winslow. Circus Actress: "You know sir, this is my first day with the circus. You'd better tell me what to do to keep from making mistakes." Manager: "Well, for one thing, don't ever undress in front of the bearded lady." WCBY Program Schedule Regular Programs -Monday through Friday 0700 Morning Caravan 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 0715 News 1330 Jack Kirkwood 0730 Morning Caravan 1345 Behind the Story 0800 Lucky U Ranch 1400 Musical Matinee 0825 Solitary Singer 1500 Parade of Sports 0830 Bob & Ray 1700 Storyteller Time 0900 House of Music 1755 Sam Balter 1000 Curt Massey 1800 News 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1845 Requestfully Yours 1030 Bob Hope 1930 Twilight Serenade 1040 John Conte 2025 This 1 Believe 1100 Startime 2055 Knox Manning 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 2155 News 1200 Way Back Home 2230 Sandman Show 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 090 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 You And The World 1130 Met. Opera Auditions 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Adventures in Research 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 News 1815 Dinah Shore 1830 Tales of Tomorrow 1900 Bing Crosby 1920 Twilight Serenade 2000 Amos 'N' Andy 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Escape 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of the W',rld 0815 News 0830 Robert Armbrus. 0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 You and the World 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 Discovery 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story Ever Told 1800 News 1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Cinema Music Hall 1900 Red Skelton 1920 Twilight Serenade 2000 Martin and Lewis 2030 Music from America 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Cavalcade of America 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 The Lineup 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Portrait of a City 1815 Jo Stafford 1030 Sports Forum 2000 Arthur Godfrey 2030 My Friend Irma 2100 Gunsmoke 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents Thursday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 American Heritage 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 What's My Line 2030 Horace Heidt 2100 Stars from Paris 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Enchanted Hour Friday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation to Learning 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 My Little Margie 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace And War 2200 Music for You WAY BACK HOME On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon. Monday, Oct. 5-Los Angles, California; Manitowoc, Wisconsin; West Springfield, Massachusetts; Grenada, Mississippi. Tuesday, Oct. 6 -Pottstown, Pennsylvania; Billings, Montana; Midland, Texas; Baldwin Park, Californa. Wednesday, Oct. 7-Oak Hill, West Virginia; Walla Walla, Washington; Manhattan, Kansas. Thursday, Oct. 8-Boston, Massachusetts; Champaign -Urbana, Illinois; Clarksdale, Mississippi; Laurinburg, North Carolina. Friday, Oct. 9-Seattle, Washington; Ithaca, New York; Bristol, Virginia. Distributedl by1 NEA .A":r TH~OUGHT THS s~ C 9 9 MRS. AMERICA 1954 Only 24 hours after another Pennsylvania beauty was crowned Miss America, Erna Snyder, mother of two sons, was awarded the title of Mrs. America at Asbury Park, N. J. In addition to her title, the lovely Mrs. Pennsylvania wins $10,000 in prizes and a trip to Guatemala with her husband. She: "How about giving me a diamond bracelet?" He: "My dear, extenuating circumstances necessitate my excluding you from such a bauble of extravagance." She: "I don't get it." He: "That's what I said." A westerner entered the saloon with his wife and six-year-old boy and ordered two whiskeys. "Ain't ma drinking?" asked the boy. The old mountaineer was discussing domestic relationships with his moonshining wife: "I guess, Zeke, I ought to be ashamed of myself. With all her faults I love her still." BUGS BUNNY