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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Vol. V, No. 39 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 June 1953


CUT IN OVERSEAS DUTY PER DIEM AT GUANTANAMO BAY EXPECTED 1 JULY

Enlisted personnel serving with their dependents at Guantanamo Bay will in all probability suffer a cut of $1.05 a day in station per diem subsistence allowances effective 1 July, states Lieutenant E. F. Bailey,
(SC), Disbursing Officer for the Naval Supply Depot.
In an A.F.P.S. release, the Defense Department has stated that this is a result of a periodical re- NAMED CHIEF OF NAVAL view of travel and station allow- OPERATIONS ances. In all probability, the cut will effect other overseas duty stations as well as Guantanamo Bay.
The purpose of the adjustment is to "bring total overseas allowances for subsistence for enlisted personnel in line with their allowances in the U.S.," the Department explained. The allowances paid to officers and single enlisted personnel were not changed since they are already comparable to those paid in the U.S.
Enlisted men principally affected are those with dependents who have drawn extra allowances when government messes are available in areas such as Alaska. Newfoundland, Canada, France, Great Britain, Iceland, North Africa, the Philippines, Puerto Rico and Saudi Arabia.
These men will now draw the 'lesser allowance which is provided for enlisted personnel with dependents when a government mess is not available in the area. Admiral Robert B. Carney, now CornNet effect is a monthly cut aver- mander in Chief of NATO forces in aging $31.50 for men with de- Southern Europe, has been named by President Eisenhower to relieve Admiral pendents in areas in which gov- William M. Fechteler as the Chief of ernment messes are available. Ex- Naval Operations. amples of the adjustment are as follows:
Alaska-$2.40 to $1.35. 14 GUANTANAMO MEN Newfoundland-$1.80 to $0.75. TO BE PROMOTED TO
Canada (except Ft. Churchill and CPO TUESDAY Newfoundland)-$1.05 to nothing.
France-varies depending upon Fourteen first class petty officers location. Paris goes from $3.30 to at Guantanamo Bay will be among $2.25. the 2,727 enlisted men to swop
Great Britain -in most areas, their white hats for the hard hats $1.80 to $0.75; London, $2.35 to of a chief petty officer Tuesday. $1.30. - All promotions will be acting
North Africa (Casablanca, Nou- appointments (temporary) and are asseur, Rabat, and Sale)-$3.40 to the result of the service-wide ex$2.35; Sidi Slimane, $2.95 to $1.90. amination held 3 February.
Philippines (except Rizal Prov- The Fleet Training Group and ince)-$2.70 to $1.65. the Fleet Training Center take top
Rizal Province-$2.80 to $1.75. honors, with seven men, fifty perPuerto Rico-$2.25 to $1.20. cent of the promotions for the Saudi Arabia-$4.55 to $3.50. base, being promoted to CPO. They The allowances will be reduced are: F. W. Chapman, SOC, R. L. by a change to the joint travel Shelf, RDC, T. A. Horner, SOC, W. regulations. Kotyh, SOC, W. J. McGeffery, RDC, 1? V. nueriL, J2 RTC. nluW sv.l~


NEWSLETTER REPORTS NORFOLK'S "NEW LOOK"

Washington (P. R. N.) -Hardly any Navy man who put in time in Norfolk, Va., during World War II remembers the city with any fond recollections whatsoever. But in the years following the war, a strange and wonderful metamorphosis has been taking place' on the banks of Hampton Roads. Postwar Norfolk has taken on a "new look"-and, even more important an entirely new outlook towards the navy man.
The Atlanta (Ga.) Journal reports: "Servicemen who were stationed at Norfolk during World War II or whose ships made the city a port of call, remember the place unpleasantly. During the years of the war Norfolk was overcrowded, generally inhospitable, and accumulated a collection of picturesque and unprintable nicknames unmatched by any American city.
"All that seems to have changed. The citizens of Norfolk have had time to catch their breath since the great sailor inundation of 194142, and everybody now loves everybody else....
"Gone are the signs that read 'Sailor Keep Out!' Southern hospitality flowers once more along Hampton Roads. Score another triumph for public relations, for the men of the fleet and the warmhearted Virginians."
So when your orders read: . . . to Norfolk, Va., for duty," don't shudder. You're in for a most pleasant surprise!


H"..K 6terling', ETU and w�y. Lwir--o, DCC.
The command with the next largest number of promotions to chief petty officer is Mobile Construction Battalion FOUR. The battalion has three men being promoted to CPO. They are: H. M. Oakes, SKC, L. L. Newman, CMC and A. F. Leheup, BULC.
The Naval Station reports two men being promoted to chief. They are: W. T. S. Walker, EMC and J. M. Goldman, MEC. I.....
The Naval Air Station also reports two men being promoted to chief, one of the two being on T.A.D. orders from Utility Squadron Ten. The two are: C. L. Swisher, ADC(AP) and T. H. Atkins, SDC.
None of the other commands reported promotions to CPO.
Examination results for those not among the 2727 listed can be obtained by submitting requests similar in form to enclosure three of BuPers Instruction 1418.7.
Only 97 of the new CPO rates will go to reservists. Twelve of the 2630 Regulars to be advanced are Waves and there are five women reservists.
At least one first-class petty officer was upped in each rating despite the fact that the number of chiefs in some is already in excess of requirements. Greatest percentage of the promotions are being made in the two machinist's mate ratings where a total of 399 men are slated for visored hats. The yeoman ratings is next with 137.


HURRICANE DRILLS NOT
SO SILLY ONCE YOU'VE
BEEN IN A HURRICANE

June is the month that begins the hurricane season in the Caribbean area. Until the first of December, we can expect to hear of hurricanes developing in the area.
"So what?" you might ask. "Why all the fuss and bother? Why have these silly hurricane drills?"
Well, Mr. Know-It-All, here's an attempt to answer your questions.
A whole gale is a fearful thing, but a hurricane is much more than that. Multiply the force of a whole gale by two and you'll have some idea of the tremendous striking power of a hurricane.
Whatever you call it-a hurricane, willy willy,' banguio or typhoon-it's a tropical storm that spells danger to lives and property.
In the Pacific in 1944, a typhoon struck, damaging 28 ships. Although most of the fleet caught in that convulsion of terrific destructive force lived through it, three destroyers capsized and went down with nearly all hands on board. A total of 800 officers and men were either lost or killed. And this was not an unusual storm!
If that's not convincing enough for you, here's what happened a few months later. Another typhoon struck and, if anything, it was worse than the first. A heavy cruiser, the Pittsburg, had her bow ripped off, as though a giant hand had picked her up and snapped her like a matchstick. And, the Pittsburgh is no rowboat!
During the same storm, great carriers like the Hornet and, the Bennington had as much as 50 feet of their flight decks smashed beyond repair.
Pick up any daily newspaper, listen to the newsbroadcasts and you will know that it's not only the ships at sea that are effected by the devistation of typhoon and hurricanes but cities, villages and agricultural areas as well.
Unlike the ships at sea, cities and villages-and naval basescan not run from the path of oncoming hurricanes. In order to survive the ordeal of a hurricane here at Guantanamo Bay, drills are being put into effect in order to familiarize base personnel with the measures which must be taken in order to safeguard lives and property.
These drills have been becoming increasing complex. Sometime in July a complete hurricane drill will be put into operation.
Already alert conditions four and three have been put into effect during various drills. As yet to be put into practice this year are alert conditions two and one.
Alert condition two means that destructive winds are but 24 hours away. Loose gear and buildings are secured. Preliminary arrangements are made to take dependents to shelters.
Condition one means that the hurricane's but a matter of minutes away. Run for shelter. A series of four groups of nine short blasts indicates alert condition one.

RECEIVES LETTER
COMMENDING CONDUCT OF BASE PERSONNEL

The Base Commander, Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, recently received a letter from the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Alshain (AKA-55)-commending the good conduct of base personnel while on liberty to Port au Prince, Haiti, 23 and 24 May. The Alshain transported to and from that liberty port.
The letter reads in part: "It is a pleasure to be able to report that the above passengers conducted themselves in a creditable manner while on board and ashore on liberty."
/s/ J.F. Foley


One husband claims his wife is Wife: What'll I do? Baby's celebrating the third anniversary swallowed the matches." of her 29th birthday. Chief: "Here, use my li'j~ter."


I i


NAVY TIMES REPORTS EM CLOTHING PRICES
SET FOR SHAKEUP

The Navy Times has reported in a recent edition-that new clothing price tags for enlisted Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel will be placed -on the books effective 1 July. The new prices will reflect changes in clothing procurement costs.
Defense Department official declined to say which clothing items would go up or down on the new price list in order to prevent personnel from going on a buying spree on items that are scheduled for increase. They said, however, that the new prices would result in changes in the basic uniform allowances.
Clothing prices took a 15 to 20 percent drop last 1 July. It also resulted in corresponding cuts in the initial clothing allowances given to new recruits and in monthly maintenance allowances.

INDIANS INCREASE

Washington (AF P S) - Unlike the buffalo, the American Indian has not decreased in number. His population has increased from 237,196 to 343,410 in the last 50 years.
Ho Hum: "Give me a sentence using the word bewitches."
Frenchie: "Youse go aheadI'll bewitches in a minute."

FALL FASHION


N ... . .
Washington (AFPS)-U. S. Marines will be sporting a "new look" this fall, according to recent uniform changes announced by Marine Corps Hq.
The new utility uniform will consist of trousers and a shirt-type coat which is similar to the civilian sport shirt with a convertible collar. Flat bone buttons will replace the old metal ones. This uniform will replace the dungarees now in use.







Page Two






Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center
Saturday, 13 June 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanaino Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer
CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer
Editorial Staff
Ensign J. McMahon .......... Staff Advisor
Al Henderson, J03 Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3- .-Sports Editor S. E. Cobbs, SN .-------------Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.














LEVERETT SALTONSTALL


Chairman of the Senate Armed
Services Committee
Sen. Leverett Saltonstall of Massachusetts became chairman of the Armed Services committee when the Republicans organized the Upper House last January.
He also serves as the Republican majority whip in the 83rd Congress and is a member of the committees on Appropriations, Small Business, and Republican Policy. As a senator he has been closely identified with legislation concerning international affairs, selective service, Armed Services unification, and veterans benefits.
Sen. Saltonstall was first elected to the Senate in November 1944. He carried Massachusetts by the largest margin ever given a candidate for statewide office-561,668. He was elected then to fill an unexpired term. In 1948 he was re-elected for a full six-year term.
Prior to his election to the Senate, he served three consecutive terms as governor of Massachusetts. From 1923 to 1937 he was a member of the state House of Representatives, serving as Speaker his last eight years.
He received his A.B. degree from Harvard University in 1914 and an LL.B degree from Harvard Law School in 1917. He also holds the honorary degree LL.D. from numerous institutions.
During WWI he served in France as a first lieutenant with the 301st Field Artillery. Four of his children served with the Armed Forces in WWII. (AFPS)

Clarksburg, Mass. (A F P S) Knowing fishing season was to open and it's a losing battle every year, school superintendeit David Malcomb ordered classes to begin at 10:30 a.m. rather than 8 o'clock on the opening day so the youngsters got two and one-half hours fishing out of their systems.


THE INDIAN


EFFORTS REWARDED BY PRESENTATION OF 2CX CERTIFICATE -Captain M. A. Moon (DC), Commanding Officer of the Dental Clinic, is pictured above presenting A. L. Young, DT1, with a certificate for successful completion of the USAFI two year college equivalency test, sometimes referred to as the 2CX award. Primarily designed for military personnel attempting to apply for military appointments or assignments requiring a minimum of two years of college level work or its equivalent. The test is by no means an easy one to _pass. It includes sections on current social problems, history and social studies, literature, science, the fine arts and mathematics.


A MESSAGE FROM GARCIA
By Henry Garcia
Recently I wrote about Jose Marti, poet, philosopher, orator and patriot. It would be impossible to paint a complete picture of this great man in but one article and consequently I am once again ready to evoke the memory of Marti.
Marti was a great lover of chil- we shall publish it with his sigdren. To him, they were the only nature so that everyone knows that pure part of humanity. "The Golden he is an intelligent boy. Boys and Age," a monthly magazine that girls usually know more than one Marti directed while living in New might think and if they were told York, was a beautiful bible of to write, they would indeed write tenderness and love. From the first very good things. They should line of the front page to the last write, of course, about things line of the back page of that maga- proper of their age, because in zine, edited "for the children of order to write about a thing you America," one could feel the live have to know that thing very well. spirit of Marti. That is the way we want the chilEmil Ludwig, a noted Pan- dren of America to be, men that American writer, said that Marti's say what they think and that say work would mean for the world it eloquently and sincerely. a step towards human redemption "What we want, in short, is that and the highest and most sensible American children should be hapexample of equality to all men on py, and that if some time a child earth, especially those fanatically from America meets us anywhere resolved to destroy other men and in the world, he may come to us, their liberties in a futile intent to shake hands with us, like he would stop the march of a progress that with an old friend, and say where has been, is and always will be everyone can hear him: 'This man achieved only through the ideals of "The Golden Age" was my of Democracy, with its freedoms of friend.'" creed, speech and thought and with
its respect for the rights of the DEFENSE SERVICE individual. MEDAL
How can human beings arrive at
understanding and respect except Washington (AFPS)-The Naby the path of love? And what tional Defense Service Medal has other sentiment is more beautiful been established to be awarded all than that that Marti had for chil- members of the Armed Forces of dren? He could do this like no one the U.S. who served during any else, giving to the children of period between June 27, 1950 and America and the entire world a a terminal date to be fixed by the simple language, pure and simple. Secretary of Defense. Each ServThe following is a translation ice will draw up its own regulafrom the "Golden Age.:" tions, authorizing award of the
"To The Children Who Read medal.
'Golden Age.'
"This magazine is for the boys,
and for the girls, of course. Without girls, life would be impossible,
just as it is impossible for the
earth to live without light.
"The boy has to work, to walk,W !
to study, to be strong and to look WI good. This a boy can accomplish
even if he is not an Apollo, for a (AFPS)-ADM William M. Fecht boy that is good, intelligent and has been appointed the new Con clean always looks good. But never Southern Europe. He succeeds, in does a boy look better than when Operations designate, ADM Robert he brings in his small, he-man's Fechteler's new command is the hands a flower for his girl friend, U.S. Sixth Fleet. or when he holds his sister by the . . * arm so that no one will offend her. Air Force Hq. announces that Boys are born to be gentlemen and the Rapid City AFB, S.D., will be girls are born to be mothers. renamed in honor of the late Brig.
"This magazine is being pub- Gen. Richard E. Ellsworth, killed lished to talk once a month, like in a B-36 crash. Gen. Ellsworth good friends, with the gentlemen was in command of the 28th Straof tomorrow and with the moth ers tegic Reconnaissance Wg. at Rapid of tomorrow, to teach the girls City at the time of his death. beautiful stories with which to
entertain their friends and to tell * * * the boys what they must do to be The Navy has announced that real men. Everything that you want the Chance Vought Aircraft Dito know, we'll teach you. We are vision of United Aircraft Corp., going to teach you in a way that has won a design competition for you will understand. We are going a new Navy day fighter. No details to tell you how the world is made of the new jet fighter will be reand what men have done up to the leased until the plane is in producpresent time. tion. It will have better perform"When a boy wants to know ance characteristics than previous something that is not in the "Gold- Navy day fighters. en Age," he can write to us, as if * * * he had known us for a long time, The Army has added to the exand we will answer his letter. It penses charged against returned does not matter if the letter has absentees or deserters. Cost of some mistakes. What matters is transportation, lodging and subthat the boy has the desire to learn. sistence of a guard or guards used
And letter is well written, in the return of bsentee or de-


Saturday, 13 June 1953


Sunday, 14 June 1953
Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930-2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)

HOSPITAL NOTES

Paul Howard, born 26 May, is the son of CDR and Mrs. J. W. Howard, ET1 and Mrs. C. L. Marsh, Jr. are the proud parents of a son, Michael Scott, born 26 May. PFC and Mrs. W. A. Schadel, announce the arrival of their son, James Robert, born 28 May. Barbara Jean Marshall, born 28 May is the bouncing baby girl of LT and Mrs. L.J. Marshall, Jr. PACT and Mrs. J. W. Bailey, Jr., are the proud parents of a baby boy, John Kevin, born 31 May. AO1 and Mrs. G. R. Hill are happy to announce the arrival of their son, George Raymond, Jr., born 6 June.
The welcome mat is extended this week to the family of CDR Campbell and also the family of LTJG Strauss. Another recent arrival and a member of the staff is H. F. Ganus, DCC, who reported for duty from the USS Palau. Welcome aboard all and best wishes for a pleasant tour at Gtmo. LCDR Atkinson, LT Nixon, LT Delaney and CWOHC Sauerbier recently returned from local leave. CAPT Kimbrough has departed for the States for a few days leave. Aso on leave in the U. S. is LT Grady. LT Carter is spending a 10 day leave in Key West and LT Holce is on 10 days local leave.

TEEN-AGE COLUMN
By Sugar Livdahl
Congratulations to Edwin Heimer who celebrated his birthday at the Teenage Club on Monday. He received some shirts, a pen, and various other presents at the party there. After refreshments, the party began to play charades.
Here's a "welcome home" to Bill Barret, who returned to Gtmo after a five years absence. Pat Burke is also back for vacation after graduation from High School in the States.


)-q r A TNz PIING TON


eler, USN, Chief of Naval Operations, mander in Chief Allied Forces in that post, the new Chief of Naval B. Carney, USN. Included in Admiral


serter will be charged against his pay accounts, under change 4 to SR 600-120-1. The charge will be in addition to those for the amount of reward or reimbursement for expenses incident to his apprehension, detention or delivery and for the cost of his own transportation to the proper station or place of trial.
The Navy Bureau of Personnel recently released a list of 61 enlisted men and 61 warrant officers who have been recommended for rank of ensign in the sixth annual Limited Duty Officer selection program. This will bring the total number of LDOs in the Navy more than 1100.

A bill, HR-5218, was introduced by Rep. Frank Ikard (D-Tex) to provide that enlisted men below pay grade E-7 who have been prisoners of war in Korea may be promoted one grade for each year, or major part of a year, of captivity, upon their return.


I


ft1








Saturday, 13 June 1953


ThIN DIAN


BRAVES' 19 RUN ATTACK
SMOTHERS IOWA NINE

The Naval Station Indians, banging out 16 hits, bombarded a team from the U.S.S. Iowa with a deluge of runs to romp to a 19-1 nonleague victory Monday night.
The Indians used three of their hits to score four runs in the first inning putting them off to a flying start while "Ski" Janowski, wh started on the mound for Naval Station was putting the Iowans down in good order. The Braves struck again in the third with six more runs as Morgan started the inning off with a single to left center. After Morgan had stolen second Webb beat out a bunt down the third base line, putting runners on first and third. Knight singled scoring Morgan and sending Webb to third, and then Webb came in to score as Rodriguez smashed out the Indians' fourth straight hit. Spillane was safe on an error by the second baseman, bringing Knight across the plate, and Greaner, after having received a base on balls, advanced on two hit batters and scored the last run as a walk forced him in.
The Indians picked up another run in the fourth and both teams scored in the fifth, the Iowans picking up their only tally on two errors and a single.
The Naval Station nine, who had their hitting clothes on that night refused to be content with a 12-1 lead and racked up two more runs in the sixth, one in the seventh, and wound the contest up with a splurge of four in the eighth, bringing the final score to 19-1.
Janowski started the game for the Indians, and pitched hitless and scoreless ball for three innings, striking out five before being relieved by Ballard in the fourth. Royal took over in the sixth and Melhoff in the ninth, all four men allowing only three hits during the evening.
Morgan had the best night at the plate, banging out three hits in three times at bat, and Knight gave the crowd a thrill in the first inning when he poled a long drive that cleared the center field fence by a substantial amount at the 350 ft. mark for a three run homer.

HOSPITAL QUITS LEAGUE
-WATCHES, LACK OF PERSONNEL TO BLAME

The Hospital Corpsmen, holders of a 2-12 record in competition in the GTMO Baseball League have withdrawn from league competition as it had become impossible for the Corpsmen to field a team. The condition can be attributed to the transfer of personnel, an insufficient number of personnel available from which to draw players, and a difficulty in arranging watches in order to allow players to be free for practice and league competition.
Due to this action, the VU-10 Mallards, Naval Station Indians, and Fleet Training Group Trainers, three teams who were scheduled to meet the Corpsmen to finish out the second round of play were awarded victories as a result of forfeit.

Did you hear about the little country gal who always went out with city fellers, because farm hands were too rough?


THIS ONE DIDN'T GET AWAY -Pictured above is fisherman B.A. Schreck, EMI, with a 90% lb. tarpon he caught recently while fishing at the mouth of the Yateras River. Schreck is attached to the Naval Station Fleet Boat Pool.


SEABEES DROP
MALLARDS 8-4 IN 8
INNING GAME

The MCB-4 Seabees tightened up the league race Wednesday night when they outhit the VU-10 Mallards 8-4 in a drawn out game that had to be called at the end of eight innings because of the 10 p.m. curfew.
The Seabees scored a run in each of the first three innings on three hits, thereby jumping off to an early lead, but the Mallards bounced right back in their half of the third with a four run rally that give them a temporary advantage. Kubic and Kirby started the inning off with singles and Crouch was safe on a fielder's choice to load the bases when Kubic slid in safely to third, beating the throw on an attempted force play. Rea then slapped a single to center, bringing in two runs, and after Loggins was safe on another fielder's choice, he and Rea came across the plate with the third and fourth runs of the inning when Ferris hit safely.
The four tallies enabled VU-10 to go out in front 4-3, but it wasn't for long for Englehardt was to hold them scoreless for the remainder of the game while the Seabees were picking up runs in the fourth, fifth, and sixth.
Ziarnek opened the sixth with a single over second. Zicolello and Murray walked, loading the bases, but Dieden rifled Richardson's ground ball to the plate to force Ziarnek. Hansen then singled to score Zicolello and Murray.
Englehardt was the winner; the Mallards using three pitchers, Myer, Esbin, and Huber, Esbin being credited with the loss.

GOLF NEWS

A GTMO golf team composed of 22 members and led by LT A.A. Grego of Naval Station and W. R. North of VU-10 journeyed to Santiago yesterday to play a match against the Santiago Country Club team.
The match, consisting of 36 holes, will be held today and tomorrow and will be played for the possession of a trophy awarded annually to the winner of the meeting between these two teams. The GTMO team took the trophy last July when they defeated the Santiago squad in a match on the local links.

May Dame Fortune ever smile on you But never her daughter-Miss Fortune.


GTMO LEAGUE
STATISTICS

(Official Statistics for First
Two Rounds)
Top Ten Batters
Player Team AB H Ave. Cherepanya NAS 63 23 .365 Rodriguez NavSta 47 17 .362 Bradshaw Marines 50 18 .360 Todd NavSta 26 9 .346 Palmer NAS 60 20 .333 Novak NAS 48 16 .333 Ziarnek MCB-4 58 18 .328 Tobin NSD 52 17 .327 Rea VU-10 38 12 .316 Loggins VU-10 43 13 .302
Homerun Leaders
Cherepanya, NAS; and Ziarnek and Grey, MCB-4 tied with 2.
RBI Leaders
Player Team RBI Cherepanya NAS 15 Palmer NAS 12 King NSD 12 Ziarnek MCB-4 12 Knight NavSta 12 Rodriguez NavSta 10 Novak NAS 10 Bradshaw Marines 9 Richardson MCB-4 9 Malkin Marines 8 Tobin NSD 8
BASEBALL STANDINGS

(As of Wednesday, 10 June)
Team Won Lost GB Marine Leathernecks ..... 11 4 NAS Flyers -------------10 5 1
Naval Station Indians __ 9 5 1 VU-10 Mallards----------9 6 2
MCB-4 Seabees.---------- 8 7 3
NSD Suppliers .......... 7 7 3/
FTG Trainers --2 12 8
PITCHING RECORDS
Player Team Won Lost Mashaw NavSta 5 0 Smith Marines 4 0 Brooks MCB-4 2 0 Trapp NAS 2 0 Poe NAS 1 0 Burton NSD 1 0 Snyder NSD 5 1 Labes Marines 8 1 Huber VU-10 3 1 Esbin VU-10 3 2 Archibald NAS 3 2
Earned Run Averages
(Team leaders pitching 30 innings
or more.)
Player Team ERA Mashaw NavSta 0.90 Smith Marines 1.35 Labes Marines 1.39 Meyer VU-10 1.50 Archibald NAS 2.82 Brooks MCB-4 3.75 Dickinson FTG 6.11
A lady was alone in her home knitting peacefully when a telegram arrived, telling her a distant cousin has passed away and left her a million dollars.Half the thrill of getting news like that, of course, comes from telling others about it. The little lady dropped her knitting, ran to the telephone, and cried excitedly, "Hello, operator! Get me anybody."

We have the highest standard of living in the world and it's driving us crazy.


MARINES TAKE OVER
FIRST PLACE; POUND THREE HURLERS FOR
14 RUNS
The Leathernecks from Marine Site, though outhit 11-8, utilized their safeties to better advantage than their opponents and took over possession of first place Wednesday night by virtue of a 14-4 win over the NAS Flyers. A contest which was anybody's ballgame during the first five innings broke wide open in the sixth when the Marines scored five runs to put them out in front with a comfortable lead that was never topped. Labes and Felkness started the works off with a walk apiece, advanced to second and third on a passed ball, and came in to score the first two runs when Tresch was safe on Smith's error. Ferris singled to left, and Trabucco loaded the bags when he took a base on balls. Bradshaw then stopped up and came through with a very timely double to right center, clearing the bases and driving in three runs to give the Marines a 9-4 advantage.
It just didn't seem to be the Flyers' night and they could gather only two more hits in the final four innings of play, while the Leathernecks were scoring a run in the seventh, one in the eighth and three more for insurance in the ninth.
Felkness was thrown out by Smith to start the top of the ninth, but Tresch and Ferris followed with bases on balls putting runners on first and second. Trabucco, who had walked three times previously then picked out one of the Flyer hurler's offerings that was in the strike zone and parked-i over the left center field fence, scoring Tresch and Ferris ahead of him and bringing the Marine total to 14. Cherepanya and Silvestrini went down swinging for the Flyers in the ninth, and the game ended when Bevington, who had walked, was thrown out while trying to steal on a nice peg by Bradshaw.
Smith and Labes handled the pitching duties for the Marines, Labes being credited with the victory, while Archibald, Novak and Poe worked for the Flyers, Archibald relieving Smith in the fourth and taking the loss.

SPORTS PERSONALITY

A familiar figure on the mound for the Fleet Training Group nine for the past three seasons has been Jim "Pop" Gettle. For the past twenty-eight years Gettle has been answering the call for spring training which started at Milan High School, Indiana where, during his younger years he was an excellent basketball player as well as a fine pitcher. In later years Jim was to organize the Southeast Indiana League at Crane, Indiana. As a Navy athlete Gettle was both player and coach in baseball and basketball during his many years of service, and compiled creditable pitching records with DesPac and SubPac squadrons. In 1936 he was a member of the Hawaiian AllStars.
During his prime Gettle depended on a blazing fast ball for much of his effectiveness. Today, much of the old zest has left his throwing arm and Jim has been using a crafty curve ball and good control during pitching chores.
Here at Guantanamo, grade school boys thank him for the interest he has displayed in teaching them the fundamentals of baseball. His competitive spirit and hustle have drawn admiration from fans and players alike, and he has been a vigorous promoter and organizer of athletics for the Training Group and the Naval Base.
We all wish him good luck on his return to Crane, Indiana. If there's still -a local ball team there, Jim Gettle will be connected with itone way or another.

Rumor has it that a wolf who was too poor to buy etchings invited the sweet young thing up to see the hand-writing on the wall.


Page Three


,60


j







THE INDIAN


Saturday, 13 June 1953


FISHING CONTEST
REPORT


SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Bolkcom, W. W..... 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L.--------3 lbs.
Scott, B. R.---------3 lbs.
Croakers
Lowenhayen, N.A. - 1 lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E.--------1lb. 8 ozs.
Tweedle, H. N.-------1lb. 8 ozs.
Shark
Gennaria, R. L..... 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Smouse, J. H.-------51 lbs.
Hardin, J.---------43 lb. 8 oz.
Trigger Fish
Endicott, C. R.-.------8 lbs. 8 ozs.
Dirkson, S.--------3 lb. 8 oz.
Coder, J.L. --------2 lbs.
Hogfish
Blount, J. M.--------1 lb. 12 ozs.
Ladyfish
Hoff, E. F.----------5 lbs.
Puckett, C. C.-------3 lbs. 4 ozs.
Mowery, J. W. .....-1 lb. 4 ozs.
Parrot Fish
Moore, L. H..-------11 lbs. 9 ozs.
Pruce, R. R.--------3 lbs. 12 ozs.
Krifha, J.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs.
Albacore
Wilkinson, R. H..... 6 lbs.
Pompano
Berlet, J. W.-------15 lbs.
French, C. D ...... 13 lbs.
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper
Tull, J. A.---------165 lbs.
Matson, J.---------20 lb. 12 oz.
Hillyer, L. E.-------19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Jacks
Hellyer, L. E.-------22 lbs. 4 ozs.
Eyster, G. W.... 22 lbs.
Mackerel
(King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P.------- 7 lbs.
Phillips, H. R.------5 lb. 8 oz.
Snappers
Abbott, G. H.-------62 lbs.
Prejean, J. W..---25 lbs. Roos, F. H.---------13 lbs.
Hogfish
Abbott, G. H.--------8 lbs.
Foy, F. D.---------6 lb. 12 oz.
Pompano
Woodward, K. S .... 17 lbs. 8 ozs. Tucker, J. L.--------5 lbs.
Parrot Fish
Prejean, J. W.----25 lbs. Sheppavd, M. E..... 23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Warner, N. S .-......67 lbs. 8 ozs.
Cavanaugh, E. H. -- 23 lbs. Franklin, E. M..... 18 lbs.
Trigger Fish
Mullins, P.----------2 lbs.
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Cheney, W. M..---20 Ibs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A.-------16 lb.
Dupree, W. L.-------15 lbs.
Esquerdo, G.A.. 15 Ibs.
Mackerel
(King)
Berggren, R. T..... 3 lbs. 8 ozs. Lantzinheiser,-------2 lbs. 12 ozs.
Snappers
Reynolds, Laura --- 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N.A. - 13 lbs. Morris, H. F....... 12 lbs. 4 ozs.
Grouper
Pinckard, J. C..---11 lbs. Gadoury, R. J.------7 lbs.
Bell, J. Jr.---------6lb. 8 oz.
Jacks
Perkins, F. G..---19 lbs. French, C. D.-------13 lbs.
Loomis, C. E.-------11 lbs. 12 ozs.
Tarpon
Smith, C. C.-------13 lb.
BOAT DIVISION
Jacks
Drake, R. J.--------21 lbs.
Sheppard, W. E.... 14 lbs. 12 ozs. Bubalka, J. M..---- 14 lbs. 4 ozs.
Barracuda
Joyner, T. H.-------21lbs.
Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Massingill, J. H.... 9 lbs. Parker, T. R.--------4 lbs. 8 ozs.
Delaney, R. E.------- 4 lb.
Snappers
Remaly, D. H.- 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Chandler, C. A. 28 lbs. 8 ozs. Esquerdo, G.-------21lbs. 4 ozs.
Snook
Rehkopf, L. P..---22 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. --- 22 lbs. Hardin, J.---------15 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Shreck, B. A.-------90 lbs.
Lightfoot, L. H.... 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P..---49 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Pass, J. S.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs.
Franklin, B. A. 3 lbs. 8 ozs. Wilkinson, R. H . 3 lbs.
Grouper
Krifka, J.----------9 lbs.


CROSSWORD PUZZLE


Across 1-Crafty 4-Shut noisily 8-Resort 11-Footwear 12 Story 13-Knock 14-Symbol for
tantalum 15-Conjunction 17-Chastise 19-Skill 21-Algonquian
Indian
23-Make lace 24-Whip 26-Infavor of 28-Courageous
person
31-Tibetan gazelle 33 Girl's name 35-Transgression 36-Near 38-Small explosive 41-Hebrew letter 42-Long, slender
fish
44-Period of time 45-Aged 47-Fish sauce 49-Music:
as written 51-Dumb


54-Negative 56-Greek letter 58-Sea eagle 59-Climbing
device
62-Definite article 64-Three-toed
sloth
65-Poem 66-African tree 68-Skidded 70-Thick, black
substance 71-Float in air 72-Heavenly body

Down
1-Portion 2-Behold 3-Japanese unit of money 4-Strip of leather 5-Note of scale
6 Priest's vestment 7-Encounter 8-Declares 9-Man's nickname 10-Simian 11-Pierce 16-Bone
18-College cheer


20-Children's
game
22-Having
scalloped edge 25-Dress in one's
finery (slang) 27-Eggs
29-Tear 30-Unit 32-Exist 34-Fuss 36-Turksh officer 37-Hindu cymbals 39-Bitter vetch 40-Shade tree 43-Pay back 46-Owing 48-Edible fish 50-Essence 52-To form by
instruction 53-Wife of
Geraint
55-Girl's nickname 57-Exclamation 59-Parcel of land 60-Girl's name 61-Greek letter 63-Worm 67-Babylonian
deity
69-Symbol for
lutecium


BASEBALL SCHEDULES 13-19 JUNE
NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday 13 June
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh Chicago at Brooklyn St. Louis at New York
Cincinnati at Philadelphia Sunday 14 June Milwaukee (2) at Pittsburgh Chicago at Brooklyn
St. Louis at New York
Cincinnati (2) at Philadelphia Monday 15 June No games
Tuesday 16 June
Philadelphia (night) at
Milwaukee
New York (night) at Cincinnati
Pittsburgh (2) at Chicago
Brooklyn (night) at St. Louis


Wednesday 17 June Philadelphia (night) at Milwaukee
New York (night) at Cincinnati Pittsburgh at Chicago
Brooklyn (night) at St. Louis Thursday 18 June Philadelphia at Milwaukee New York at Cincinnati Pittsburgh at Chicago Brooklyn at St. Louis Friday 19 June New York (night) at Milwaukee Philadelphia (night) at
Cincinnati
Brooklyn at Chicago
Pittsburgh (night) at St. Louis


AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday 13 June
Boston at Chicago
Philadelphia at St. Louis Washington at Detroit New York at Cleveland Sunday 14 June
Boston (2) at Chicago
Philadelphia (2) at St. Louis
Washington at Detroit
New York (2) at Cleveland Monday 15 June
No games
Tuesday 16 June
Chicago (night) at Washington
Cleveland (night) at
Philadelphia
St. Louis at New York
Detroit (night) at Boston


Wednesday 17 June Chicago (night) at Washington Cleveland (night) at Philadelphia
St. Louis at New York
Detroit at Boston Thursday 18 June
Chicago (night) at Washington
Cleveland (night) at
Philadelphia
St. Louis at New York
Detroit at Boston Friday 19 June
Cleveland (night) at Washington Chicago (night) at Philadelphia
Detroit at New York
St. Louis at Boston


GUANTANAMO LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday 13 June
NAS vs VU-10 at Marine Site Sunday 14 June Marines vs MCB-4 at Marine Site Monday 15 June Naval Station vs NSD at Fleet Recreation Center Tuesday 16 June
NAS 1B74 at


Fleet Recreation Center Wednesday 17 June Marines vs FTG at Fleet Recreation Center


Thursday 18 June
VU-10 vs NSD at
Fleet Recreati


ter


LADIES' FISHING
CONTEST

LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Laura Reynolds .... 8 lbs. 8 ozs.
Grouper
Irene Coder--------2 lbs.
Jacks
Irene Coder-.-----2 lbs. Peggy Catchaleovitch 1 lb.
Snapper
Doris Ward---------1 lb. 12 ozs.
Eva Dupree--------1 lb. 8 ozs. Lucy Howell--------1 lb. 6 ozs. Irene Coder--------I lb.
BOAT DIVISION
Barracuda
V.D. Wreath------ I lb.
Grouper
Marjorie Bowers _---1lb. Darlene Puckett 1-- Ilb. 8 ozs.
Snapper
Darlene Puckett _-- 2 lbs. 8 ozs. Mary Adams-------1 lb. 12 ozs. Ann Carothers --- 8 ozs.
SPECIAL DIVISION
Parrot Fish
Irene Coder .-----. 1 lb. 8 ozs.
Shark
Fay Yarbro ----- 2 lbs. 8 ozs.
Trigger Fish
Irene Coder ------ 3 lbs.
SPEAR FISHING
Parrot Fish
Betty Herlin--------1 lb. 12 ozs.
Fish not entered in contest:
Mexican Sand Fish Irene Coder .......
Sand Flounder
Irene Coder 8 ozs.
Bermuda Chub
Irene Coder--------2 lbs.
Yellow Grunt
Mrs. L. H. Hayden - 8 ozs.
The Ladies' Fishing Contest closes midnight tomorrow 14 June, 1953, so be sure to get your final entries in before its too late.


Oakmont, P-a. (AtF-) - Hundreds of servicemen, including Gen. Omar Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were among the 9,972 golfers who beat U.S. Open champion Julius Boros in the recent National Golf Day Contest.
It was the second annual event sponsored by Life Magazine and the Professional Golfers Assn. which saw a total of more than 103,000 golfers attempt to beat Boros' two-under-par score of 70. Each golfer paid an entry fee of $1 which goes to the USO and the National Golfing Association. All entrants were allowed to apply their handicaps to the scores.
Gen. Bradley earned his "I Beat Boros" medal with a score of 8112 69. The tournaments were conducted at nation-wide courses where thousands competed. Last year approximately 14,000 out of 80,000 competitors were able to top Ben Hogan's score of 72.
West Point, N.Y. (AFPS)-In a recent field day here, Naval Academy athletes took three out of five contests from the Military Academy, winning in the baseball, lacrosse and tennis meets. The Cadets were victorious in the track and golf duels.
The Midshipmen won the baseball contest 10-2 scored in tennis 6-3 and knocked the Cadets out of the national intercollegiate lacrosse finals with a 10 to 7 win. Army produced its seventh straight track meet victory with a 73Y2 to 57/2 win over the Sailors. On the links, Army won 4-3.

FERMIN PAVILA SEZ:

The waters from Fisherman Point up to the old dumps south of NAS are now excellent grounds for red snappers. Fish in shallow water and use mullet or bonefish for bait. The best fishing time is from sunset to about 10 p.m.

ATTENTION FISHERMEN!

Just a little notice to remind all you anglers that the contest will end a week from tomorrow at midnght on 21 June, 1953. There's still some time to pull in a couple of whoppers and win a prize.
Sailor (in phone conversation): "Darling, will you be mine? I'll love you and love you forever."
Operator: "You were cut off. Is there anything I can do?"
Sailor: "I'll say so, honey. What are you doing tonight?"


Page Four


04









Saturday, 13 June 1953 THE INDIAN e~S Page Five


NAS VICTORIOUS IN TWO PISTOL MATCHES -Captain Frank Bruner, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station, is pictured above with members of the Naval Air Station Pistol Team holding the trophies awarded them in the recent base-wide rifle competition. They are, from left to right: R.T. Underwood, AN, CAPT Bruner, Lieutenant J.H. McLeod, Jr., Team Captain, and R.R. Varnell. Another team member, 0. P. Hamlen, AM3, is not pictured above All team members received the Navy's Expert Pistol Medal.


SMITH CAPTURES CARBINE HONORS -CAPT Bruner presents the carbine rifle High Individual Trophy to James P. Smith, RMC, of the Naval Air Station Communications Office. Smith also qualified and received the Navy's Expert Rifle Medal.


SN: "What kind of service is your new used car giving you?"
BMC: "Fifty-fifty. One morning it carries me to work, the next, I carry it."

"Want to take my sister to a dance?" the foreman asked.
"What does she look like?" the laborer questioned.
"I'll pay expenses," said the foreman.
"Sorry, but I have a date."
Here's to the Reno widow! After each divorce she feels like a new man.
Usually you can tell by looking at a girl what kind of a past she is going to have.


"My son doesn't, want to get married."
"Yeah? Just wait until the wrong girl comes along."

It was their first date and they were both thinking of the same thing. She called it mental telepathy'; he called it beginner's luck

He admired the costume of the leading chorus girl.
"Who made her dress?"
"The police."

If every boy in the Unites States could read every girls' mind, the gas consumption would drop off at least fifty percent.


ATOMIC SUBS WILL BE FIRST TO USE
STEAM UNDERWATER

Steam, next to sail and oars, is the oldest marine motive power, but until now it has never been successfully taken below the surface by submarines. With the coming of atomic submarines, a new first will be accomplished by the U.S. Navy.
Taking steam power under water will be possible in the USS
Nautilus and her sister sub USS
Sea Wolf only because of a "closed ' . cycle" principle used in transferring atomic heat into steam. There
is no exhaust. Steam, after passing through the turbine, is condensed and sent back to the fresh
water tank to be used again,
The Navy is taking no chances
on a failure in their nuclear power plants. To allow for any case of
nuclear failure in the A-sub, two (This is the first in a series of articles alternate power plants will be in- containing the latest voting information in accordance with change #3 of DA Pamstalled: a diesel engine and electric phlet 50, NavPers 15850C, AF Pamphlet motors. 34-5-IC, and change #3 of CG Personnel Circular 8-52. It applies to Service personThe Nautilus will have a "therm- nel.dependents residing with Service peral" type reactor while the Sea sonnel and U. S. citizens attached to, and Wolf will be powered by a faster serving with, U. S. Armed Forces beyond "intermediate" reactor. The main the continental limits of the U. S.) difference in these two types of Eleven states will hold state nuclear power plants will be in only and/or local elections during the one phase of the transfer of heat summer and fall of 1953. from the reactor to produce steam Generally s p e a k i n g, Armed which will turn the propeller Forces personnel and civilians offishafts. cially attached to, and serving with,
In the Nautilus, the heat from the Armed Forces of the United the reactor is drawn off by water States will not be able to vote in (the coolant agent) being pumped person if stationed outside their through pipes at high pressure. home states. Laws in most states, The hot water goes to the boiler however, provide for voting by abwhere the. heat is transferred to sentee ballot for Service personnel. the feed water system. Here the In many cases, servicemen and heat again produces steam which women will return to their home will drive the sub's turbines, states upon completion of their
The spinning turbines-through service requirements and therea series of reduction gears-turn fore it is to their advantage to take the propellers, part in the state and local elections
One phase of the operation will at home.
be done a little differently in the Information concerning the firsi Sea Wolf. In its transfer of nuclear two states holding elections of any heat, the "intermediate" power kind during the summer and fall plant will use a liquid metal to of 1953 is as follows: draw the heat from the reactor Connecticut instead of water, as used in the Towns, cities and boroughs will Nautilus. hold elections on varying dates.
A part of the steam created will (Schedule can be obtained from be used to feed turbo-generators local I & E offices) Service personwhere it will produce electric cur- nel may obtain ballots by mailing rent for the submarine. After- the Federal Post Card Applicatior wards, the condensed steam will be to town, city or borough clerk at pumped back to the boiler for place of Conn. residence. re-use.
Heavy shielding will be built Mississippi
around the reactors to protect the The general election for mayors crews from dangerous radiation, members of Boards of Aldermen, Also, a monitoring system will and other municipal or local offibe installed to sound an alarm cers in most municipalities will be should radiation rise. held June 2, 1953. Application for
In addition, all crewmen will ballots by the Federal Post Cai, wear pocket dosimeters which will Application may be made at any be checked regularly to insure that time to City or County Registrar. no man receives more than a toler- Next Week: Kentucky and Virginia. able radiation exposure, and scientists have developed electronic WITH PEANUTS? "watchdogs" that will shut off the
atomic engine if things go wrong. Orlando, Fla. (AFPS)-City commissioners handed down the ruling
"Allow me to present my wife that elephants may park on local to you." streets, but must pay parking "Oh no thanks, I have one." meter fees.


NOW HEAR THIS!
By Mike Static
W.G.B.Y. still going through face-lifting job and many program changes . . Brand new show! . . "There's Music In The Air!" every Saturday at 5 p.m. with Alfredo Antonini doling out the light classics and ballads . . . here's a switch for you, "Symphonette now heard at 10 p.m. on Monday and "Symphonies For Youth" at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday . Give a listen to Georgia Price on "Big Time" Sunday night at 8:30 as he takes you back to yesterday... the "Duke" of Ellington will be a guest on "Bud's Bandwagon" Monday at 11:30 a.m. and will give out with some fine sounds-... The king of Progression will be awarded the '52 downbeat medal on "Al Goodman's Musical Album" Wednesday at 8, the King? . . . why, Stan Kenton, of course! . . . "Hollywood Radio Theatre" features Kirk Douglas teamed with Jo Stafford in the "Young Man With A Horn', that's Sunday at 10 p.m. . ... Hear The great Liberace guest on the Charlie McCarthy-Edgar Bergen show this Sunday at 9 in the evening....
. . . Victor Mature takes the drama role on Friday's "Suspense", a real thriller. . ... Don't forget to lend an ear to "True Adventures" each and every Wednesday eve at 6:30, true tales of Man and his continual struggle to survive and conquer the overpowering elements of Nature"... For the latest in News and Sports and the very best in music, keep tuned to 1450 on your radio dial!



a


INDIAN STRIKER? -The Mohawk haircut belongs to one Ronnie Ornelas, son of Lieutenant and Mrs. V. M. Ornelas. When asked the reason for the unusual haircut, Ronnie replied, "A guy's got to keep cool, you know." Ronnie, incidently, took the part of Nicky in the recent Little Theatre presentation of "Strange Bedfellows."

ft


Saturday, 13 June 1953


6)0


THE INDIAN


b)* Page Five







Navy-10kDPPO-Gtmo. 3867-B


.4


TH18 :NDIAN


WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Regular Programs - Monday Through Friday


HOSIERY HUCKSTER


0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 Solitary Singer 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News



Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonies for Youth 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News
1830 Life with Luigi 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Time 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Two Thousand Plus 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off
Sunday
0800 Hymns of World 0815 News
0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News
1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Piano Playhouse 1730 Greatest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 News
1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny
1930 Twilight Time 2000 Phil Harris 2030-Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions


Washington (AFPS)-The practice of discounting in the financing of G.I. home loans by lenders and builders will be sharply restricted by the Veterans Administration.
Discounting is the act a builder selling a mortgage to a lender for less than the face value of his loan. This results in tjie lender receiving the same as a higher interest rate since he would get the same total return but at'a smaller initial investment. Thus it has been possible for a lender to receive more than the former four-percent maximum interest rate.


1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 Storyteller 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 At Ease 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1845 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Time 2025 This I Believe 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off


2155 News 2200 Hollywod Radio Theater 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off

Monday
0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story
2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Piano Playhouse 2200 Symphonette

Tuesday
0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0830 Playboys 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Dragnet 2030 People are Funny 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200-American Music Hall

Wednesday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Paulena Carter 1730 Secret Mission 1830 True Adventure 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barolow Presents

Thursday
0830 Playboys
0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day, 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America
Friday
0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense
2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


Under the higher four-and-ahalf interest rate the VA figures there should be no need for a continuation of the discount arrangement. The usual result of this has been that the veteran-borrower has to absorb the cost of the discount either by paying a higher price or by taking lower quality construction.

The nurse asked the little brother if he would like to see the new baby.
"Nope," said Johnny, "but I'd like to see the stork."


The all-time American favorite in the popular music field-Hoagy Carmichael's "Star Dust"-has the distinction of being the most recorded song in the history of Tin Pan Alley. To date, it has been waxed in 350 versions. Most popular are the Artie Shaw and Bing Crosby efforts Joni James
has signed with Tony, Acquaviva, who also handles Bob Haymes. Joni just recently split ......... with Roy Rodde
who launched
her with the "Why Don't You Believe Me?" hit . . . Music world saddened by the
Jackie Xristoff 'death of Django
Reinhardt, the fabulous jazz guitarist. He was 43
Lucy Monroe and Jackie Kristoff on their way to Korea for the USO; Jackie, by the way, is one of the youngest performers to hit the USO circuit-she's 19.. The Indiantown Gappers evidently can spot a good thing. They recently nominated her as their "Sweetheart"... 20th Century-Fox director Sam Fuller has a problem that we can readily appreciate. While filming the "Pickup on South Street" with Richard Widmark and Jean Peters, he ran up against the problem of what to do with the 100 extras. he was trying to squeeze in a 12' by 6' section of a subway car. So, he just had assistants make like typical subway guards and push the extras in, instructing them meanwhile to stand on one foot-so what's news about that ? Happens -every day. . ... 1,600 Marines of the 1st Provisional Marine Air Ground Task Force, FMF, will take part in the Caine Mutiny. Their maneuvers in mid-June will be recorded for inclusion in the film being shot on location in Hawaii by Columbia . . . Paramount to film 3-D color cartoon shorts... Edgar Allan Poe's "Murders in The Rue Morgue," to get the 3-D and color treatment from Warner Bros.
She: "I'm living in a dormitory at college."
He: "A what?"
She: "A dormitory. You know what that is. What did you sleep in while you were in the Navy?"
He "My skivvies."
A farmer bought a parrot for $10 and asked the auctioneer if the bird talked. "You should know, he's been bidding against you for 30 minutes."
Bars are something which, if you go into many of, you are apt to come out singing a few of, and maybe land behind some.


AnserofPszI


Actress Gale Storm exposes a weilfilled nylon as visible proof that the lady's stocking is here to stay. She's publicizing the 13th year of nylon selling in the U.S.

NEW RECORDS

Cupid Takes Aim ...
The month of June makes its 1953 debut and with it thousands say "I Do"-commencing the conventional moon, June, spoon season. Suddenly, a surge of new releases hits the airways and record stands. All reflect the same theme-amour. For example: eight new sides by the Jackie Gleason Orchestra neatly packaged in an album entitled "Lover's Rhapsody," revive some universal favorites such as "When Your Lover Has Gone," "Tenderly," "I'm Through With Love," and "Dark Is The Night."
Plus a four chapter mood-provoking suite arranged by C. Dudley King Jr. and conducted by Jackie Gleason designed to illustrate through' soft inspiring strings and a deft reed section, "Desire," "Flirtation," "Temptation," and last, by no means least, "Enchantment."
If this fails to impress you, then let us suggest the unique "Wedding Album" featuring Richard Ellsasser at the console of the mighty Hammond electric organ.
The album offers many of the beloved pieces heard at -a wedding ceremony such as "Because," Schubert's "Ava Maria," "The Wedding March" from Lohengrin by Wagner and many more discintive selections.




Saturday, 13 June
WESTWARD THE WOMEN
R. Taylor D. Darcel
Sunday, 14 June
CITY BENEATH THE SEA
R. Ryan M. Powers
Monday, 15 June
KANSAS PACIFIC
S. Hayden E. Miller
plus
I Remember The Glory
The Speed Queen Tuesday, 16 June
CRY OF THE HAUNTED
V. Gassman B. Sullivan
plus
Missing Mouse College Circus
Wednesday, 17 June
GIRLS OF PLEASURE ISLAND D. Taylor L. Glenn
Thursday, 18 June
THE SYSTEM
F. Lovejoy J. Weldon
plus
Sports Review Friday, 19 June
TONIGHT WE SING
D. Wayne E. Pinza


� �


Saturday, 13 June 1953




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4. Qhe Vol. V, No. 39 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 June 1953 CUT IN OVERSEAS DUTY PER DIEM AT GUANTANAMO BAY EXPECTED 1 JULY Enlisted personnel serving with their dependents at Guantanamo Bay will in all probability suffer a cut of $1.05 a day in station per diem subsistence allowances effective 1 July, states Lieutenant E. F. Bailey, (SC), Disbursing Officer for the Naval Supply Depot. In an A.F.P.S. release, the Defense Department has stated that this is a result of a periodical reNAMED CHIEF OF NAVAL view of travel and station allowOPERATIONS ances. In all probability, the cut will effect other overseas duty stations as well as Guantanamo Bay. The purpose of the adjustment is to "bring total overseas allowances for subsistence for enlisted personnel in line with their allowances in the U.S.," the Department explained. The allowances paid to officers and single enlisted personnel were not changed since they r' are already comparable to those paid in the U.S. Enlisted men principally affected are those with dependents who have drawn extra allowances when government messes are available in areas such as Alaska. Newfoundland, Canada, France, Great Britain, Iceland, North Africa, the Philippines, Puerto Rico and Saudi Arabia. These men will now draw the lesser allowance which is provided for enlisted personnel with dependents when a government mess is not available in the area. Admiral Rohert B. Carney, now CamNet effect is a monthly cut avermanner in Chief of NATO forces in aging $31.50 for men with deSuthern Europe, has been nadlb pendents in areas in which govwilliam M. Fehteleras th Chief of ernment messes are available. ExNaval Operaions. amples of the adjustment are as follows: Alaska-$2.40 to $1.35. 14 GUANTANAMO MEN Newfoundland-$1.80 to $0.75. TO BE PROMOTED TO Canada (except Ft. Churchill and CPO TUESDAY Newfoundland)-$1.05 to nothing. France-varies depending upon Fourteen first class petty officers location. Paris goes from $3.30 to at Guantanamo Bay will be among $2.25. the 2,727 enlisted men to swop Great Britain -in most areas, their white hats for the hard hats $1.80 to $0.75; London, $2.35 to of a chief petty officer Tuesday. $1.30. All promotions will be acting North Africa (Casablanca, Nouappointments (temporary) and are asseur, Rabat, and Sale)-$3.40 to the result of the service-wide ex$2.35; Sidi Slimane, $2.95 to $1.90. examination held 3 February. Philippines (except Rizal ProvThe Fleet Training Group and ince)-$2.70 to $1.65. the Fleet Training Center take top Rizal Province-$2.80 to $1.75. honors, with seven men, fifty perPuerto Rico-$2.25 to $1.20. cent of the promotions for the Saudi Arabia-$4.55 to $3.50. base, being promoted to CPO. They The allowances will be reduced are: F. .Chapman, SOC. R. L. by a change to the joint travel Shelf, RDC, F. A. Homer, SOC. W. regulations. Koty SOC n. McGeffery, RDC, a.trC Gunranao, ndj Ba wil mng NEWSLETTER REPORTS NORFOLK'S "NEW LOOK" Washington (P. R. N.) -Hardly any Navy man who put in time in Norfolk, Va., during World War II remembers the city with any fond recollections whatsoever. But in the years following the war, a strange and wonderful metamorphosis has been taking place on the banks of Hampton Roads. Postwar Norfolk has taken on a "new look"-and, even more important an entirely new outlook towards the navy man. The Atlanta (Ga.) Journal reports: "Servicemen who were stationed at Norfolk during World War II or whose ships made the city a port of call, remember the place unpleasantly. During the years of the war Norfolk was overcrowded, generally inhospitable, and accumulated a collection of picturesque and unprintable nicknames unmatched by any American city. "All that seems to have changed. The citizens of Norfolk have had time to catch their breath since the great sailor inundation of 194142, and everybody now loves everybody else. .. "Gone are the signs that read 'Sailor Keep Out!' Southern hospitality flowers once more along Hampton Roads. Score another triumph for public relations, for the men of the fleet and the warmhearted Virginians." So when your orders read: .to Norfolk, Va., for duty," don't shudder. You're in for a most pleasant surprise! R. F. :Sterling, ETC and W. wiro, DCC. The command with the next largest number of promotions to chief petty officer is Mobile Construction Battalion FOUR. The battalion has three men being promoted to CPO. They are: H. M. Oakes, SKC, L. L. Newman, CMC and A. F. Leheup, BULC. The Naval Station reports two men being promoted to chief. They are: W. T. S. Walker, EMC and J. M. Goldman, MEC. The Naval Air Station also reports two men being promoted to chief, one of the two being on T.A.D. orders from Utility Squadron Ten. The two are: C. L. Swisher, ADC(AP) and T.H. Atkins, SDC. None of the other commands reported promotions to CPO. Examination results for those not among the 2727 listed can be obtained by submitting requests similar in form to enclosure three of BuPers Instruction 1418.7. Only 97 of the new CPO rates will go to reservists. Twelve of the 2630 Regulars to be advanced are Waves and there are five women reservists. At least one first-class petty officer was upped in each rating despite the fact that the number of chiefs in some is already in excess of requirements. Greatest perceetage of the promotions are being made in the two machinist's mate ratings where a total of 399 men are slated for visored hats. The yeoman ratings is next with 137. HURRICANE DRILLS NOT SO SILLY ONCE YOU'VE BEEN IN A HURRICANE June is the month that begins the hurricane season in the Caribbean area. Until the first of December, we can expect to hear of hurricanes developing in the area. "So what?" you might ask. "Why all the fuss and bother? Why have these silly hurricane drills?" Well, Mr. Know-It-All, here's an attempt to answer your questions. A whole gale is a fearful thing, but a hurricane is much more than that. Multiply the force of a whole gale by two and you'll have some idea of the tremendous striking power of a hurricane. Whatever you call it-a hurricane, willy willy, banguio or typhoon-it's a tropical storm that spells danger to lives and property. In the Pacific in 1944, a typhoon struck, damaging 28 ships. Although most of the fleet caught in that convulsion of terrific destructive force lived through it, three destroyers capsized and went down with nearly all hands on hoard. A total of 800 officers and men were either lost or killed. And this was not an unusual storm! If that's not convincing enough for you, here's what happened a few months later. Another typhoon struck and, if anything, it was worse than the first. A heavy cruiser, the Pittsburg, had her bow ripped off, as though a giant hand had picked her up and snapped her like a matchstick. And, the Pittsburgh is no rowboat! During the same storm, great carriers like the Hornet and the Bennington had as much as 50 feet of their flight decks smashed beyond repair. Pick up any daily newspaper, listen to the newsbroadcasts and you will know that it's not only the ships at sea that are effected by the devistation of typhoon and hurricanes but cities, villages and agricultural areas as well. Unlike the ships at sea, cities and villages-and naval basescan not run from the path of oncoming hurricanes. In order to survive the ordeal of a hurricane here at Guantanamo Bay, drills are being put into effect in order to familiarize base personnel with the measures which must be taken in order to safeguard lives and property. These drills have been becoming increasing complex. Sometime in July a complete hurricane drill will be put into operation. Already alert conditions four and three have been put into effect during various drills. As yet to be put into practice this year are alert conditions two and one. Alert condition two means that destructive winds are but 24 hours away. Loose gear and buildings are secured. Preliminary arrangements are made to take dependents to shelters. Condition one means that the hurricane's but a matter of minutes away. Run for shelter. A series of four groups of nine short blasts indicates alert condition one. RECEIVES LETTER COMMENDING CONDUCT OF BASE PERSONNEL The Base Commander, Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, recently received a letter from the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Alshain (AKA-55) commending the good conduct of base personnel while on liberty to Port au Prince, Haiti, 23 and 24 May. The Alshain transported to and from that liberty port. The letter reads in part: "It is a pleasure to be able to report that the above passengers conducted themselves in a creditable manner while on board and ashore on liberty." /s/ J. F. Foley One husband claims his wife is Wife: What'll I do? Baby's celebrating the third anniversary swallowed the matches." of her 29th birthday. Chief: "Here, use my 1H'hter." It "7 NAVY TIMES REPORTS EM CLOTHING PRICES SET FOR SHAKEUP The Navy Times has reported in a recent edition that new clothing price tags for enlisted Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard personnel will be placed on the books effective 1 July. The new prices will reflect changes in clothing procurement costs. Defense Department official declined to say which clothing items would go up or down on the new price list in order to prevent personnel from going on a buying spree on items that are scheduled for increase. They said, however, that the new prices would result in changes in the basic uniform allowances. Clothing prices took a 15 to 20 percent drop last 1 July. It also resulted in corresponding cuts in the initial clothing allowances given to new recruits and in monthly maintenance allowances. INDIANS INCREASE Washington (AF P S) -Unlike the buffalo, the American Indian has not decreased in number. His population has increased from 237,196 to 343,410 in the last 50 years. Ho Hum: "Give me a sentence using the word bewitches." Frenchie: "Youse go aheadI'll bewitches in a minute." FALL FASHION Washington (AFPS)-U. S. Marines will be sporting a "new look" this fall, according to recent uniform changes announced by Marine Corps Hq. The new utility uniform will consist of trousers and a shirt-type coat which is similar to the civilian sport shirt with a convertible collar. Flat bone buttons will replace the old metal ones. This uniform will replace the dungarees now in use. ) r T

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Saturday, 13 June 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 13 June 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Ensign J. McMahonStaff Advisor Al Henderson, JO3 ----------Editor J. C. Dierks, JO3Sports Editor S. E. Cobbs, SN--Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. LEVERETT SALTONSTALL Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee Sen. Leverett Saltonstall of Massachusetts became chairman of the Armed Services committee when the Republicans organized the Upper House last January. He also serves as the Republican majority whip in the 83rd Congress and is a member of the committees on Appropriations, Small Business, and Republican Policy. As a senator he has been closely identified with legislation concerning international affairs, selective service, Armed Services unification, and veterans benefits. Sen. Saltonstall was first elected to the Senate in November 1944. He carried Massachusetts by the largest margin ever given a candidate for statewide office-561,668. He was elected then to fill an unexpired term. In 1948 he was re-elected for a full six-year term. Prior to his election to the Senate, he served three consecutive terms as governor of Massachusetts. From 1923 to 1937 he was a member of the state House of Representatives, serving as Speaker his last eight years. He received his A.B. degree from Harvard University in 1914 and an LL.B degree from Harvard Law School in 1917. He also holds the honorary degree LL.D. from numerous institutions. During WWI he served in France as a first lieutenant with the 301st Field Artillery. Four of his children served with the Armed Forces in WWII. (AFPS) Clarksburg, Mass. (A F P S) Knowing fishing season was to open and it's a losing battle every year, school superintendent David Malcomb ordered classes to begin at 10:30 a.m. rather than 8 o'clock on the opening tday so the youngsters got two and one-half hours fishing out of their systems. EFFORTS REWARDED BY PRESENTATION OF 2CX CERTIFICATE -Captain M. A. Moon (DC), Commanding Officer of the Dental Clinic, is pictured above presenting A. L. Young, DT1, with a certificate for successful completion of the USAFI two year college equivalency test, sometimes referred to as the 2CX award. Primarily designed for military personnel attempting to apply for military appointments orassignments requiring a minimum of two years of college level work or its equivalent. The test is by no means an easy onto vass. It includes sections on current social problems, history and social studies, literature, science, the fine arts and mathematics. A MESSAGE FR By Henry Recently I wrote about Jose Ma patriot. It would be impossible to pai man in but one article and conseq evoke the memory of Marti. Marti was a great lover of children. To him, they were the only pure part of humanity. "The Golden Age," a monthly magazine that Marti directed while living in New York, was a beautiful bible of tenderness and love. From the first line of the front page to the last line of the back page of that magazine, edited "for the children of America," one could feel the live spirit of Marti. Emil Ludwig, a noted PanAmerican writer, said that Marti's work would mean for the world a step towards human redemption and the highest and most sensible example of equality to all men on earth, especially those fanatically resolved to destroy other men and their liberties in a futile intent to stop the march of a progress that has been, is and always will be achieved only through the ideals of Democracy, with its freedoms of creed, speech and thought and with its respect for the rights of the individual. How can human beings arrive at understanding and respect except by the path of love? And what other sentiment is more beautiful than that that Marti had for children? He could do this like no one else, giving to the children of America and the entire world a simple language, pure and simple. The following is a translation from the "Golden Age:" "To The Children Who Read 'Golden Age.'" "This magazine is for the boys, and for the girls, of course. Without girls, life would be impossible, just as it is impossible for the earth to live without light. "The boy has to work, to walk, to study, to be strong and to look good. This a boy can accomplish even if he is not an Apollo, for a boy that is good, intelligent and clean always looks good. But never does a boy look better than when he brings in his small, he-man's hands a flower for his girl friend, or when he holds his sister by the arm so that no one will offend her. Boys are born to be gentlemen and girls are born to be mothers. "This magazine is being published to talk once a month, like good friends, with the gentlemen of tomorrow and with the mothers of tomorrow, to teach the girls beautiful stories with which to entertain their friends and to tell the boys what they must do to be real men. Everything that you want to know, we'll teach you. We are going to teach you in a way that you will understand. We are going to tell you how the world is made and what men have done up to the present time. "When a boy wants to know something that is not in the "Golden Age," he can write to us, as if he had known us for a long time, and we will answer his letter. It does not matter if the letter has some mistakes. What matters is that the boy has the desire to learn. Andche letter is well written, ROM GARCIA Garcia rti, poet, philosopher, orator and int a complete picture of this great uently I am once again ready to we shall publish it with his signature so that everyone knows that he is an intelligent boy. Boys and girls usually know more than one might think and if they were told to write, they would indeed write very good things. They should write, of course, about things proper of their age, because in order to write about a thing you have to know that thing very well. That is the way we want the children of America to be, men that say what they think and that say it eloquently and sincerely. "What we want, in short, is that American children should be happy, and that if some time a child from America meets us anywhere in the world, he may come to us, shake hands with us, like he would with an old friend, and say where everyone can hear him: 'This man of "The Golden Age" was my friend.' DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL Washington (AFPS)-The National Defense Service Medal has been established to be awarded all members of the Armed Forces of the U.S. who served during any period between June 27, 1950 and a terminal date to be fixed by the Secretary of Defense. Each Service will draw up its own regulations, authorizing award of the medal. Sunday, 14 June 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturday, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015, Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) HOSPITAL NOTES Paul Howard, born 26 May, is the son of CDR and Mrs. J. W. Howard, ET1 and Mrs. C. L. Marsh, Jr. are the proud parents of a son, Michael Scott, born 26 May. PFC and Mrs. W. A. Schadel, announce the arrival of their son. James Robert, born 28 May. Barbara Jean Marshall, born 28 May is the bouncing baby girl of LT and Mrs. L. J. Marshall, Jr. PACT and Mrs. J. W. Bailey, Jr., are the proud parents of a baby boy, John Kevin, born 31 May. AO1 and Mrs. G. R. Hill are happy to announce the arrival of their son, George Raymond, Jr., born 6 June. The welcome mat is extended this week to the family of CDR Campbell and also the family of LTJG Strauss. Another recent arrival and a member of the staff is H. F. Ganus, DCC, who reported for duty from the USS Palau. Welcome aboard all and best wishes for a pleasant tour at Gtmo. LCDR Atkinson, LT Nixon, LT Delaney and CWOHC Sauerbier recently returned from local leave. CAPT Kimbrough has departed for the States for a few days leave. Aiso on leave in the U. S. is LT Grady. LT Carter is spending a 10 day leave in Key West and LT Hole is on 10 days local leave. TEEN-AGE COLUMN By Sugar Livdahl Congratulations to Edwin Heimer who celebrated his birthday at the Teenage Club on Monday. He received some shirts, a pen, and various other presents at the party there. After refreshments, the party began to play charades. Here's a "welcome home" to Bill Barret, who returned to Gtmo after a five years absence. Pat Burke is also back for vacation after graduation from High School in the States. PTEP O/~r An WASHINGTON (AFPS)-ADM William M. Fechteler, USN, Chief of Naval Operations, has been appointed the new Commander in Chief Allied Forces in Southern Europe. He succeeds, in that post, the new Chief of Naval Operations designate, ADM Robert B. Carney, USN. Included in Admiral Fechteler's new command is the U.S. Sixth Fleet. serter will be charged against his pay accounts, under change 4 to Air Force Hq announces thatSR 600-120-1. The charge will be the Rapid City AFB, S.D., will be on ad oembrsemnt renamed in honor of the late Brig. Gen. Richard E. Ellsworth, killed expenses incident to his apprein a B-36 crash. Gen. Ellsworth pension, detention or delivery and was in command of the 28th Strafor the cost of his own transportategic Reconnaissance Wg. at Rapid tfonrtothe proper station or place City at the time of his death. of ta. S61The Navy Bureau of Personnel The Navy has announced that recently released a list of 61 ent the Chance Vought Aircraft Dilisted men and 61 warrant officers vision of United Aircraft Corp., who have been recommended for has won a design competition for rank of ensign in the sixth annual a new Navy day fighter. No details Limited Duty Officer selections proof the new jet fighter will be regram. This will bring the total leased until the plane is in proetucnumber of LDOs in the Navy tion. It will have better performnore than 1100. dance characteristics than previous Navy day fighters. A bill, HR-5218, was introduced c c by Rep. Frat Ikard (D-Tex) to The Army has added to the exprovide that enlisted men below penses charged against returned pay grade E-7 who have been absentees or deserters. Cost of prisoners of war in Korea may be transportation, lodging and subpromoted one grade for each year, sistence of a guard or guards used or major part of a year, of capin the return og sentee or detivity, upon their return. Page Two THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 13 June 1953 THE INDIAN Laparts; BRAVES' 19 RUN ATTACK SMOTHERS IOWA NINE The Naval Station Indians, banging out 16 hits, bombarded a team from the U.S.S. Iowa with a deluge of runs to romp to a 19-1 nonleague victory Monday night. The Indians used three of their hits to score four runs in the first inning putting them off to a flying start while "Ski" Janowski, wh started on the mound for Naval Station was putting the Iowans down in good order. The Braves struck again in the third with six more runs as Morgan started the inning off with a single to left center. After Morgan had stolen second Webb beat out a bunt down the third base line, putting runners on first and third. Knight singled scoring Morgan and sending Webb to third, and then Webb came in to score as Rodriguez smashed out the Indians' fourth straight hit. Spillane was safe on an error by the second baseman, bringing Knight across the plate, and Greaner, after having received a base on balls, advanced on two hit batters and scored the last run as a walk forced him in. The Indians picked up another run in the fourth and both teams scored in the fifth, the Iowans picking up their only tally on two errors and a single. The Naval Station nine, who had their hitting clothes on that night refused to be content with a 12-1 lead and racked up two more runs in the sixth, one in the seventh, and wound the contest up with a splurge of four in the eighth, bringing the final score to 19-1. Janowski started the game for the Indians, and pitched hitless and scoreless ball for three innings, striking out five before being relieved by Ballard in the fourth. Royal took over in the sixth and Melhoff in the ninth, all four men allowing only three hits during the evening. Morgan had the best night at the plate, banging out three hits in three times at bat, and Knight gave the crowd a thrill in the first inning when he poled a long drive that cleared the center field fence by a substantial amount at the 350 ft. mark for a three run homer. HOSPITAL QUITS LEAGUE -WATCHES, LACK OF PERSONNEL TO BLAME The Hospital Corpsmen, holders of a 2-12 record in competition in the GTMO Baseball League have withdrawn from league competition as it had become impossible for the Corpsmen to field a team. The condition can be attributed to the transfer of personnel, an insufficient number of personnel available from which to draw players, and a difficulty in arranging watches in order to allow players to be free for practice and league competition. Due to this action, the VU-10 Mallards, Naval Station Indians, and Fleet Training Group Trainers, three teams who were scheduled to meet the Corpsmen to fitfish out the second round of play were awarded victories as a result of forfeit. Did you hear about the little country gal who always went out with city fellers, because farm hands were too rough? "/I-t wnth m z ee te ia cuolsolzon? THIS ONE DIDN'T GET AWAY -Pictured above is fisherman B.A. Schreck, EM1, with a 90%z lb. tarpon he caught recently while fishing at the mouth of the Yateras River. Schreek is attached to the Naval Station Fleet Boat Pool. SEABEES DROP MALLARDS 8-4 IN 8 INNING GAME The MCB-4 Seabees tightened up the league race Wednesday night when they outhit the VU-10 Mallards 8-4 in a drawn out game that had to be called at the end of eight innings because of the 10 p.m. curfew. The Seabees scored a run in each of the first three innings on three hits, thereby jumping off to an early lead, but the Mallards bounced right back in their half of the third with a four run rally that give them a temporary advantage. Kubic and Kirby started the inning off with singles and Crouch was safe on a fielder's choice to load the bases when Kubic slid in safely to third, beating the throw on an attempted force play. Rea then slapped a single to center, bringing in two runs, and after Loggins was safe on another fielder's choice, he and Rea came across the plate with the third and fourth runs of the inning when Ferris hit safely. The four tallies enabled VU-10 to go out in front 4-3, but it wasn't for long for Englehardt was to hold them scoreless for the remainder of the game while the Seabees were picking up runs in the fourth, fifth, and sixth. Ziarnek opened the sixth with a single over second. Zicolello and Murray walked, loading the bases, but Dieden rifled Richardson's ground ball to the plate to force Ziarnek. Hansen then singled to score Zicolello and Murray. Englehardt was the winner; the Mallards using three pitchers, Myer, Esbin, and Huber, Esbin being credited with the loss. GOLF NEWS A GTMO golf team composed of 22 members and led by LT A. A. Grego of Naval Station and W. R. North of VU-10 journeyed to Santiago yesterday to play a match against the Santiago Country Club team. The match, consisting of 36 holes, will be held today and tomorrow and will be played for the possession of a trophy awarded annually to the winner of the meeting between these two teams. The GTMO team took the trophy last July when they defeated the Santiago squad in a match on the local links. May Dame Fortune ever smile on you But never her daughter-Miss Fortune. GTMO LEAGUE STATISTICS (Official Statistics for First Two Rounds) Top Ten Batters Player Team AB H Ave. Cherepanya NAS 63 23 .365 Rodriguez NavSta 47 17 .362 Bradshaw Marines 50 18 .360 Todd NavSta 26 9 .346 Palmer NAS 60 20 .333 Novak NAS 48 16 .333 Ziarnek MCB-4 58 18 .328 Tobin NSD 52 17 .327 Rea VU-10 38 12 .316 Loggins VU-10 43 13 .302 Homerun Leaders Cherepanya, NAS; and Ziarnek and Grey, MCB-4 tied with 2. RBI Leaders Player Team RBI Cherepanya NAS 15 Palmer NAS 12 King NSD 12 Ziarnek MCB-4 12 Knight NavSta 12 Rodriguez NavSta 10 Novak NAS 10 Bradshaw Marines 9 Richardson MCB-4 9 Malkin Marines 8 Tobin NSD 8 BASEBALL STANDINGS (As of Wednesday, 10 June) Team Won Lost GB Marine Leathernecks-11 4 NAS Flyers--10 5 1 Naval Station Indians_ 9 5 11/ VU-10 Mallards9--6 2 MCB-4 Seabees8--7 3 NSD Suppliers--7 7 31/ FTG Trainers--2 12 8 PITCHING RECORDS Player Team Won Lost Mashaw NavSta 5 0 Smith Marines 4 0 Brooks MCB-4 2 0 Trapp NAS 2 0 Poe NAS 1 0 Burton NSD 1 0 Snyder NSD 5 1 Labes Marines 3 1 Huber VU-10 3 1 Esbin VU-10 3 2 Archibald NAS 3 2 Earned Run Averages (Team leaders pitching 30 innings or more.) Player Team ERA Mashaw NavSta 0.90 Smith Marines 1.35 Labes Marines 1.39 Meyer VU-10 1.50 Archibald NAS 2.82 Brooks MCB-4 3.75 Dickinson FTG 5.11 A lady was alone in her home knitting peacefully when a telegram arrived, telling her a distant cousin has passed away and left her a million dollars.Half the thrill of getting news like that, of course, comes from telling others about it. The little lady dropped her knitting, ran to the telephone, and cried excitedly, "Hello, operator! Get me anybody." We have the highest standard of living in the world and it's driving 's crazy. MARINES TAKE OVER FIRST PLACE; POUND THREE HURLERS FOR 14 RUNS The Leathernecks from Marine Site, though outhit 11-8, utilized their safeties to better advantage than their opponents and took over possession of first place Wednesday night by virtue of a 14-4 win over the NAS Flyers. A contest which was anybody's ballgame during the first five innings broke wide open in the sixth when the Marines scored five runs to put them out in front with a comfortable lead that was never topped. Labes and Felkness started the works off with a walk apiece, advanced to second and third on a passed ball, and came in to score the first two runs when Tresch was safe on Smith's error. Ferris singled to left, and Trabucco loaded the bags when he took a base on balls. Bradshaw then stopped up and came through with a very timely double to right center, clearing the bases and driving in three runs to give the Marines a 9-4 advantage. It just didn't seem to be the Flyers' night and they could gather only two more hits in the final four innings of play, while the Leathernecks were scoring a run in the seventh, one in the eighth and three more for insurance in the ninth. Felkness was thrown out by Smith to start the top of the ninth, but Tresch and Ferris followed with bases on balls putting runners on first and second. Trabucco, who had walked three times previously then picked out one of the Flyer hurler's offerings that was in the strike zone. and parked i over the left center field fence, scoring Tresch and Ferris ahead of him and bringing the Marine total to 14. Cherepanya and Silvestrini went down swinging for the Flyers in the ninth, and the game ended when Bevington, who had walked, was thrown out while trying to steal on a nice peg by Bradshaw. Smith and Labes handled the pitching duties for the Marines, Labes being credited with the victory, while Archibald, Novak and Poe worked for the Flyers, Archibald relieving Smith in the fourth and taking the loss. SPORTS PERSONALITY A familiar figure on the mound for the Fleet Training Group nine for the past three seasons has been Jim "Pop" Gettle. For the past twenty-eight years Gettle has been answering the call for spring training which started at Milan High School, Indiana where, during his younger years he was an excellent basketball player as well as a fine pitcher. In later years Jim was to organize the Southeast Indiana League at Crane, Indiana. As a Navy athlete Gettle was both player and coach in baseball and basketball during his many years of service, and compiled creditable pitching records with DesPac and SubPac squadrons. In 1936 he was a member of the Hawaiian AllStars. During his prime Gettle depended on a blazing fast ball for much of his effectiveness. Today, much of the old zest has left his throwing arm and Jim has been using a crafty curve ball and good control during pitching chores. Here at Guantanamo, grade school boys thank him for the interest he has displayed in teaching them the fundamentals of baseball. His competitive spirit and hustle have drawn admiration from fans and players alike, and he has been a vigorous promoter and organizer of athletics for the Training Group and the Naval Base. We all wish him good luck on his return to Crane, Indiana. If there's still a local ball team there, Jim Gettle will be connected with itone way or another. Rumor has it that a wolf who was too poor to buy etchings invited the sweet young thing up to see the hand-writing on the wall. Page Three .,. ; '

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9 & Page Four Saturday, 13 June 1953 FISHING CONTEST REPORT SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Bolkcom, W. W. 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L. 3 lbs. Scott, B. R. -3 lbs. Croakers Lowenhayen, N. A. 1 lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E. -1 lb. 8 ozs. Tweedle, H. N.1 lb. 8 ozs. Shark Gennaria, R. L. 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Smouse, J. H. 51 lbs. Hardin, J. ____-43 lb. 8 oz. Trigger Fish Endicott, C. R. -8 lbs. 8 ozs. Dirkson, S. ------3 lb. 8 oz. Coder, J. L. -------2 lbs. Hogfish Blount, J. M.1 lb. 12 ozs. Ladyfish Hoff, E. F. __ -5 lbs. Puckett, C. C. -3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J. W.1 lb. 4 ozs. Parrot Fish Moore, L. H. __ 11 lbs. 9 ozs. Pruce, R. R. ------3 lbs. 12 ozs. Krifha, J. ____ 2 lbs. 8 ozs. Albacore Wilkinson, R. H. 6 lbs. Pompano Berlet, J. W. -15 lbs. French, C. D. --13 lbs. SPEAR FISHING Grouper Tull, J. A. __ _-165 lbs. Matson, J. _____-20 lb. 12 oz. Hillyer, L. E. -19 lbs. 8 ozs. Jacks Hellyer, L. E. -22 lbs. 4 ozs. Eyster, G. W. -22 lbs. Mackerel (King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P. 7 lbs. Phillips, H. R. -5 lb. 8 oz. Snappers Abbott, G. H. -62 lbs. Prejean, J. W. -25 lbs. Roos, F. H. -------13 lbs. Hogfish Abbott, G. H. -8 lbs. Foy, F. D. -------6 lb. 12 oz. Pompano Woodward, K. S. 17 lbs. 8 ozs. Tucker, J. L. -5 lbs. Parrot Fish Prejean, J. W. -25 lbs. Sheppard, M. E. 23 lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Warner, N. S. -67 lbs. 8 ozs. Cavanaugh, E. H. -23 lbs. Franklin, E. M. 18 lbs. Trigger Fish Mullins, P. ------2 lbs. LAND DIVISION Barracuda Cheney, W. M. -20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A. _16 lb. Dupree, W. L. -15 lbs. Esquerdo, G. A. 15 lbs. Mackerel (King) Berggren, R. T. 3 lbs. 8 ozs. Lantzinheiser, -2 lbs. 12 ozs. Snappers Reynolds, Laura 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. -13 lbs. Morris, H. F. -_12 lbs. 4 ozs. Grouper Pinckard, J. C. -11 lbs. Gadoury, R. J. -7 lbs. Bell, J. Jr. --------6 lb. 8 oz. Jacks Perkins, F. G. -19 lbs. French, C. D. -13 lbs. Loomis, C. E. -11 lbs. 12 ozs. Tarpon Smith, C. C. -13 lb. BOAT DIVISION Jacks Drake, R. J. -----21 lbs. Sheppard, W. E. 14 lbs. 12 ozs. Bubalka, J. M. -14 lbs. 4 ozs. Barracuda Joyner, T. H. 21 lbs. Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Mackerel (King) Massingill, J. H. 9 lbs. Parker, T. R. -4 lbs. 8 ozs. Delaney, R. E.4 lb. Snappers Remaly, D. H. -56 lbs. 8 ozs. Chandler, C. A. 28 lbs. 8 ozs. Esquerdo, G. 21 lbs. 4 ozs. Snook Rehkopf, L. P. -22 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 22 lbs. Hardin, J. _-_ 15 lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Shreck, B. A. -90 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P. -49 lbs. 8 ozs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Pass, J. S. --------2 lbs. 8 ozs. Franklin, B. A. 3 lbs. 8 ozs. Wilkinson, R. H. 3lbs. Grouper Krifka, J. --------9 lbs. CROSSWORD PUZZLE --6 a t3 Across 54-Negative 20-Children's 1-Crafty 56-Greek letter game 4-Shut noisily 58-Sea eagle 22-Having 8-Resort 59-Climbing scalloped edge 11-Footwear device 25-Dress in one's 12-Story 62-Definite article finery (slang) 13-Knockc 64-Three-toed 27-Eggs 14-Symbol for sloth 29-Tear tantalum 65-Poem 50-Unit 15-Conjunction 66-African tree 32-Exist 17-Chastise 68-Skidded 34-Fuss 19-Skill 70-Thick, black 36-Turksh officer 21-Algonquian substance 37-Hindu cymbals Indian 71-Float in air 89-Bitter vetch 23-Makce lace 72-Heavenly body 40-Shade tree 24-Whip 43-Pay hack 26-In favor of 46-Owing 28-Courageous Down 48-Edible fish person 1-Portion 50-Essence 31-Tibetan gazelle 2-Behold 52-To form by 33-Girl's name 3-Japanese instruction 35-Transgression unit of money 53-Wife of 36-Near 4-Strip of leather Geraint 38-Small explosive 5-Note of scale 55-Girl's nickname 41-Hebrew letter 6-Priest's 57-Exclamation 42-Long, slender vestment 59-Parcel of land fish 7-Encounter 60-Girl's name 44-Period of time 8-Declares 61-Greek letter 45-Aged 9-Man's nickname 63-Worm 47-Fish sauce 10-Simian 67-Babylonian 49-Music: 11-Pierce deity as written 16-Bone 69-Symbol for 51-Dumb 18-Collegeacheer luteeium BASEBALL SCHEDULES 13-19 JUNE NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday 13 June Milwaukee at Pittsburgh Chicago at Brooklyn St. Louis at New York Cincinnati at Philadelphia Sunday 14 June Milwaukee (2) at Pittsburgh Chicago at Brooklyn St. Louis at New York Cincinnati (2) at Philadelphia Monday 15 June No games Tuesday 16 June Philadelphia (night) at Milwaukee New York (night) at Cincinnati Pittsburgh (2) at Chicago Brooklyn (night) at St. Louis AMERICAN LEA Saturday 13 June Boston at Chicago Philadelphia at St. Louis Washington at Detroit New York at Cleveland Sunday 14 June Boston (2) at Chicago Philadelphia (2) at St. Louis Washington at Detroit New York (2) at Cleveland Monday 15 June No games Tuesday 16 June Chicago (night) at Washington Cleveland (night) at Philadelphia St. Louis at New York Detroit (night) at Boston Wednesday 17 June Philadelphia (night) at Milwaukee New York (night) at Cincinnati Pittsburgh at Chicago Brooklyn (night) at St. Louis Thursday 18 June Philadelphia at Milwaukee New York at Cincinnati Pittsburgh at Chicago Brooklyn at St. Louis Friday 19 June New York (night) at Milwaukee Philadelphia (night) at Cincinnati Brooklyn at Chicago Pittsburgh (night) at St. Louis 3UE SCHEDULE Wednesday 17 June Chicago (night) at Washington Cleveland (night) at Philadelphia St. Louis at New York Detroit at Boston Thursday 18 June Chicago (night) at Washington Cleveland (night) at Philadelphia St. Louis at New York Detroit at Boston Friday 19 June Cleveland (night) at Washington Chicago (night) at Philadelphia Detroit at New York St. Louis at Boston GUANTANAMO LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday 13 June NAS vs VU-10 at Marine Site Sunday 14 June Marines vs MCB-4 at Marine Site Monday 15 June Naval Station vs NSD at Fleet Recreation Center Tuesday 16 June NAS CB-4 at Fleet Recreation Center Wednesday 17 June Marines vs FTG at Fleet Recreation Center Thursday 18 June VU-10 vs NSD at Fleet Recrea enter IB 47 THE INDIAN ___ w ..,J ....... AG LADIES' FISHING CONTEST LAND DIVISION Barracuda Laura Reynolds ___ 8 lbs. 8 ozs. Grouper Irene Coder --------2 lbs. Jacks Irene Coder --------2 lbs. Peggy Catchaleovitch 1lb. Snapper Doris Ward-1--------1 lb. 12 ozs. Eva Dupree --------1 lb. 8 ozs. Lucy Howell1 lb. 6 ozs. Irene Coder-1-------1 lb. BOAT DIVISION Barracuda V.D. Wreath1lb. Grouper Marjorie Bowers 1lb. Darlene Puckett 1lb. 8 ozs. Snapper Darlene Puckett 2 lbs. 8 ozs. Mary Adams1 lb. 12 ozs. Ann Carothers 8 ozs. SPECIAL DIVISION Parrot Fish Irene Coder------1 lb. 8 ozs. Shark Fay Yarbro-------2 lbs. 8 ozs. Trigger Fish Irene Coder_-------3 lbs. SPEAR FISHING Parrot Fish Betty Herlin -__-_ 1 lb. 12 ozs. Fish not entered in contest: Mexican Sand Fish Irene Coder Sand Flounder Irene Coder -8 ozs. Bermuda Chub Irene Coder-1-------2 lbs. Yellow Grunt Mrs. L. H. Hayden -8 ozs. The Ladies' Fishing Contest closes midnight tomorrow 14 June, 1953, so be sure to get your final entries in before its too late. Oakmont, Pa. (AFPS) -Hundreds of servicemen, including Gen. Omar Bradley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were among the 9,972 golfers who beat U.S. Open champion Julius Boros in the recent National Golf Day Contest. It was the second annual event sponsored by Life Magazine and the Professional Golfers Assn. which saw a total of more than 103,000 golfers attempt to beat Boros' two-under-par score of 70. Each golfer paid an entry fee of $1 which goes to the USO and the National Golfing Association. All entrants were allowed to apply their handicaps to the scores. Gen. Bradley earned his "I Beat Boros" medal with a score of 8112-69. The tournaments were conducted at nation-wide courses where thousands competed. Last year approximately 14,000 out of 80,000 competitors were able to top Ben Hogan's score of 72. West Point, N. Y. (AFPS)-In a recent field day here, Naval Academy athletes took three out of five contests from the Military Academy, winning in the baseball, lacrosse and tennis meets. The Cadets were victorious in the track and golf duels. The Midshipmen won the baseball contest 10-2 scored in tennis 6-3 and knocked the Cadets out of the national intercollegiate lacrosse finals with a 10 to 7 win. Army produced its seventh straight track meet victory with a 731/2 to 571/ win over the Sailors. On the links, Army won 4-3. FERMIN PAVILA SEZ: The waters from Fisherman Point up to the old dumps south of NAS are now excellent grounds for red snappers. Fish in shallow water and use mullet or bonefish for bait. The best fishing time is from sunset to about 10 p.m. ATTENTION FISHERMEN! Just a little notice to remind all you anglers that the contest will end a week from tomorrow at midnght on 21 June, 1953. There's still some time to pull in a couple of whoppers and win a prize. Sailor (in phone conversation): "Darling, will you be mine? I'll love you and love you forever." Operator: "You were cut off. Is there anything I can do?" Sailor: "I'll say so, honey. What are you doing tonight?"

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Saturday, 13 June 1953 NAS VICTORIOUS IN TWO PISTOL MATCHES -Captain Frank Bruner, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station, is pictured above with members of the Naval Air Station Pistol Team holding the trophies awarded them in the recent base-wide rifle competition. They are, from left to right: R. T. Underwood, AN. CAPT Bruner, Lieutenant J. H. McLeod, Jr., Team Captain, and R. R. Varnell. Another team member, O. P. Hamlen, AM3, is not pictured above All team members received the Navy's Expert Pistol Medal. SMITH CAPTURES CARBINE HONORS -CAPT Bruner presents the carbine rifle High Individual Trophy to James P. Smith, RMC, of the Naval Air Station Communications Office. Smith also qualified and received the Navy's Expert Rifle Medal. SN: "What kind of service is your new used car giving you?" BMC: "Fifty-fifty. One morning it carries me to work, the next, I carry it." "Want to take my sister to a dance?" the foreman asked. "What does she look like?" the laborer questioned. "I'll pay expenses," said the foreman. "Sorry, but I have a date." Here's to the Reno widow! After each divorce she feels like a new man. Usually you can tell by looking at a girl what kind of a past she is going to have. "My son doesn't, want to get married." "Yeah? Just wait until the wrong girl cones along." It was their first date and they were both thinking of the same thing. She called it mental telepathy; he called it beginner's luck He admired the costume of the leading chorus girl. "Who made her dress?" "The police." If every boy in the Unites States could read every girls' mind, the gas consumption would drop off at least fifty percent. ATOMIC SUBS WILL BE FIRST TO USE STEAM UNDERWATER Steam, next to sail and oars, is the oldest marine motive power, but until now it has never been successfully taken below the surface by submarines. With the coming of atomic submarines, a new first will be accomplished by the U.S. Navy. Taking steam power under water will be possible in the USS Nautilus and her sister sub USS Sea Wolf only because of a "closed cycle" principle used in transferring atomic heat into steam. There is no exhaust. Steam, after passing through the turbine, is condensed and sent back to the fresh water tank to be used again. The Navy is taking no chances on a failure in their nuclear power plants. To allow for any case of nuclear failure in the A-sub, two (rhis is the first in a series of articles alternate power plants will be incontaining the latest voting information in stalled: a diesel engine and electric accordoaces1hne5C o AF Pammotors. 34-5-IC, sod change #3 of CG Personel The Nautilus will have a "thermCirclar 8-52. It applies to Service peroonThe autius wll hve ~ nel, dependents residing with Service peral" type reactor while the Sea sonnet and U. S. citizens attached to, and Wolf will be powered by a faster serving with, U. S. Armed Forces hond "intermediate" reactor. The main the continental limits of the U. S.) difference in these two types of Eleven states will hold state nuclear power plants will be in only an/or local elections during the one phase of the transfer of heat summer and fall of 1953. from the reactor to produce steam Generally speaking, Armed which will turn the propeller Forces personnel and civilians offishafts. cially attached to, and serving with, In the Nautilus, the heat from the Armed Forces of the United the reactor is drawn off by water States will not be able to vote in (the coolant agent) being pumped person if stationed outside their through pipes at high pressure. home states. Laws in most states, The hot water goes to the boiler however, provide for voting by abwhere the heat is transferred to senate ballot for Service personnel. the feed water system. Here the In many cases, servicemen and heat again produces steam which women will return to their home will drive the sub's turbines. states upon completion of their The spinning turbines-through service requirements and therea series of reduction gears-turn fore it is to their advantage to take the propellers. part in the state and local elections One phase of the operation will at home. be done a little differently in the Information concerning the first Sea Wolf. In its transfer of nuclear two states holding elections of any heat, the "intermediate" power kind during the summer and fall plant will use a liquid metal to of 1953 is as follows: draw the heat from the reactor Connecticut instead of water, as used in the Towns, cities and boroughs wsll Nautilus. hold elections on varying dates A part of the steam created will (Schedule can be obtained fron be used to feed turbo-generators local I & E offices) Service personwhere it will produce electric curnel may obtain ballots by mailing rent for the submarine. Afterthe Federal Post Card Applcatior wards, the condensed steam will be to town, city or borough clerk at pumped back to the boiler for place of Coon. residence. re-use. Heavy shielding will be built Mississippi around the reactors to protect the The general election for mayors crews from dangerous radiation. members of Boards of Aldermen Also, a monitoring system will and other municipal or local offibe installed to sound an alarm cers in most municipalities will hi should radiation rise. held June 2, 1953. Application for In addition, all crewmen will ballots by the Federal Post Cat, wear pocket dosimeters which will Application may be made at any be checked regularly to insure that time to City or County Registrar, no man receives more than a tolerNcxt Week: Kentucky and Virginia. able radiation exposure, and scientists have developed electronic WITH PEANUTS? "watchdogs" that will shut off the atomic engine if things go wrong. Orlando, Fla. (AFPS)-City commissioners handed down the ruling "Allow me to present my wife that elephants may park on local to you." streets, but nust pay parking "Oh no thanks, I have one." meter fees. NOW HEAR THIS! By Mike Static W.G.B.Y. still going through face-lifting job and many program changes ...Brand new show! ..."There's Music In The Air!" every Saturday at 5 p.m. with Alfredo Antonini doling out the light classics and ballads ...here's a switch for you, "Symphonette now heard at 10 p.m. on Monday and "Symphonies For Youth" at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday .. Give a listen to Georgia Price on "Big Time" Sunday night at 8:30 as he takes you back to yesterday. the "Duke" of Ellington will be a guest on "Bud's Bandwagon" Monday at 11:30 a.m. and will give out with some fine sounds ...The king of Progression will be awarded the '52 downbeat medal on "Al Goodman's Musical Album" Wednesday at 8, the King? ...why, Stan Kenton, of course! ..."Hollywood Radio Theatre" features Kirk Douglas teamed with Jo Stafford in the "Young Man With A Horn', that's Sunday at 10 p.m. ...Hear The great Liberace guest on the Charlie McCarthy-Edgar Bergen show this Sunday at 9 in the evening. .. Victor Mature takes the drama role on Friday's "Suspense", a real thriller. ..Don't forget to lend an ear to "True Adventures" each and every Wednesday eve at 6:30, true tales of Man and his continual struggle to survive and conquer the overpowering elements of Nature". For the latest in News and Sports and the very best in music, keep tuned to 1450 on your radio dial! a INDIAN STRIKER? -The Mohawk haircut belongs to one Ronnie Ornelas, son of Lieutenant and Mrs. V. M. Ornelas. When asked the reason for the unusual haircut, Ronnie replied, "A guy's got to keep cool, you know." Ronnie, incidently, took the part of Nicky in the recent Little Theatre presentation of "Strange Bedfellows." 11 6)w Page Five THE INDIAN , e e r e ;t l iit i, e r L. il

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Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 3867-B '4 THE INDIAN S. Saturday, 13 June 1953 WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE Regular Programs -Monday Through Friday HOSIERY HUCKSTER 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 Solitary Singer 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonies for Youth 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Music in the Air 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News 1830 Life with Luigi 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Time 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Two Thousand Plus 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of World 0815 News 0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Piano Playhouse 1730 Greatest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 News 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Time 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions Washington (AFPS)-The practice of discounting in the financing of G.I. home loans by lenders and builders will be sharply restricted by the Veterans Administration. Discounting is the act a builder selling a mortgage to a lender for less than the face value of his loan. This results in the lender receiving the same as a higher interest rate since he would get the same total return but at a smaller initial investment. Thus it has been possible for a lender to receive more than the former four-percent maximum interest rate. 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 Storyteller 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 At Ease 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1845 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Time 2025 This I Believe 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off 2155 2200 2300 2400 News Hollywod Radio Theater Orchestras of the West Sign Off Monday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Piano Playhouse 2200 Symphonette Tuesday 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0830 Playboys 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Dragnet 2030 People are Funny 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Paulena Carter 1730 Secret Mission 1830 True Adventure 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barolow Presents Thursday 0830 Playboys 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall The all-time American favorite in the popular music field-Hoagy Carmichael's "Star Dust"-has the distinction of being the most recorded song in the history of Tin Pan Alley. To date, it has been waxed in 350 versions. Most popular are the Artie -Shaw and Bing Crosby efforts .Joni James has signed with D J.~ Tony, Acquaviva, who also handles Bob Haymes. Joni just recently split with Roy Rodde who launched her with the Why Don't You y : Believe Me?" hit ..Music world saddened by the Jackie Kristoff death of Django aceKrsof Reinhardt, the fabulous jazz guitarist. He was 43 Lucy Monroe and Jackie Kristoff on their way to Korea for the USO; Jackie, by the way, is one of the youngest performers to hit the USO circuit-she's 19. The Indiantown Gappers evidently can spot a good thing. They recently nominated her as their "Sweetheart". 20th Century-Fox director Sam Fuller has a problem that we can readily appreciate. While filming the "Pickup on South Street" with Richard Widmark and Jean Peters, he ran up against the problem of what to do with the 100 extras he was trying to squeeze in a 12' by 6' section of a subway car. So, he just had assistants make like typical subway guards and push the extras in, instructing them meanwhile to stand on one foot-so what's news about that? Happens every day. ...1,600 Marines of the 1st Provisional Marine Air Ground Task Force, FMF, will take part in the Caine Mutiny. Their maneuvers in mid-June will be recorded for inclusion in the film being shot on location in Hawaii by Columbia ...Paramount to film 3-D color cartoon shorts Edgar Allan Poe's "Murders in The Rue Morgue," to get the 3-D and color treatment from Warner Bros. She: "I'm living in a dormitory at college." He: "A what?" She: "A dormitory. You know what that is. What did you sleep in while you were in the Navy?" He "My skivvies." A farmer bought a parrot for $10 and asked the auctioneer if the bird talked. "You should know, he's been bidding against you for 30 minutes." Bars are you go into to come out maybe land Under the higher four-and-ahalf interest rate the VA figures there should be no need for a continuation of the discount arrangement. The usual result of this has been that the veteran-borrower has to absorb the cost of the discount either by paying a higher price or by taking lower quality construction. The nurse asked the little brother if he would like to see the new baby. "Nope," said Johnny, "but I'd like to see the stork." something which, if many of, you are apt singing a few of, and behind some. Answfwer to Puzle M1SP E TAP ERATE AT 1 EROE OLD UTE E N E I' Actress Gale Storm exposes a wellfilled nylon as visible proof that the lady's stocking is here to stay. She's publicizing the 13th year of nylon selling in the U.S. NEW RECORDS Cupid Takes Aim .. The month of June makes its 1953 debut and with it thousands say "I Do"-commencing the conventional moon, June, spoon season. Suddenly, a surge of new releases hits the airways and record stands. All reflect the same theme-amour. For example: eight new sides by the Jackie Gleason Orchestra neatly packaged in an album entitled "Lover's Rhapsody," revive some universal favorites such as "When Your Lover Has Gone," "Tenderly," "I'm Through With Love," and "Dark Is The Night." Plus a four chapter mood-provoking suite arranged by C. Dudley King Jr. and conducted by Jackie Gleason designed to illustrate through soft inspiring strings and a deft reed section, "Desire," "Flirtation," "Temptation," and last, by no means least, "Enchantment." If this fails to impress you, then let us suggest the unique "Wedding Album" featuring Richard Elsasser at the console of the mighty Hammond electric organ. The album offers many of the beloved pieces heard at a wedding ceremony such as "Because," Schubert's "Ava Maria," "The Wedding March" from Lohengrin by Wagner and many more disuntive selections. Saturday, 13 June WESTWARD THE WOMEN R. Taylor D. Darcel Sunday, 14 June CITY BENEATH THE SEA R. Ryan M. Powers Monday, 15 June KANSAS PACIFIC S. Hayden E. Miller plus I Remember The Glory The Speed Queen Tuesday, 16 June CRY OF THE HAUNTED V. Gassman B. Sullivan plus Missing Mouse College Circus Wednesday, 17 June GIRLS OF PLEASURE ISLAND D. Taylor L. Glenn Thursday, 18 June THE SYSTEM F. Lovejoy J. Weldon plus Sports Review Friday, 19 June TONIGHT WE SING D. Wayne E. Pinza E I LY L. DE NO T. 5A AT PR SO EN R ERA EC ST N O T DD7ER 5P w GA


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