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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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QAi


Vol. V, No. 54


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Saturday, 26


September 1953


Radio "Hams" Cover


The World from NAS'


KG4AO Shack

A group of amateur radio enthusiasts have banded together at the Naval Air Station to offer base residents a worth-while service in the form of radio communications with the States.
Licenced by the Federal Communications C o m m i s s i o n and assigned a frequencey by the Tenth Naval District, the group of four "ham radio" operators dial the controls of station KG4AO. At present, KG4AO is the only "ham radio" station operated on the naval base by a club.
The club is primarily a facility of Naval Air Station Special Services, but both its facilities and services are open to anyone stationed at Guantanamo Bay. The four-man group is headed by Lieutenant Commander F. N. Vanderhoef, NAS Communications Officer, who serves in the capacity of trustee.
Because of the comparatively few persons who operate the station, KG4A4Os- services are limited to routine working hours unless special arrangements have been made in advance. These services include direct station-to-station communication and radio-telephone patchboard communication. Calls can also be made by Fleet personnel during working hours. There is no charge for the service and approximately 100 calls per month are handled by KG4AO, which is located top side of the NAS administration building. The 400 watts output is capable of reaching almost any part of the world under favorable atmostpheric conditions. No one particular type or manufacture of equipment is used and several pieces of equipment were recently acquired from the now-defunct KG4AC, which was operated from Bay Hill Barracks Four.
Interested "hams" or persons interested in becoming "ham" operators should contact LCDR Vanderhoef during working hours. Qualified persons are needed and the club is interested in helping persons qualify for FCC licencing. FCC test can be given on the base by any licenced operator.
KG4AO first went on the air in 1950 and had been operated from a Quonset hut near the NAS hobby shop.

Civilian Dentist
Opens office Here

Dr. Raymond C. Pepin, civilian dentist from Longview, Wash., has opened a suite of offices in the building occupied by the Navy Clinic on Bay Hill. He will be available for treatment to U.S. civilians on the base and military dependents. Appointments may be made by calling 9-385. Dr. Pepin is sponsored by the Navy Exchange.


First Aide, CD, Course

Underway Here


A nine week's course in first aid and civil defense measures will get underway Wednesday at ten o'clock in the Community Hall on Marina Point with Mrs. R. E. Allen, an American Red Cross instructor, conducting classes.
The two-hour classes are being taught under the auspicious of both the American Red Cross and naval base officials. The course, which is currently being taught throughout the entire United States, is designed to instruct the trainee in the prevention of accidents in the home, the detection of ills and the measures which are necessary in the event of an accident until the doctor arrives or the patient can be removed to a hospital.
The course will be presented to all interested wives and mothers of military or civilian personnel associated with the naval base. The first meeting will be held primarily to decide what days and what time would be best suited to the largest number of persons so that classes might be scheduled accordingly.


"The Queen" Leaves for D.C.


Save for the Future: BUY U.S. DEFENSE BONDS.


MCB-1 Rebels A Standout In Local


Hillbilly Performances


When it's roundup time in the hayloft of Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY you can count on the ol' cow hands of the MCB-1 Rebels to turn in a top notch performance. During the recent WGBY benefit broadcast for the Little League, the Rebels, pictured above with hillbilly announcer Dave Doyle (extreme right), stayed in the saddle from beginning to end. They are (from left to right), Fred Roos, Herb Garland, T. P. Jones, George Ashlin, Mack McBrien (leader), Singer Buck Buchanan, WGBY Staffer Don Herlin and Jimmy Brown. Heard every Friday between 12:30 and 1:30 on "Hayloft Jamboree," the group is comprised largely of MCB-1 personnel and has appeared at the various movie lyceums and clubs about the base. Among the Rebel's repertoire are several pieces original with the group, "Hatuey," "Boqueron Run" and the instrumental "Black and White Rag."
.9O


Former Private Craft,
Queen Served 12 Years
In avy, 8 in Gtmo

After serving for eight years at Guantanamo Bay, the "Queen" left here last Thursday in the -Carter Hall (LSD-3) for duty in the Washington, D. C., area. As part of the present economy drive, the "Queen" was found to be excess equipment for the naval base and was subsequently ordered to the nation's capital.
Originally built to order for a private meat-packing company in 1932, the sixty-foot craft was turned over to the government during the first few days of World War II. She was loaned to the government at the token rate of one dollar per year as were nearly all other yachts and sea-going craft. During the war she was bought outright by the government.
After first acquiring several .50 caliber machine guns and depth charges, the twenty-ton "Queen" was sent to Port of Spain, Trinidad, where she served with the Army as a harbor patrol craft. Then and now, she was capable of cruising at an impressive 16 knots and could accomodate 56 men. This was a luxury boat turned man-o-war.
With the war's end, the "Queen," so named because of her designation, "Q-63," was acquired by the Navy and sent to Guantanamo Bay. During her tour of duty at the naval base, the "Queen" played host to such famous personages as former President Truman, General Mark Clark, Senator Kefauver and numerous other congressmen.

MOTORIST:
Shaw said, "It's a Pity to waste youth on children," but it's the only time they have for it. Don't cut them short.


S0







THE INDIAN


0


Saturday, 19 September 1953


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 26 September 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer Editorial Staff
Lieutenant E. A. Sandness_-Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOC ------ Managing Editor Al Henderson, JO3 ---------- News Editor J. C. Dierks, J03 ----------------Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN --------- Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed rn government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.

TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP


The High School softball team has really had a rugged schedule lately, along with a nasty scattering of mangled players. Pierce Lehmbeck, key shortstop broke his ankle sliding into third, John Moon suffered a spiked leg trying to stop a run from crossing at home and Eddy Stafford fractured his little finger on a hard throw. . . But there's a brighter side: George MacMichael, our pitcher, has managed to keep himself all in one piece and can still knock a long ball as well.... The Naval Base School cheer leaders will be elected on October 1st. Last year's yell leaders, Frances Bruner, Carol Currier and Barbara Burke, are teaching this year's group of new girls ...


EARL D. JOHNSON
Under Secretary of the Army

Earl D. Johnson was born in Hamilton, Ohio, Dec. 14, 1905. He attended public schools in Milwaukee and in 1928 was graduated from the University of Wisconsin where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and the ROTC.
In 1932 Mr. Johnson was graduated as a pilot from the Air Corps Training Centers, Randolph and Kelly Fields, Tex., and ordered to active duty at Langley Field, Va. He left the Air Corps in 1933 and joined the Chicago office of Loomis, Sayles and Co., economic consultants. In June of that year he took charge of the Milwaukee office of the firm and in 1941 he became head of the New York office.
Mr. Johnson reported for active duty as a first lieutenant June 1, 1942, as a pilot in the Ferrying Div. of the Air Transport Command. Later he commanded the 4th and 6th Ferrying Groups and at the close of WWII was serving as Deputy CO of the Ferrying Div. He left the service in 1946 with the rank of colonel.


A Message from Garcia ...

The Tunas County

Fair

By Henry Garcia
A very kind and well-known Navy officer suggested to me the other day that I should write about different towns of Cuba, about their history, etc., and refer to them when mentioning their location, in terms of "time and fare costs from this base." I think that is a good idea, and so in this "Message" I am going to refer to the "Victoria de las Tunas' County Fair."
First of all, I think I should tell you what Victoria de las Tunas is. Tunas as they call it for short
-is, second only to Bayamo, one of the most historical towns in Cuba. It is located near Holguin (about an HOUR from it). Its name means in English "Victory of the Cactus Plants" because in the days of the Independence War there were many cactus plants over there, and one of greatest victories of the war was achieved there. it is about FIVE HOURS from Santiago de Cuba, by bus, and the fare for the round trip from Santiago costs only around SIX DOLLARS. There are good hotels and boarding houses in town, clean and reasonable, and there are many nice places to have a good time.
The Fair is a popular event, with exhibition of the best stock of cattle (the same as in Bayamo's), typical dances, and many things to enjoy.
Incidentally, although having beautiful women is no exclusive privilege of any town in Cuba, nature has bestowed her favors on the girls of this town, and you'll see them around the Fair, adorned with flowers-or rather "adoring the flowers they carry" with their beauty.
The Fair starts on 26 September, and lasts five days. Hope I'll see you there!


Sunday, 27 September 1953
Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a tu r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W.J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


Navy Pistoleers Win


At Camp Perry Meet

Camp Perry, Ohio (AFPS)-A Navy team zeroed in 1,120 points out of a possible 1,200 to win the .45 caliber pistol matches' while the Army placed second with 1,118 and the Marine Corps third with 1,115.
A Marine team ranked first in .38 caliber pistol shooting With 1,147 points out of 1,200 with the Army second with '1,145 points.
The Marine team, not the Los Angeles police department as first reported, placed second in the .22 matches with 1,155 points.


The third platoon of the military training currently being conducted at the Naval Station emerges from the gas chamber looking somewhat like men from outer space with their gas masks. The training program is scheduled to be concluded in the middle of October after over 80% of all personnel attached to the Naval'Station have been indoctrinated in military procedures.


Seeing is believing. Latest fashion trends show the male gain in- competition with milady's for comfort and attention. Miss Jackie Bolens, New York, and her escort, Bernard Kotzen, Charlotteville, N. C., attending the sixth annual Men's Formal Convention in Philadelphia get the treatment from an apparently puzzled sailor.
q


Page Two







Saturday, 26 September 1953


9


THE INDIAN


Football Picture Shows Struggle In Midwest Golf Tourney Set


By Jack Dierks
Every year about this time the curtain begins to ring down on the baseball season and with the exception of the World Series, the country's
* sports fans will for the most part be occupied during the next two or three months following the crack of pads and the thud of cleated feet on pigskins as a few thousand high school, college, and pro mentors put their charges through the paces.
When we take a look at the collegiate football picture it's always a fairly safe policy to start with the
mid-west. Although the relative schedule but PENN STATE has merits of any particular section of a lot of depth and a powerful runthe country can be argued pro and ning game to bolster their hopes. con far into the night, it is this Watch Syracuse in this area. writer's opinion that at least you're MARYLAND not far off if you string along In the South Atlantic section it with the Big Ten area. seems to narrow down to a race
NOTRE DAME between MARYLAND, DUKE, and
The first glance into our crystal WEST VIRGINIA. Maryland lost ball reveals a fine view of South 17 seniors to West Virginia's one' Bend's golden dome, and that through graduation but the Termeans NOTRE DAME. The only repins boast a lot depth. The Duke thing green about the Irish this Blue Devils, although lacking in year is their uniforms, and for the this department have an outstandfirst time in three seasons coach ing starting eleven. The Terps and Frank Leahy seems to have a Duke could very well end in a tie wealth of experienced talent. Lead- for the title as they don't meet ing the veterans are Johnny Latt- this year. ner, the Chicagoan whose two-way U.C.L.A. play set All-America standards The balance of power on the that the nation's halfbacks are now West Coast appears to lie in the trying to match. Irish prospects vicinity of Los Angeles with even seem bright enough to the U.C.L.A., SOUTHERN CALIFORperenniaily pessemistic Mr. Leahy, NIA, and CALIFORNIA squaring who, so far, is giving the crying off against one another. The Rose towel a temporary rest. Bowl contender will probably be
MICHIGAN STATE either the Bruins or the Golden
A look at the Western Confer- Bears. The Uclans' graduation ence brings us to MICHIGAN losses were slight, and with Paul STATE, way up on the list of last Cameron, the Coast's best tailback year's top squads. The Spartans under his wing, Red Sanders has could have taken the Big Ten .title a right to be confident, Southern in a walkaway last year, and we Cal looks to be the next toughest, can't help wondering if perhaps and California, with 26 lettermen they timed their conference break- and Johnny Olszewski gone seem in a year too late. However, Biggie to be delegated for the third spot. Munn should field another crack But watch SoCal. eleven, and his lads will be strong RICE contenders for the crown. _It 0Ught - tb ab-- n--ok-&ALABAMA dragout fight between RICE,
GEORGIA TECH, ALABAMA, TEXAS, and BAYLOR for Southand TENNESSEE seem to round west honors but Texas, while losing out the pick of one half of the three All-Conference backs and Southern Conference with Tech, two All-Conference linemen has unbeaten in their last 27 starts good reserves and a golden yearand led by the hard-running Leon ling crop and may deserve the nod. Hardiman, drawing most of the Baylor, on the other hand has nine votes for the favorite spot. ALA- offensive starters returning includBAMA lost its first game last week ing their complete 1952 backfield but ought to settle down when the so you can take your choice. The season gets underway, w h i 1 e Owls just missed last year, closing TENNESSEE seems to be just with a four game winning streak, about as tough as usual in facing and the present team, made up a hard 11 game schedule. FLO- mostly of seniors, is about due for RIDA and GEORGIA are confer- a break. ence dark horses, the Bulldogs' OKLAHOMA Zeke Bratkowski copping Southern Out in the Midlands OKLAConference offensive honors for the HOMA faces the terrific task of past two seasons. meeting three powerhouses in their
OHIO STATE first three games, Notre Dame,
In many opinions OHIO STATE Pitt, and Texas, but the Sooners was the class of the conference in still appear strong enough to rate 1952 .vhen they scored victories the call for their seventh consecuover Illinois and Michigan, and tive conference title. If anybody there seems to be no reason why knocks them off, it will probably the Buckeyes can't continue where be Nebraska, who shapes up as a they left off. The one drawback little tougher than KANSAS and for State this year is a rugged MISSOURI, two year-in and yearschedule that hits three of the out challangers. four tough conference, elevens and
picks a couple of dillies in California and Penn for outside com- PORTS QUIZ petition.
If Stu Holcomb can replace Dale
Samuels and Bernie Flowers it may Questions very well be "Hail PURDUE" 'that 1. In boxing, what is a cruiserwill be ,echoing through the Big weight? Ten. The Boilermakers should be 2. Who holds the pitching recright up there fighting for the top ord for consecutive scoreless inspot. nings in the major leagues?
PRINCETON Answers
The East doesn't seem to be able 1. The 161-175 weight class in to boast of any outstanding power- Great Britain is called cruiserhouses for 1953 but PRINCETON, weight; it is commonly called lightled by Captain Homer Smith, heavy in the U.S. shapes up as being as blilliant, 2. Walter Johnson of Washington offensively at least, as the Kaz- with 56 consecutive scoreless inmaier teams and looks like a nings in 1913 for the American good choice. SYRACUSE, with 22 League and Carl Hubbell of the returning lettermen has strong Giants with 46 1/3 innings in 1923 Sophomore talent and a favorable for the National League.
p


The 1953 Tenth Naval District Golf Tournament will be held on the Naval Station course here on 23, 24 and 25 October, it was announced recently. Naval activities in the Caribbean area have been authorized to enter teams, with the naval stations at San Juan, Roosevelt Roads and Trinidad being allowed six participants each, and local activities here at Guantanamo being alotted three teams of not more than six players each.
Medal play will consist of 18 holes on the 23rd and 24th of October and 36 holes on the 25th. Teams from the Guantanamo Bay area will be selected by the Commander, Naval Base from Navy and Marine Corps personnel, and may include representatives from the Fleet Training Group.

Marines Take Rifle

Shoot at Perry Meet

Camp Perry, Ohio (AFPS)-The Camp Pendleton (Calif.) Marines won the national trophy rifle match, the top event for Service teams, to end the 68th national rifle and pistol championships.
The Corps team finished second, 925 points, the Coast Guard third, 914, followed by the Quantico Marines, 912, the San Diego Marine Recruit Depot, 902, and the Army's Ft. Riley (Kans.), 899. Neither the Navy nor the Air Force entered a team.
Earlier, four Marines from Parris Island, S.C., won the en-listed -men's-trophy- ntch -with -a score of 575 of a possible 600. Firing at 200 yards, the members were: 1st Lt. Stanley Millar, with 144, Cpl., Garry Alderman, 139, Sgt. Guy Graves, 150, and M/Sgt. James A. Davison, 142. A marine team also fired 381 out of a possible 400 to win the Rumbold trophy match. Members of the team and scores were: T/Sgt. James A. Zahm, 97; Capt. James A. Machin, 96, S/Sgt. Mitchell Pietroforte, 96, and Pfc. D. Austin, 92.


Special Fishing Contest

Set for Women, and


Youngsters

Better watch those fish stories, Pop! Mom or the kids may top you in the tall tale division, and, more embarrassing still, may even offer documented proof to back up their stories.
Special fishing contests for women and children began at 0500 this morning and will continue until 18 October. Special prizes will be awarded to all winners. Entries from the women may also be entered in the regular fishing contest that is currently underway.
For award purposes the children will be divided into three age groups: 3 through 5; 6 through 9; and 10 through 15. (Contest officials were understandably reluctant to define age groups for the ladies.)
So, Pop, if you go home to a deserted house and a cold supper. look seaward, Mate and there you'll find her. And the only thing you can do about it is pick up your own tackle and go grumbling toward the pier.


Rain Slows Local

Softball Tournament
Naval Station
The Naval Station League is being thrown off stride by the unusually heavy rains. Monday night's games were postponed due to wet grounds, however the 5th Division picked up a 7-0 forfeit from the Flag Division who has dropped from the league for the remainder of the schedule.
Tuesday night the 1st Division picked up a 7-0 forfeit win from the 6th Division, who has also left the league. The 5th Division then downed the 1st Division 11-4 4n a game that had been previously rained out. the Cooks & Bakers of the 11th Division downed the Commissary Store 7-4 in the nightcap.
Wednesday night's games were canceled temporarily due to wet grounds once more. Postponed games will be rescheduled as soon as possible. Standings as of Wednesday are as follows: Team W L PCT. GB 2nd Division ---------9 1 .900 ARD 16 & AFDL 1 -- 8 1 .889 2 5th Division --------- 8 2 .800 1 11th Division ------- 7 3 .700 2 FCP & RPIO ------- 5 3 .625 3 1st Division --------- 5 4 .556 32 9th Division ---------4 4 .500 4 AFDL 47 -----------4 5 .444 4'Y
High School ---------3 5 .375 5 Flag Division ------- 3 8 .273 6% Commissary Store --- 2 6 .250 6 3rd & 7th Division -- 2 8 .200 7 6th Division -------- 0 10 .000 9
Air Station
The Gashouse Gang had plenty of spark Tuesday night and ignited themselves sufficiently to overcome a strong but complacent Boatshed nine by a score of 19-6. By virtue of this victory, Leeward Point again regained the league lead. G-61ldpitched a supurb game for the Gas House and also hit a homerun, triple, and double in five trips to the plate. Yates connected safely in three out of four chances.
The schedule has been rearranged as of 25 September to include rained out and postponed games and is as follows for the remainder of the second half:
25 September
Supply vs Cooks & Bakers
26 September
Leeward Point vs Aerology
28 September
Cooks & Bakers vs Gas Shop
29 September
Leeward Point vs Supply
30 September
Leeward Point vs Cooks & Bakers
Standings as of 24 September: Team Won Lost Leeward Point ------------- 4 1
Boatshed --------------------5 2
Special Services ---------------5 2
Cooks & Bakers --------------3 2
Gas Shop -------------------- 4 3
Aerology --------------------- 2 4
Supply ---------------------- 2 4
Operations -------------------2 5
Communications - 0 7
Marine Site
Wednesday the 2nd Section downed the Officers and Staff NCO 6-3 and Thursday Headquarters nosed out the 1st Section 4-3. Friday's contest saw the Officers & NCOs bounce back with a win over Headquarters 9-4, and Monday Headquarters did a little rebounding themselves to trounce the 1st Division 18-9.
The Standings are as follows:
Team Won Lost 2nd Section ------------------7 1
Headquarters ----------------5 4
Officers & NCOs --------------3 6
1st Section ------------------- 2 6
A couple of girls handed the cashier at a cafeteria, on their way out, a slip of paper with the numbers 1004180 on it. This satisfied the cashier, who let them pass without paying. Why?
Well, it reads: "I owe nothing, for I ate nothing."


6


Page Three


Pa e Three








Navy-10NDPP0-Gtlo. 4161D


THE INDIAN


9


Saturday, 26 September 1953


"Show business in the blood." This can, if taken too seriously, be a very fatal ailment. The prognosis is generally negative. Or, in the language of the layman-"no talent." We were thinking along these medical lines as we watched the beauteous Barbara Ruick explain her ailment. She proved our diagnosis to be incorrect.
The brown-eyed honey blonde (the type that gentlemen prefer) was explaining how it felt to have your mother be Sam Spade's secretary. Not that her mother is by profession a stenographer, we were informed, it's just that her mother happens to be one of the better known names in radio-Lurene Tuttle. "You get tired of being the 'daughter of Lurene Tuttle' . .,� so I went out on my own ....
Her father, Melville Ruick, is also one of the better known names around the TV and radio networks. This combination should certainly be conducive to acting and in Barbara's case it definitely was.
She has made about 13 pictures for MGM at this point. She also records for MGM. Her first love, however, is music. "I guess I'm just a frustrated drummer . . . I have a set home that I practice on every once in awhile" . . To date MGM has not been able to find a suitable role for a drummer-girl but they are undoubtedly trying, because nobody would want to keep this pretty miss unhappy for any length of time.



Hospital Notes


Born 15 September, Brian Gene is the son of EN2 and Mrs. Skyles Infinger. AD1 and Mrs. Maynard A. Shelton announce the birth of Richard Leonard born 16 September. A son arrived at the home of BM1 and Mrs. Richard I. Aanrud September 18, and has been named Lewis Benjamin. Steven Marion, born 19 September, is the son of SOl and Mrs. Marion C. Harrison.



The Armed Forces Radio
Station for Guantanamo Bay, WGBY, will air the World Series direct from New York commencing Wednesday, 30 September. Game time will be 1300 except on Sunday when it will be one hour later.


No honest man ever had to repent of his honesty.


WGBY Program Schedule

Regular Programs- Monday through Friday
0700 Morning Caravan 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 0715 News 1330 Jack Kirkwood 0730 Morning Caravan 1345 Behind the Story 0800 Lucky U Ranch 1400 Musical Matinee 0825 Solitary Singer 1500 Parade of Sports 0830 Bob & Ray 1700 Storyteller Time 0900 House of Music 1755 Sam Balter 1000 Curt Massey 1800 News 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1845 Requestfully Yours 1030 Bob Hope 1930 Twilight Serenade 1040 John Conte 2025 This 1 Believe 1100 Startime 2055 Knox Manning 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 2155 News 1200 Way Back Home 2230 Sandman Show 1215 News


Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0750 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0810 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 You And The World 1130 Met. Opera Auditions 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Adventures in Research 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 News
1815 Dinah Shore 1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Hymns of the W , A 0815 News
0830 Robert Armbruso.. 0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 You and the World 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Piano Playhouse
1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 Discovery
1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story Ever Told 1800 News
1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Red Skelton 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 My Friend Irma 2030 Big Time 2100 Charlie McCarthy


2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theatre .2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off
Monday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Cavalcade of America 1815 Jo Stafford
1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story
2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette
Tuesday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 The Lineup 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall
Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Portrait of a City :815 Jo Stafford
1 30 Sports Forum .o0 Arthur Godfrey 2030 Al Goodman L00 Gunsmoke 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents

Thursday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 American Heritage 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 What's My Line 2030 Horace Heidt 2100 Stars from Paris 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America

Friday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation to Learning 1815 Jo Stafford 1810 Inside Track 2000 Suspense
2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace And War 2200 Music for You


WAY BACK HOME


On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon.
Monday, Sept. 28 -Victoria, Texas; Portsmouth, Ohio; Bayreuth, Germany; Klamath Falls, Oregon.
Tuesday, Sept. 29 -Newport News, Virginia; New York City, New York; Lexington, North Carolina.


Wednesday, Sept 30-Clinton, Illinois; Houma, Louisiana; Jackson, Tennessee; Wilkes - Barre, Pennsylvania.
Thursday, Oct. 1-Jackson, Mississippi; Baltimore, M a r y lan d; Crab Orchard, West Virginia.
Friday, Oct. 2-Tulsa, Oklahoma; Summerville, Georgia; Columbia, South Carolina.


CLINGING VINE?


As cute a sparrow as ever walked a limb, Shirley McCrea, proves that Miami's foliage is often as pleasant a subject as its beaches. Shirley's approach makes bird watching far more interesting.

"You plead guilty to stealing this man's overcoat," said the judge, "and now you want me to reduce your fine. Why?"
"Please, your honor," begged the man, "I had to have the sleeves shortened."



Movie Schedule

Saturday, 26 September ROSE OF CIMARRON
Jack Buetel Mala Powers
Sunday, 27 September
EVERYTHING I HAVE IS
YOURS
Marge Champion Gover Champion
Monday, 28 September
PANDORA AND THE FLYING
DUTCHMAN
A. Gardner J. Mason
Tuesday, 29 September AGAINST ALL FLASH
Errol Flynn Maureen O'Hara


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Vol. V, No. 54 g2m Radio "Hams" Cover The World from NAS' KG4AO Shack A group of amateur radio enthusiasts have banded together at the Naval Air Station to offer base residents a worth-while service in the form of radio communications with the States. Licenced by the Federal Communications C o in m i s s i o n and assigned a frequencey by the Tenth Naval District, the group of four "ham radio" operators dial the controls of station KG4AO. At present, KG4AO is the only "ham radio" station operated on the naval base by a club. The club is primarily a facility of Naval Air Station Special Services, but both its facilities and services are open to anyone stationed at Guantanamo Bay. The four-man group is headed by Lieutenant Commander F. N. Vanderhoef, NAS Communications Officer, who serves in the capacity of trustee. Because of the comparatively few persons who operate the station, KG4AO's services are limited to routine working hours unless special arrangements have been made in advance. These services include direct station-to-station communication and radio-telephone patchboard communication. Calls can also be made by Fleet personnel during working hours. There is no charge for the service and approximately 100 calls per month are handled by KG4AO, which is located top side of the NAS administration building. The 400 watts output is capable of reaching almost any part of the world under favorable atmostpheric conditions. No one particular type or manufacture of equipment is used and several pieces of equipment were recently acquired from the now-defunct KG4AC, which was operated from Bay Hill Barracks Four. Interested "hams" or persons interested in becoming "ham" operators should contact LCDR Vanderhoef during working hours. Qualified persons are needed and the club is interested in helping persons qualify for FCC licencing. FCC test can be given on the base by any licenced operator. KG4AO first went on the air in 1950 and had been operated from a Quonset hut near the NAS hobby shop. Civilian Dentist Opens office Here Dr. Raymond C. Pepin, civilian dentist from Longview, Wash., has opened a suite of offices in the building occupied by the Navy Clinic on Bay Hill. He will be available for treatment to U.S. civilians on the base and military dependents. Appointments may be made by calling 9-385. Dr. Pepin is sponsored by the Navy Exchange. 9 First Aide, C.D, Course Underway Here A nine week's course in first aid and civil defense measures will get underway Wednesday at ten o'clock in the Community Hall on Marina Point with Mrs. R. E. Allen, an American Red Cross instructor, conducting classes. The two-hour classes are being taught under the auspicious of both the American Red Cross and naval base officials. The course, which is currently being taught throughout the entire United States, is designed to instruct the trainee in the prevention of accidents in the home, the detection of ills and the measures which are necessary in the event of an accident until the doctor arrives or the patient can be removed to a hospital. The course will be presented to all interested wives and mothers of military or civilian personnel associated with the naval base. The first meeting will be held primarily to decide what days and what time would be best suited to the largest number of persons so that classes might be scheduled accordingly. Saturday, 26 September 1953 "The Queen" Leaves for D.C. Save for the Future: BUY U.S. DEFENSE BONDS. MCB-1 Rebels A Standout In Local Hillbilly Performances When it's roundup time in the hayloft of Armed Forces Radio Station WGBY you can count on the ol' cow hands of the MCB-1 Rebels to turn in a top notch performance. During the recent WGBY benefit broadcast for the Little League, the Rebels, pictured above with hillbilly announcer Dave Doyle (extreme right), stayed in the saddle from beginning to end. They are (from left to right), Fred Roos, Herb Garland, T. P. Jones, George Ashlin, Mack McBrien (leader), Singer Buck Buchanan, WGBY Staffer Don Herlin and Jimmy Brown. Heard every Friday between 12:30 and 1:30 on "Hayloft Jamboree," the group is comprised largely of MCB-1 personnel and has appeared at the various movie lyceums and clubs about the base. Among the Rebel's repertoire are several pieces original with the group, "Hatuey," "Boqueron Run" and the instrumental "Black and White Rag." Former Private Craft, Queen Served 12 Years In Navy, 8 in Gtmo After serving for eight years at Guantanamo Bay, the "Queen" left here last Thursday in the -Carter Hall (LSD-3) for duty in the Washington, D. C., area. As part of the present economy drive, the "Queen" was found to be excess equipment for the naval base and was subsequently ordered to the nation's capital. Originally built to order for a private meat-packing company in 1932, the sixty-foot craft was turned over to the government during the first few days of World War II. She was loaned to the government at the token rate of one dollar per year as were nearly all other yachts and sea-going craft. During the war she was bought outright by the government. After first acquiring several .50 caliber machine guns and depth charges, the twenty-ton "Queen" was sent to Port of Spain, Trinidad, where she served with the Army as a harbor patrol craft. Then and now, she was capable of cruising at an impressive 16 knots and could accomodate 56 men. This was a luxury boat turned man-o-war. With the war's end, the "Queen," so named because of her designation, "Q-63," was acquired by the Navy and sent to Guantanamo Bay. During her tour of duty at the naval base, the "Queen" played host to such famous personages as former President Truman, General Mark Clark, Senator Kefauver and numerous other congressmen. MOTORIST: Shaw said, "It's a Pity to waste youth on children," but it's the only time they have for it. Don't cut them short. U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

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w THE INDIAN Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 26 September 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Lieutenant E. A. Sandness.Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOCManaging Editor Al Henderson, JO-3 News Editor J. C. Dierks, J03---------Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSN--Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on. government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP The High School softball team has really had a rugged schedule lately, along with a nasty scattering of mangled players. Pierce Lehmbeck, key shortstop broke his ankle sliding into third, John Moon suffered a spiked leg trying to stop a run from crossing at home and Eddy Stafford fractured his little finger on a hard throw. ...But there's a brighter side: George MacMichael, our pitcher, has managed to keep himself all in one piece and can still knock a long ball as well. The Naval Base School cheer leaders will be elected on October 1st. Last year's yell leaders, Frances Bruner, Carol Currier and Barbara Burke, are teaching this year's group of new girls. .. EARL D. JOHNSON Under Secretary of the Army Earl D. Johnson was born in Hamilton, Ohio, Dec. 14, 1905. He attended public schools in Milwaukee and in 1928 was graduated from the University of Wisconsin where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and the ROTC. In 1932 Mr. Johnson was graduated as a pilot from the Air Corps Training Centers, Randolph and Kelly Fields, Tex., and ordered to active duty at Langley Field, Va. He left the Air Corps in 1933 and joined the Chicago office of Loomis, Sayles and Co., economic consultants. In June of that year he took charge of the Milwaukee office of the firm and in 1941 he became head of the New York office. Mr. Johnson reported for active duty as a first lieutenant June 1, 1942, as a pilot in the Ferrying Div. of the Air Transport Command. Later he commanded the 4th and 6th Ferrying Groups and at the close of WWII was serving as Deputy CO of the Ferrying Div. He left the service in 1946 with the rank of colonel. A Message from Garcia .. The Tunas County Fair By Henry Garcia A very kind and well-known Navy officer suggested to me the other day that I should write about different towns of Cuba, about their history, etc., and refer to them when mentioning their location, in terms of "time and fare costs from this base." I think that is a good idea, and so in this "Message" I am going to refer to the "Victoria de las Tunas' County Fair." First of all, I think I should tell you what Victoria de las Tunas is. Tunas-as they call it for short -is, second only to Bayamo, one of the most historical towns in Cuba. It is located near Holguin (about an HOUR from it). Its name means in English "Victory of the Cactus Plants" because in the days of the Independence War there were many cactus plants over there, and one of greatest victories of the war was achieved there. it is about FIVE HOURS from Santiago de Cuba, by bus, and the fare for the round trip from Santiago costs only around SIX DOLLARS. There are good hotels and boarding houses in town, clean and reasonable, and there are many nice places to have a good time. The Fair is a popular event, with exhibition of the best stock of cattle (the same as in Bayamo's), typical dances, and many things to enjoy. Incidentally, although having beautiful women is no exclusive privilege of any town in Cuba, nature has bestowed her favors on the girls of this town, and you'll see them around the Fair, adorned with flowers-or rather "adoring the flowers they carry" with their beauty. The Fair starts on 26 September, and lasts five days. Hope I'll see you there! Saturday, 19 September 1953 Sunday, 27 September 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Navy Pistoleers Win At Camp Perry Meet Camp Perry, Ohio (AFPS)-A Navy team zeroed in 1,120 points out of a possible 1,200 to win the .45 caliber pistol matches while the Army placed second with 1,118 and the Marine Corps third with 1,115. A Marine team ranked first in .38 caliber pistol shooting with 1,147 points out of 1,200 with the Army second with 1,145 points. The Marine team, not the Los Angeles police department as first reported, placed second in the .22 matches with 1,155 points. The third platoon of the military training currently being conducted at the Naval Station emerges from the gas chamber looking somewhat like men from outer space with their gas masks. The training program is scheduled to be concluded in the middle of October after over 80% of all personnel attached to the Naval Station have been indoctrinated in military procedures. Seeing is believing. Latest fashion trends show the male gam in competition with milady's for comfort and attention. Miss Jackie Bolens, New York, and her escort, Bernard Kotzen, Charlotteville, N. C., attending the sixth annual Men's Formal Convention in Philadelphia get the treatment from an apparently puzzled sailor. Page Two

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Saturday, 26 Septembes' 1953 THE INDIAN PaFe Three Football Picture Shows Struggle In Midwest Golf Tourney Set By Jack Dierks Every year about this time the curtain begins to ring down on the baseball season and with the exception of the World Series, the country's sports fans will for the most part be occupied during the next two or three months following the crack of pads and the thud of cleated feet on pigskins as a few thousand high school, college, and pro mentors put their charges through the paces. When we take a look at the collegiate football picture it's always a fairly safe policy to start with the mid-west. Although the relative schedule but PENN STATE has merits of any particular section of a lot of depth and a powerful runthe country can be argued pro and ning game to holster their hopes. con far into the night, it is this Watch Syracuse in this area. writer's opinion that at least you're MARYLAND not far off if you string along In the South Atlantic section it with the Big Ten area, seems to narrow down to a race NOTRE DAME between MARYLAND, DUKE, and The first glance into our crystal WEST VIRGINIA. Maryland lost ball reveals a fine view of South 17 seniors to West Virginia's one Bend's golden dome, and that through graduation but the Termeans NOTRE DAME. The only reins boast a lot depth. The Duke thing green about the Irish this Blue Devils, although lacking in year is their uniforms, and for the this department have an outstandfirst time in three seasons coach ing starting eleven. The Terps and Frank Leahy seems to have a Duke could very well end in a tie wealth of experienced talent. Leadfor the title as they don't meet ing the veterans are Johnny Lattthis year. ner, the Chicagoan whose two-way U.C.L.A. play set All-America standards The balance of power on the that the nation's halfbacks are now West Coast appears to lie in the trying to match. Irish. prospects vicinity of Los Angeles with even seem bright enough to the U.C.L.A., SOUTHERN CALIFORperennially pessemistic Mr. Leahy, NIA, and CALIFORNIA squaring who, so far, is giving the crying off against one another. The Rose towel a temporary rest. Bowl contender will probably be MICHIGAN STATE either the Bruins or the Golden A look at the Western ConferBears. The Uclans' graduation ence brings us to MICHIGAN losses were slight, and with Paul STATE, way up on the list of last Cameron, the Coasts best tailback year's top squads. The Spartans under his wing, Red Sanders has could have taken the Big Ten title a right to be confident, Southern in a walkaway last year, and we Cal looks to be the next toughest, can't help wondering if perhaps and California, with 26 letterman they timed their conference breakand Johnny Olszewski gone seem in a year too late. However, Biggie to be delegated for the third spot. Munn should field another crack But watch SoCal. eleven, and his lads will be strong RICE contenders for the crown. It ought to be a knockdown ALABAMA dragout fight between RICE, GEORGIA TECH, ALABAMA, TEXAS, and BAYLOR for Southand TENNESSEE seem to round west honors but Texas, while losing out the pick of one half of the three All-Conference backs and Southern Conference with Tech, two All-Conference linemen has unbeaten in their last 27 starts good reserves and a golden yearand led by the hard-running Leon log crop and may deserve the nod. Hardiman, drawing most of the Baylor, on the other hand has nine votes for the favorite spot. ALAoffensive starters returning includBAMA lost its first game last week ing their complete 1952 backfield but ought to settle down when the so you can take your choice. The season gets underway, w h ii e Owls just missed last year, closing TENNESSEE seems to be just with a four game winning streak, about as tough as usual in facing and the present team, made up a hard 11 game schedule. FLOmostly of seniors, is about due for RIDA and GEORGIA are confera break. ence dark horses, the Bulldogs' OKLAHOMA Zeke Bratkowski copping Southern Out in the Midlands OKLAConference offensive honors for the HOMA faces the terrific task of past two seasons. meeting three powerhouses in their OHIO STATE first three games, Notre Dame, In many opinions OHIO STATE Pitt, and Texas, hut the Sooners was the class of the conference in still appear strong enough to rate 1952 when they scored victories the call for their seventh consecuover Illinois and Michigan, and tive conference title. If anybody there seems to be no reason why knocks them off, it will probably the Buckeyes can't continue where be Nebraska, who shapes up as a they left off. The one drawback little tougher than KANSAS and for State this year is a rugged MISSOURI, two year-in and yearschedule that hits three of the out challengers. four tough conference, elevens and picks a couple of dillies in California and Penn for outside competition. If Stu Holcomb can replace Dale Samuels and Bernie Flowers it may Questions very well be "Hail PURDUE" that 1. In boxing, what is a cruiserwill be echoing through the Big weight? Ten. The Boilermakers should be 2. Who holds the pitching recright up there fighting for the top ord for consecutive scoreless inspot. nings in the major leagues? PRINCETONAnswers The East doesn't seem to be able 1. The 161-175 weight class in to boast of any outstanding powerGreat Britain is called cruiserhouses for .1953 but PRINCETON, weight; it is commonly called lightled by Captain Homer Smith, heavy in the U.S. shapes up as being as blilliant, 2. Walter Johnson of Washington offensively at least, as the Kazwith 56 consecutive scoreless inmaier teams and looks like a nings in 1913 for the American good choice. SYRACUSE, with 22 League and Carl Hubbell of the returning lettermen has strong Giants with 46 1/3 innings in 1923 Sophomore talent and a favorable for the National League. BleDvlathuhlcigi The 1953 Tenth Naval District Golf Tournament will be held on the Naval Station course here on 23, 24 and 25 October, it was announced recently. Naval activities in the Caribbean area have been authorized to enter teams, with the naval stations at San Juan, Roosevelt Roads and Trinidad being allowed six participants each, and local activities here at Guantanamo being allotted three teams of not more than six players each. Medal play will consist of 18 holes on the 23rd and 24th of October and 36 holes on the 25th. Teams from the Guantanamo Bay area will be selected by the Commander, Naval Base from Navy and Marine Corps personnel, and may include representatives from the Fleet Training Group. Marines Take Rifle Shoot at Perry Meet Camp Perry, Ohio (AFPS)-The Camp Pendleton (Calif.) Marines won the national trophy rifle match, the top event for Service teams, to end the 68th national rifle and pistol championships. The Corps team finished second, 925 points, the Coast Guard third, 914, followed by the Quantico Marines, 912, the San Diego Marine Recruit Depot, 902, and the Army's Ft. Riley (Kans.), 899. Neither the Navy nor the Air Force entered a team. Earlier, four Marines from Parris Island, S. C., won the enlisted men's trophy match with a score of 575 of a possible 600. Firing at 200 yards, the members were: 1st Lt. Stanley Millar, with 144, Cpl., Garry Alderman, 139, Sgt. Guy Graves, 150, and M/Sgt. James A. Davison, 142. A marine team also fired 381 out of a possible 400 to win the Rumbold trophy match. Members of the team and scores were: T/Sgt. James A. Zahm, 97; Capt. James A. Machin, 96, S/Sgt. Mitchell Pietroforte, 96, and Pfc. D. Austin, 92. Special Fishing Contest Set for Women, and Youngsters Better watch those fish stories, Pop! Mom or the kids may top you in the tall tale division, and, more embarrassing still, may even offer documented proof to back up their stories. Special fishing contests for women and children began at 0500 this morning and will continue until 18 October. Special prizes will be awarded to all winners. Entries from the women may also be entered in the regular fishing contest that is currently underway. For award purposes the children will be divided into three age groups: 3 through 5; 6 through 9; and 10 through 15. (Contest officials were understandably reluctant to define age groups for the ladies.) So, Pop, if you go home to a deserted house and a cold supper. look seaward, Mate and there you'll find her. And the only thing you can do about it is pick up your own tackle and go grumbling toward the pier. Rain Slows Local Softball Tournament Naval Station The Naval Station League is being thrown off stride by the unusually heavy rains. Monday night's games were postponed due to wet grounds, however the 5th Division picked up a 7-0 forfeit from the Flag Division who has dropped from the league for the remainder of the schedule. Tuesday night the 1st Division picked up a 7-0 forfeit win from the 6th Division, who has also left the league. The 5th Division then downed the 1st Division 11-4 in a game that had been previously rained out. the Cooks & Bakers of the 11th Division downed the Commissary Store 7-4 in the nightcap. Wednesday night's games were canceled temporarily due to wet grounds once more. Postponed games will be rescheduled as soon as possible. Standings as of Wednesday are as follows: Team W L PCT. GB 2nd Division-1 .90 ARDO 16 & AFDL 1 _8 1 .889 V 5th Division -----5-8 2 .800 1 11th Division -7 3 .700 2 FOP & RPIO --5 .625 3 1st Division --5 4 .556 3i 9th Division --4 4 .500 4 AFDL 47 -----4 5 .444 41/ High Schooli1-5 .375 5 Flag Division3 8 .273 6/ Commissary Store -__ 2 6 .250 6 3rd & 7th Division __ 2 8 .200 7 6th Division --0 10 .000 9 Air Station The Gashouse Gang had plenty of spark Tuesday night and ignited themselves sufficiently to overcome a strong but complacent Boatshed nine by a score of 19-6. By virtue of this victory, Leeward Point again regained the league lead. Gold pitched a supurb game for the Gas House and also hit a homerun, triple, and double in five trips to the plate. Yates connected safely in three out of four chances. The schedule has been rearranged as of 25 September to include rained out and postponed games and is as follows for the remainder of the second half: 25 September Supply vs Cooks & Bakers 26 September Leeward Point vs Aerology 28 September Cooks & Bakers vs Gas Shop 29 September Leeward Point vs Supply 30 September Leeward Point vs Cooks & Bakers Standings as of 24 September: Team Won Lost Leeward Point e---4 1 Woatshed the2ndSec----5 2 Special Services andStaf----5 2 Cooks & Bakers back-with-a-in3 2 Has dhop -4, andMn-----4 3 Aerology -----------2 4 Supply ------------2 4 Operations ------2 Communnications-------0 7 Marine Site Wednesday the 2nd Section downed the Officers and Staff NCO 6-3 and Thursday Headquarters, nosed out the 1st Section 4-3. Friday's contest saw the Officers & NCOs bounce back with a win over Headquarters 9-4, and Monday Headquarters did a little reboundiog themselves to trounce the pst Division 18-9. The Standings are as follows: Team Wan Lost 2nd Section---7 1 Headquarters -----__ 5 4 Officers & NCOs--_______3 6 1st Sectiont reads:"Ioweotn2 6 A couple of girls handed the cashier at a cafeteria, on their way out, a slip of paper with the numbers 1004180 on it. This satisfled the cashier, who let them pass without paying. Why? Well, it reads: "I owe nothing, for I ate nothing." Saturday, 26 September 1953 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Navy-1ONDPPO-Gtmo. 4161D THE INDIAN 9 Saturday, 26 September 1953 "Show business in the blood." This can, if taken too seriously, be a very fatal ailment. The prognosis is generally negative. Or, in the language of the layman-"no talent." We were thinking along these medical lines as we watched the beauteous Barbara Ruick explain her ailment. She proved our diagnosis to be incorrect. The brown-eyed honey blonde (the type that gentlemen prefer) was explaining how it felt to have your mother be Sam Spade's secretary. Not that her mother is by profession a stenographer, we were informed, it's just that her mother happens to be one of the better known names in radio-Lurene Tuttle. "You get tired of being the 'daughter of Lurene Tuttle' so I went out on my own .. Her father, Melville Ruick, is also one of the better known names around the TV and radio networks. This combination should certainly be conducive to acting and in Barbara's case it definitely was. She has made about 13 pictures for MGM at this point. She also records for MGM. Her first love, however, is music. "I guess I'm just a frustrated drummer ...I have a set home that I practice on every once in awhile" ...To date MGM has not been able to find a suitable role for a drummer-girl but they are undoubtedly trying, because nobody would want to keep this pretty miss unhappy for any length of time. Hospital Notes Born 15 September, Brian Gene is the son of EN2 and Mrs. Skyles Infinger. AD1 and Mrs. Maynard A. Shelton announce the birth of Richard Leonard born 16 September. A son arrived at the home of BM1 and Mrs. Richard I. Aanrud September 18, and has been named Lewis Benjamin. Steven Marion, born 19 September, is the son of SOl and Mrs. Marion C. Harrison. The Armed Forces Radio Station for Guantanamo Bay, WGBY, will air the World 9Series direct from New York commencing Wednesday, 30 September. Game time will be 1300 except on Sunday -when it will be one hour later. No honest man ever had to repent of his honesty. WGBY Program Schedule Regular Programs -Monday through Friday 0700 Morning Caravan 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 0715 News 1330 Jack Kirkwood 0730 Morning Caravan 1345 Behind the Story 0800 Lucky U Ranch 1400 Musical Matinee 0825 Solitary Singer 1500 Parade of Sports 0830 Bob & Ray 1700 Storyteller Time 0900 House of Music 1755 Sam Balter 1000 Curt Massey 1800 News 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1845 Requestfully Yours 1030 Bob Hope 1930 Twilight Serenade 1040 John Conte 2025 This 1 Believe 1100 Startime 2055 Knox Manning 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 2155 News 1200 Way Back Home 2230 Sandman Show 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 You And The World 1130 Met. Opera Auditions 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Adventures in Research 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 News 1815 Dinah Shore 1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of the W .d 0815 News 0830 Robert Armbrus0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 You and the World 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1210 Piano Playhouse 1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 Discovery 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story Ever Told 1800 News 1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Red Skelton 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 My Friend Irma 2030 Big Time 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theatre .2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Cavalcade of America 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 The Lineup 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Portrait of a City '815 Jo Stafford 1 430 Sports Forum : QU0 Arthur Godfrey 2030 Al Goodman A30 Gunsmoke 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents Thursday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 American Heritage 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 What's My Line 2030 Horace Heidt 2100 Stars from Paris 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation to Learning 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace And War 2200 Music for You WAY BACK HOME On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon. Monday, Sept. 28 -Victoria, Texas; Portsmouth, Ohio; Bayreuth, Germany; Klamath Falls, Oregon. Tuesday, Sept. 29 -Newport News, Virginia; New York City, New York; Lexington, North Carolina. S.UG, SU NY islilutrd thit io O3KAYSVUl1 &0'Stf, RTEP__. ~' ~SOONU ','WHAT --.^ j ro SA0O Y 12Th 0 ~ +PVN1 Wednesday, Sept 30 -Clinton, Illinois; Houma, Louisiana; Jackson, Tennessee; Wilkes -Barre, Pennsylvania. Thursday, Oct. 1-Jackson, Mississippi; Baltimore, Mar y 1 an d; Crab Orchard, West Virginia. Friday, Oct. 2-Tulsa, Oklahoma; Summerville, Georgia; Columbia, South Carolina. APP5 q CLINGING VINE As cute a sparrow as ever walked a limb, Shirley McCrea, proves that Miami's foliage is often as pleasant a subject as its beaches. Shirley's approach makes bird watching far more interesting. "You plead guilty to stealing this man's overcoat," said the judge, "and now you want me to reduce your fine. Why?" "Please, your honor," begged the man, "I had to have the sleeves shortened." Movie Schedule Saturday, 26 September ROSE OF CIMARRON Jack Buetel Mala Powers Sunday, 27 September EVERYTHING I HAVE IS YOURS Marge Champion Gover Champion Monday, 28 September PANDORA AND THE FLYING DUTCHMAN A. Gardner J. Mason Tuesday, 29 September AGAINST ALL FLAGS Errol Flynn Maureen O'Hara