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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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University of Florida
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Vol. V, INo. 50


U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


Saturday, 29 August 1953


"Freedoms Foundation"

Contest Deadline

Set For Oct, 15

Washington (AFPS) - Deadline for entering the Freedoms Foundation's "letters from service personnel" contest is only about two months away.
Letters may be submitted by Service personnel on the subject "What America Means To Me" and must be received before midnight, Oct. 15, 1953.
Men and women who are on active duty in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps or Coast Guard, either in the U.S. or overseas, may submit letters of not more than 500 words on America or some phase of American life. Soundness of ideas and clear thinking, rather than literary form, will be the basis for judging letters.
Entries are to be sent to Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio Service, 1016 North McCadden Place, Los Angeles 38, Calif., and must have the signature, rank, service number, and organization of the eafrait.- -Awards will be in the form of cash and George Washington Honor Medal Awards. The principal award will be $1000 and an Honor Medal. In addition there will be 20 awards of $100 and Honor Medals, and 10 or more Honor Medals alone.
The contest is being sponsored jointly by the Freedoms Foundation, Valley Forge, Pa., and the Office of Armed Forces Information and Education of the Defense Dep*Ttment. Winners' names will be announced Feb. 22, 1954.

Navy Em's Eligible
For NROTC Training

Qualified enlisted personnel may again participate this year in the Navy college aptitude test for entry as midshipmen into the NROTC, the Navy Department has announced.
There are 200 positions open to enlisted personnel on active duty. Successful candidates will be appointed midshipman in the Naval Reserve and will receive a commission as ensign in the Navy or 2nd lieutenant in the Marine Corps upon successful completion of the four-year course.
NROTC students may pursue any course leading to a baccalaureate, or higher, degree with the exception of medicine, dentistry, veterinary, theology, pharmacy, music or art.
Candidates must be between their 17th and 21st birthday, unmarried, physically qualified and a high school graduate or possess an equivalent certificate. All qualified personnel may apply to their COs for permission to take the Navy college aptitude test on Dec. 12, 1953. All nominations should reach the Bureau of Personnel by Oct. 20,
-(AFPS).


ADM Arthur W. Radford
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff

The new Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, ADM Arthur W. Radford, USN, is a veteran naval aviator. He was graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1916.
During WWI he served in the Atlantic Fleet and then, for a year following the war, in the Pacific Fleet. In April 1920 he reported to the Naval Air Station, Pensaco1WaF a.,h eirThe 16-K Thflfi training. He was graduated as Naval Aviator #2896 in November 1920.
Active in Aviation
ADM Radford received a variety of assignments during the peacetime years including duty with the newly established Bureau of Aeronautics, OIC of the Alaskan Survey Detachment, and several tours of sea duty in both staff and flying capacities.
From the beginning of WWII until April 1943 he was Director of Aviation Training in the Bureau of Aeronautics. He was credited


U. S. Air Force Will Utilize

N.A.S. As Training Stop

Navy Guantanamo will soon become acquainted with the U. S. Air
Force. According to present plans, the Navigation Training Command at Harlingen Air Force Base, Texas, will send training flights to Guantanamo Bay Commencing in October as part of a regular training program.
Six Planes Weekly
by the Navy with developing the Three T-29s (Convair trainers) expanded program of aviation will leave Harlingen A.F.B. twice training which provided the vast weekly for Guantanamo Bay. Each numbers of skilled pilots needed plane will have 12 officer students in the war. aboard plus instructors and the
Commands Task Force usual flight crew.
In April 1943 he was transferred 5 - 7 Hour Flight
to the Pacific where he became During the 1,500 mile flight beCommander Carrier Div. 2 and tween Harlingen and Guantanamo, later Carrier Div. 11. He led a the 36 students will participate in carrier task force group in action an over-water navigation problem both prior to and during the as a climax to their twelve weeks landings on Baker, Makin, and of training. Depending upon weaTarawa Islands. ther conditions, the flights should
Heads CarDiv 6 last between five and seven hours.
He became Chief of Staff to the The planes will arrive at McCalla
Commander Aircraft Pacific in Field either in the late afternoon
December 1943 and then returned or early evening.
to Washington as Assistant Deputy Overnight Stop
Chief of Naval Operations (Air), The planes will depart the folin May 1944. He resumed Pacific lowing morning for HarlingenFleet duty as commander of Car- which is just above the Mexican rier Div. 6 in November and di- border in Texas. (The flight is t--reced = �tt -. on- ,J .... Iwo m& about-two an one- half times as long
and Okinawa. as the flight between Guantanamo
CinCPac Bay and Miami, Florida.)
Following the war, ADM Rad- The Navigation Training Coinford carried out several major mand at Harlingen was recently assignments including that of opened to train prospective navigaCommander in Chief, Pacific, from tion officers for the Military Air April 30, 1949 to June 1953. At Transport Command and the that time he was ordered to Strategic Air Command. Washington in preparation for assuming his new duties. (AFPS) M CB's 4 and 7

Doc: The pain in your leg is Locations caused by old age. Trade Man: "Old age nothing; the other
leg's the same age and it don't The mobility of mobile construchurt."44 11 k- Z


TEN-INCH LINES ARE IMPORTANT to a seaplane salvage derrick, and here 0. H. Wilborn, BM2, demonstrates to C. D. Barrand, SN, (left) and R. J. Saltzman, SN, (right) the correct method of splicing one of these heavy-duty manillas. The three men are stationed on board the YSD-21.
9t 0


onl a a Io was uemonstratea Tuesday as Mobile Construction Battalion 7 changed places with Mobile Construction Battalion 4.
Arriving from SeaBee headquarters at Davisville, R. I., aboard the USS Sanborn (PA-193), MCB-7 is scheduled to undertake the projects formerly worked upon by MCB-4 and as yet uncompleted. These projects are all on the Leeward side of the naval base and are primarily connected with Naval Air Station facilities.
Following the debarkation of MCB-7 Tuesday morning, the officers and men of MCB-4 boarded the Sanborn for Davisville. The battalion arrived at Guantanamo Bay last April and had undertaken over 25 heavy construction projects
-such as the construction of roads and barracks.
The officers and men of MCB-7 are no strangers to Guantanamo Bay. Prior to their last over-seas tour at Port Lyautey, the battalion was stationed here in 1952.
The movement of mobile construction battalions, say MCB-4 spokesmen, is for morale and training purposes.

"Tell me, sailor, what do they call a man who refuses to fight?' "A bachelor."


T


I








THE INDIAN


9


Saturday, 29 August 1953


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 29 August 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer Editorial Staff
Lieutenant E. A. Sandness__Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOC -------- Managing Editor Al Henderson, JO3 ---------- News Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3 ----------------Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN --------- Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval, Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.

Blood Donors Needed
Volunteer Blood Donors are urgently needed in order to secure whole blood to meet the requirements for blood transfusions at the Naval Hospital.
Anyone, civilian or military, who wishes to donate blood may visit the Laboratory, Naval Hospital, for screening and selection -between the hours 0800 to 1500 on Monday through Friday.
Your blood may save someone's life.TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP

By Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston
Gitmo High reopened last Monday and a pleasant, carefree three months of Summer vacation came to a close . . . 10th grade leads in population . . . Jimmy Cavanagh keeps wandering in and out of the sophomore homeroom at all hours of the day; James, my boy, you'll have to realize you're a junior now . . .
A hearty "Bon Voyage" to Pat Parks and Jerry Murphy who left us last week-Jerry to Washington and Lee for the "home stretch", and Pat to Miami High . . . Come to think of it, the rest of the college crowd will be leaving very shortly: Bill Barret, Pat Burke, Jeaneene Hummel and Bob Wilkinson all leaving around the 12th of September . . . DID YOU SEE? Norman Huddy striving to finish up his two-line poem? ... Carol being taken home in her special car, right to the door, yet? ... The senior class' zombie (contribution from Mrs. Mathews)? ... Flip giving her first political speech and latching on to the title of Captain Bruner, II, in P. E.?... The aforementioned Flip's blue toenails ? . . . Anita drowning her sorrows in a milk shake at the PX? (Her only sorrow is school opening.) Shall we form a club?...

NOTICE

All employees who work on the Naval Base and live in Cuba are required to register in the Customs Office at Guantanamo, according to a notice issued recently by Arturo B. Canet Perez, Customs Administrator.


A Message from Garcia ....


Maceo Family - A Symbol of Cuba

By Henry Garcia
Some who read "The Indian" have asked me to write about Maceo. I shall do so with pleasure, since Maceo shares with Marti the place of honor in the history of Cuba. We had many brave warriors and many men of intelligence dedicated to the noble task of freeing this country from the hands of Spain. But two figures distinguish themselves among all the others, and they are Jose Marti and Antonio Maceo. Marti, the White and Maceo, the Negro, fighting shoulder to shoulder as an everlasting symbol of union. Marti, the intellect put to the service of a great task; Maceo, the courage and fortitude necessary to accomplish that task. I shall not write about Maceo today, though. I am going to dedicate this column to his mother, Mariana Grajales. I am going to write about this magnificent woman, about this wonderful patriot, who sacrificed everything for the sake of Cuba.
As some of the readers know,
Mother's Day in Cuba is also known . . . Maceo had been killed at the Mot's ayrin Casalso D wn front! The lion hearted general as Mariana Grajales' Day, in who had so many times been close homage to a Cuban mother who to Death, had finally succumbed (parodying the well-'known trag- to her cold embrace . . . Mariana edy), "did not love her sons less, received the news with just a little but loved Cuba more." Mariana
sent her sons to the war, and when groan, while her fists became so en tight that they almost bled, and the youngest, Jose was killed and without a tear or a sigh, she went Antonio, after having been wound- into her house. "She has no heart," ed several times in the battle field, inthe ome. of h nh had kissed his mother goodbye, bors. the comment of the neighand went back once more to war, burs..But Mariana, alone in her his wounds not completely healed room, alone as a bird without a yet, something happened that has nest, as a branch without leaves, been given account of in countless or as a pool without water, began pemsgive and ouplas in count s to cry, and the tears she had held poems and plays in this country ... back for so many times, flowed
There were a few women in ft bchoes aytmefoe
hei rh wereatchiwoeng in the gently down the cheeks that would neighborhood watching the depar- never again receive the kisses of ture of Maceo and they made her sons. "She cries," said one of remarks about this mother who the neighbors. "The heart of the stood there coldly, without uttering mother has at last flourished!" even a sigh, bidding farewell to her Mariana answered. "I don't cry for son with these historical words, my son! . . I don't cry for the "You are going to fight for your child I once. bore . I cry for country, son . . . Let's see how chiIotncbr . . . I cry for my
the my impotency .. I cry for my well you do it!" Mariana, fate because I have no more sons mother, cold and firm as a rock, t giv e o m s stood there, watching her son dis- to give to my country! . . . That's appear in the sands of the road. why I cry . . . That's why! . . "She has no heart," commented the
neighbors, "she doesn't cry when hh she sees her son go!" One day, one sad day, the bad news arrived S ips of the F


From 11 to 14 Months

Washington (AFPS)-The tour of duty for leathernecks serving in Korea will gradually be increased from 11 months to 14 months, according to the following announcement issued by Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps.
"In view of the truce in Korea, the Marine Corps plans to conduct the future rotation of marines from Korea on a 'stretch-out' basis. that combat marines serve approximately 11 months in Korea. It is expected that this tour will be increased gradually during the next few months.
"By about March 1954, it is anticipated that most marines will be serving on 14-month tours in Korea, while 16-month tours may finally be established, if such extension of Korean service proves necessary.
"The 'stretch-out' rotation policy continues the practice under which all marines due for discharge are returned to the U. S. in ample time for their scheduled separation from the service."

THRIFT SHOP

The Thrift Shop is now open Monday through Friday from 0900 to 1130. Dozens of articles are on sale at low prices, and all profits go to Navy Relief.


Sunday, 30 August 1953
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel
Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: Saturday, 1730
1800; 1930- 2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


A choir of 48 NROTC
Midshipmen from cruise "B"
will sing at the 1100 chapel services Sunday. The choir
will also sing at the Naval
Station Movie Lyceum beginning at 1930.


The quickest way to drive home an argument is to ignore instructions from the back seat.

Future To Have


Norfolk, Va. (AFPS)-The Navy has overhauled and converted the destroyer USS Meredith into an experimental ship- an effort to make living conditions more desirable aboard ship.
Sponge rubber mattresses, fluorescent lighting, more showers and wash basins, and new messing facilities are just a few of the new features found aboard the 2200 ton de- f 3 stroyer.
Hot food will be transported
from the galley to the men at 2 tables in the messhall by dumbwaiter. In the messhall are new type tables and benches smartly upholstered in simulated leather.
The destroyer's washrooms are equipped with small gear lockers for toilet articles. Bulkheads and 'overheads will be painted in two-tone colors easy on the eyes.
The living compartments have been designed to provide more space, and bunks have been re- . ... allocated. Beneath the bottom .. bunks are new types of gear lockers and sliding drawers.
The improvements are the results of a two year survey covering 200 ships and an opinion poll of 7,300 officers and men of the Atlantic Fleet. .
Although it cost a half million Labor Day, 7 September dollars to convert the living quarteri, the restudy of ships and their 1953, will be observed as a complements may lead to an ap- holiday on the Naval Base. proximate 10 per cent reduction in All but necessary work, drills the number of men assigned to and exercises will be susnaval vessels. The annual savings for the Atlantic Fleet alone could pended on that day. reach $100,000,000.

9


Page Two


Marine K-Duty Tours

Will Be Increased Soft Lights, Foam Mattresses








Saturday, 29 August 1953


9


Fishing Entries Intra-Mural Softball


LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Marcinule, P. 23 lbs. 8 ozs. Mrs. R. F. Richter --------19 lbs. 8 oss.
Harris, W. K. ___ 16 lbs. 12 ozss.
Jacks
Whitmore, F. M. - 17 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A. 12 lbs. Blake, 0. C. ----------------9 lbs.
Mackerel (King)
McNeil, D. A. 30 lbs.
Snapper
Dunree, W. L. -------------43 lbs. 8 ozs.
Kelly, C. L. ----------------33 lbs. 4 ozs.
Loewenbagen, A. H. ------- 16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snook
Loewenbagen, A. H - ------ 13 lbs.
Tarpon
Brock. R. 26 lbs. Ciccarelli, B. --------------23 lbs.
BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Ray, C. F. -----------------32 lbs.
Hardin, J .--------------- 22 lbs. 8 ozs.
Baily, H. E. ---------------16 lbs.
Jacks
Whitmore, F. M. -----------10 lbs. 13 ozs.
Suslick, A. D. 6 lbs. Sanborn, J. L. --------------5 lbs.
Mackerel (King)
Scott, B. R. ----------------9 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snapper
Pass, J. S. -----------------41 lbs. 4 ozs.
Lightfoot, L. H. ------------35 lbs.
Gennaria, R. H. ------------32 lbs.
Snook
Leverett. W. R. ------------14 lbs. 8 ozs.
Shepherd, W. L. ------------11 lbs. 8 ozs.
Forsee, N. E. - 9 lbs. 12 ozs.
Tarpon
Loomis, C. E. 47 lbs. 12 ozs. Beman, E. F. --------------25 lbs.
Bailey, H. E-------------- 14 lbs. 7 ozs.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Chandler, C. A. ----------- 4 lbs. 8 ozs.
Williams, H. H. ------------*2 lbs.
Cole, J. - lb. 8 ozs. Sutherling, E. W .----------- 1 lb. 3 ozs.
Pompano
French, C. D. --------------16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Hinkle, R. A. 9 lbs. Greaner, S. W. S 4 lbs.
Shark'
Hummel, C. A. -- 200 lbs. Dinoch, T. ----------------83 lbs.
Lins, S. B. ----------------49 lbs.
Triggerfish
Borborian, S., Jr. -----------3 lbs. 8 ozs.
SPEAR FISHING DIVISION
Grouper
Nichols, E. M. - - - 67 lbs. 8 ozs. Marcinule, P. ---------------7 lbs. 3 ozs.
Wreath, F. - ----------------2lbs.
Jacks
Matson, J. F. --------------14 lbs.
Foster, R. D. - - 11 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snappers
Foster, R. D--------------- 19 lbs.
Tarpon
Foster, R. D. --------------26 lbs. 8 ozs.
Rosendahl, G. A. - 20 lbs. 8 ozs.
Hogfish
Foster. R. D - 6 lbs. Nichols, E. M. ----- 5 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mackerel (Spanish)
Abbott, G. H. ---------------7 lbs.


Little League Fund

Grows With Sales


Little League activities for 1953 are beginning to shape up with increased ticket sales for the benefit being held to raise money for the purchase of baseball equipment, and a continuation of the work on the new baseball diamond.
The field, located between Fourth and Fifth Streets in Villamar was graded by the local Seabee battalion and is now being finished up by volunteer workers from the American Legion, Fleet Reserve, and Sojourners' Club, the three organizations sponsoring Little League. It is hoped that the field will be ready for play by the end of the week, at which time tryouts for the League teams will begin.


In High Gear


At Marine Detachment

Intra-mural softball at Marine Site swung into high gear with three league games being played. On 19 August the Officers and Staff NCO's beat the 2nd Section Guard Platoon team 19-16, but the following day the 2nd Section squad bounced back with a win. walloping the 1st Section Guard Platoon, 19-11. On 24 August the Headquarters team shut out the Officers and Staff NCO's by a score of 11-0, causing the standing to shape up as follows: Team Won Lost Headquarters -----------2 0
Officers and Staff NCOs __ 1 1 2nd Section Guard Platoon 1 1 1st Section Guard Platoon 0 2
Activity in the Naval Station Softball League was temporarily cancelled for the week due to the presence of the midshipmen who are using the diamonds. Teams will resume play on Monday, however.


THE INDIANPav~e Threes


Tourney Announced

The 10th Naval District golf championship tournament will be played on the Guantanamo Bay golf course, it was announced last week by LT E. A. Sandness, Special Services Officer. The tourney will be conducted on September 18, 19 and 20.
Local linksters played a 72-hole elimination match last week to determine who will represent Guantanamo in the coming meet. LT Anthony Grego topped the competition with a 291 and W. R. North, current club champion, chalked up a 295. Following in order were 0. E. Smith, 310, H. H. Skinner, 326, W. Narwich, 332 and H. Kreusche with 342.
1 The local team will be matched against representatives from all commands in the 10th Naval District.


East Lansing, Alich. (AFkPS)Michigan State football coach Biggie Munn and staff recently travelled to Germany as guests of the Army to conduct a five-day football clinic for more than 180 coaches of the Armed Forces teams in Europe.
Also sitting in on the Spartan mentor's gridiron sessions were twenty coaches of high schools serving American dependents in the European command.
NAS, Floyd Bennett Field, N. Y. (AFPS)-Drivers are tuning up for the first sport car races to be held in metropolitan New York since 1910. The races are scheduled here for Saturday, Aug. 29. Races for all types of sport cars will benefit the joint services personnel welfare fund at the field.

SPORTS QUIZ

Questions
(AFPS)-. What Major League hurler pitched two games in one day on five different occasions?
2. How many square feet of surface does the average putting green have .
3. What Major League club holds the all-time season high for attendance at home?
4. What was the slowest speed ever recorded to win the "Indianapolis 500"?
Answers
1. Joseph J. McGinnity, "Iron Man"' of the National League in the early 1900's. He also seta record of 434 innings pitched iil 1903.
2. Five thousand to seven thousand square feet.
3. The Cleveland Indians in 1948 drew 2,620,627 fans for an all-time record attendance.
4. An average of 74.59 mph turned in by Ray Haroun driving a Marmon racing car in 1911, was fast enough to win the first "500" mile race.


The naval base will have a new bathing area soon when a Phillips Park project providing a 200-ft. concrete waterfront causeway and a beautiful still-water lagoon is completed.
Construction of the swimming facilities was necessary as a replacement for the Cable Beach area which will be placed out of bounds to personnel in the near future.
The new "swimming hole" will be located at the north end of the park.
Included in the project is the building of locker rooms, shower rooms and a large parking area.
Construction so far has been restricted to the blasting of large boulders which had to be eliminated before the major building could be started. This week, however, workmen started to pour concrete for the ramp and series of steps leading down one of the cliffs to the swimming area.
It is expected that it will be several months before the entire project can be completed.


By S/SGT. HOYT L. GIMLIN, USAF

(AFPS Staff Writer)
Almost all Americans at one time or another have had the rewarding experience of seeing an athlete of championship merits who was successfully competing despite a physical handicap. Few persons who saw Pete Gray field and throw with his one arm from the outfield for the St. Louis Browns in 1944 season, Hungarian Koroly Takacs won could fail to be impressed. the world's pistol championship in
Pete caught the ball in his gloved 1939 after losing his right handhand, removed the glove with a learned to shoot with his left. Jim sweeping motion across his chest, Nichols, an American golfer with at the same time grabbed the ball only a left arm, has, averaged 73 in the palm of his hand and made in his professional tournaments the throw to the infield, and has shot as low as 63.
Gray faded from the majors Deafness is not a limit in team when the old regulars returned sports as evidenced by the numfrom the war-but that didn't dim ber of high schools for the deaf the fans' impression. Too, there that have football teams. Blind was Monty Stratton, the White Sox students actually have played ace, who lost a leg in a hunting football by the aid of a sound accident but came back to the device attached to the football. mound fortified with an artificial This spring a team from the one, for limited success in the University of Illinois won the Fifth minors. Annual Wheelchair Basketball AsMiller Anderson, who has but sociation Tournament. To qualify, one leg, won the U. S. diving a player must have lost his legs, championship in 1942 and placed or else be paralyzed from the second in the 1948 Olympic Games. waist down. Sepp Swicknagl, an Australian
double amputee, lost his legs below
the knees from a grenade explosion L A F F S in 1942, now earns his living by "When will your father's leg be teaching tennis in the summer and well so he can come to work?" skiing in winter. "Not for a long time I think."
The German, national ski jump- "Why?"
ing c h a m p i o n in 1949, Toni "Because compensation's set in." Trutcher, jumped distances of 71 * * * and 79 meters without a right leg. Guard; "Soldier, are you going A leading U. S. shotput artist, to kiss that girl." Bill Lambert, is blind. Soldier: "No sir."
Hans Redl, an Austrian, became Guard: "Then hold my flashthe tennis champion of his coun- light." try, and at one time a Davis cup
team member, He had but one Housewife: "Are those eggs arm. Bill Talbert, a perennial top fresh ?" ranking American tennis player, Grocer: "Lady, feel those eggs has been a diabetic, and so is up and see if they're cool enough to and coming Ham Richardson. sell yet."
9p


Phillips Park Project 1 Oth N, o, Golf
Tn Inrnva Rwimminr


THE INDIAN


Pa Thr









Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4078D


THE INDIAN


9


Saturday, 29 August 1953


Columbia's "From Here to Eternity" has recorded the highest gross ever attained by a motion picture, playing without a stage show anywhere in the world, in its first five days at New York's Capitol Theater. Take was $126,557. Just sort of proves a point about people being willing to pay for GOOD pictures . . . Mrs. Errol Flynn, better known as Patrice Wymore, back in town to wrap up his financial affairs. Says hubby Errol will return to the U.S. contrary to all rumors . . . Things have reached a sad state-even Popeye has turned to 3-D! First release will be "Popeye-The Ace of Space."-Another ideal shattered. We thought Popeye was above all this mortal nonsence of 3-D and space ships, but we were wrong . . . Latest craze in the Mid-west that has the film industry rocking is the introduction of a drive-in with individual screens for each car . . . Dragnet title being changed for re-sale. Officials turned down the proposed "The Cop"-BBC-TV has pulled one of the big surprises of the year with the successful introduction of 3-D television . . . Richard Bissell's towboat story of the Mississippi "Stretch Along the River," has been purchased by Columbia. It will be one of their top productions of the '53-54 schedule. It is currently selling in the pocket book form, if you care.



Hospital Notes

Heirport News: Amelia Jane Ingersoll, born 19 August is the daughter of SN and Mrs. M. M. Ingersoll. GMC and Mrs. G. E. Berry are happy to anounce the arrival of their daughter Josephine Patricia, born 21 August. LTJG and J. L. English are the proud parents of a son, Carl Arthur, born 24 August.
Mrs. H. Bowler, the American Red Cross representative from this hospital, recently departed on TAD to Quarry Heights, Canal Zone, where she will attend American Red Cross conferences.
We would like to remind all officers of this command of the plans for the winter bowling league which will be getting underway soon. The hospital took top honors in the last summer bowling league and second place in the last winter bowling league. So let's all get in there and roll to keep'up the good record in the forthcoming event .


WGBY Program Schedule


0700 Morning 0715 News 0730 Morning 0800 Lucky U 0825 Solitary 0830 Bob & R 0900 House of 1000 Curt Ma 1015 Ronnie 1030 Bob Hop 1040 John Co 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Ba 1200 Way Ba 1215 News

Saturday
0700 Morning 0715 News 0730 Morning 0800 Jewish R 0830 Space Ps 0900 Gene Au 0930 Tarzan
1000 Tales of 1030 Let's Pr 1100 Lina Ro 1115 You And 1130 Met Oper 1200 Steve Al 1215 News 1230 Saturday In - "--^


Regular Programs--_Monday Through Friday

Caravan 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 Jack Kirkwood
Caravan 1345 Behind the Story Ranch 1400 Musical Matinee Singer 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS [ay 1700 Storyteller Time Music 1755 Sam Balter asey 1800 From The Pressbox Kemper 1815 News e 1845 Requestfully Yours ntie 1930 Twilight Serenade 2025 This I Believe
andwagon 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out ck Home 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show

2130 Twenty Questions
Caravan 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theater Caravan 2300 New York Philharmonic Religious Program 2400 Sign Off atrol
try Monday 0845 Charleen Hawks
the Texas Ranger 1045 Jo Stafford etend 1730 Cavalcade of America may 1830 Inside Track The World 2000 Groucho Marx ra Auditions 2030 Big Story len 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee
Swing Session 2200 Symphonette


- n rvl. r-es -u 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News
1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1980 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out
2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News
0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News
1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 Moments With The Masters 1400 What's My Line? 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Ozzie & Harriet, 1730 Greatest Story 1500 Eddie Fisher 1815 News
1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy


Tuesday
0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 Dragnet 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall


Wednesday
0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 Portrait of a City 1830 Sports Foram 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents

Thursday
0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Jo Stafford
1730 American Heritage 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Horace Heidt 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America

Friday
0845 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense
2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


Way Back Home


On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon.
Monday, Aug. 31-Fargo, North Dakota; Defiance, Ohio; Jacksonville, Illinois.
Tuesday, Sept. 1-Monett, Missouri; Hollywood, Calif.; Fort Worth, Texas.
Wednesday, Sept. 2-Anniston,


Alabama; Los Angeles, Calif.; Jackson, Tennessee.
Thursday, Sept. 3 -Thomson, Georgia; Lewiston, Maine; Cheyenne, Wyoming; Adrian, Michigan.
Friday, Sept. 4-Del Rio, Texas; Wenatchee, Washington; Wheeling, West Virginia; Green Bay, Wisconsin.


� 9


GRASS ROOTS?


This young lady, one Lana Bashama by name, evidently wants to show us that there is more than just sand to be seen down Miami way. The two-piece bathing suit which is a sort of union card in some parts of Florida does not detract from the scenery in the least.




Movie Schedule


Saturday, 29 August PONY EXPRESS (T)
R. Fleming C. Heston
Sunday, 30 August
BY THE LIGHT OF THE SILVERY
MOON (T)
D. Day G. MacRae
Monday, 31 August LAW AND ORDER
R. Reagan bD. Malone
Tuesday, 1 September
THE SUN SHINES BRIGHT
C. Winninger J. Russell
Wednesday, 2 September
PICK UP ON SOUTH STREET
R. Widmark J. Peters
Thursday, 3 September
SOMBRERO (T)
P. Angeli R. Montalban
Friday, 4 September
A SLIGHT CASE OF LARCENY
M. Rooney E. Bracken



JEST A SECOND


A cowpoke rode his pony into the saloon and ordered the pony four straight shots.
"What about yourself?" asked the barkeep.
"No thanks, I'm driving."

Mountain climber: "Do people fall often?"
Guide: "No, only once."

Groom: "Who spilled mustard on this waffle "
Bride: "Oh, honey, how could you? This is a lemon pie."

"What brought you here?"
"Two policemen."
"Drunk, I suppose."
"Yes sir, both of them."

Parking place -something you see when you haven't got your car.

Hear about the man who hadla waterproof, shockproof, unbreakable, anti-magnetic watch? He lost it.




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9 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 29 August 1953 "Freedoms Foundation" Contest Deadline Set For Oct, 15 Washington (AFPS) -Deadline for entering the Freedoms Foundation's "letters from service personnel" contest is only about two months away. Letters may be submitted by Service personnel on the subject "What America Means To Me" and must be received before midnight, Oct. 15, 1953. Men and women who are on active duty in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps or Coast Guard, either in the U.S. or overseas, may submit letters of not more than 500 words on America or some phase of American life. Soundness of ideas and clear thinking, rather than literary form, will be the basis for judging letters. Entries are to be sent to Awards Editor, Armed Forces Radio Service, 1016 North McCadden Place, Los Angeles 38, Calif., and must have the signature, rank, service number and organization of the entrant'. Awards will be in the form of cash and George Washington Honor Medal Awards. The principal award will be $1000 and an Honor Medal. In addition there will be 20 awards of $100 and Honor Medals, and 10 or more Honor Medals alone. The contest is being sponsored jointly by the Freedoms Foundation, Valley Forge, Pa., and the Office of Armed Forces Information and Education of the Defense Department. Winners' names will be announced Feb. 22, 1954. Navy Em's Eligible For NROTC Training Qualified enlisted personnel may again participate this year in the Navy college aptitude test for entry as midshipmen into the NROTC, the Navy Department has announced. There are 200 positions open to enlisted personnel on active duty. Successful candidates will be appointed midshipman in the Naval Reserve and will receive a commission as ensign in the Navy or 2nd lieutenant in the Marine Corps upon successful completion of the four-year course. NROTC students may pursue any course leading to a baccalaureate, or higher, degree with the exception of medicine, dentistry, veterinary, theology, pharmacy, music or art. Candidates must be between their 17th and 21st birthday, unmarried, physically qualified and a high school graduate or possess an equivalent certificate. All qualified personnel may apply to their COs for permission to take the Navy college aptitude test on Dec. 12, 1953. All nominations should reach the Bureau of Personnel by Oct. 20. -(AFPS). ADM Arthur W. Radford Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff The new Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, ADM Arthur W. Radford, USN, is a veteran naval aviator. He was graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1916. During WWI he served in the Atlantic Fleet and then, for a year following the war, in the Pacific Fleet. In April 1920 he reported to the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla., where he took flight training. He was graduated as Naval Aviator #2896 in November 1920. Active in Aviation ADM Radford received a variety of assignments during the peacetime years including duty with the newly established Bureau of Aeronautics, OIC of the Alaskan Survey Detachment, and several tours of sea duty in both staff and flying capacities. From the beginning of WWII until April 1943 he was Director of Aviation Training in the Bureau of Aeronautics. He was credited U. S. Air Force Will Utilize N.A.S. As Training Stop Navy Guantanamo will soon become acquainted with the U. S. Air Force. According to present plans, the Navigation Training Command at Harlingen Air Force Base, Texas, will send training flights to Guantanamo Bay Commencing in October as part of a regular training program. by the Navy with developing the The T-29s (nitnr expanded program of aviation will leave Harlingen A.F.B. twice training which provided the vast weekly for Guantanamo Bay. Each numbers of skilled pilots needed plane will have 12 officer students in the war. aboard plus instructors and the Commands Task Force usual flight crew. In April 1943 he was transferred 5 -7 Hour Flight to the Pacific where he became During the 1,500 mile flight beCommander Carrier Div. 2 and teen Harlingen and Guantanamo, later Carrier Div. 11. He led a the 36 students will participate in carrier task force group in action an over-water navigation problem both prior to and during the as a climax to their twelve weeks landings on Baker, Makin, and of training. Depending upon weaTarawa Islands. their conditions, the flights should Heads CarDiv 6 last between five and seven hours. He became Chief of Staff to the The planes will arrive at McCalla Commander Aircraft Pacific in Field either in the late afternoon December 1943 and then returned or early evening. to Washington as Assistant Deputy Overnight Stop Chief of Naval Operations (Air), The planes will depart the folin May 1944. He resumed Pacific lowing morning for HarlingenFleet duty as commander of Carwhich is just above the Mexican rier Div. 6 in November and diborder in Texas. (The flight is rected--atacks-on -Japan, Iwo Jima about two an one-half times as long and Okinawa. as the flight between Guantanamo CinCPac Bay and Miami, Florida.) Following the war, ADM RadThe Navigation Training Coiford carried out several major mand at Harlingen was recently assignments including that of opened to train prospective navigaCommander in Chief, Pacific, from tion officers for the Military Air April 30, 1949 to June 1953. At Transport Command and the that time he was ordered to Strategic Air Command. Washington in preparation for assuming his new duties. (AFPS) M IC B' S 4 and 7 Doe: The pain in your leg i Locations caused fo by old age.GTn an: Old age nothing; the other leg's the same age and it don't hurt." TEN-INCH LINES ARE IMPORTANT to a seaplane salvage derrick, and here 0. H. Wilborn, BM2, demonstrates to C. D. Barrand, SN, (left) and R. J. Saltzman, SN, (right) the correct method of splicing one of these heavy-duty manillas. The three men are stationed on board the YSD-21. The mobility of mobile construction battalions was demonstrated Tuesday as Mobile Construction Battalion 7 changed places with Mobile Construction Battalion 4. Arriving from SeaBee headquarters at Davisville, R. I., aboard the USS Sanborn (PA-193), MCB-7 is scheduled to undertake the projects formerly worked upon by MCB-4 and as yet uncompleted. These projects are all on the Leeward side of the naval base and are primarily connected with Naval Air Station facilities. Following the debarkation of MCB-7 Tuesday morning, the officers and men of MCB-4 boarded the Sanborn for Davisville. The battalion arrived at Guantanamo Bay last April and had undertaken over 25 heavy construction projects -such as the construction of roads and barracks. The officers and men of MCB-7 are no strangers to Guantanamo Bay. Prior to their last over-seas tour at Port Lyautey, the battalion was stationed here in 1952. The movement of mobile construction battalions, say MCB-4 spokesmen, is for morale and training purposes. "Tell me, sailor, what do they call a man who refuses to fight?' "A bachelor." QAe Vol. V, No. 50 I

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Saturday, 29 August 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 29 August 1953 4 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Lieutenant E. A. Sandness--Officer Adviser H. E. Davis, JOCManaging Editor Al Henderson, JOLNews Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3-------Sports S. E. Cobbs, PHSNPhotographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. Blood Donors Needed Volunteer Blood Donors are urgently needed in order to secure whole blood to meet the requirements for blood transfusions at the Naval Hospital. Anyone, civilian or military, who wishes to donate blood may visit the Laboratory, Naval Hospital, for screening and selection between the hours 0800 to 1500 on Monday through Friday. Your blood may save someone's life. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Barbara Burke and Linda Thurston Gitmo High reopened last Monday and a pleasant, carefree three months of Summer vacation came to a close ...10th grade leads in population ...Jimmy Cavanagh keeps wandering in and out of the sophomore homeroom at all hours of the day; James, my boy, you'll have to realize you're a junior noW .. A hearty "Bon Voyage" to Pat Parks and Jerry Murphy who left us last week-Jerry to Washington and Lee for the "home stretch", and Pat to Miami High ...Come to think of it, the rest of the college crowd will be leaving very shortly: Bill Barret, Pat Burke, Jeaneene Hummel and Bob Wilkinson all leaving around the 12th of September ...DID YOU SEE? Norman Huddy striving to finish up his two-line poem? ...Carol being taken home in her special car, right to the door, yet? .. The senior class' zombie (contribution from Mrs. Mathews) ? .. Flip giving her first political speech and latching on to the title of Captain Bruner, II, in P. E.? .. The aforementioned Flip's blue toenails ? ...Anita drowning her sorrows in a milk shake at the PX? (Her only sorrow is school opening.) Shall we form a club? NOTICE All employees who work on the Naval Base and live in Cuba are required to register in the Customs Office at Guantanamo, according to a notice issued recently by Arturo B. Canet Perez, Customs Administrator. A Message from Garcia .i 0 U Maceo Family -A Symbol of Cuba By Henry Garcia Some who read "The Indian" have asked me to write about Maceo. I shall do so with pleasure, since Maceo shares with Marti the place of honor in the history of Cuba. We had many brave warriors and many men of intelligence dedicated to the noble task of freeing this country from the hands of Spain. But two figures distinguish themselves among all the others, and they are Jose Marti and Antonio Maceo. Marti, the White and Maceo, the Negro, fighting shoulder to shoulder as an everlasting symbol of union. Marti, the intellect put to the service of a great task; Maceo, the courage and fortitude necessary to accomplish that task. I shall not write about Maceo today, though. I am going to dedicate this column to his mother, Mariana Grajales. I am going to write about this magnificent woman, about this wonderful patriot, who sacrificed everything for the sake of Cuba. As some of the readers know, Macen had been killed at the Mother's Day in Cuba is also known front! The lion hearted general as Mariana Grajales' Day, in who had so many times been close homage to a Cuban mother who to Death, had finally succumbed (parodying the well-known tragto her cold embrace .Mariana edy), "did not love her sons less, but loved Cuba more." Mariana received the news with just a little sent her sons to the war, and when groan, while her fists became so the youngest, Jose was killed and tight that they almost bled, and Antonio, after having been woundwithout a tear or a sigh, she went ed several times in the battle field, into her house. "She hasn heart," had kissed his mother goodbye, again t Mment o the neighand went back once more to war, rs u r, alone in h his wounds not completely healed roo, as a b ir without a yet, something happened that has ns as a brnc without lea been given account of in countless oraapolwtutaebgn aengvn paysun thi country to cry, and the tears she had held poems and plays this country .so many There were a few women in the back tmes fld neighborhood watching the departure never again receive the kisses of ture of Maceo and they made her sons. "She cries," said one of remarks about this mother who the neighbors. "The heart of the stood there coldly, without uttering mother has at last flourished!" even a sigh, bidding farewell to her Mariana answered. "I don't cr for son with these historical words, y "You are going to fight for your ci Ion .I cry for country, son ...Let's see how my Ioncy bore I cry for well you do it!" Mariana, the ft bec I hav n or mother, cold and firm as a rock, t gi r h n m s stood there, watching her son dise to my count appear in the sands of the road. why I cry .That's why! "She has no heart," commented the neighbors, "she doesn't cry when wy one sadedreceid te n s wh sed of the F From 11 to 14 Months Washington (AFPS)-The tour of duty for leathernecks serving in Korea will gradually be increased from 11 months to 14 months, according to the following announcement issued by Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps. "In view of the truce in Korea, the Marine Corps plans to conduct the future rotation of marines from Korea on a 'stretch-out' basis. that combat marines serve approximately 11 months in Korea. It is expected that this tour will be increased gradually during the next few months. "By about March 1954, it is anticipated that most marines will be serving on 14-month tours in Korea, while 16-month tours may finally be established, if such extension of Korean service proves necessary. "The 'stretch-out' rotation policy continues the practice under which all marines due for discharge are returned to the U. S. in ample time for their scheduled separation from the service." THRIFT SHOP The Thrift Shop is now open Monday through Friday from 0900 to 1130. Dozens of articles are on sale at low prices, and all profits go to Navy Relief. 0 Sunday, 30 August 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) A choir of 48 NROTC Midshipmen from cruise "B" will sing at the 1100 chapel services Sunday. The choir will also sing at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum beginning at 1930. The quickest way to drive home an argument is to ignore instructions from the back seat. future To Have Norfolk, Va. (AFPS)-The Navy has overhauled and converted the destroyer USS Meredith into an experimental shipan effort to make living conditions more desirable aboard ship. Sponge rubber mattresses, fluorescent lighting, more showers and wash basins, and new messing facilities are just a few of the new features found aboard the 2200 ton de$CUTI1.UU.l stroyer. Hot food will be transported from the galley to the men at tables in the messhall by dumbwaiter. In the messhall are new type tables and benches smartly upholstered in simulated leather. The destroyer's washrooms are equipped with small gear lockers for toilet articles. Bulkheads and overheads will be painted in two-tone colors easy on the eyes. The living compartments have been designed to provide more space, and bunks have been reallocated. Beneath the bottom bunks are new types of gear lockers and sliding drawers. i thj n >ms r <> >. r':J The improvements are the results of a two year survey covering 200 ships and an opinion poll of 7,300 officers and men of the Atlantic Fleet. Although it cost a half million dollars to convert the living quar1abo, Dayl 7 sepember terms, the restudy of ships and their complements may lead to an apholiday on the Naval Base. proximate 10 per cent reduction in All but necessary work, drills the number of men assigned to and exercises will be susnaval vessels. The annual savings for the Atlantic Fleet alone could ended on that day. reach $100,000,000. ,~ < 9Iwn h ae akadsre Page Two THE INDIAN 9 Marine K-Duty Tours Lh F M Will Be increased oOft ighlt3, -O0 Mattresses

PAGE 3

Saturday, 29 August 1953 r S sports LAND DIVISION Barracuda Marcinule, P.-23 lbs. 8 ozs. Mrs. R. F. Richter19 lbs. 8 ozs. Harris, W. K.-16 lbs. 12 ozs. Jacks Whitmore, F. M. --17 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A.-12 lbs. Blake, 0. C.-9 lbs. Mackerel (King) McNeil, D. A.30 lbs. Snapper Dunree, W. L. --43 lbs. 8 ozs. Kelly, C. L. __ ____ 33 lbs. 4 ozs. Loewenhagen, A. H. 16 lbs. 8 oss. Snook Loewenhagen, A. H. 13 lbs. Tarpon Brock, R. ---26 lbs. Ciccarelli, B. --------23 lbs. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Ray, C. F. --32 lbs. Hardin, J. ---22 lbs. 8 ozs. Baily, H. E.---16 lbs. Jacks Whitmore, F. M. --10 lbs. 13 ozs. Suslick, A. D. ---6 lbs. Sanborn, J. L. --5 lbs. Mackerel (King) Scott, B. R. ---9 lbs. 8 ozs. Snapper Pass, J. S. __-_ -_-_ 41 lbs. 4 ozs. Lightfoot, L. H. --35 lbs. Gennaria, R. H. --32 lbs. Snook Leverett, W. R. ----------14 lbs. 8 ozs. Shepherd, W. L.-11 lbs. 8 ozs. Forsee, N. E. ---9 lbs. 12 ozs. Tarpon Loomis, C. E. --47 lbs. 12 ozs. Beman, E. F. .--25 lbs. Bailey, H. E. --14 lbs. 7 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Chandler, C. A. -4 lbs. 8 ozs. Croakers Williams, H. H.-'2 lbs. Cole, J. -3 1 lb. 8 ozs. Sutherling, E. W.--------1 lb. 3 oss. Pompana French, C. D. n 16 lbs. 8 ozs. Hinkle, R. A. --9 lbs. Greater, S. W.-4 lbs. Shark Hummel, C. A.--200 lbs. Dinoch, T. ___l 83 bs. Lins, S. B. ----49 lbs. Triggerfish Borborian, S., Jr.-3 lbs. 8 ozs. SPEAR FISHING DIVISION Grouper Nichols, E. M. ---7 lbs. 8 ozs. Marcinule, P. --7 lbs. 3 ozs. Wreath, F. ---2 lbs. Jacks Matson, J. F. --14 lbs. Foster, R. D. --11 lbs. 8 ozs. Snappers Foster, R. D. ----19 lbs. Tarpon Foster, R. D. --26 lbs. 8 ozs. Rosendahl, G. A.--20 lbs. 8 ozs. Hogfish Foster, R. D. 6--lbs. Nichols, E. M. --5 lbs. 8 os. Mackerel (Spanish) Abbott, G. H. _____ 7 lbs. Little League Fund Grows With Sales Little League activities for 1953 are beginning to shape up with increased ticket sales for the benefit being held to raise money for the purchase of baseball equipment, and a continuation of the work on the new baseball diamond. The field, located between Fourth and Fifth Streets in Villamar was graded by the local Seabee battalion and is now being finished up by volunteer workers from the American Legion, Fleet Reserve, and Sojourners' Club, the three organizations sponsoring Little League. It is hoped that the field will be ready for play by the end of the week, at which time tryouts for the League teams will begin. In High Gear At Marine Detachment Intra-mural softball at Marine Site swung into high gear with three league games being played. On 19 August the Officers and Staff NCO's beat the 2nd Section Guard Platoon team 19-16, but the following day the 2nd Section squad bounced back with a win. walloping the 1st Section Guard Platoon, 19-11. On 24 August the Headquarters team shut out the Officers and Staff NCO's by a score of 11-0, causing the standing to shape up as follows: Team Won Lost Headquarters ------------2 0 Officers and Staff NCOs __ 1 1 2nd Section Guard Platoon 1 1 1st Section Guard Platoon 0 2 Activity in the Naval Station Softball League was temporarily cancelled for the week due to the presence of the midshipmen who are using the diamonds. Teams will resume play on Monday, however. Phillips Park Project To Improve Swimming The naval base will have a new bathing area soon when a Phillips Park project providing a 200-ft. concrete waterfront causeway and a beautiful still-water lagoon is completed. Construction of the swimming facilities was necessary as a replacement for the Cable Beach area which will be placed out of bounds to personnel in the near future. The new "swimming hole" will be locatedat the north end of the park. Included in the project is the building of locker rooms, shower rooms and a large parking area. Construction so far has been restricted to the blasting of large boulders which had to be eliminated before the major building could be started. This week, however, workmen started to pour concrete for the ramp and series of steps leading down one of the cliffs to the swimming area. It is expected that it will be several months before the entire project can be completed. ~BENCH By S/SGT. HOYT L. GIMLIN, USAF (AFPS Staff Writer) Almost all Americans at one time or another have had the rewarding experience of seeing an athlete of championship merits who was successfully competing despite a physical handicap. Few persons who saw Pete Gray field and throw with his one arm from the outfield for the St. Louis Browns in 1944 season, Hungarian Koroly Takacs won could fail to be impressed. the world's pistol championship in Pete caught the ball in his gloved 1939 after losing his right handhand, removed the glove with a learned to shoot with his left. Jim sweeping motion across his chest, Nichols, an American golfer with at the same time grabbed the ball only a left arm, has, averaged 73 in the palm of his hand and made in his professional tournaments the throw to the infield. .and has shot as low as 63. Gray faded from the majors Deafness is not a limit in team when the old regulars returned sports as evidenced by the numfrom the war-but that didn't dim her of high schools for the deaf the fans' impression. Too, there that have football teams. Blind was Monty Stratton, the White Sox students actually have played ace, who lost a leg in a hunting football by the aid of a sound accident but came back to the device attached to the football. mound fortified with an artificial This spring a team from the one, for limited success in the University of Illinois won the Fifth minors. Annual Wheelchair Basketball AsMiller Anderson, who has but sociation Tournament. To qualify, one leg, won the U. S. diving a player must have lost his legs, championship in 1942 and placed or else be paralyzed from the second in the 1948 Olympic Games. waist down. Sepp Swicknag1, an Australian double amputee, lost his legs below the knees from a grenade explosion L A F F S in 1942, now earns his living by "When will your father's leg be teaching tennis in the summer and well so he can come to work?" skiing in winter. "Not for a long time I think." The German national ski jump"Why?" ing champion in 1949, Toni "Because compensation's set in." Trutcher, jumped distances of 71 and 79 meters without a right leg. Guard; "Soldier, are you going A leading U. S. shotput artist, to kiss that girl." Bill Lambert, is blind. Soldier: "No sir." Hans Red1, an Austrian, became Guard: "Then hold my flashthe tennis champion of his counlight." try, and at one time a Davis cup team member. He had but one Housewife: "Are those eggs arm. Bill Talbert, a perennial top fresh?" ranking American tennis player, Grocer: "Lady, feel those eggs has been a diabetic, and so is up and see if they're cool enough to and coming Ham Richardson. sell yet" 9 Fishing Entries Intra-Mural Softball THE INDIAN 10th N, 0, Golf Tourney Announced The 10th Naval District golf championship tournament will be played on the Guantanamo Bay golf course, it was announced last week by LT E. A. Sandness, Special Services Officer. The tourney will be conducted on September 18, 19 and 20. Local linksters played a 72-hole elimination match last week to determine who will represent Guantanamo in the coming meet. LT Anthony Grego topped the competition with a 291 and W. R. North, current club champion, chalked up a 295. Following in order were 0. E. Smith, 310, H. H. Skinner, 326, W. Narwich, 332 and H. Kreusche with 342. The local team will be matched against representatives from all commands in the 10th Naval District. East Lansing, Mich. (AFPS)Michigan State football coach Biggie Munn and staff recently travelled to Germany as guests of the Army to conduct a five-day football clinic for more than 180 coaches of the Armed Forces teams in Europe. Also sitting in on the Spartan mentor's gridiron sessions were twenty coaches of high schools serving American dependents in the European command. NAS, Floyd Bennett Field, N. Y. (AFPS)-Drivers are tuning up for the first sport car races to be held in metropolitan New York since 1910. The races are scheduled here for Saturday, Aug. 29. Races for all types of sport cars will benefit the joint services personnel welfare fund at the field. SPORTS QUIZ Questions (AFPS)-1. What Major League hurler pitched two games in one day on five different occasions? 2. How many square feet of surface does the average putting green have.M 3. What Major League club holds the all-time season high for attendance at home? 4. What was the slowest speed ever recorded to win the "Indianapolis 500"? Answers 1. Joseph J. McGinnity, "Iron Man"' of the National League in the early 1900's. He also set a record of 434 innings pitched iii 1903. 2. Five thousand to seven thousand square feet. 3. The Cleveland Indians in 1948 drew 2,620,627 fans for an all-time record attendance. 4. An average of 74.59 mph turned in by Ray Haroun driving a Marmon racing car in 1911, was fast enough to win the first "500" mile race. Pare Three Page Three

PAGE 4

Navy--1ONDPPO-Gtmo. 4078D THE INDIAN 9 Saturday, 29 August 1953 Columbia's "From Here to Eternity" has recorded the highest gross ever attained by a motion picture, playing without a stage show anywhere in the world, in its first five days at New York's Capitol Theater. Take was $126,557. Just sort of proves a point about people being willing to pay for GOOD pictures ...Mrs. Errol Flynn, better known as Patrice Wymore, back in town to wrap up his financial affairs. Says hubby Errol will return to the U.S. contrary to all rumors ...Things have reached a sad state-even Popeye has turned to 3-D! First release will be "Popeye-The Ace of Space."-Another ideal shattered. We thought Popeye was above all this mortal nonsence of 3-D and space ships, but we were wrong ...Latest craze in the Mid-west that has the film industry rocking is the introduction of a drive-in with individual screens for each car ...Dragnet title being changed for re-sale. Officials turned down the proposed "The Cop"-BBC-TV has pulled one of the big surprises of the year with the successful introduction of 3-D television ...Richard Bissell's towboat story of the Mississippi "Stretch Along the River," has been purchased by Columbia. It will be one of their top productions of the '53-54 schedule. It is currently selling in the pocket book form, if you care. Hospital Notes Heirport News: Amelia Jane Ingersoll, born 19 August is the daughter of SN and Mrs. M. M. Ingersoll. GMC and Mrs. G. E. Berry are happy to anounce the arrival of their daughter Josephine Patricia, born 21 August. LTJG and J. L. English are the proud parents of a son, Carl Arthur, born 24 August. Mrs. H. Bowler, the American Red Cross representative from this hospital, recently departed on TAD to Quarry Heights, Canal Zone, where she will attend American Red Cross conferences. We would like to remind all officers of this command of the plans for the winter bowling league which will be getting underway soon. The hospital took top honors in the last summer bowling league and second place in the last winter bowling league. So let's all get in there and roll to keep'up the good record in the forthcoming event WGBY Program Schedule Regular Programs-_Monday Through Friday 0700 Morning Caravan 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 0715 News 1330 Jack Kirkwood 0730 Morning Caravan 1345 Behind the Story 0800 Lucky U Ranch 1400 Musical Matinee 0825 Solitary Singer 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 0830 Bob & Ray 1700 Storyteller Time 0900 House of Music 1755 Sam Balter 1000 Curt Massey 1800 From The Pressbox 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1815 News 1030 Bob Hope 1042 Requeotfully Yours 1040 John Contie 1930 Twilight Serenade 1100 Startime 2025 This I Believe 1530 Bud's Bandwagon 2051 Knox Manning-Time Out 1200 Way Bach Home 2155 News 1215 News 2230 Sandman Show Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Met Opera Auditions 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News 0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1040 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News 1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 Moments With The Masters 1400 What's My Line? 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 News 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theater 2300 New York Philharmonic 2400 Sign Off Monday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 Dragnet 2030 Name That Tune 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 Portrait of a City 1830 Sports Forum 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents Thursday 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 American Heritage 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Horace Heidt 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall Way Back Home On your radio dial at 1450 every weekday at 12 noon. Monday, Aug. 31-Fargo, North Dakota; Defiance, Ohio; Jacksonville, Illinois. Tuesday, Sept. 1-Monett, Missouri; Hollywood, Calif.; Fort Worth, Texas. Wednesday, Sept. 2-Anniston, Alabama; Los Angeles, Calif.; Jackson, Tennessee. Thursday, Sept. 3 -Thomson, Georgia; Lewiston, Maine; Cheyenne, Wyoming; Adrian, Michigan. Friday, Sept. 4-Del Rio, Texas; Wenatchee, Washington; Wheeling, West Virginia; Green Bay, Wisconsin. 19 GRASS ROOTS? This young lady, one Lana Bashana by name, evidently wants to show us that there is more than just sand to be seen down Miami way. The two-piece bathing suit which is a sort of union card in some parts of Florida does not detract from the scenery in the least. Movie Schedule Saturday, 29 August PONY EXPRESS (T R. Fleming C. Heston Sunday, 30 August BY THE LIGHT OF THg SILVERY MOON (T) D. Day G. MacRae Monday, 31 August LAW AND ORDER R. Reagan B. Malone Tuesday, 2 September THE SUN SHINES BRIGHT C. Winninger J. Russell Wednesday, 3 September PICK UP ON SOUTH STREET R. Widmark J. Peters Thursday, 3 September SOMBRERO (T) P. Angeli R. Montalban Friday, 4 September A SLIGHT CASE OF LARCENY M. Rooney E. Bracken JEST A SECOND A cowpoke rode his pony into the saloon and ordered the pony four straight shots. "What about yourself?" asked the barkeep. "No thanks, I'm driving." Mountain climber: "Do people fall often?" Guide: "No, only once." Groom: "Who spilled mustard on this waffle Bride: "Oh, honey, how could you? This is a lemon pie." "What brought you here?" "Two policemen." "Drunk, I suppose." "Yes sir, both of them." Parking place -something you see when you haven't got your car. Hear about the man who had a waterproof, shockproof, unbreakable, anti-magnetic watch? He lost it.