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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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University of Florida
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Q~he


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Chaplain Hachen Here


To Conduct Services

Chaplain David S. Hachen of ComServLant will be at the Naval Base chapel from September 14th through the 16th to lead all people of Jewish faith in the proper observance of the High Holy Days.
On September 15th at 1930 he will conduct a service on the Jewish New Year (Rosh Hashanah), and the traditional ceremony of the sounding of the ram's horn (the Shofar) will call all persons of the faith to self-examination and selfjudgement. At that time, New Year's greeting cards and calendars for the year 5714 will be distributed.
His second service will be in the chapel at 1930 Wednesday and will be on the theme of the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur).
Chaplain Hachen has expressed regret that his schedule will not permit him to be here on the actual dates of these two holy days, but it is felt that Jewish personnel will understand and cooperate with him in his efforts to meet their religious needs.
Capla-inMachen will -be i thechaplain's office all day Monday, 14 September and will welcome telephone calls or visits from all persons of Jewish faith.


Second A-Sub

Keel Laid

Washington (AFPS)-Keel laying ceremonies for the second nuclear powered submarine, the Sea Wolf (SSN-575), took place 1 September, the Navy announced.
The submarine is being built by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation at Groton, Conn.
The Sea Wolf will be the third vessel of the U. S. Navy to bear that name.


Rent Hike Does Not


Apply to Villamar

The recent directive from the Bureau of Budget raising the rental on defense housing of enlisted personnel does not apply to the Guantanamo Bay area, according to a spokesman for the station rental board.
This means that residents of the Villamar area may breathe easily again, at least for a while.
The original directive stated that rents for defense housing occupied by enlisted personnel would be raised to a level comparable to that of officers and local civilian housing. However, a specific exemption was obtained for the Naval Base here.
Therefore, it is not the intention of the rental board to recommend a rent increase at present.


Walls of the first of the 300 new housing units begin to jut skyward in Villamar as SeaBees of Mobile' Construction Battalion ONE place into position the first of the 434,530 blocks which will be required to complete the housing project. Ground for the project was broken on 1 July and RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, Base Commander, laid the cornerstone of the l of~th new un~aits 0 AuguSt. The units will be Classified as Public Quarters.


Navy Exchange Laundry Undergoing

$250,000 Modernization Program

The Naval Station Navy Exchange Laundry will begin a quarter of a million dollar modernization program Monday that promises to give laundry patrons the latest in service.


New and reconditioned laundry equipment, including washers and driers, will replace equipment now in use. One result is that shirts and jumpers will be pressed according to prescribed directions. Each shirt will be separately packaged and the jumpers will be pressed both from the inside and outside and will have regulation folds in the collars.
The modernization of the local laundry is part of the Navy's world-wide program to give newer and better laundering services to its personnel.
One reason for the seemingly high cost of modernization is the cost of modern laundry equipment. One washer, according to Lieutenant S.W. Plarr, laundry officer, costs $20,000. Not all the equipment to be installed will be new. Some of the equipment will come from other naval establishments as far away as Guam after first having been reconditioned in New York or rebuilt by the manufacture.
The modernization program will probably take at least three weeks and during this time all laundering will be done at nights. Consequently it is expected that service for that time will be somewhat slower than the usual service. As one piece of old equipment is disconnected its modern counterpart will be installed. This should prevent any excesive delay ih services during the switch-over.


Certain changes in the building will be affected, most noticeable of which will be the moving of the receiving window from its present location facing Sherman Avenue to a location facing the Library.
The entire plant will be designed on an elastic basis which will allow for the expansion or contraction of facilities with fluctuations in demands for services. The plant will be set up on a unit plan so that individual units can be put into operation or taken out of operation according to demand. This will allow for greater efficiency.
Other features of interest to patrons includes the incorporation of the standard Navy marking system. In the future, any piece of laundry marked at Guantanamo Bay will be able to be identified at any other Navy laundry using the same system of marking. The initial of the man's last name plus the last four digits of his service number will comprize his laundry marking. The possibility of identical markings among two or more men is very slim.
No longer will stockings be tied together for laundering and drying purposes, causing general wear to the stockings and more than a few negative comments. Laundry bags will be used in the future, eliminating the need for tieing the patron's socks together.


Saturday, 12 September 1953


Super Connie Flights


May be Headed For


FLAW Guantanamo

Results of Runway Inspection Will Determine Feasibility Of Using Heavier Aircraft

Regularly scheduled flights of Lockheed Super Constellations to and from Guantanamo Bay may soon be initiated by the Fleet Logistics Air Wing. The Super Connies would replace the R5D's in present use.
The decision to send the larger and heavier aircraft on regularly scheduled FLAW flights is pending a survey being conducted at McCalla Field by the Paving Inspection and Testing Division of the the Bureau of Docks.
Runway Tested
Inspection of the runways began last week and will continue until 1 October, says Mr. W. J. Dunning, civil engineer with the Bureau of Docks. The parking and ramp areas adjacent to the field are also being inspected to determine if they can withstand S u p e r Constellation loads.
A certain amount of load deflection is permissible on any runway. In other words, a runway can withstand a certain amount of "give" without sustaining any damage-without cracking up un: der the strain. BuDocks engineers are attempting to learn whether or not the runways at McCalla can withstand the loads that would be imposed by Super Constellations. This is being accomplished, explains Mr. Dunning, by simulating Constellation loads with the aid of a 50-ton tractor, a water tank (to vary the load), various size pressure plates and measuring devices.
In conjunction with these tests, the subsurface of the runways are also being tested for constituency and water content. This knowledge will aid in the future repairs or expansion of the field.
More Passengers, Cargo
The use of Super Constellations (R7V's) will mean that a larger number of passengers and a greater amount of cargo can be carried at greater speeds and over longer distances. If the Super Connies are put into service, the R5D's in present use will probably be shifted to continental runs where shorter flights are required.
Commercial counterparts of the Navy's Super Constellations are already in use by major air lines and are an enlarged and speedier version of the world famous Connies. The Super Constellation is powered by four 3250 hp Wright turbo - compound engines. Extra fuel is carried in wing tip tanks. Additional passenger space has been made possible by inserting a thirteen-foot section into the Constellation fuselage.
MOTORISTS: Give the kids a brake.


Vol. V, No. 52






9


Page Two


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 12 September 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer Editorial Staff
Lieutenant E. A. Sandness__Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOC ------ Managing Editor Al Henderson, JO3 ---------- News Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3 ------------------ Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN ---------- Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.

TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP

By Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston
The recent picnics at Phillips Park have attracted droves of teen-agers to eat fried chicken and play softball ...
Kay Gennaria, leaving us next week, was giving the horses at the corral a workout along with Margo Anderson and Barbara Garris, but no amount of money could get Fay aboard one of the four-legged friends. . . . Seems a past experience has set Fay against the poor creatures for an indefinite period of time. . . . Eddie Stafford, Anita Sierra, Eunice Avila and Edwin Heimer were really raising the roof to the beat of the Cuban mambo band Monday afternoon... All teenage keglers are reminded that the bowling teams will be formed soon at the club meetings ...
George MacMichael was the winner of the election last Tuesday for VeePee of the Student Council. Norman Huddy will be this years prexy. .. . . Cheerleader practice is just around the corner ...
Belated congrats to Pierce Lehmbeck and George MacMichael for their assignments as co-editors of this year's edition of the "Coral Reef." With these two leading off, we're sure to have a better year book than ever before. . . . Speaking of editors, Doris Sigler is heading the school paper this year.
Much to the relief of the freshman the initiation is over and already-next year's sophmores are planning revenge ...


THE INDIAN


A Message from Garcia ..... The Story of Hatuey


by Henry Garcia


Hatuey is known to most Americans only through the label of the famous Cuban beer. However, I think it will be interesting for Americans to know who Hatuey was, since his life is one of the most interesting chapters in the history of Cuba.
Hatuey was an Indian Chief who
came to Cuba from his native Santo .. Domingo (now the Dominican Republic) in the early days of the Spanish conquest. The conquerors had overcome most of Santos Domingo and had left behind them only devastation and death. So Hatuey came to Cuba to warn his Indian brothers in this island (the tribes of "Tainos" and "Siboneyes") against the Spaniards.
The Indian war smoke signals filled the Cuban skies, and by night while the Conquerors slept, the sound of drums was heard. The Indians would crawl into the Conquerors' tents followed by dogs which did not bark and the Indian knives would speak their mute language of Death.
Hatuey, the leader, was finally caught and he was sentenced to die at the stake.
The day of the execution a Spanish priest came to Hatuey, and askd him to confess, so that he would be able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Hatuey was tied to the stake. He had been tortured. He did not fear death, but when he was offered by this man the realm of heaven, the shadow of hope ADM Robert B. Carney, USN crossed his mind, but he ventured Chief of Naval Operations this question, "Do these go to heaven?" "Oh ... yes ... they ' ADM Robert Bostwick Carney, do" was the priest's answer. 'Then,' replied Hatuey, "I do not want to USN, born in Vallejo, Calif., Mar. go to heaven. If these people who 26, 1895, has succeeded ADM Wilmake me suffer and who kill inno- liam M. Fechteler, USN, as Chief cent Indians go up there, I do not of Naval Operations. ADM Carney want to be with them... I shall was graduated from the Naval not confess!" The signal was given. Academy in 1916. The flames surrounded Hatuey and During WWI he served aboard got close to him. But he did not the USS Fanning when she capseem to suffer. On the other hand, a tured the German submarine U-58 radiant smile was shown in his face Nov. 17, 1917. And as the smoke ascended to the ADM Carney's postwar assignsky, some of the witnesses said nents included command of two that they had seen the silhouette destroyers, and duties within the of a two-feathered Indian going Navy Department. up with smoke. Beyond the limited In the early months of WWII, knowledge of man about the things he was Chief of Staff for Comof the eternal, there is justice in mander, Support Forces, Atlantic heaven for men of good will. Fleet. Then he commanded the


Jean Peters isn't the prize in the Freedoms Foundations "What America Means to Me" letter contest but $1000 cash will be awarded to the serviceman or woman who submits the top entry. The lovely star is shown as she scans some of the letters already submitted. Letters are to be of 500 words or less and should be mailed to Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio Service, Los Angeles 38, Calif. Letters must be received by midnight Oct. 15, 1953. Otherwise, they will be considered for next year's awards. To be eligible, you must be *n active duty in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard.


Japanese during 1942-43.
He was successively Chief of Staff to Commander, South Pacific Force and to Commander Third Fleet from 1943-45. The Navy Cross was awarded to the Admiral for extraordinary heroism during the battle for Leyte Gulf, Oct. 23-26, 1944.
In February 1946, ADM Carney became Assistant Chief of Naval Operations (Logistics) and in June the same year advanced to Deputy CNO.
Four years later he assumed command of the Second Fleet and later was designated Commander in Chief, U. S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. For the last year he had served as Commander in Chief, Allied Forces, Southern Europe.

The Marine Corps has announced that male enlisted personnel who entered active duty prior to July 1, 1952 and will be discharged or released from active duty prior to July 1, 1954 will not be required to purchase tropical garrison uniforms provided they maintain five cotton khaki uniforms during their remaining period of active duty. These men are exempted from Para 363 of MarCor Memo 37-53 which applies to all other enlisted male personnel.


Saturday, 12 September 1953


a


Sunday, 13 September 1953
Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 17301800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: , 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


Tiny Tot Bible Time

B. J. Sutherling Dear TWO'S and THREE'S,
Bible Stories are the most wonderful stories in the world-and these stories, in the Indian, are especially for you!
There will be tiny-tot prayers, and finger-plays, too
That Mommy and Daddy will help you to do.
Today, our story is about two little boys who knew how to share.
Jonathan Shares With David I Sam. 18:1-4
David and Jonathan were friends.
They played together with. bows
and arrows.
They laughed together and sang
,songs.
They went to Sunday school and
heard stories about GOD.
They were happy friends. Jonathan had pretty clothes:
warm coats, bright caps and
strong belts.
David had no pretty clothes. Jonathan loved David;
he wanted David to wear his
clothes.
Jonathan said, "David, please put
on my new coat."
And David did.
Jonathan said, "Put on my belt,
too."
And David did.
Jonathan liked to share his toys
with David.
He said, "Here David. You may
have my new bow and arrow." David smiled! How happy he was!
He had a new coat, a new belt
and a new bow and arrow.
Jonathan was glad, too. He liked
to see David smile, and put on
the clothes.
And David said, "Thank you, thank
you, Jonathan."
He knew Jonathan loved him!
B. J. Sutherling
Copyright GLP 1952 Dear God,
May our house be a friendly
house
With a door that opens wide.
Our toys and games for sharing With all who come inside. Amen. Bible Thought:
"SHARE WHAT YOU HAVE"
fr. Heb. 13:16








Saturday, 12 September 1953


9


THE INDIAN


10th ND Golf Tourney


Set For October

The 10th Naval District Golf Tournament, originally scheduled to be played on the Guantanamo Naval Base course on the 18th, 19th and 20th September, has been postponed until 23, 24 and 25 October.
Limited to Navy and Marine Corps participants the tournament will bring together teams from four commands in the Caribbean area. San Juan, Puerto Rico, will send 12 men; Roosevelt Roads will send six; six from Trinidad; and 18 will play from Guantanamo Naval Base.
Representing the Naval Base here will 'be three 6-man teams. Team 1 is composed of Grego, North, Totilo, Skinner, Knilans and Narwid.
Team 2- Vanderhoef, Spears, Krusche, Byrne, Lehmbeck and Bruner.
Team 3 - Barmhall, Reynolds, Mauldin, Speckman, Drennan and Jones.


Little League Needs Support


Taking it easy as he snares a high throw in the Old-Timers Game at the Yankee Stadium is Wally Pipp, famous 'Bomber' first-sacker of years ago. The two-inning game featuerd old Yankee stars against a team of former star native New Yorkers. The natives beat the old timers, 6-3.


Softball Activity Resumes at NavSta; NAS, Marin-e Leagu es-Tighte-n-- As-Pla- Mov-es

Closer to Half-Way Point


After a slight delay due to rain and wet grounds the Naval Station intra-mural softball league is again back in action. Monday night, in a game highlighted by the one-hit pitching of Mandis, who also poled three consecutive homeruns good for six RBIs, the 2nd Division downed the Commissary Store 19-4. The 1st Division collected a 7-0 forfeit in the scheduled nightcap when the Flag Division was unable to field a team.
Tuesday evening the 5th Division downed the 11th Division in a free swinging contest 17-10. The second game saw the ARD 16 remain undefeated, downing the AFDL 47 15-5.
Naval Station League standings are as follows:
Team Won Lost GB ARDL 16-AFDL1 7 0 2nd Division -------------6 1 1
1st Division --------------4 1 2
5th Division --------- - 4 2 21 FCP-RPIO ---------------3 2 3
l1th Division ------------4 3 3
Flag Division ------------3 3 3
AFDL 47 -------------2 4 4 2
9th Division -------------2 4 4 2
Commissary Store -------- 2 4 4 3rd and 7th Division --- 2 5 5 High School --------------1 4 5
6th Division ------------- 0 7 7
Naval Air Station
Activity has been heavy in the Air Station League, also with Leeward Point defeating the highly touted Special Services team 3-2, thus holding on to undisputed possession of first place. The game was highlighted by the superb hurling of Yarbrough and Shea.
The Cooks and Bakers lost a ding-dong battle to Aerology 15-13. Ciccarlli, the Cooks & Bakers' ace twirler lost his first game of the season due to his unusual lack of control in the 1st inning when Aerology scored 12


runs. Murray pitched fine ball after relieving Ciccarelli in the 1st frame. Anderson was the hitting star, garnering 5 hits in 5 trips to the plate.
Standing as of 8 September are as follows:
Team Won Lost Leeward Point ----------------4 0
Boatshed ----------------------3 1
Cooks and Bakers --------------2 2
Gas Shop ----------------------2 2
Operations 2 2 Special Services ----------------2 2
Aerology ------ - ------------ 2 3
Supply 1 4 Communications ----------------0 5

Marine Site
The Officers and Staff NCOs have been having a rough time of it lately dropping a 9-4 decision to the Headquarters team on 4 September, another to the Second Section Tuesday by an 11-4 score, and another the following day when they were outhit by the 1st Section 11-7.
The League leaders in the hitting department so far this year are as follows:
Player Team Avg. Rosati 2nd Section .578 Smith, J. 1st Section .555 Romano 1st Section .500 Smetanka O-NCOs .473 Alling Headquarters .450
The League standings:
Team Won Lost 2nd Section ------------ 4 1
Headquarters ---------- 3 2
1st Section ---- -------- 2 3
Officers and NCOs ----- 2 5
Doctor: "Young woman, you 'have acute appendicitis."
She: "Never mind the compli,1ments-tell me what's wrong with me."


Fishing Entries
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Marcinuk, P. --------------23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Richter, Mrs. R. F .--------- 19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Harris, W. K. 16 lbs. 12 ozs.
Grouper
Leverett, W. R. -------------4 lbs. 6 ozs.
Jacks
Whitmore, F. M. --- -- 17 lbs. 8 ozs. Beman. J. A. --------------15 lbs. 9 ozs.
McNeil, D. A. ----------12 lbs.
Mackerel (King)
McNeil, D. A. --- -- 30 lbs.
Snapper
Dupree, W. L. -------------43 lbs. 8 ozs.
Kelly, C. L. --------------33 lbs. 4 ozs.
Loewenhagen, A. H- ----- 16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snook
Loewenhagen, A. H ----- 13 lbs.
Tarpon
Brock, R. ------- 26 lbs.
Ciccarelli, B. 23 lbs.
BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Ray, C. F. -----------------32 lbs.
Hardin, J. ----------------22 lbs. 8 ozs.
Baily, H. E--------------- 16 lbs.
Jacks
Whitmore, F. M. - -- 10 lbs. 13 ozs. Suslick, A. D. --------------6 lbs.
Dalton, L. B. --------- 5 lbs. 1 oz.
Mackerel (King)
Scott, B. K- -------- 9 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snapper
Pass, J. S. ----------------41 lbs. 4 ozs.
Lightfoot, L. H. ------------35 lbs.
Gennaria, R. H. ------------32 lbs.
Snook
Leverett, W.R ------------14 lbs. 8 ozs.
Shepherd, W. L. ------------11 lbs. 8 ozs.
Lightfoot, L. H. ------------11 lbs.
Tarpon
Loomis, C. E. --------------47 lbs. 12 ozs.
Lightfoot, L. H. ------------30 lbs.
Beman, -E. F.- ------------25 lbS.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Chandler, C. A. -------------4 lbs. 8 ozs.
Croakers
Williams, H. H. ------------2 lbs.
Cole, J. -------------------1 lb. 8 ozs.
Sutherling, E. W .----------- 1 lb. 3 ozs.
Parrotfish
Nixon, R. M. -------------1 lb. 14 ozs.
Pompano
French, C. D. --------------16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Hinkle, R. A. ---------------9 lbs.
Greaner, S. W. -------------4 lbs.
Shark
Hummel, C. A. ------------200 lbs.
Bryan, W. C. --------------98 lbs.
Dinoch, T. -----------------83 lbs.
Triggerfish
Borborian, S. Jr., -----------3 lbs. 8 ozs.
SPEAR FISHING DIVISION
Grouper
Nichols, E. M. -------------67 lbs. 8 ozs.
Marcinuk, P. 7 lbs. 3 ozs. Wreath, F. -----------------2 lbs.
Jacks
Matson, J. F. --------------14 lbs.
Prejean, J. W, - 13 lbs. 9 oza. Foster, R. D.--------------11 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snapper
Foster, R. D.--------------19 lbs.
Tarpon
Foster, R.D .-------------- 26 lbs. 8 ozs.
Rosendal, G. A. ------------20 lbs. 8 ozs.
Marcinuk, P --------------20 lbs.
Hogfish
Foster, R. D.---------------6 lbs.
Nichols, E. M. --------------5 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mackerel (Spanish)
Abbott, G. H. --------------7 lbs.

MAJOR LEAGUE STANDING'S
(As of Thursday, 10 September)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Team W L PCT. GB Brooklyn ---- 97 42 .698 Milwaukee --- 84 56 .600 13Y2 St. Louis'---- 75 62 .547 21 Philadelphia - 76 63 .468 21 New York __ 65 74 .428 38 Chicago ----- 56 82 .406 40Y2 Pittsburgh --- 44 97 .312 54
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Team W L PCT. GB New York --- 91 44 .674 Cleveland ____ 84 55 .604 9 Chicago ----- 80 59 .576 13 Boston ------ 76 64 .543 17/ Washington -_ 70 69 .504 23 Detroit ------ 54 87 .383 40 Philadelphia - 53 87 .379 40 St. Louis ---- 49 92 .348 45


For two-bits you can buy yourself a piece of America, 1963. Fostered in real, old-fashioned, grass-root Americanism is the Little League, a vital milestone on the road to citizenship.
Organized in 1939 Little Leagues are in operation in 44 of the 48 states with 115,000 boys under 12 years of age on the rosters of 7,650 teams.
It would be impossible to measure completely and accurately the benefits of Little League Baseball to the individual boy, the team on which he plays, or the entire community where Little League Baseball operates.
The main objective of Little League Baseball is to provide baseball participation for boys, and that, coupled with the adults contirbuting their services and the fans rooting in the bleachers, combine to make the Little League a potent factor in community life.
Youngsters no longer have to sit on the sidelines because they are too small or too young. Now they can get out there on their own pint-sized field with their midget bats and their cut-to-size uniforms and play just as exciting a ball game as you'd see in Yankee Stadium. They play according to special rules compiled in consideration of their endurance and stamina, but it's still big league baseball on a "little people" basis.
Here at the Naval Base the youngsters are trying to get started on their grasp of the American way of life with formation of a Little League. They are being sponsored by the local branches of the American Legion, the Fleet Reserve Association and the Sojourners' Club. Volunteer workers from all three organizations are pitching in to complete the regulation small-sized baseball diamond located between Fourth and Fifth Street in Villamar. As soon as the field is finished they will issue a call for try-outs for the teams and Little League will be in business.
BUT-There are uniforms to buy and equipment to buy and it takes money. Little League is financed and supported locally. It is entirely non-profit. There is no appropriation set aside for it. In order to get the little people started right, the three sponsoring organizations have organized a Little League Baseball Benefit drawing to be held on Friday, 18 September at 1900 at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum. First prize for the drawing is a choice of a 9 cubic-foot refrigeraotr or $215.00 in cash. Second prize is a set of golf clubs or $110.00 in cash. Third prize is a Hallicrafter radio or $50.00 in cash. Two more prizes of merchandize or cash total $50.00.
But aside from the prizes, your two-bit ticket for the drawing will give these youngsters a- little shove on the right road to the American way of life. Get a ticket from any of the boys and girls selling them, or contact any member of the American Legion, the 'Fleet Reserve Association or the Sojourners' Club, or call the Indian office for information.
And that's your two-bit investment in America, 1963.


Page Three








Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4161-B


THE INDIAN


9


Saturday, 12 September 1953


Danny Thomas, he who had the big hate for "moronic Television," has signed for a weekly series over ABC-TV. Television may be moronic as he says but the hard cash it pays certainly isn't... Betty Grable and Mr. Grable, one Harry James, will play their first theater date together sometime around Labor Day in Chicago .. Wrankie Laine broke the Weekend record at Atlantic City's Steel Pier . . . U. S. Public Health Service reports several state and city authorities are taking steps to prevent the re-use of polarized glasses necessary for watching 3-D movies- they're worried about the spread of eye infections . . James Hilton's "Lost Horizon" will hit the Broadway boards in the musical form sometime this fall... Everytime we see Jean Simmons in a movie we wonder why girls like that never live "next door"-such a doll . . TV DEPT.-The other PM Arthur Godfrey decided that the collection of entertainers who were to perform on his "Talent Scouts" program had something less than talent. So what did he do?-Just cancelled them all and went into his '.'Godfrey and His Friends" format. Which should certainly prove to all doubters that the Redhead is King Arthur as far as CBS is concerned... Sponsor who was supposed to pick up the tab for the Dave Garroway show opposite "I Love Lucy" decided that the competition was too heavy and backed off-CBS certainly has the redhead market sewed up . . . The Netherlands Cinema Federation reports that TV in Holland have been a failure. Lack of film and high taxes were blamed, but wiser Broadwayites are laying six, two and even they could have made it with wrestling and the roller derby.

Some of you who read this will soon be exchanging your Navy for civilian garb. You will be interested in knowing what credit you can hope to receive in civilian schools for your Navy training and what civilian occupations can best utilize the skills you have acquired during your Navy hitch. The Information and Education Office can give you all the dope on courses to take that will help you to prepare for a good job in the future or enable you to meet the entrance requirements of civilian schools or colleges.

If you must be blue-be a bright blue.


WGBY Program Schedule
Regular Programs - Monday through Friday
0700 Morning Caravan 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 0715 News 1330 Jack Kirkwood 0730 Morning Caravan 1345 Behind the Story 0800 Lucky U Ranch 1400 Musi al Matinee 0825 Solitary Singer 1500 ,Parade of Sports 0830 Bob & Ray 1700 Storyteller Time 0900 House of Music 1755 ;Sam Balter 1000 Curt Massey 1800 News 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1845 Requestfully Yours 1030 Bob Hope 1900 Twiliht Serenade 1040 John Conte 2025 This I Believe 1100 Startime 2055 Knox Manning 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 2155 News 1200 Way Back Home 2230 Sandman Show 1215 News


Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene. Autry 0930 Tarzan
1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 You And The World 1130 Met. Opera Auditions 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 News
1815 Dinah Shore 1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off
Sunday
0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News
0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 You and the World 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News
1230 Piano Playhouse
1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 Science Magazine 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story Ever Told 1800 News
1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Red Skelton 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 My Friend Irma 2030 Big Time 2100 Charlie McCarthy


2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 ,Hollywood Radio Theatre 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off
Monday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Cavalcade of America 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story
2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette
Tuesday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 Dragnet 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall
Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Portrait of a City 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Sports Forum 2000 Arthur Godfrey 2030 Al Goodman 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents
Thursday
0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 American Heritage 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 What's My Line 2030 Horace Heidt 2100 Stars from Paris 2130 Meet Millie. 2200 Music From America
Friday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation to Learning 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense
2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace And War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


Way Back Home


On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon.
Monday, Sept. 14-Chicago, Illinois; Hollywood, California; Flint, Michigan.
Tuesday, Sept. 15 - Richland Center, Wisconsin; Pullman, Washington; St. Louis, Missouri.
Wednesday, Sept. 16-Stuttgart,


Arkansas; Cleveland, Tennessee; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Opelika, Alabama.
Thursday, Sept. 17-Cleveland, Ohio; Bangor, Maine; Washington, D. C.; Pottsville, Pennsylvania.
Friday, Sept. 18-DeKalb, Illinois; Clarksburg, West Virginia; San Bernardino, California.


r


ULYSSES' SIREN


Silvana Mangano, well known among the red-blooded American males for her roles in "Bitter Rice" and "Anna" goes all out in her next--"Ulysses." In the movie version of Homer's classic, Silvana will play Panelope, Circe and Calypso, which is a lot of woman for any actress.


Movie Schedule

Saturday, 12 September
JAMAICA RUN (T)
Ray Milland Arlene Dahl Wendell Corey Patrick Knowles
Sunday, 13 September
ROAR OF THE CROWD
Howard Duff Helene Stanley Dave Willock Louise Arthur
plus
Little Johnny's Jet (T)
The Postman
Monday, 14 September
DANGEROUS CROSSING
J. Crain M. Rennie C. Adams C. Betz
Tuesday, 15 September
SHOOT FIRST
Joel McCrea Evelyn Keyes Herbert Lom Marius Goring
plus
HARE TRIMMED (T)
Wednesday, 16 September
THE GIRL NEXT DOOR (T) Dennis Day June Haver Dan Dailey Billy Gray
Thursday, 17 September FAIR WIND TO JAVA
Fred MacMurray Vera Ralston Robert Douglas Victor McLaughlin
Friday, 18 September
CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS Gig Young Mala Powers William Talman Edward Arnold
Saturday, 19 September SOUTH SEA WOMAN
Burt Lancaster Virginia 'Mayo Chuck Connor Arthur Shields

Radio station WGBY has
a vacancy for one announcer.
Navy and Marine Corps per-!
sonnel interested in this type
of work will be given an audition in the radio station.j
Men reporting for the audition must have a letter ofl permission from their divi-I Sion officer. The only man-I
datory requirement is one
year's obligated service re-!
maining on the tour of duty
in this aera.

The rest of our days depends on the rest of our nights.




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79Aeg~ U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 12 September 1953 Chaplain Hachen Here To Conduct Services Chaplain David S. Hachen of ComServLant will be at the Naval Base chapel from September 14th through the 16th to lead all people of Jewish faith in the proper observance of the High Holy Days. On September 15th at 1930 he will conduct a service on the Jewish New Year (Rosh Hashanah), and the traditional ceremony of the sounding of the rain's horn (the Shofar) will call all persons of the faith to self-examination and selfjudgement. At that time, New Year's greeting cards and calendars for the year 5714 will be distributed. His second service will be in the chapel at 1930 Wednesday and will be on the theme of the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur). Chaplain Hachen has expressed regret that his schedule will not permit him to be here on the actual dates of these two holy days, but it is felt that Jewish personnel will understand and cooperate with him in his efforts to meet their religious needs. Chaplain Hachen will be in the chaplain's office all day Monday, 14 September and will welcome telephone calls or visits from all persons of Jewish faith. Second A-Sub Keel Laid Washington (AFPS)-Keel laying ceremonies for the second nuclear powered submarine, the Sea Wolf (SSN-575), took place 1 September, the Navy announced. The submarine is being built by the Electric Boat Division of the General Dynamics Corporation at Groton, Conn. The Sea Wolf will be the third vessel of the U. S. Navy to bear that name. Rent Hike Does Not Apply to Villamar The recent directive from the Bureau of Budget raising the rental on defense housing of enlisted personnel does not apply to the Guantanamo Bay area, according to a spokesman for the station rental board. This means that residents of the Villamar area may breathe easily again, at least for a while. The original directive stated that rents for defense housing occupied by enlisted personnel would be raised to a level comparable to that of officers and local civilian housing. However, a specific exemption was obtained for the Naval Base here. Therefore, it is not the intention of the rental board to recommend a rent increase at present. Walls of the first of the 300 new housing units begin to jut skyward in Villamar as SeaBees of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE place into position the first of the 434,530 blocks which will be required to complete the housing project. Ground for the project was broken on 1 July and RADM C. L. C. Atkeson, Base Commander, laid the cornerstone of the first of the new units 10 August. The units will be classified as Public Quarters. Navy Exchange Laundry Undergoing $250,000 Modernization Program The Naval Station Navy Exchange Laundry will begin a quarter of a million dollar modernization program Monday that promises to give laundry patrons the latest in service. New and reconditioned laundry equipment, including washers and driers, will replace equipment now in use. One result is that shirts and jumpers will be pressed according to prescribed directions. Each shirt will be separately packaged and the jumpers will be pressed both from the inside and outside and will have regulation folds in the collars. The modernization of the local laundry is part of the Navy's world-wide program to give newer and better laundering services to its personnel. One reason for the seemingly high cost of modernization is the cost of modern laundry equipment. One washer, according to Lieutenant S. W. Plarr, laundry officer, costs $20,000. Not all the equipment to be installed will be new. Some of the equipment will come from other naval establishments as far away as Guam after first having been reconditioned in New York or rebuilt by the manufacture. The modernization program will probably take at least three weeks and during this time all laundering will be done at nights. Consequently it is expected that service for that time will be somewhat slower than the usual service. As one piece of old equipment is disconnected its modern counterpart will be installed. This should prevent any excesive delay in services during the switch-over. Certain changes in the building will be affected, most noticeable of which will be the moving of the receiving window from its present location facing Sherman Avenue to a location facing the Library. The entire plant will be designed on an elastic basis which will allow for the expansion or contraction of facilities with fluctuations in demands for services. The plant will be set up on a unit plan so that individual units can be put into operation or taken out of operation according to demand. This will allow for greater efficiency. Other features of interest to patrons includes the incorporation of the standard Navy marking system. In the future, any piece of laundry marked at Guantanamo Bay will be able to be identified at any other Navy laundry using the same system of marking. The initial of the man's last name plus the last four digits of his service number will comprize his laundry marking. The possibility of identical markings among two or more men is very slim. No longer will stockings be tied together for laundering and drying purposes, causing general wear to the stockings and more than a few negative comments. Laundry bags will be used in the future, eliminating the need for tieing the patron's socks together. Super Connie Flights May be Headed For FLAW Guantanamo Results of Runway Inspection Will Determine Feasibility Of Using Heavier Aircraft Regularly scheduled flights of Lockheed Super Constellations to and from Guantanamo Bay may soon be initiated by the Fleet Logistics Air Wing. The Super Connies would replace the R5D's in present use. The decision to send the larger and heavier aircraft on regularly scheduled FLAW flights is pending a survey being conducted at McCalla Field by the Paving Inspection and Testing Division of the the Bureau of Docks. Runway Tested Inspection of the runways began last week and will continue until 1 October, says Mr. W. J. Dunning, civil engineer with the Bureau of Docks. The parking and ramp areas adjacent to the field are also being inspected to determine if they can withstand S u p e r Constellation loads. A certain amount of load deflection is permissible on any runway. In other words, a runway can withstand a certain amount of "give" without sustaining any damage-without cracking up under the strain. BuDocks engineers are attempting to learn whether or not the runways at McCalla can withstand the loads that would be imposed by Super Constellations. This is being accomplished, explains Mr. Dunning, by simulating Constellation loads with the aid of a 50-ton tractor, a water tank (to vary the load), various size pressure plates and measuring devices. In conjunction with these tests, the subsurface of the runways are also being tested for constituency and water content. This knowledge will aid in the future repairs or expansion of the field. More Passengers, Cargo The use of Super Constellations (R7V's) will mean that a larger number of passengers and a greater amount of cargo can be carried at greater speeds and over longer distances. If the Super Connies are put into service, the R5D's in present use will probably be shifted to continental runs where shorter flights are required. Commercial counterparts of the Navy's Super Constellations are already in use by major air lines and are an enlarged and speedier version of the world famous Connies. The Super Constellation is powered by four 3250 hp Wright turbo -compound engines. Extra fuel is carried in wing tip tanks. Additional passenger space has been made possible by inserting a thirteen-foot section into the Constellation fuselage. MOTORISTS: Give the kids a brake. Vol. V, No. 52

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Saturday, 12 September 1953 A Message from Garcia The Story of Hatuey by Henry Garcia Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 12 September 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Lieutenant E. A. Sandness.Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOCManaging Editor Al Henderson, JO3 -News Editor J. C. Dierks, J03---Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSNPhotographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston The recent picnics at Phillips Park have attracted droves of teen-agers to eat fried chicken and play softball. .. Kay Gennaria, leaving us next week, was giving the horses at the corral a workout along with Margo Anderson and Barbara Garris, but no amount of money could get Fay aboard one of the four-legged friends. ...Seems a past experience has set Fay against the poor creatures for an indefinite period of time. ...Eddie Stafford, Anita Sierra, Eunice Avila and Edwin Heimer were really raising the roof to the beat of the Cuban mambo band Monday afternoon. All teenage keglers are reminded that the bowling teams will be formed soon at the club meetings. .. George MacMichael was the winner of the election last Tuesday for VeePee of the Student Council. Norman Huddy will be this years prexy. ...Cheerleader practice is just around the corner. .. Belated congrats to Pierce Lehnbeck and George MacMichael for their assignments as co-editors of this year's edition of the "Coral Reef." With these two leading off, we're sure to have a better year book than ever before. ...Speaking of editors, Doris Sigler is heading the school paper this year. Much to the relief of the freshman the initiation is over and already next year's sophmores are planning revenge. ... iMehec nc offe !8s glumz 'Si~p fod ig, Hatuey is known to most Americans only through the label of the famous Cuban beer. However, I think it will be interesting for Americans to know who Hatuey was, since his life is one of the most interesting chapters in the history of Cuba. Hatuey was an Indian Chief who came to Cuba from his native Santo Domingo (now the Dominican Re public) in the early days of the l """' Spanish conquest. The conqueros had overcome most of Santos Domingo and had left behind them only devastation and death. So Hatuey came to Cuba to warn his Indian -brothers in this island (the tribes of "Tainos" and "Siboneyes") against the Spaniards. The Indian war smoke signals filled the Cuban skies, and by night while the Conquerors slept, the sound of drums was heard. The Indians would crawl into the Conquerors' tents followed by dogs which did not bark and the Indian knives would speak their mute language of Death. Hatuey, the leader, was finally caught and he was sentenced to die at the stake. The day of the execution a Spanish priest came to Hatuey, and askd him to confess, so that he would be able to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Hatuey was tied to the stake. He had been tortured. He did not fear death, but when he was offered by this man the realm AF. of heaven, the shadow of hope ADM Robert B. Carney, USN crossed his mind, but he ventured Chief of Naval Operations this question, "Do these go to heaven?" "Oh .yes .they ADM Robert Bostwick Carney, do" was the priest's answer. 'Then,' USN born in Vallejo, Calif., Mar. replied Hatuey, "I do not want to 26 1 go to heaven. If these people who l 95 h eed ADM Wilmake me suffer and who kill inno f Na cent Indians go up there, I do not a Opratio ADM Cane want to be with them ..aI shall raduae fo th1a not confess!" The signal was given. The flames surrounded Hatuey and During WWI he served aboard got close to him. But he did not the USS Fanning when she capseem to suffer. On the other hand, a turned the German submarine U-58 radiant smile was shown in his face Nov. 17, 1917. And as the smoke ascended to the ADM Carney's postwar assignsky, some of the witnesses said ments included command of two that they had seen the silhouette destroyers, and duties within the of a two-feathered Indian going Navy Department. up with smoke. Beyond the limited In the early months of WWII, knowledge of man about the things he was Chief of Staff for Coiof the eternal, there is justice in wander, Support Forces, Atlantic heaven for men of good will. Fleet. Then he commanded the 26,o1895,ehas succeeded ADM Wil-o Jean Peters isn't the prize in the Freedoms Foundations "What America Means to Me" letter contest but $1000 cash will be awarded to the serviceman or woman who submits the top entry. The lovely star is shown as she scans some of the letters already submitted. Letters are to be of 500 words or less and should be mailed to Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio Service, Los Angeles 38, Calif. Letters must be received by midnight Oct. 15, 1953. Otherwise, they will be considered for next year's awards. To be eligible, you must be on active duty in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard. 6 USS Denver n action against t e Japanese during 1942-43. He was successively Chief of Staff to Commander, South Pacific Force and to Commander Third Fleet from 1943-45. The Navy Cross was awarded to the Admiral for extraordinary heroism during the battle for Leyte Gulf, Oct. 23-26, 1944. In February 1946, ADM Carney became Assistant Chief of Naval Operations (Logistics) and in June the same year advanced to Deputy CNO. Four years later he assumed command of the Second Fleet and later was designated Commander in Chief, U. S. Naval Forces, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. For the last year he had served as Commander in Chief, Allied Forces, Southern Europe. The Marine Corps has announced that male enlisted personnel who entered active duty prior to July 1, 1952 and will be discharged or released from active duty prior to July 1, 1954 will not be required to purchase tropical garrison uniforms provided they maintain five cotton khaki uniforms during their remaining period of active duty. These men are exempted from Para 363 of MarCor Memo 37-53 which applies to all other enlisted male personnel. Q Sunday, 13 September 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Tiny Tot Bible Time B. J. Sutherling Dear TWO'S and THREE'S, Bible Stories are the most wonderful stories in the world-and these stories, in the Indian, are especially for you! There will be tiny-tot prayers, and finger-plays, too That Mommy and Daddy will help you to do. Today, our story is about two little boys who knew how to share. Jonathan Shares With David I Sam. 18:1-4 David and Jonathan were friends. They played together with bows and arrows. They laughed together and sang songs. They went to Sunday school and heard stories about GOD. They were happy friends. Jonathan had pretty clothes: warm coats, bright caps and strong belts. David had no pretty clothes. Jonathan loved David; he wanted David to wear his clothes. Jonathan said, "David, please put on my new coat." And David did. Jonathan said, "Put on my belt, too." And David did. Jonathan liked to share his toys with David. He said, "Here David. You may have my new bow and arrow." David smiled! How happy he was! He had a new coat, a new belt and a new bow and arrow. Jonathan was glad, too. He liked to see David smile, and put on the clothes. And David said, "Thank you, thank you, Jonathan." He knew Jonathan loved him! B. J. Sutherling Copyright GLP 1952 Dear God, May our house be a friendly house With a door that opens wide. Our toys and games for sharing With all who come inside. Amen. Bible Thought: "SHARE WHAT YOU HAVE" ..fr. Heb. 13:16 Page Two b THE INDIAN 9)

PAGE 3

9 Saturday, 12 September 1953 ~c 5.,10th NO Golf Tourney Set For October The 10th Naval District Golf Tournament, originally scheduled to be played on the Guantanamo Naval Base course on the 18th, 19th and 20th September, has been postponed until 23, 24 and 25 October. Limited to Navy and Marine Corps participants the tournament will bring together teams from four commands in the Caribbean area. San Juan, Puerto Rico, will send 12 men; Roosevelt Roads will send six; six from Trinidad; and 18 will play from Guantanamo Naval Base. Representing the Naval Base here will be three 6-man teams. Team 1 is composed of Grego, North, Totilo, Skinner, Knilans and Narwid. Team 2 -Vanderhoef, Spears, Krusche, Byrne, Lehmbeck and Bruner. Team 3 -Barmhall, Reynolds, Mauldin, Speckman, Drennan and Jones. 46 THE INDIAN Page Three sp or/s Little League Needs Support Taking it easy as he snares a high throw in the Old-Timers Game at the Yankee Stadium is Wally Pipp, famous 'Bomber' first-sacker of years ago. The two-inning game featuerd old Yankee stars against a team of former star native New Yorkers. The natives beat the old timers, 6-3. Softball Activity Resumes at NavSta; NAS, Marine Leagues Tighten As Play Moves Closer to Half-Way Point After a slight delay due to rain and wet grounds the Naval Station intra-mural softball league is again back in action. Monday night, in a game highlighted by the one-hit pitching of Mandis, who also poled three consecutive homeruns good for six RBIs, the 2nd Division downed the Commissary Store 19-4. The 1st Division collected a 7-0 forfeit in the scheduled nightcap when the Flag Division was unable to field a team. Tuesday evening the 5th Division downed the 11th Division in a free swinging contest 17-10. The second game saw the ARD 16 remain undefeated, downing the AFDL 47 15-5. Naval Station League standings are as follows: Team Won Lost GB ARDL 16-AFDL1 -7 0 2nd Division --6 1 1 1st Division -4 1 2 5th Division 4 2 21/2 FCP-RPIO -3 2 3 11th Division ----4 3 3 Flog Divisiona A 3 3 3. AFDL 47---_______2 4 41/ Ath Divitson h b 4 4 Commissary Storeau 4 4 Le anr 7th Division eeai2 5 h High School1 4 6th Divisiong on 7 7 Naval Air Station Activity has been heavy in the Air Station League, also with Leeward Point defeating the highly touted Special Services team 3-2, thus holding on to undisputed possession of first place. The game was highlighted by the superb hurling of Yarbrough and Shea. The Cooks and Bakers lost a ding-dong battle to Aerology 15-13. Ciccarl1i, the Cooks & Bakers' ace twirler lost his first game of the season due to his unusual lack of control in the 1st inning when Aerology scored 12 runs. Murray pitched fine ball after relieving Ciccarelli in the 1st frame. Anderson was the hitting star, garnering 5 hits in 5 trips to the plate. Standing as of 8 September are as follows: Team Won Lost Leeward Point 4 0 Boatshed __3 1 Cooks and Bakers ---2 2 Gas Shop ----2 Operations ___ 2 2 Special Services ---2 2 Aerology ------2 3 Supply -----1 4 Communications --0 5 Marine Site The Officers and Staff NCOs have been having a rough time of it lately dropping a 9-4 decision to the Headquarters team on 4 September, another to the Second Section Tuesday by an 11-4 score, and another the following day when they were outhit by the 1st Section 11-7. The League leaders in the hitting department so far this year are as follows: Player Team Avg. Rosati 2nd Section .578 Smith, J. 1st Section .555 Romano 1st Section .500 Smetanka O-NCOs .473 Ailing Headquarters .450 The League standings: Team Won Lost 2nd Section -------------4 1 Headquarters ----------3 2 1st Section 2 3 Officers and NCOs --2 5 Doctor: "Young woman, you have acute appendicitis." She: "Never mind the compliments-tell me what's wrong with me." Fishing Entries LAND DIVISION Barracuda Marcinuk, P. -23 lbs. 8 ozs. Richter, Mrs. R. F. 19 lbs. 8 ozs. Harris, W. K. -16 lbs. 12 ozs. Grouper Leverett, W. R. --4 lbs. 6 ozs. Jacks Whitmore, F. M. --17 lbs. 8 ozs. Beman, J. A. 15 lbs. 9 ozs. McNeil, D. A. --12 lbs. Mackerel (King) McNeil, D. A. -30 lbs. Snapper Dupree, W. L. --43 lbs. 8 ozs. Kelly, C. L. -33 lbs. 4 ozs. Loewenhagen, A. H. 16 lbs. 8 ozs. Snook Loewenhagen, A. H. ____ 13 lbs. Tarpon Brock, R. ---26 lbs. Ciccarelli, B. _---__ 23 lbs. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Ray, C. F. ---32 lbs. Hardin, J. -_ 22 lbs. 8 ozs. Baily, H. E. ---6 lbs. Jacks Whitmore, F. M.-10 lbs. 13 ozs. Suslick, A. D. ---6 lbs. Dalton, L. B. 5 lbs. 1 oz. Mackerel (King) Scott, B. R. ---9 lbs. 8 ozs. Snapper Pass, J. S. e41 lbs. 4 oss. Lightfoot, L. H. --35 lbs. Gennaria, R. H. --32 lbs. Snook Leverett, W. R. --14 lbs. 8 ozs. Shepherd, W. L. --11 lbs. 8 ozs. Lightfoot, L. H. --11 lbs. Tarpon Loomis, C. E. --47 lbs. 12 ozs. Lightfoot, L. H. --30 lbs. Beman, E. F. --_ 25 lbs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefsh Chandler, C. A. --4 lbs. 8 ozs. Croakers Williams, H. H. 2 lbs. Cole, J. ___ 1 lb. 8 0zs. Sutherling, E. W. --1 lb. 3 ozs. Parrotfish Nixon, R. M. ------1 lb. 14 ozs. Pompano French, C. D. ---16 lbs. 8 ozs. Hinkle, R. A. ---9 lbs. Greener, S. W. --4 lbs. Shark Hummel, C. A. --200 lbs. Bryan, W. C. ---98 lbs. Dinoch, T. ---83 lbs. Triggerfish Borborian, S. Jr., -3 lbs. 8 ozs. SPEAR FISHING DIVISION Grouper Nichols, E. M. --67 lbs. 8 ozs. Marcinuk, P. ---7 lbs. 3 ozs. Wreath, F.-2 lbs. Jacks Matson, J. F. ---14 lbs. Prejean, J. W. --13 lbs. 9 ozs. Foster, R. D. ---11 lbs. 8 ozs. Snapper Foster, R. D. ---19 lbs. Tarpon Foster, R. D. -__ 26 lbs. 8 ozs. Rosendal, G. A. --20 lbs. 8 ozs. Marcinuk, P. --20 lbs. Hogish Foster, R. D. ---6 lbs. Nichols, E. M. -5 lbs. 8 ozs. Mackerel (Spanish) Abbott, G. H. --7 lbs. MAJOR LEAGUE STANDING'S (As of Thursday, 10 September) NATIONAL LEAGUE Team W L PCT. GB Brooklyn 97 42 .698 Milwaukee 84 56 .600 131/2 St. Louis 75 62 .547 21 Philadelphia -76 63 .468 21 New York 65 74 .428 38 Chicago 56 82 .406 40/2 Pittsburgh 44 97 .312 54 AMERICAN LEAGUE Team W L PCT. GB New York 91 44 .674 Cleveland 84 55 .604 9 Chicago 80 59 .576 13 Boston 76 64 .543 17/2 Washington __ 70 69 .504 23 Detroit 54 87 .383 40 Philadelphia -53 87 .379 401/2 St. Louis 49 92 .348 45 For two-bits you can buy yourself a piece of America, 1963. Fostered in real, old-fashioned, grass-root Americanism is the Little League, a vital milestone on the road to citizenship. Organized in 1939 Little Leagues are in operation in 44 of the 48 states with 115,000 boys under 12 years of age on the rosters of 7,650 teams. It would be impossible to measure completely and accurately the benefits of Little League Baseball to the individual boy, the team on which he plays, or the entire community where Little League Baseball operates. The main objective of Little League Baseball is to provide baseball participation for boys, and that, coupled with the adults contirbuting their services and the fans rooting in the bleachers, combine to make the Little League a potent factor in community life. Youngsters no longer have to sit on the sidelines because they are too small or too young. Now they can get out there on their own pint-sized field with their midget bats and their cut-to-size uniforms and play just as exciting a ball game as you'd see in Yankee Stadium. They play according to special rules compiled in consideration of their endurance and stamina, but it's still big league baseball on a "little people" basis. Here at the Naval Base the youngsters are trying to get started on their grasp of the American way of life with formation of a Little League. They are being sponsored by the local branches of the American Legion, the Fleet Reserve Association and the Sojourners' Club. Volunteer workers from all three organizations are pitching in to complete the regulation small-sized baseball diamond located between Fourth and Fifth Street in Villamar. As soon as the field is finished they will issue a call for try-outs for the teams and Little League will be in business. BUT-There are uniforms to buy and equipment to buy and it takes money. Little League is financed and supported locally. It is entirely non-profit. There is no appropriation set aside for it. In order to get the little people started right, the three sponsoring organizations have organized a Little League Baseball Benefit drawing to be held on Friday, 18 September at 1900 at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum. First prize for the drawing is a choice of a 9 cubic-foot refrigeraotr or $215.00 in cash. Second prize is a set of golf clubs or $110.00 in cash. Third prize is a Hallicrafter radio or $50.00 in cash. Two more prizes of merchandize or cash total $50.00. But aside from the prizes, your two-bit ticket for the drawing will give these youngsters a little shove on the right road to the American way of life. Get a ticket from any of the boys and girls selling them, or contact any member of the American Legion, the Fleet Reserve Association or the Sojourners' Club, or call the Indian office for information. And that's your two-bit investment in America, 1963. r--

PAGE 4

Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4161-B THE INDIAN 9 Saturday, 12 September 1953 Danny Thomas, he who had the big hate for "moronic Television," has signed for a weekly series over ABC-TV. Television may be moronic as he says but the hard cash it pays certainly isn't ... Betty Grable and Mr. Grable, one Harry James, will play their first theater date together sometime around Labor Day in Chicago Frankie Laine broke the weekend record at Atlantic City's Steel Pier ...U. S. Public Health Service reports several state and city authorities are taking steps to prevent the re-use of polarized glasses necessary for watching 3-I) moviesthey're worried about the spread of eye infections ...James Hilton's "Lost Horizon" will hit the Broadway boards in the musical form sometime this fall. Everytime we see Jean Simmons in a movie we wonder why girls like that never live "next door"-such a doll ...TV DEPT.-The other PM Arthur Godfrey decided that the collection of entertainers who were to perform on his "Talent Scouts" program had something less than talent. So what did he do?-Just cancelled them all and went into his ''Godfrey and His Friends" format. Which should certainly prove to all doubters that the Redhead is King Arthur as far as CBS is concerned .. Sponsor who was supposed to pick up the tab for the Dave Garroway show opposite "I Love Lucy" decided that the competition was too heavy and backed off-CBS certainly has the redhead market sewed up ...The Netherlands Cinema Federation reports that TV in Holland have been a failure. Lack of film and high taxes were blamed, but wiser Broadwayites are laying six, two and even they could have made it with wrestling and the roller derby Some of you who read this will soon be exchanging your Navy for civilian garb. You will be interested in knowing what credit you can hope to receive in civilian schools for your Navy training and what civilian occupations can best utilize the skills you have acquired during your Navy hitch. The Information and Education Office can give you all the dope on courses to take that will help you to prepare for a good job in the future or enable you to meet the entrance requirements of civilian schools or colleges. If you must be blue-be a bright blue. 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 Solitary Singer 0830 Bob & Ray 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 John Conte 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan, 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene. Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Rangers 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Paulena Carter 1115 You And The World 1130 Met. Opera Auditions 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 News 1815 Dinah Shore 1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Knox Manning 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News 0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Choral Symphony 1045 You and the World 1100 Protestant Divine Services 1200 Personal Album 1215 News 1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 New York Philharmonic 1400 Music with the Girls 1430 Science Magazine 1445 At Ease 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story Ever Told 1800 News 1815 Eddie Fisher 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Red Skelton 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 My Friend Irma 2030 Big Time 2100 Charlie McCarthy On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon. Monday, Sept. 14-Chicago, Illinois; Hollywood, California; Flint, Michigan. Tuesday, Sept. 15 -Richland Center, Wisconsin; Pullman, Washington; St. Louis, Missouri. Wednesday, Sept. 16-Stuttgart, 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 130 Jack Kirkwood 1345 Behind the Story 1400 Musi.al Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports 1700 Storyteller Time 1755 Sam Balter 1000 News 1815 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Serenade 2025 This 1 Believe 2055 Knox Manning 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Cavalcade of America 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1015 Steve Allen 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 Dragnet 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Francis Farwell 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Portrait of a City 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Sports Forum 2000 Arthur Godfrey 2030 Al Goodman 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents Thursday 0845 Tennessee Ernie 1045 Strike it Rich 1730 American Heritage 1815 Steve Allen 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 What's My Line 2030 Horace Heidt 2100 Stars from Paris 2130 Meet Millie. 2200 Music From America Friday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation to Learning 1815 Jo Stafford 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace And War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall Arkansas; Cleveland, Tennessee; Grand Rapids, Michigan; Opelika, Alabama. Thursday, Sept. 17-Cleveland, Ohio; Bangor, Maine; Washington, D. C.; Pottsville, Pennsylvania. Friday, Sept. 18-DeKalb, Illinois; Clarksburg, West Virginia; San Bernardino, California. ULYSSES' SIREN Silvana Mangano, well known among the red-blooded American males for her roles in "Bitter Rice" and "Anna" goes all out in her next-"Ulysses." In the movie version of Homer's classic, Silvana will play Panelope, Circe and Calypso, which is a lot of woman for any actress. Movie Schedule Saturday, 12 September JAMAICA RUN (T) Ray Milland Arlene Dahl Wendell Corey Patrick Knowles Sunday, 13 September ROAR OF THE CROWD Howard Duff Helene Stanley Dave. Willock Louise Arthur plus Little Johnny's Jet (T) The Postman Monday, 14 September DANGEROUS CROSSING J. Crain M. Rennie C. Adams C. Betz Tuesday, 15 September SHOOT FIRST Joel McCrea Evelyn Keyes Herbert Lom Marius Goring plus HARE TRIMMED (T) Wednesday, 16 September THE GIRL NEXT DOOR (T) Dennis Day June Haver Dan Dailey Billy Gray Thursday, 17 September FAIR WIND TO JAVA Fred MacMurray Vera Ralston Robert Douglas Victor McLaughlin Friday, 18 September CITY THAT NEVER SLEEPS Gig Young Mala Powers William Talman Edward Arnold Saturday, 19 September SOUTH SEA WOMAN Burt Lancaster Virginia Mayo Chuck Connor Arthur Shields Radio station WGBY has a vacancy for one announcer. Navy and Marine Corps per-1 sonnel interested in this type of work will be given an audition in the radio station. Men reporting for the audi-' tion must have a letter of permission from their divi-1 sion officer. The only man-datory requirement is one! year's obligated service remaining on the tour of duty in this aera. The rest of our days depends on the rest of our nights. I, WGBY Program Schedule Regular Programs -Monday through Friday Way Back Home