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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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English

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University of Florida
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U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba


100,000th Cement


Block Turned Out


By MCB-1

The Villamar Replacement Housing Project came nearer to its goal recently as the 100,000th cement block was turned out by men of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE recently.
The block machine, set up and operated by MCB-ONE on Bargo Point, will supply all the building blocks needed to complete the replacement housing project.
A grand total of 434,530 blocks are needed to do the job, 180,000 of which will be turned out by MCB-ONE during its current operation.
'A crew of sixteen men under the direction of Henry Beamsderfer, BU2, and Homer Scott, SW3, man the single block machine responsible for the cement block production.


Pictured above (from left to right) are Henry Beamsderfer, BU2, and Kenny T. Hill, BUCN, removing 100,000th block produced by men of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE.


NavBase Nines


Feted at Dinner
The Naval Base feted and feasted its baseball players, coaches, and officials Monday night with a banquet at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club which included the presentation of team and individual trophies for outstanding diamond performances and marked the close of baseball activities for the 1953 season.
The ceremonies got underway with the awarding of a large first place trophy to the Naval Station Indians, League champions for 1953. The Indians, who got off to a very ordinary start, finished up with a spurt, winning 12 straight
(Continued on Page Three)


Radford, Carney


Represent Navy On


Defense Team

Admiral Arthur W. Radford, 57, was sworn in as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff last week, the first Navy man to hold the top job on the nation's defense team.
General Omar Bradley, leaving active duty after 42 years, administered the oath to Admiral Radford in a brief ceremony in the office of the Secretary of Defense, Charles E. Wilson. Since General Bradley holds the 5-star rank created during World War II, he cannot technically retire from active duty but must remain on "active duty without assignment."
An hour later, General Matthew B. Ridgway was sworn in as Army Chief of Staff to succeed General Lawton Collins who moves to the NATO organization as U. S. representative on the military committee.
On Monday, 17 August, Admiral Robert B. Carney accepted the post of Chief of Naval Operations $�ceeding Ai ma illiant Fechteler who takes the NATO Mediterranean command vacated by Carney.
Completing the defense set-up is General Nathan F. Twining who was sworn in as Air Force Chief of Staff last June.
The four- Radford, Ridgway, Carney and Twining-immediately face the task set down for them by the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Wilson said he wanted them to ''go over the entire defense picture."


Water Shortage

Still Critical;

Reserve Down

Due to heavy torrential rains there is a critical shortage in the base water supply, according to CDR J. N. Lawlor, Public Works Officer.
The heavy rains were responsible for an unusually high turbulence in the Yateras River, source of water for the base.
In turn, the turbulence caused a high percentage of foreign matter which could not be eliminated by the base filtration plant. So whenever turbulence reaches a certain point it becomes necessary to stop the intake of water to insure the purity of the base water.
This is what happened when torrential rains recently caused a loss of two days' water intake. Weather conditions since, have placed a high demand upon the reserve supply, and the shortage, instead of being replenished, is becoming acute. The present reserve of water is being slowly but surely reduced.

p


Saturday, 22 August 1953


Boy Scout Circus Opens Today

Today is circus day! Not a full-grown circus with a parade and three .rings, but a junior circus prepared by the scouts on the base.
Sponsored by the Boy Scouts, Explorer Scouts and Cub Scouts the circus will feature rides for the kids, games of skill and chance for kids of all ages, 6 to 60, and exhibitions and displays of scouting craft.
All week long scout headquarters has been echoing with the final preparations-hammer against nail and hammer against thumb-for the one-day stand. The gate opens at 1400 today and the festivities continue until 1800 at the seaplane ramp on Fisherman's Point. A mobile canteen will be on hand to provide soft drinks and hot dogs. Admission tickets may be purchased at the gate. Money derived from the circus will be used to defray scouting expenses for the coming year.


Yateras River


Closed to Anglers


For Two Seasons

The recent seeding of the Yateras River with bass fingerlings has necessitated the closing of the river to fishing, according to an announcement received from the base commander's office.
The action is necessary to allow at least two generations of the Florida bass to reach maturity before the stock is depleted. Similar precautions are necessary for the preservation of all wild life and are observed both in Cuba and the United States.
Of the 5,000 fingerlings, ferried from the Winter Haven hatchery in Florida, only 40% survived the rugged trip by plane. There is no possible way of knowing how many will survive their new surroundings since nothing comparable has been done before. However, each mature female is capable of reproducing 5,000 of its kind.
Most bass reach 6nly about 12 pounds, but the Florida large mouth bass has attained a 21 pound, 4 ounce record in its native Florida. Just what proportions they will reach in the Yateras is something for speculation and the dreams of anglers.
It is expected that the Yateras will remain closed to fishing for at least two years.
"I'm looking for a girl who doesn't smoke, drink nor neck." "What for?"


Among the featured attractions at the various booths will be a sponge throw, balloon-dart booth, cake booth and a fish pond. A new innovation in rides this year besides the regular donkey and train rides will be a -"hot rod" ride.
It is planned to make the scout circus an annual event.


Middies End

Summer Cruise

In Gtmo

Midshipmen Cruise "Charlie" arrived in the Guantanamo Bay area Thursday with the USS Roanoke, under the flag of RADM R. P. Glass, Commander, Cruiser Division TWO, leading.
Nine ships with over 1,100 middies and NROTC students will remain in this area, their last stop before returning to the United States, until 25 August.
On August 26th, Cruise "Baker", returning to the United States from a European cruise, will arrive headed by the USS Iowa flying the flag of RADM C. L. Green, Commander, Battleship Division TWO. The 10 ships and 1600 NROTC students will depart for the states on 31 August.


9


Vol. V, .No. 49








Papoe TwoTEINANStda,2Auut15


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 22 August 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer Editorial Staff
Lieutenant E. A. Sandness-'Officer Adviser H.,E. Davis, JOC ------ Managing Editor Al Henderson, JO3 ---------- News Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3 ------------------ Sports
Pierce Lehmbeck ------------------ Sports
S. E. Cobbs, PHSN --------- Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-85 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.


What Is A Sailor?

Between the innocence of babyhood and the dignity of manhood we find a delightful creature called a "Sailor". Sailors come in assorted sizes, weights, and colors, but all sailors have the creed; to kill as much time as possible of every inute, of every hour, of every day, and to protest of noise. Their only weapon-is -c-ional firingof guns, and sometimes an airplane roaring overhead.
Sailors are found everywhere, on the water, on all streets, in fast moving cars, taverns, and night clubs. Look real hard and you'll find them swinging from ropes, jumping through portholes, and peering through keyholes! Girls love them, soldiers hate them, the cooks ignore them, and the ship protests them. All sailors are truth, (with their fingers crossed), beauty in their' uniforms, wisdom with cigarettes in their socks, and the hope of the future with a girl in their arms. When you are busy, they usually follow, with a fantastic story of the sea-or elsewhere. When you want him to make a good impression, his brain turns to jelly, or else he'll deny that he is in the Navy. A fine lad, this Navy boy.
Above all -material things, a sailor likes GIRLS, strong drinks, comic books, night clubs, and MAIL CALL. He's not much for standing watch, beans for breakfast, shining shoes, washing uniforms, Captain's Mast, or just plain 'ol WORK!
Nobody else gets so much fun out of talking, water, or breezes. No one else has such small pockets, with no place for poker chips, cards, billfolds, and other personal belongings; but he usually finds room. A sailor is a magical creature., You can lock him out of your home, but you can't lock him out of your heart. You may get him to pay the bill once, but not all the time. Might as well give up, he's your captor, your jailor, and your sailor; and when you come home at night with only the shattered pieces of your hopes and dreams, he can mend them like new, with a letter which begins"Hi Darling!" Yes, he's your sailor now-No one else wants him! 1 !


A Message from Garcia:

Marti, Cuban Patriot
By Henry Garcia

After a silence of a few weeks because of illness, I am glad to to be back with the kind readers of The Indian. Today I am going to tell you another chapter in the life of the great Cuban patriot, Jose Marti. So far, we know that Marti, in spite of his humble birth and adverse environment, distinguished himself in various fields of learning,. We also know that he was a poet, a philosopher, and a lover of children. And we know that he sacrificed his life in the battlefield, fighting for the independence of Cuba. But we have not yet spoken of one vital thing in the life of Marti; his romance with the "child from Guatemala"...
While living in Guatemala, where he was a school teacher and a close friend of Guatemala's president, Marti would visit the president every night and play chess with him. Watching them play, night after night, young Maria Garcia Granados, the president's daughter, was gradually being captivated by the elegance, the intelligence, the facility of expression and the personality of the Cuban. Marti could not but notice the fifteen-year-old girl, who had delicate features and a still more delicate soul. They made friends and the romance began. But Marti was betrothed to a woman that he had left behind in Cuba and he would act like a man of honor. So sweet was this romance, so tender and so pure that it can properly fit with the great romances of history.
There was only one kiss between
tlienan tht k wasdepoqatdby Marti on Maria's forehead, rather paternally, the day of his departure to Cuba.
Distance, time and silence, the greatest enemies of love, came between the two.
When Marti returned to Guatemala with his Cuban wife, Carmen Zayas Bazan, young Maria Garcia Granados, still in love with him, saw them come in the distance and ran desperately away, very far away from them . . . toward the river ...
Hours later, a doctor removed Maria's dead body from the water. "She died of fever", said the doctor.


"No, she died of love!" assured Marti.
There was' sadness, deep sadness is Marti's heart and there were tears in his eyes. And when a man, a real MAN cries, it is so solemn a spectacle that it moves to admiration and respect.
Marti, the poet, wrote then his beautiful poem "The Child From Guatemala" which ends like this:
"She entered late in the river, A doctor took her therefrom,
They say that she died from
f ever . . .
I know that she died from love! ..
In remembrance of Matri's great love the government of Cuba each year gives a scholarship to the Guatemalan girl with the highest qualifications in school and brings her to Cuba, with all her expenses paid, in homage of Maria, the sweet girl who so much loved Marti and so sincerely was reciprocated in her love, but who came a little too late to the life of a man whose sence of honor and of duty was above all.

"Now son", said father, "tell me why I punished you?"
"That's it", exclaimed the little boy, "First you pound hell out of me and then you ask me why you did it."


TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
By Barbara Burke

A sad group of Teen-Agers departed from the airport last Friday after seeing Sugar Livdahl, Bailey Yeager and Joe Livdahl off on the plane. Sugar is headed for Hollins College in Virginia, Bailey is returning to Washington and Joe, after a short vacation, will be back to finish out the school year. Missing-f-rom-the -O' !-G -ol after establishing himself as a familiar sight there, is Jimmy Stuchel, the heroic lifeguad. With school opening on Monday he just couldn't keep up his "seven days a week" job.
We're glad to. welcome back Norman Huddy who has returned from his summer vacation in the states. Norman will be a senior this year.
Did you see: Margo Anderson as Lucy in "Only An Orphan Girl".... Pat Burke breaking 200 in bowling .... Flip Bruner playing Black Jack. . . . Carol Currier and her "hoss"?


Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930- 2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic)

Spearfishing Is

Exciting But Can


Be Dangerous

Spearfishing is an exciting sport. Being one of the newer forms of recreation here at Guantanamo Bay it has become necessary to acquaint those who own spearfish-irg-eqnipmntir1th, a few~ of the basic precautionary measures to be taken in order to avoid accidents.
Take Care
Your speargun should always be kept in an unloaded position before entering the water. Within its effective range it is more dangerous than a high powered rifle.
The first thing to do upon entering the water is to load your speargun. Before attempting to do so, however, check the gun's safety catch and make sure it is in the locked position. If the safety is not on it is possible that the spear will not stay in place and a severely cut hand may result. There have been a few cases where the trigger mechanism has not held the spear without the support of the safety, and has fired automatically when the safety was released. Always check the safety before and after loading.
Keep Safety On
The use of the speargun in the water is another important factor. The safety on your gun should be kept in a locked position while swimming and released only when a dive is being made. If the gun is not fired, don't forget to put the safety on again before surfacing
In the water people have a habit of approaching without your being aware of their presence, so remember, always carry your gun in a downward position with the safety catch on an never point it at anything you do not wish to spear. Never carry or have your gun in a loaded position while on shore or in a boat. The only time a speargun should be loaded is in the wator. Out of the water it serves no purpose loaded and may cause an accident.
The buddy system is another wise practice. Always swim in pairs or in a small group. You never know when this habit may save your life.


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 22 August 1953


Pa e Two







~aturdav. '22 August 1953


THE INDIAN


,
W Page Three


Nines Feted
(Continued from Page One)
games and winding up their season with a 20-6 record. Individual trophies were also passed out to members of the Indian squad.
The next presentation was an equally impressive looking trophy awarded to the second place Marine Leathernecks, who while winning 19 and dropping 7 were hot on the Braves' tail feathers most of the time and' couldn't be counted out until the very end. MCB-4 was then given the cup awarded annually to the team showing the most sportsmanship on the playing field.
The Naval Station lads, making a clean sweep of team honors this year also pocketed the post season playoff award, a triumph which netted them another trophy an, the gift of handsome engraved cigarette lighters to members o the team.,
The first of the individual trophies to be given out were those presented to "Brad" Bradshaw, Marine backstop who was named the League's most valuable player by a pool of the opposing players and who walked off with the RBI honors for the year, driving in 31 of the Leathernecks' runs.
Cherepanya of the NAS Flyers and Ziarnek of MCB-4 battled right down to the wire for the home run leadership, finally ending up in a dead heat with four apiece, a feat for which they both were rewarded. Hurling honors went to Labe Of
the Marines, who compiled a 7-0' record and to LT Mashaw of the Indians who managed to hold opposing batters to an average of 0.90 earned runs per game before being transferred in the middle of the season, while the final presentation was' made to Annette of the VU-10 Mallards who hit safely often enough to rack up an impressive .415 average to lead the circuit in that department.
The large crowd present feasted on fried chicken and apple pie. The banquet broke up with a host of congratulations on all sides and the hope for a successful baseball season in 1954.


Fishing Entries
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Mrs. 'R. F. Ritchter -------- 19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Harris, W. K. --------------16 lbs. 12 ozs.
Jacks
Whitmore, F.M ------------17 lbs. 8 ozs.
McNeil, D. A. --------------12 lbs.
Mackerel (King)
McNeil, D. A. --------------30 lbs.
Snapper
Dupree, W. L. -------------43 lbs. 8 ozs.
Kelly, C. L. ---------------33 lbs. 4 ozs.
Snook
Loewenhagen, A. H. 13 lbs.
Tarpon
Brock, R . ----------------- 26 lbs.
Ciccarelli, B .-------------- 23 lbs.
BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
Ray, C. F .----------------- 32 lbs.
Hardin, J .---------------- 22 lbs. 8 ozs.
Jacks
Whitmore, F. M. -----------10 lbs. 13 ozs.
Suslick, A, D. --------------6 lbs.
Mackerel (King)
Scott. B. R. ----------------9 lbs. 8 ozs.
Snapper
Pass, J. S . ----------------- 41 lbs. 4 oz.
Gennaria, R. H. ------------32 lbs.
Snook
Leverett, W. a.---------14 lbs. 8 ozs.
Shepherd, W. L. ------------11 lbs. 8 Ozs.
Tarpon
Loomis, C. E. --------------47 lbs. 12 ozs.
Beman, E. F 25 lbs.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Chandler, C. A. -------------4 lbs. 8 ozs.


Naval Base Golfers

Hit Jamaican Jackpot


In Mid-island Meet

A team of naval base golfers, led by the 1953 club champion, Wright North of VU-10, journeyed to Jamaica last week and wrote a new chapter into the history of the Mid-Island Open championship.
They not only shattered the course record of the beautiful Manchester Club, but also walked off with three of the four trophies awarded.


Above, Base Commander, Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson (left), presents the 1953 GTMO League Championship trophy to Captain J. M. Howell, Executive Officer of the Naval Station.
Below, Colonel J. B. Hill, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, accepts the runner-up trophy from the Admiral.


Janowski Honored at Dinner



For Naval Station Indians

The Naval Station Indians, win- Dunmire, team manager, who coroners of the league title and the mended not only Janowski, but the Post League Tournament, held one team as a whole. Dunmire pointed last get-together Tuesday night in out the fact that without the comthe Petty Officers Club at Naval bined efforts of each and every Station. Present were members of member of a team they could not the team and their families and be a winning group. guests.
Highlight of the evening was the Intra-command softball at the presentation of awards to Indian ineracks got ay on
stieotac,"Si Jnwsi Marine Barracks got underway on strikeout ace, "Ski" Janowski, Monday 19 August with the HeadJanowski received a trophy for quarters Platoon team edging the being the most valuable member 1st Guard Section, 5-4. of the team. The presentation was
made by CAPT J. M. Howell Four teams comprise the league, Executive Officer, who commended the 2nd Guard Section and Cointhe athlete highly. Later on in the bined Officers and staff NCO's evening the team showed their teams being the remaining two appreciation to Janowski when squads entered in competition. they presented him with a gold The Headquarters Platoon, winwatch and gold cuff links. The ners of the season's first contest presentation was made by Chief took the title last year.


North and Grego
It was North who chopped 'off one stroke of the 291 course record set up by the former Jamaican champion Leslie Ward. North's 290 toppled the record which had stood unbeaten for two years. And it was North and Tony Grego, from Naval Station, who came in at the finish one and two to walk away with the three trophies presented, for the match.
Grego toured the first 54 holes of the 72 hole match with a 218. North and the closest competitor, Ron Sturdy of Jamaica, were close behind with 216, but Grego seemed to be headed for the cup. Then North settled down and played par golf for the last round. He caught up with Grego on the 60th hole and they played neck and neck until Grego temporarily lost control of his putter and fell behind, finishing with a 293. Sturdy wound up with 296.
North was awarded the MidIsland trophy and the Henry Evelyn Cup. Grego received the St. Andrew bowl.

Sunday, 16 August, twenty-four Fleet Training Group golfers participated in the third quarter of their FTG Tournament.
LTJG K. E. Treffinger was the low handicap medalist with a low net of 70. The low gross was taken by LT E. L. West with an 84.
The old man in the corner wept as the hostess sang "My Old Kentucky Home."
"Pardon me," asked another guest, "are you a Kentuckian?"
"No, a musician."


Saturday '2 uut15








Navy-IONDPPO-Gtmo. 4078C


-RET INDIAN


, wftuday "2, August 1953


In the new Columbia picture, "Let's Do It Again," Jane Wyman has a real ball as she is romantically pursued by Ray Milland, Aldo Ray and Tom Helmore. But the boy Who really makes it is a sideline watcher -Fred Karger, musical supervisor on the picture. He -and Jane slipped away one weekend during the filming of the .picture and were married... NBC Symphony Orchestra has recorded the theme from "Victory At Sea." Will hit the stands in the early fall . . . Silvano Mangano signed for the part of Helen of Troy . . . Oh, to be in Paris . . . We're running the picture of Debbie Reynolds, MGM's bright young thing, just because so many people have asked us to. We're easy to get along with . . . This one should be the "be all and end all" of the western movies "Jesse James vs. The Daltons." Brett King, who has one of the leads, was a WWII Air Force pilot . . . Columbia's making another musical from "My Sister Eileen." That's the way to be a hit-find something that has been a success several times and stick with it . . . Edward G. Robinson seems to have undecgone a complete change of heart-or at least parts. In his last picture he played the part of a cop-first time in his career. Now he's signed for MGM's "The Big Leaguer," his main item of armor being a baseball bat . . . NBC straining at the bit to sign Mary Martin and Ethel Merman, as well as Leland Hayward. Competition with CBS is hot. All this is the result of the one-shot Ford Anniversary show a few weeks back . . . "The Big Story," NBC's dramatization of famous newspaper stories, will feature Walter Winchell's story of how he talked Louis (Lepke) Buchalter into surrending to J. Edgar Hoover back in 1939. Show is due Aug. 28. . . . There are now 24,292,600 television sets in the U. S.


Hospital Notes


Heirport News: CSC and Mrs. P. Gushanas are happy to announce the arrival of their son Peter Patrick, born 11 August. LTJG and Mrs. R. S. Potteiger are the proud parents of a son David Andrew, born 13 August.
We extend a hearty welcome aboard to LTJG W. Beachman, MC, who recently reported aboard on two weeks temporary additional duty. CDR V. W. H. Campbell, MC, recently departed for Jacksonville on TAD.


Regular Programs

0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 Solitary Singer 0830 Bob & Ray 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 John Contie 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News

Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Met Opera Auditions 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News
1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Hymns ofth Wol 0815 News
0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News
1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 Moments With The Masters 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 News
1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy


Saturday, 22 August
REDHEAD FROM WYOMING
M. O'Hara , A. Nicol
Sunday, 23 August
THE I DON'T CARE GIRL
D. Wayne M. Gaynor.Monday, 24 August'
KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL
J. Payne C. Gray


-Monday Through Friday

2130 Twenty Questions
2155 News
2200 Hollywood Radio Theater 2300 New York Philharmonic
2400 Sign Off
1230 Hillbilly Jamboree
1330 Jack Kirkwood
1345 Behind the Story 1400 Musical Matinee
1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS
1700 Storyteller Time
1755 Sam Balter
1800 From The Pressbox
1815 News
1845 Requestfully Yours
1930 Twilight Serenade
2025 This I Believe
2055 Knox Manning-Time Out
2155 News
2230 Sandman Show

Monday
0845 Charleen Hawks
1045 Jo Stafford
1730 Cavalcade of America
1830 Inside Track
2000 Groucho Marx
2030 Big Story
2100 Broadway's My Beat
2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette


Tuesday
0845 Frances Farwell Sings
1045 Strike It Rich
1730 Bookshelf of the World 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks
2000 Dragnet
2030 People Are Funny
2100 Vaughn Monroe
2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 220 American Music Hall


Wednesday
0830 Jo Stafford
0845 Charleen Hawks
1045 Jo Stafford
1730 Portrait of a City
1830 Sports Forum
2000 Al Goodman
2030 Arthur Godfrey 21fl0 Nigh Beat .....
2130 Our Miss Brooks
2200 Howard Barlow Presents

Thursday
0845 Frances Farwell Sings
1045 Jo Stafford
1730 American Heritage
1830 Sports Answer Man
2000 Music With The Girls
2030 Father Knows Best
2100 Horace Heidt
2130 Meet Millie
2200 Music From America

Friday
0845 Charlien Hawks
1730 Invitation To Learning
1830 Inside Track
2000 Suspense
2030 Meet Corliss Archer
2100 Jazz Nocturne
2130 FBI In Peace and War
2200 Hollywood Music Hall


Tuesday, 25 August
BLOODHOUNDS OF BROADWAY M. Gaynor S. Brady
Wednesday, 26 August
GIRLS IN THE NIGHT
H. Lembert J. Holden
Thursday, 27 August ONE BIG AFFAIR
E. Keyes D. O'Keefe


TOURIST LURE


This is the so-called "off" season in Miami Beach and we surmise that it is so only because people are not aware that the beaches are enhanced by such beauties as Joyce Chrest.


Way Back Home

On your radio dial al 1450 every weekday at 12 noon.
Monday, Aug. 24- Charlotte, North Carolina; Centralia, Illinois; Convington, Virginia.
Tuesday, Aug. 25- Cleveland, Ohio; Gulfport, Mississippi; Rome, Georgia.
Wednesday, Aug. 26 -P o'r t Angeles, Washington, Greely, Colorado; San Juan Capistrano, California; Baldwinsville, New York.
_Thursday. A u 7-=Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; St. Louis, Missouri; Woonsocket, Rhode Island.
Friday, Aug. 28-Boston, Massachusetts; Savannah, Georgia; Anniston, Alabama.



JEST A SECOND

The despondent old gentleman emerged from his club and climbed stiffly into his luxurious limousine.
"Where to, sir?" asked the chauffer respectfully.
"Drive off a cliff, James," replied, the old gentleman. "I'm committing suicide."

If the hindsight of some women was as good 'as their foresight, they wouldn't wear glasses.

When a girl sneezes it's a sign she's catching cold. When she yawns its a sign she's gotten cold.

One thing we learn each summer is what this country needs is a lawn grass that will grow an inch high and quit.

Everyone has a purpose in life even if it is only to serve as a horrible example.

The only difference between a GI student and any other is that they did their hitch in the army before.

Husband: "I guess you're pretty sore because I came home last night with this black eye." ,
Wife: "Not at all. When you came home you didn't have the black eye."

Sailor: "We're coming to a tunnel. Are you afraid?"
WAVE: "Not if you take that cigar out of your mouth.


q


WGBY Program Schedule


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U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 22 August 1953 100,000th Cement Block Turned Out By MCB-1 The Villamar Replacement Housing Project came nearer to its goal recently as the 100,000th cement block was turned out by men of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE recently. The block machine, set up and operated by MCB-ONE on Bargo Point, will supply all the building blocks needed to complete the replacement housing project. A grand total of 434,530 blocks are needed to do the job, 180,000 of which will be turned out by MCB-ONE during its current operation. A crew of sixteen men under the direction of Henry Beamsderfer, BU2, and Homer Scott, SW3, man the single block machine responsible for the cement block production. Pictured above (from left to right) are Henry Beamsderfer, BU2, and Kenny T. Hill, BUCN, removing 100,000th block produced by men of Mobile Construction Battalion ONE. NavBase Nines Feted at Dinner The Naval Base feted and feasted its baseball players, coaches, and officials Monday night with a banquet at the Naval Air Station Enlisted Men's Club which included the presentation of team and individual trophies for outstanding diamond performances and marked the close of baseball activities for the 1953 season. The ceremonies got underway with the awarding of a large first place trophy to the Naval Station Indians, League champions for 1953. The Indians, who got off to a very ordinary start, finished up with a spurt, winning 12 straight (Continued on Page Three) Radford, Carney Represent Navy On Defense Team Admiral Arthur W. Radford, 57, was sworn in as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff last week, the first Navy man to hold the top job on the nation's defense team. General Omar Bradley, leaving active duty after 42 years, administered the oath to Admira l Radford in a brief ceremony in the office of the Secretary of Defense, Charles E. Wilson. Since General Bradley holds the 5-star rank created during World War II, he cannot technically retire from active duty but must remain on "active duty without assignment." An hour later, General Matthew B. Ridgway was sworn in as Army Chief of Staff to succeed General Lawton Collins who moves to the NATO organization as U. S. representative on the military committee. On Monday, 17 August, Admiral Robert B. Carney accepted the post of Chief of Naval Operations succeeding Admiral William M. Fechteler who takes the NATO Mediterranean command vacated by Carney. Completing the defense set-up is General Nathan F. Twining who was sworn in as Air Force Chief of Staff last June. The four -Radford, Ridgway, Carney and Twining-immediately face the task set down for them by the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Wilson said he wanted them to "go over the entire de fense picture." Water Shortage Still Critical; Reserve Down Due to heavy torrential rains there is a critical shortage in the base water supply, according to CDR J. N. Lawlor, Public Works Officer. The heavy rains were responsible for an unusually high turbulence in the Yateras River, source of water for the base. In turn, the turbulence caused a high percentage of foreign matter which could not be eliminated by the base filtration plant. So whenever turbulence reaches a certain point it becomes necessary to stop the intake of water to insure the purity of the base water. This is what happened when torrential rains recently caused a loss of two days' water intake. Weather conditions since, have placed a high demand upon the reserve supply, and the shortage, instead of being replenished, is becoming acute. The present reserve of water is being slowly but surely reduced. 0p Boy Scout Circus Opens Today Today is circus day! Not a full-grown circus with a parade and three rings, but a junior circus prepared by the scouts on the base. Sponsored by the Boy Scouts, Explorer Scouts and Cub Scouts the circus will feature rides for the kids, games of skill and chance for kids of all ages, 6 to 60, and exhibitions and displays of scouting craft. All week long scout headquarters has been echoing with the final preparations-hammer against nail and hammer against thumb-for the one-day stand. The gate opens at 1400 today and the festivities continue until 1800 at the seaplane ramp on Fisherman's Point. A mobile canteen will be on hand to provide soft drinks and hot dogs. Admission tickets may be purchased at the gate. Money derived from the circus will be used to defray scouting expenses for the coming year. Yateras River Closed to Anglers For Two Seasons The recent seeding of the Yateras River with bass fingerlings has necessitated the closing of the river to fishing, according to an announcement received from the base commander's office. The action is necessary to allow at least two generations of the Florida bass to reach maturity before the stock is depleted. Similar precautions are necessary for the preservation of all wild life and are observed both in Cuba and the United States. Of the 5,000 fingerlings ferried from the Winter Haven hatchery in Florida, only 40% survived the rugged trip by plane. There is no possible way of knowing how many will survive their new surroundings since nothing comparable has been done before. However, each mature female is capable of reproducing 5,000 of its kind. Most bass reach only about 12 pounds, but the Florida large mouth bass has attained a 21 pound, 4 ounce record in its native Florida. Just what proportions they will reach in the Yateras is something for speculation and the dreams of anglers. It is expected that the Yateras will remain closed to fishing for at least two years. "I'm looking for a girl who doesn't smoke, drink nor neck." "What for?" 0 Among the featured attractions at the various booths will be a sponge throw, balloon-dart booth, cake booth and a fish pond. A new innovation in rides this year besides the regular donkey and train rides will be a "hot rod" ride. It is planned to make the scout circus an annual event. Middies End Summer Cruise In Gtmo Midshipmen Cruise "Charlie" arrived in the Guantanamo Bay area Thursday with the USS Roanoke, under the flag of RADM R. P. Glass, Commander, Cruiser Division TWO, leading. Nine ships with over 1,100 middies and NROTC students will remain in this area, their last stop before returning to the United States, until 25 August. On August 26th, Cruise "Baker", returning to the United States from a European cruise, will arrive headed by the USS Iowa flying the flag of RADM C. L. Green, Commander, Battleship Division TWO. The 10 ships and 1600 NROTC students will depart for the states on 31 August. 9jk Vol. V, No. 49 0

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Saturday, 22 August 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 22 August 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atheson, Jr., USN Lieutenant ECommander CAPT Robert Hs. Wilkinson Chief of Staff J .S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuo fe CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell E receive Officer Editorial Staff Lieutenant E. A. SandnessOfficer Ader H. E. Davis. JOC--Managing Editor Al Henderson, J03-News Editor J. C. ierks Jo i--------------Sports Pierce Lehmbeck------Sports S. E. Cobbi PHSNlPhotographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, foanled by non-appropriated funds, printed on government euspment, for free distribution on the e ..Naval Base, iuantanamo Bay. Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INsIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-5 (Hev) 19ds. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without bitten permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. What Is A Sailor? Between the innocence of babyhood and the dignity of manhood we find a delightful creature called a "Sailor". Sailors come in assorted sizes, weights, and colors, but all sailors have the creed; to kill as much time as possible of every minute, of every hour, of every day, and to protest of noise. Their only weapon is occasional firing of guns, and sometimes an airplane roaring overhead. Sailors are found everywhere, on the water, on all streets, in fast moving cars, taverns, and night clubs. Look real hard and you'll find them swinging from ropes, jumping through portholes, and peering through keyholes! Girls love them, soldiers hate them, the cooks ignore them, and the ship protests them. All sailors are truth, (with their fingers crossed), beauty in their uniforms, wisdom with cigarettes in their socks, and the hope of the future with a girl in their arms. When you are busy, they usually follow, with a fantastic story of the sea-or elsewhere. When you want him to make a good impression, his brain turns to jelly, or else he'll deny that he is in the Navy. A fine lad, this Navy boy. Above all material things, a sailor lites GIRLS, strong drinks, comic books, night clubs, and MAIL CALL. He's not much for standing watch, beans for breaktfast, shining shoes, washing uniforms, Captain's Mast, or just plain 'ol WORK! Nobody else gets so much fun out of talking, water, or breezes. No one else has such small pockets, with no place for poker chips, cards, billfolds, and other personal belongings; but he usually finds room. A sailor is a magical creature. You can lock him out of your home, hut you can't lock him out of your heart. You may get him to pay the bill once, but not all the time. Might as well give up, he's your. captor, your jailer, and your sailor; and when you come home at night with only the shattered pieces of your hopes and dreams, he can mend them like new, with a letter which begins"Hi Darling!" Yes, he's your sailor now-No one else wants him! A Message from Garcia: Marti, Cuban Patriot By Henry Garcia After a silence of a few weeks because of illness, I am glad to to be back with the kind readers of The Indian. Today I am going to tell you another chapter in the life of the great Cuban patriot, Jose Marti. So far, we know that Marti, in spite of his humble birth and adverse environment, distinguished himself in various fields of learning. We also know that he was a poet, a philosopher, and a lover of children. And we know that he sacrificed his life in the battlefield, fighting for the independence of Cuba. But we have not yet spoken of one vital thing in the life of Marti; his romance with the "child from Guatemala" ... While living in Guatemala, where he was a school teacher and a close friend of Guatemala's president, Marti would visit the president every night and play chess with him. Watching them play, night after night, young Maria Garcia Granados, the president's daughter, was gradually being captivated by the elegance, the intelligence, the facility of expression and the personality of the Cuban. Marti could not but notice the fifteen-year-old girl, who had delicate features and a still more delicate soul. They made friends and the romance began. But Marti was betrothed to a woman that he had left behind in Cuba and he would act like a man of honor. So sweet was this romance, so tender and so pure that it can properly fit with the great romances of history. There was only one kiss between them and that kiss was deposited by Marti on Maria's forehead, rather paternally, the day of his departure to Cuba. Distance, time and silence, the greatest enemies of love, came between the two. When Marti returned to Guatemala with his Cuban wife, Carmen Zayas Bazan, young Maria Garcia Granados, still in love with him, saw them come in the distance and ran desperately away, very far away from them ...toward the river Hours later, a doctor removed Maria's dead body from the water. "She died of fever", said the doctor. "No, she died of love!" assured Marti. There was sadness, deep sadness is Marti's heart and there were tears in his eyes. And when a man, a real MAN cries, it is so solemn a spectacle that it moves to admiration and respect. Marti, the poet, wrote then his beautiful poem "The Child From Guatemala" which ends like this: "She entered late in the river, A doctor took her therefrom, They say that she died from fever I know that she died from love! .. In remembrance of Matri's great love the government of Cuba each year gives a scholarship to the Guatemalan girl with the highest qualifications in school and brings her to Cuba, with all her expenses paid, in homage of Maria, the sweet girl who so much loved Marti and so sincerely was reciprocated in her love, but who came a little too late to the life of a man whose sence of honor and of duty was above all. "Now son", said father, "tell me why I punished you?" "That's it", exclaimed the little boy, "First you pound hell out of me and then you ask me why you did it." TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Barbara Burke A sad group of Teen-Agers departed from the airport last Friday after seeing Sugar Livdahl, Bailey Yeager and Joe Livdahl off on the plane. Sugar is headed for Hollins College in Virginia, Bailey is returning to Washington and Joe, after a short vacation, will be back to finish out the school year. -Missing from the 0' Club pool after establishing himself as a familiar sight there, is Jimmy Stuchel, the heroic lifeguard. With school opening on Monday he just couldn't keep up his "seven days a week" job. We're glad to welcome back Norman Huddy who has returned from his summer vacation in the states. Norman will be a senior this year. Did you see: Margo Anderson as Lucy in "Only An Orphan Girl". Pat Burke breaking 200 in bowling. Flip Bruner playing Black Jack. ...Carol Currier and her "hoss" ? Q N Sunday, 23 August 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturda y, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) Spearfishing Is Exciting But Can Be Dangerous Spearfishing is an exciting sport. Being one of the newer forms of recreation here at Guantanamo Bay it has become necessary to acquaint those who own spearfishing equipment with a few of the basic precautionary measures to be taken in order to avoid accidents. Take Care Your speargun should always be kept in an unloaded position before entering the water. Within its effective range it is more dangerous than a high powered rifle. The first thing to do upon entering the water is to load your speargun. Before attempting to do so, however, check the gun's safety catch and make sure it is in the locked position. If the safety is not on it is possible that the spear will not stay in place and a severely cut hand may result. There have been a few cases where the trigger mechanism has not held the spear without the support of the safety, and has fired automatically when the safety was released. Always check the safety before and after loading. Keep Safety On The use of the speargun in the water is another important factor. The safety on your gun should be kept in a locked position while swimming and released only when a dive is being made. If the gun is not fired, don't forget to put the safety on again before surfacing. In the water people have a habit of approaching without your being aware of their presence, so remember, always carry your gun in a downward position with the safety catch on an never point it at anything you do not wish to spear. Never carry or have your gun in a loaded position while on shore or in a boat. The only time a speargun should be loaded is in the water. Out of the water it serves no purpose loaded and may cause an accident. The buddy system is another wise practice. Always swim in pairs or in a small group. You never know when this habit may save your life. 4 Pae Two THE INDIAN Page Two

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Saturday. '22 Au ust 1953 "'5 Nines Feted (Continued from Page One) games and winding up their season with a 20-6 record. Individual trophies were also passed out to members of the Indian squad. The next presentation was an equally impressive looking trophy awarded to the second place Marine Leathernecks, who while winning 19 and dropping 7 were hot on the Braves' tail feathers most of the time and couldn't be counted out until the very end. MCB-4 was then given the cup awarded annually to the team showing the most sportsmanship on the playing field. The Naval Station lads, making a clean sweep of team honors this year also pocketed the post season playoff award, a triumph which netted them another trophy an' the gift of handsome engraved cigarette lighters to members o the team. The first of the individual trophies to be given out were those presented to "Brad" Bradshaw, Marine backstop who was named the League's most valuable player by a pool of the opposing players and who walked off with the RBI honors for the year, driving in 31 of the Leathernecks' runs. Cherepanya of the NAS Flyers and Ziarnek of MCB-4 battled right down to the wire for the home run leadership, finally ending up in a dead heat with four apiece, a feat for which they both were rewarded. Hurling honors went to Labes of the Marines, who compiled a 7-0 record and to LT Mashaw of the Indians who managed to hold opposing batters to an average of 0.90 earned runs per game before being transferred in the middle of the season, while the final presentation was made to Annette of the VU-10 Mallards who hit safely often enough to rack up an impressive .415 average to lead the circuit in that department. The large crowd present feasted on fried chicken and apple pie. The banquet broke up with a host of congratulations on all sides and the hope for a successful baseba l season in 1954. Fishing Entries LAND DIVISION Barracuda Mrs. R. F. Ritchter --19 lbs. 8 ozs. Harris, W. K. ----16 lbs. 12 ozs. Jacks Whitmore, F. M.--17 lbs. 8 oss. Mackerel (King) McNeil, D. A.--30 lbs. Snapper Dupree, W. L.--______41 lbs. 8 os. Kelly, C. L.---11____ 3 lbs. 4 ezs. Snook Loewenhagen, A. H. 13 lbs. Tarpon Brock, R. --__---1--28 lbs. Ciccarelli, B.BA ON-23 lbs. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda Ray, C. F.---II______ 3 lbs. Hadi J. --------22 lbs. 8 ozs. Jacks Wssore, F. M.--appr 410 lbs. 14 ozs. Suslick, A, D.--5_ lbs. Mackerel (King) Scott, BI. R.--_____ ___ lbs. 8 os. Snapper Foss. J. S.---_____ 41 lbs. 4 os. Gennaria, R. H. -------32 lbs. Snook Leverett, W. .----14 lbs. 1 ozs. Shepherd, W. L.--____11 lbs. 8 os. Tarpon Lomis, C. E. ---_______ 47 lbs. 11 os. Beman, E. F.E -25 lbs. SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Chandler, C. A. --4 lbs. 8 ozs. Naval Base Golfers Hit Jamaican Jackpot In Mid-Island Meet A team of naval base golfers, led by the 1953 club champion, Wright North of VU-10, journeyed to Jamaica last week and wrote a new chapter into the history of the Mid-Island Open championship. They not only shattered the course record of the beautiful Manchester Club, but also walked off with three of the four trophies awarded. Above, Base Commander, Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson (left), presents the 1953 GTMO League Championship trophy to Captain J. M. Howell, Executive Officer of the Naval Station. Below, Colonel J. B. Hill, Commanding Officer, Marine Barracks, accepts the runner-up trophy from the Admiral. Janowski Honored at Dinner For Naval Station Indians The Naval Station Indians, winDunmire, team manager, who comners of the league title and the mended not only Janowski, but the Post League Tournament, held one team as a whole. Dunmire pointed last get-together Tuesday night in out the fact that without the comthe Petty Officers Club at Naval bined efforts of each and every Station. Present were members of member of a team they could not the team and their families and be a winning group. guests. Highlight of the evening was the Intra-command softball at the presentation of awards to Indian Marine Barracks got underway on strikeout ace, "Ski" Janowski, Monday 19 August with the HeadJanowski received a trophy for rters Platoon team edging the being the most valuable member qua of the team. The presentation was made by CAPT J. M. Howell Four teams comprise the league, Executive Officer, who commended the 2nd Guard Section and Coithe athlete highly. Later on in the bined Officers and staff NCO's evening the team showed their teams being the remaining two appreciation to Janowski when squads entered in competition. they presented him with a gold The Headquarters Platoon, winwatch and gold cuff links. The ners of the season's first contest presentation was made by Chief took the title last year. biedefot o ec adevr North and Grego It was North who chopped off one stroke of the 291 course record set up by the former Jamaican champion Leslie Ward. North's 290 toppled the record which had stood unbeaten for two years. And it was North and Tony Grego, from Naval Station, who came in at the finish one and two to walls away with the three trophies presented for the match. Grego toured the first 54 holes of the 72 hole match with a 218. North and the closest competitor, Ron Sturdy of Jamaica, were close behind with 216, but Grego seemed to be headed for the cup. Then North settled down and played par golf for the last round. He caught up with Grego on the 60th hole and they played neck and neck until Grego temporarily lost control of his putter and fell behind, finishing with a 293. Sturdy wound up with 296. North was awarded the MidIsland trophy and the Henry Evelyn Cup. Grego received the St. Andrew bowl. Sunday, 16 August, twenty-four Fleet Training Group golfers participated in the third quarter of their FTG Tournament. LTJG K. E. Treffinger was the low handicap medalist with a low net of 70. The low gross was taken by LT E. L. West with an 84. The old man in the corner wept as the hostess sang "My Old Kentucky Home." "Pardon me," asked another guest, "are you a Kentuckian?" "No, a musician." THE INDIAN Page Three Saturday 22 Augus 3 porfs 49

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Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 4078C THE INDIAN Saturday, 22 August 1953 In the new Columbia picture, "Let's Do It Again," Jane Wyman has a real ball as she is romantically pursued by Ray Milland, Aldo Ray and Tom Helmore. But the boy who really makes it is a sideline watcher -Fred Karger, musical supervisor on the picture. He and Jane slipped away one weekend during the filming of the picture and were married. NBC Symphony Orchestra has recorded the theme from "Victory At Sea." Will hit the stands in the early fall ...Silvano Mangano signed for the part of Helen of Troy .. Oh, to be in Paris ...We're running the picture of Debbie Reynolds, MGM's bright young thing, just because so many people have asked us to. We're easy to get along with ...This one should be the "be all and end all" of the western movies "Jesse James vs. The Daltons." Brett King, who has one of the leads, was a WWII Air Force pilot ...Columbia's making another musical from "My Sister Eileen." That's the way to be a hit-find something that has been a success several times and stick with it ...Edward G. Robinson seems to have undergone a complete change of heart-or at least parts. In his last picture he played the part of a cop-first time in his career. Now he's signed for MGM's "The Big Leaguer," his main item of armor being a baseball bat ...NBC straining at the bit to sign Mary Martin and Ethel Merman, as well as Leland Hayward. Competition with CBS is hot. All this is the result of the one-shot Ford Anniversary show a few weeks back ..."The Big Story," NBC's dramatization of famous newspaper stories, will feature Walter Winchell's story of how he talked Louis (Lepke) Buchalter into surrending to J. Edgar Hoover back in 1939. Show is due Aug. 28. ...There are now 24,292,600 television sets in the U. S. Hospital Notes Heirport News: CSC and Mrs. P. Gushanas are happy to announce the arrival of their son Peter Patrick, born 11 August. LTJG and Mrs. R. S. Potteiger are the proud parents of a son David Andrew, born 13 August. We extend a hearty welcome aboard to LTJG W. Beachman, MC, who recently reported aboard on two weeks temporary additional duty. CDR V. W. H. Campbell, MC, recently departed for Jacksonville on TAD. Regular Programs0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 Solitary Singer 0830 Bob & Ray 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 John Contie 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 Tarzan 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Met Opera Auditions 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1830 Amos 'N' Andy 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Tales of Tomorrow 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of the World 0815 News 0830 Robert Armbruster 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Steve Allen 1215 News 1230 Piano Playhouse 1300 Moments With The Masters 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Ozzie & Harriet 1730 Greatest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 News 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Serenade 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy Saturday, 22 August REDHEAD FROM WYOMING M. O'Hara A. Nicol Sunday, 23 August THE I DON'T CARE GIRL D. Wayne M. Gaynor Monday, 24 Augusti' KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL J. Payne C. Gray --Monday Through Friday 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News 2200 Hollywood Radio Theater 2300 New York Philharmonic 2400 Sign Off 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 Jack Kirkwood 1345 Behind the Story 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Storyteller Time 1750 Sam BaIter 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1845 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Serenade 2025 This I Believe 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show Monday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Fibber McGee 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Bookshelf of the World 1830 Your Chaplain Speaks 2000 Dragnet 2030 People Are Funny 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 Portrait of a City 1830 Sports Forum 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barlow Presents Thursday 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Jo Stafford 1730 American Heritage 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Horace Heidt 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall Tuesday, 25 August BLOODHOUNDS OF BROADWAY M. Gaynor S. Brady Wednesday, 26 August GIRLS IN THE NIGHT R. Lembert J. Holden Thursday, 27 August ONE BIG AFFAIR E. Keyes D. O'Keefe TOURIST LURE This is the so-called "off" season in Miami Beach and we surmise that it is so only because people are not aware that the beaches are enhanced by such beauties as Joyce Chrest. Way Back Home On your radio dial al 1450 every weekday at 12 noon. Monday, Aug. 24 -Charlotte, North Carolina; Centralia, Illinois; Convington, Virginia. Tuesday, Aug. 25 -Cleveland, Ohio; Gulfport, Mississippi; Rome, Georgia. Wednesday, Aug. 26 -P o r t Angeles, Washington, Greely, Colorado; San Juan Capistrano, California; Baldwinsville, New York. Thursday, Aug. 27-Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; St. Louis, Missouri; Woonsocket, Rhode Island. Friday, Aug. 28-Boston, Massachusetts; Savannah, Georgia; Anniston, Alabama. JEST A SECOND The despondent old gentleman emerged from his club and climbed stiffly into his luxurious limousine. "Where to, sir?" asked the chauffer respectfully. "Drive off a cliff, James," replied the old gentleman. "I'm committing suicide." If the hindsight of some women was as good as their foresight, they wouldn't wear glasses. When a girl sneezes it's a sign she's catching cold. When she yawns its a sign she's gotten cold. One thing we learn each summer is what this country needs is a lawn grass that will grow an inch high and quit. Everyone has a purpose in life even if it is only to serve as a horrible example. The only difference between a GI student and any other is that they did their hitch in the army before. Husband: "I guess you're pretty sore because I came home last night with this black eye." Wife: "Not at all. When you came home you didn't have the black eye." Sailor: "We're coming to a tunnel. Are you afraid?" WAVE: "Not if you take that cigar out of your mouth. q WGBY Program Schedule MOVIE SCHEDULE