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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Base
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QAe


Vol. V, No. 37 U. S. NaVal Base, tuantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 May 1953


BOOKKEEPING MACHINES DO THE WORK
OF MANY HANDS FOR SUPPLY DEPOT


JUNE BEGINS HURRICANE SEASON;
PRACTICE DRILLS TRAIN ALL HANDS

Call it a hurricane or willy willy or a banguio or a typhoon, call it anything but remember that it's a tropical storm that spells D A N G E R, danger to property and to lives.
June begins the hurricane sea- imaginary hurricane, as the case son in the Caribbean area. Any may be -from the Naval Base. day between now and December Alert condition four means that we can expect to hear of hurricanes the hurricane is 72 hours away. developing in the area. Under this condition, normal work
At nine o'clock Tuesday morn- routines are carried out.
ing, an imaginary hurricane- Under alert condition three," deHurricane Alice -will be within structive winds are within 48 72 hours of Guantanamo Bay and hours of the Base. Preliminary alert condition four will be set. precautions are carried out. This drill will be but one of the Alert condition tvio means that many drills planned to familiarize destructive winds are but 24 hours base personnel with the measures away. Loose gear and buildings which must be taken in order to are secured. Preliminary arrangesafeguard lives and property. ments are made to take dependents
These drills will become increas- to shelters.
ingly complex until sometime in Condition one means that you July when a complete hurricane should hold on to your hats, the drill-minus hurricane, we hope- hurricane's just around the corner! will be put into operation. Run for shelter. A series of four
Various alert conditions tell the groups of nine short blasts indiproximity of the hurricane-or cates alert condition one.


GREATER EFFICIENCY AFFORDED BY MACHINES -Employees of the Fiscal Department of the Naval Supply Depot are pictured above operating recently installed bookkeeping machines which produce results faster and more accurately than previous hand methods.

The Fiscal Departmen of +hp Naval Sunnly Depot recently put into operation four-new electrical bookkeeping miachins capabi of pc.forming many accounting functions previously accomplished only by hand, states Commander C. A. Messenheimer, Commanding Officer of the Supply Depot.
The new machine methods increase efficiency by producing the required results faster and more Washington (AFPS)-President accurately. One outstanding ex- Eisenhower has named ADM Arample is the preparation of civil- thur W. Radford as the new Chairian payrolls and the earnings re- man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, cord of each employee. The payrolls succeeding Gen. Omar N. Bradley. were previously prepared by type- ADM Radford will be the first Navy writer followedby detailed manual man to become Chairman of the postings from payroll to earnings Joint Chiefs. record. The bookkeeping machines now prepare the payrolls and post Visitor (to little girl) : "And was simultaneously to the applicable your grandpa covered with insurearnings record in one operation.
Installed during April by tech- ance when he died?"
nicians of the National Cash Reg- Little Girl: "No'm, just a nightister Company, further uses of the shirt." machines are currently being developed and it is expected that full utilization will be attained in the near future.
Mr. Fred Wiles, sales representative of the National Cash Register Company, and Lieutenant W. N. Haddock of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts visited the Depot in connection with the machine installations and the training of machine operators.

Memphis, Tenn. (AFPS)-The USO has banned sweater wearing by its hostesses because they are "more attracting than attractive."


POSTERS TO BE ENTERED IN NATIONAL CONTEST -Winners of the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Poppy Day Poster Contest pose with their winning posters along with Mrs. Peggy Way, Chairman of the Poppy Day Committee for the American Legion Auxiliary. Winner in the fourth-fifth-sixth grade group was Paul Saurbier. Dorothy Howell, center won in the seventh-eigth-ninth grade group. Winner in the 10th-llth-12th grade group was Marilyn Borup, right. The ladies of the Auxiliary collected $446.00 during this past Poppy Day. The money will be put into a special fund for needy veterans and their children.


Today, Memorial Day, will
be observed as a holiday at
this Naval Base. At noon, the Naval Station and all salut-ing vessels in commission.in.. the harbor, not alongside the dock, will fire a salute of 21 minute-guns and will display the National Ensign at halfmast from eight a.m. until I the completion of the salute,
or until 12:20 p.m. if no so- lute is fired.
Local units of the Fleet Reserve Association and the i American Legion will hold I memorial services at the
Naval Station Administration Building Flag pole, at 12 noon All Base personnel are invited.g All activity except necessary work, drills and exercises will be suspended.


LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTATION DRAWS LARGE CROWDS--Last night the final curtain came down on "Strange Bedfellows," the latest production of the Little Theatre Group. As with the preceding presentations of "You Can't Take It With You" and "Ten Little Indians," large crowds turned out for the hilarious comedy. Pictured above taking their final curtain call is the cast of "Strange Bedfellows." They are, from left to right: David homes as Mayor Tebbett, Jackie Hardy as Mrs. Worley, Don MacQuarrie as Gifford; Helen DeWing as Addle, Pat Ornelas a Tillie Sparker, Marie MacCarthy as Julia, Doris Sigler as Beulah, David Doyle as the Senator, Ronnie Ornelas as Nicky, Sugar Livdahl as Opal, Margo Anderson as Lillian, Claudette Fisher as Birdie, Pierce Lehmbeck as Vincent, Barbara Bates as Zita, Claire Sharpe as Clarissa, Jan Janecek as Mathew and Bob Brady as Lirg.
P)~


'V








Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 80 May 1958


� �fd a/



Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center

Saturday, 30 May 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer
Editorial Staff
Ensign J. McMahon---------- Staff Advisor
Al Henderson, J03 .. . . ..------ .-----Editor
J. C. Dierks, J03.------- ----.Sports Editor
S�E. Cobbs, SN------------Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay,Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.,
This publication receives AFPS material.
AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.


The job of Assistant Defense
Secretary and Comptroller is not a new one for Wilfred James
McNeal.
When President Eisenhower approved him for the Defense Department staff it was a continuation of the same job.
Secretary McNeil was first appointed to the post by former President Truman in- Septemhir '1949.
He has been responsible for all budget, accounting, reporting, auditing and fiscal-activities of the
Department since then.
During WWII he was a Rear Admiral, Naval: Reserve, in the Supply Corps and was' appointed Fiscal Director of the Navy Department in January 1945. His previr" ous experience included assignment as the Navy Disbursing Officer, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts.
In February 1947 Sec. McNeil
became Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy. He was appointed Special Assistant: to the Secretary of Defense in September 1947 and, served in that position until September 1949, when he took office as Assistant
Secretary.
The 52-year old Secretary had
experience in banking, automobile merchandising and newspaper circulation besides his government
service. (AFPS)

Memphis, Tenn. (AFPS) - The
coat was the latest style so its well-worn look puzzled Mrs. Daisy Roe. The wearer explained that the coat was worn by her mother 32 years ago and now that it was back
in style she was wearing it.

How true Dept: A lot of girls
buy soap that promises "skin you
love to touch." But just try to.


TRAFFICMEMORIAL

On this as on other Memorial Days, many words will be spoken in honor of those who gave their lives for their country. Once again we shall remember Valley Forge, Bull Run, Belleau Woods, Salerno and Seoul. These in turn will remind us of other battles and beachheads where men died for a cause. But how shall we remember the thousands who gave their lives in vehicle accidents? To erect a monument in their memory would not commemorate a noble cause, but would only be the raising of a memorial to a waste of life and property.
During the first three months of this year 109 Navy men died in auto crashes. Let us resolve not only that our honored dead shall not have died in vain, but also that this horrible, needless slaughter of human lives in vehicles shall not continue.


A MESSAGEFROM GARCIA
By Henry Garcia
Jose Marti, poet, philosopher, orator-and above all, a great patriotis to Cubans what Abraham Lincoln is to Americans. Recently the Republic of Cuba
celebrated her Independence Day.
On this national holiday, 20 May, 'CARRIERS CHEAPER toasts were made that the Repub- THAN AIRFIELDS' lic might always be "with all and
for the welfare of all," as dreamt Aircraft carriers are less expenby the Apostle of Freedom, Jose sive than a series of land air bases, Marti. says Vice Adm. Matthias B. GardMarti, who was born in a humble ner Deputy Chief of Naval Operhouse in !-avana 28 January 1853,1ations for Air. lived in extreme poverty with his
Spanish-born parents. Cuba was Striking back as critics say and then under the domination of Spain are not subject to an undue amount and only the wealthy could edu- of mechanical failures. cate their children. Despite his He was one of several top dehumble birth and the desires of fense officers who spoke to the his father, Marti acquired an ex- American Legion's National Sectensive education and became a urity Commission recently. notorious public speaker. Those Adm. W.M. Fechteler, Chief of who heard him said his speeches Naval Operations, said the Navy were of such a terrific force that controls the seas around Korea and they destroyed all barriers of op- is ready ,to set up and hold a position, blockade of the -Chinese coast at
At 17, physically an adolescent any time. but intellectually and emotionally
an adult, Marti Rear Adm. R.N. Smoot said the was accused of Navy is having trouble getting y career officers b ecause,.of "depraved and continual harping" against
ainst thverS - senior officers. He said this criand sent tor ticism is destroying the prestige

son. Despite their, of all officers. pleas of his famThe bigger a man's head gets,
-y 6U n g patriot.. the easier it is to fill his shoes. loved dea rly,
Marti would not
cease his work of
awakening the
hearts of the Cu-.
ban people, of Gacl E showing 'them what a, wonderful
thing it would be to have a free W A S J country. His ears were deaf to any
voice other than the voice of his
ideal, freedom for Cuba. (AFPS)-The House voted to ext 'From prison, Marti went to 1955. The extension, which was si Spain, then to Guatemala, Mexico* voice vote in the House with only ,an theUnitedStates.malaye -Under the extension physicians
and the United States. Always he and dentists under 51 years of age contributed from abroad to the would have to regitser. Defense cause of independence in Cuba. Department officials said that 12,With the outbreak of, war in 12.50 doctors and dentists will be 1895, Marti returned to Cuba to needed in the next two years. participate inthe island's physical . * * struggle for independence. In his The Chief of Air Force Chapfirst actual combat, he fell under lains, Maj. Gen. Charles I. Carthe bulletsof a Spanish "guerrilla." lains, pre.ened Charles I.talThe year was 1895, the date 19 May center, presented donations totaland the place "Dos Rios," which is Asg $26,000 to the Netherlands near Santiago de Cuba. He Ill Ambassador recently to help ren acin teasuntheCwa. Hhde- lieve suffering caused by the floods facing the sun, the way he had ex- in th Duc nainererts pressed that he wanted to die in he Dutch nation earlier this one of his simple verses . . . year.
"Do not put me in the dark The donations represented Palm To go like traitors are gone, Sunday offerings from USAF I am good, and being good chapels world-wide with the exI shall die facing the sun!" ception of the European Theater.
The following day, 20 May, the USAFE made a separate collecRepublic of Cuba rose. As Domingo tion for flood relief. Gocuria so aptly put it, "A man * * * falls, but a nation rises. Present and former members of the Navy Nurse Corps observed the
A red corpuscle is not a Russian 45th anniversary of the Corps' non-com. establishment recently. Established


I


Sunday, 31 May 1953
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily vMass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 17301800; 1930- 2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHG, USN
(Catholic)

TEEN-AGE COLUMN
By Sugar Liviahl
If you've passed the teen-age club on any of the recent mornings, you've probably seen a group of hard working people pulling weeds, raking and generally: inproving the looks of one side of the club. But why only one side? Recently the club picked two captains who in turn chose a team which was responsible for care of one side of the hut. The team keeping' their side looking the best would be given a party by the members of the losing team. So far it looks like Mike McKinley's team is ahead.
Speaking of the teen-age club, don't forget the weekly Saturday night meetings at seven o'clock. A big dance is now being planned in celebration of the Club's first anniversary.
Last Friday night a party was given for Gail Walmsley, who left for the States last Saturday. A prize was given to Margo Anderson for drawing the funniest picture of-Gail's ideal man.
Here's a foid adios to Carr6II (Robbie) Robertson, who also left for the States. Best of luck to both of you!

HOSPITAL NOTES

Heirport News: Marsha Lynn Williamsen, born 19 May is the bouncing baby girl of EN3 and Mrs. K. E. Williamsen. AD2 and Mrs. J. E. Holbrook, Jr are happy to announce the arrival of their son, John Ernest III, born 19 May. Diane Elizabeth George born 19 May is the daughter of ADC and Mrs. D. E. George. AE1 and Mrs. T. C. Cotchaleovitch announce the arrival of a son born 24 May. LT and Mrs. D.E. Cummins are the proud parents of a baby boy, David Ervin, born 24 May. GMC and Mrs. R. J. Buschbacher are happy to announce-the arrival of their son, born 25 May.


"ING TON

tend the doctor draft law until July 1, ent to the Senate, was approved by minor opposition.
by an Act of Congress in 1908, the Corps now has less than 3000 members on active duty, and needs 1000 nurses to reach authorized strength.
It reached a peak strength of 11,C86 members during World War II. Present Director of the Corps is CAPT Winnie Gibson, NC, USN.

The Marine Corps summer officer candidate training program will train an expected 5000 college men in 1953, according to figures
compiled by Marine Corps Hq.
Approximately 500 colleges and
universities in the US will supply the candidates. About 1000 June 1953 college graduates now enrolled in the Officer Candidate Course, the Platoon Leader's Class
and f v0,nVnfUn iiiu T,[rainin


Class are to be commissioned following summer training. All training will be concentrated at Quantico, Va.


THE INDIAN


Page Two


Saturday, 30 May 1953


t


















SNYDER NOTCHES WIN AS
NSD TOPS INDIANS 6-4

Making the most of four hits, the NSD Suppliers pulled an upset Monday night as they knocked the Naval Station Indians out of a tie for first place with a 6-4 victory.
With Meh handling the pitching chores for Naval Station and Snyder hurling for the Suppliers, things went along smoothly until the third, when NSD brought five runs across the plate on two hits. Mehl issued a base on balls to Milnikel, and after Blair had struck out Milnikel and Toomey were both safe when Webb dropped Plaskett's throw on an attempted force play at second. Shaeff struck out, but Snyder was safe on an error- by Knight, and Tobin walked, forcing a run across the plate. Janowski replaced Mehl on the mound for the Indians, and Graham, the first man to face him tripled deep to left center, scoring three runs, King following with a single to score Graham.
The Suppliers picked up another run in the fifth and Naval Station three in the sixth to narrow the Suppliers' lead to three runs. Webb singled, and burned up the base paths a minute later to score all the way from first when Knight followed with another single. Knight took second on a wild pitch, Blog walked, and the runners advanced to second and third as Snyder was throwing out Spillane. Both men then came across the plate when Milnikel bobbled Plaskett's grounder.
The indians managed to squeeze across another run in the seventh
on a fielder's choice, Rodriguez' single, and an error by King, making the score 6-4 but Snyder set them down in the last two frames without a hit, and that was the way the game ended.
Mehl allowed one hit in two and two thirds innings, and Janowski three in five and one third innings, while Snyder, the winner, went all the way for the Suppliers, holding Naval Station to six safeties.



I-QU'.,




Questions
(AFPS)-1. What active Major Leaguer has the most hits?
2. In table tennis, what constitutes a "rest"?
3. Who won the American League home run title in 1952?
4. Paavo Nurmi was the first athlete to run a mile under four minutes-10 seconds. (True-False)
5. What present American League pitcher once won three World Series games while pitching for the St. Louis Cardinals?
Answers
"SP!-ooA 91761 aqlu s ui aui;eaxi{ xoS paej uo;soa oqt{ pe#avap 'su o sinorI ";S lql q4,A 1ou 'uaaT1 Ig -A.uEE ""I86T 1 1'601, Jo
4,vul O s 9H "0-E:-V aa@4q S1I !~o o siTj aq SEMoDUsa J o an2amu
-nopvf salnr "-,,01:1, uaq ami, 4saq siq "0T:T ui aousi p alltm a'q aetn!o2ou o alqV .aAau SVA aU! olqn np pun ;ac l aa "asj ta u "1f
�saaddiaJ punoa gg qt&A (puBioA9j[) Xqo(I SAKI-S "

'paeioas ou s iqaIM Jo ;insa9 16 I soa V ,,'1uiod,, ue patuaaj st payees si q!PTtj o 1nse aiq ;saa Veld u. s I nq aq qT 2u.up pouad aq4 s.i spual alqul u! sa: V "g

-ayes gSOI'g q.lv isniaA unuj "1

Boss: "My boy, do you believe in life after death?"
Office boy: "Yes, sir."
Boss (tenderly): "Then that makes everything just fine. About an hour after you left yesterday afternoon to bury your grandfather he came in to see you."
A nut at the wheel
A peach on his right A curve on the road Fruit salad tonight.


WINNERS OF RIFLE MATCH RECEIVE TROPHIES- The sextet pictured above comprise most of the winners of the M-1 Rifle Match held at the Marine Rifle Range on 14 and 15 May. From left to right are: Bailey, 294 points, Smigla, 302; Owens, 302; Ray, 315; Mikulecky, 323; Dunbar, 326. Missing from the picture are Seeba, 294; and Woodard, 286. The Marine team took first place with a total of 2443 points.


TABLE FULL OF AWARDS GOES TO THIS LEATHERNECK -PFC U. S. J. Dunbar walked off with honors in the M-1 Rifle Match with 326 points.


LEDDICK TO MATCH
STRIDES WITH NAVY'S BEST AT CAMP LEJEUNE

For those of you who may have been alarmed at the sight of a lightly clad figure racing madly about the recreation and golf course areas at various hours, the following information is directed in the hope that it will defray observers' intentions to notify the Base Police or some equally competent authority.
The runner is former N.Y. U. track star Warren Leddick, the Naval Supply Depot's contribution to the ranks of the thinclads. Leddick, 26, a member of the Grand Street Boys Association, has, for

the past few weeks been braving GTMO heat, dust, and insects to round himself into shape for the coming All-Navy Track 'and Field meet to be held on 11 and 12 June at Camp Lejeune, N. C. Primarily a distance man, Leddick plans on competing in the mile and three mile runs at this gathering of the Navy's best. If successful in qualifying at Lejeune, he will run in the big Interservice competition at Fort Jackson on 19 and 20 June, a meet which will bring together the top service track and field stars in Uncle Sam's fold.
Hailing from Schenectady, New York, and holder of six high school monograms in track and cross country, Leddick has every intention of keeping up his running after his discharge, with his eye set especially on a try at the grueling Boston marathon, a 26 mile grind which is famous for discouraging even the most iron lunged enthusiasts.
Due to the lack of proper facilities for the purpose, the New Yorker has met with some difficulty right along in carrying through a proper training program for topfligh competition, but-has-managed to carry on by running anywhere that is fairly fiat, and for that matter some places that aren't, as he can readily testify by telling of his meeting and subsequent conquest of a good sized hill out Kittery beach way which he happened to encounter during one of his six mile jaunts.
The GTMO heat, as we all know, can be bad, and it seems much worse when starting on the last lap of a fast two-mile, but Leddick hopes to find pleasant relief from the tropical summer in the "cool, northern" climate of South Carolina. At least he is sure that he wont be any hotter than anyone else, and hopes to cut a little time off the 4:20 plus mile performances he has been turning out lately.
At any rate, everyone is hoping that the flying Supplier will pocket a couple of trophies to bring back and show around the old home port.


CARBINE CHAMPS POSE FOR PICTURE -Champions with the carbine in the recent meet and their scores are as follows: Bailey, 253; Smigla, 222; Tribie, 247; Graham, 248; Ray, Team Captain, Mikulecky, 253; Dunbar, 293; Seeba, 249; and Woodard. 235 are missing from the picture.


Sizes often are deceiving. Sometimes a woma4's thumb has a man under it. ,""'


Then there was the girl who wanted to be a bubble dancer but her dad said "no soap.1








Page Four THE INDIA ~ Saturda~r, 30 May 1953


FISHING CONTEST
REPORT

SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Bolkcom, W. W. 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L.-------- 3 lbs.
Scott, B. R.---------3 lbs.
Croakers
Lowenhayen, N.A. _ 1 lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E.--------1 lb. 8 ozs.
Gralish, G. E.--------1 lb. 4 ozs.
Shark
Gennaria, R. L. --- 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J . ........-43 lb. 8 oz.
Chelf, R.L..--------40 lbs.
Trigger Fish
Endicott, C. R.------8 lbs. 8 ozs. Dirkson, S.---------3lb. 8 oz.
Kamwick, C. S..... 1 lb. 12 ozs.
Hogfish
Blount, J. M..-------I lb. 12 ozs.
Ladyfish
Hoff, E. F.----------5 lbs.
Puckett, C. C......-3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J. W.------1 lb. 4 ozs.
Parrot Fish
Krifha, J.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs.
Brooks, W. F.------1 lb. 10 ozs. Horner, T. A.-------1 lb.
Albacore
Wilkinson, R. H..... 6 lbs.
Pompano
French, C. D.------13 lbs.
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper
Matson, J.---------20 lb. 12 oz.
Hillyer, L. E.-------19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Billings, H. R..---14 lbs.
Jacks
Eyster, G. W.-------22 lbs.
Allen, M. R.--------17 lbs.
Mackerel
(King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P.------- 7 lbs.
Phillips, H. R.------5 lb. 8 oz.
Snappers
Prejean, J. W...... 25 lbs. Roos, F. H.---------13 lbs.
Abbott, G.----------8 lbs.
Hogfish
Foy, F. D.---------6 lb. 12 oz.
McAlister, R. E. 5 lbs. 4 ozs.
Pompano
Tucker, J. L.--------5 lbs.
Parrot Fish
Sheppard, M. E..... 23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Cavanaugh, E. H. -- 23 lbs.Franklin, E. M. 18 lbs. Williams, R. G. 16 lbs.
Trigger Fish
Mullins, P.----------2lbs.
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Cheney, W. M..---20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A.----16 lb. Dupree, W. L.-------15 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Berggren, R. T ..... 3 lbs. 8 ozs. Lantzinheiser,-------2 lbs. 12 ozs.
Snappers
Reynolds, Laura --- 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. - 13 lbs. Morris, H. F.-------12 lbs. 4 ozs.
Grouper
Gadoury, R. J.------7lbs.
Bell, J. Jr.---------6 lb. 8 oz.
Manning, W. B. --- 3 lbs. 12 ozs.
Jacks
Perkins, F. G.- 19 lbs. Loomis, C. E.-------11 lbs. 12 ozs.
Featheringill, W. E.- 11 lbs.
Tarpon


Smith, C. C.------13lb.
BOAT DIVISION
Jacks
Drake, R. J.--------21 lbs.
Bubalka, J. M..---14 lbs. 4 ozs. Wood, C. N.--------10 lbs. 8 ozs.
Barracuda
Joyner, T. H.-------21lbs.
Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Massingill, J. H.... 9 lbs. Parker, T. R.-------4 lbs. 8 ozs.
Delaney, R. E.------- 4 lb.
Snappers
Remaly, D. H..---56 lbs. 8 ozs. Chandler, C. A..... 28 lbs. 8 ozs. Esquerdo, G.-------21 lbs. 4 ozs.
0 Snook
Rehkopf, L. P.-____ 22 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H...... 22 lbs. Hardin, J.---------15 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Lightfoot, L. H.... 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P..---49 lbs. 8 ozs. Garrison, R. L..---36 lbs.
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Pass, J.S.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs.
Wilkinson, R. H . 3 lbs. Franklin, B. A. 3 lbs. 8 ozs.

FERMIN PAVILA SEZ:

Fishing is good in the bay with the moon at night using shrimp or white bait such as herring fillet, and four fathoms of line. Principal factor in catching fish is to have a little luck and lots of patience.


CROSS/,7ORD PUZZLE


Across 1--Jump 4-Bloodless 9-Wooden pin 12-Fuss 13-Hostelry 14-Grain 15-Fracases 17-Regard 19-Bury 21-Consume 22-Agreement 24-Goal 26-Chief
Memphis god 29-Spirited horse 31-Encountered 33-Affirmative 34-Exclamation 35-Uncooked 37-Born 39-Japanese
measure 40-Staff 42-Decree 44-Be of use 46-On the occan 48-Ethiopian title 50-Roman dc te


51-Suitable 53-Burn with
water
55-Macaws 58-Parts of stairs 61-Fabulous bird 62-Earn 64-Decay 65-Man's
nickname
66-Leaks through 67-Ocean

Down
1-Meat from thigh of hogs 2-Poem 3-Protective organization 4-Stimulate 5-Minor Hebrew prophet 6-Pronoun
7-Golf mound
8 Otherwise 9-Comely 10-Organ of sight 11-Precious stone 16-Go in


18-Knock 20-Edge 22-Scabies 23-One of Three
Musketeers 25-Males 27-Eagle's nest 28-Calls 30-Pigeon pea 32-Afternoon
party
36-Armed conflict 38-Sins 41-Mar 43-Existed 45-Snakes 47-Ventilate 49-Shinplaster
(colloq.)
52-Scottis caps 54-River islands 55-Macaw 56--Pilfer
57-Perceive
by the eye 59-Fish eggs 60-Music:
as written 63-Note of scale


BASEBALL SCHEDULES TO 5 JUNE
AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday, 30 May
Cleveland (2) at Chicago St. Louis (2) at Detroit
Boston (2) at Washington
New York (2) at Philadelphia Sunday, 31 May
St. Louis (2) at Chicago
Cleveland at Detroit
Philadelphia at New York Washington (2) at Boston Monday, 1 June
No games
Tuesday, 2 June
New York (night) at Chicago
Washington (night) at St. Louis Philadelphia (night) at Detroit
Boston (night) at Cleveland


Wednesday, 3 June
New York at Chicago Washington (night) at St. Louis Philadelphia at Detroit Boston (night) at Cleveland Thursday, 4 June
New York at Chicago
Washington (night) at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Detroit
Boston at Cleveland Friday, 5 June
Washington (night) at Chicago
New York (night) at St. Louis
Boston (night) at Detroit
Philadelphia (night) at
Cleveland


NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday, 30 May
Brooklyn (2) at Pittsburgh Philadelphia (2) at New York
Chicago (2) at Cincinnati
Milwaukee (2) at St. Louis Sunday, 31 May
Pittsburgh (2) at Brooklyn
New York at Philadelphia
Milwaukee (2) at Cincinnati
Chicago at St. Louis Monday, 1 June
No games
Tuesday, 2 June
Chicago (night) at Pittsburgh Milwaukee (night) at Brooklyn
Cincinnati (night) at New York
GUANTANAMO LI Saturday, 30 May
Naval Station vs Hospital at
Marine Site
FTG vs VU-10 at
Marine Site Sunday, 31 May
Marines vs NSD at
Marine Site
MCB-4 vs NAS at
Marine Site VIonday, 1 June
NAS vs VU-10 at


St. Louis (night) at Philadelphia Wednesday, 3 June
Chicago (night) at Pittsburgh
Milwaukee at Brooklyn Cincinnati at New York
St. Louis (night) at Philadelphia Thursday, 4 June
Chicago at Pittsburgh
Milwaukee at Brooklyn
St. Louis (night) at Philadelphia Friday, 5 June
Cincinnati (night) at Pittsburgh
St. Louis (night) at Brooklyn Chicago (night) at New York
Milwaukee (night) at
Philadelphia
LEAGUE SCHEDULE
Fleet Recreation Center
Tuesday, 2 June
Marine vs Naval Station at
Fleet Recreation Center
Wednesday, 3 June
MCB-4 vs NSD at
Fleet Recreation Center
Thursday, 4 June
FTG vs Hospital at
Fleet Recreation Center


WARD, BACKFROM SERVICE, CLICKING IN CHICAGO OUTFIELD

This is the story of a veteran who "came home" to discover someone else in his job-an unusual job, at that! ...
The vet is Preston Ward, who, after accepting his discharge at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., came home to Wrigley Field., the home of the Chicago Clubs, to find his regular first baseman's job cornered by Dee Fondy.
Despite the fact that Pres had held the spot for the Cubs until sidelined by a broken ankle in midseason 1950, he was still uncertain of his future status.
Pres didn't get the blanket assurances that Willie Mays, Don Newcombe, and other major-leaguers got from their club bosses that "your spot will be held open
for you."
The first day that Pres reported to Catalina Island, the spring training home of the Chicagoans, Manager Phil Cavarretta called him aside.
The old pro explained to Ward that club officials had decided to test him as an outfielder.
The only spot that could be classified as "open" was in center where Hal Jeffcoat, a capable fielder but weak hitter, held forth in '52. Hank Sauer, the National League's Most Valuable Player in '52, was in left with Frankie Baumholtz, who battled Stan Musial right down to the wire for the '52 NL batting crown, in right.
"Getting my timing back and trying to play into shape were my biggest troubles," Ward reveals. "Those two years at Ft. Wood helped me stay in condition. I was lucky enough to face big league pitching once in awhile-but it just isn't the same."
The pitching Ward refers to was that of Johnny Antonelli, Erv Palica, Tom Poholsky, Ray Herbert and Harvey Haddix. In five games played in the National Semi-Pro tourney at Wichita for Ft. Wood last year, Ward bashed out three long home runs afid sparked the Hilltoppers to second place.
Antonelli and Poholsky were on the winning, Ft. Myer, Va., Colonials.
In two years at the Missouri installation, Ward batted .382 leading the team in home runs and RBIs both years.
The former-football and basketball star at Southwest Missouri State (Springfield, Mo.) revealed that he had never played the outfield until the Cub manager asked him to give it a trial.
And that's the story of a vet, blocked from his job, who made his way to a regular position-admittedly, under unusual circumstances!

Blind man: "Ain't you got two singles, budd ? These two-dollar bills are bad luck,"
DT3: "How do you know it's a two-dollar bill, if you're blind?"
Blind man: "Oh, I ain't blind. My partner is. It's his day off and he went to the movies. Me, I'm a deaf mute."

Wife: "Your honor, my husband is never sober. I want a divorce."
Judge: "Indeed? Has he ever tried Alcoholics Anonymous?"
Wife: "Judge, that man will drink anything."

BASEBALL STANDINGS

Team Won Lost VU-10 Mallards----------8 3
Naval Station Indians '-- 7 4 NAS Flyers-------------7 4
Marine Leathernecks .... 7 4 MCB-4 Seabees ------- '7 4 NSD Suppliers-----------6 6
Hospital Corpsmen-------2 10 FTG Trainers-----------1 10


Just once we'd like to see a Famous Last Words: "Would
-aiter c aeous enough to place you like to step ou d ors and say the chJ7 the table face-up. that again?"


Page ,Four


THE1IN4DIA V


Saturday; 30 May 953








Saturday, 30 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five


INTERESTED IN
UNDERWATER THRILLS?
JOIN SKINDIVERS!

Oi of the fast erowing organizations in the Guantanamo Bay area is the one known as the GTMO Bay Denizens bf the Deep, a group making up those of local residence who enjoy the fine art of spear fishing.
In existence for approximately two months the Denizens of the Deep now boast more than 50 members and are growing by leaps and bounds as tales of large catches and fascinating sights beneath the blue Caribbean waters have encouraged more and more fishing enthusiasts to,'take up the sport of spear fishing, or skin diving as it is popularly called.
The local organization was set up for the following purposes: To organize local skindivers and to promote interest in skindiving in the area. To take proper precautions to insure as much as possible the safety of those participating as well as to indoctrinate newcomers in the science of spearfishing, and to evaluate new equipment to be used in connection with the sport by demonstrating its uses, advantages, etc. with members of the group.
The Denizens of the Deep, always anxious to. lure new members into their ranks have planned on being in a big Spear Fishing Regatta to be held at Port Antonio, Jamaica during the 4th of July weekend. Those interested will find the trip enjoyable as a good time is expected to be had by all.


NEW RECORDS

Nat "King" Cole Scores Again!
Yes, once again Nat comes to bat with another hit that will cause many a record collector or disc jockey a double play on his turn-table when the many fans cry out, "play It again." We refer, of course, to Nat's etching of "Blue Gardenia" from the motion picture of the same name. Needless to say, Nat weaves this ballad throughout the picture with a nostalgic backing from Nelson Riddle that makes this record a matchless product of needle point finish. Bob Russell and Lester Lee cop honors for the words and music to "Blue Gardenia." We look forward to many more promising hits to pour forth from their talented pens in the near future. This looks like another home run for Nat "King" Cole. The final decision rests with you.
Return of the Thin Man!
As many of you may already know, Frank Sinatra has switched recording labels and contracts.' Just recently, Frank made his introductory disc for one of the country's leading record companies with an opus recorded not too long ago for the same recording outfit by bandleader Billy May. In fact, Billy wrote the instrumental portion of "Lean Baby." Now with lyrics added by Roy Alfred and the orchestra of Axel Stordahl backing Sinatra, the crooner rides again in the top J 0 bracket, certainly disproving the theory about never changing horses in mid-stream.
Stone Age lover's slogan: "I came, I saw, I conked her."


TAKES TIME FOR TOMORROW --James R. Kerr, TESN, of the Second Division, Naval Station, "took time for tomorrow" by successfully completing the USAFI course "Introduction to Accounting." Kerr is pictured above receiving a certificate in recognition of his efforts from Ensign R.E. Allen, Second Division Officer. The presentation was made recently in the Naval Station I&E office.


ENGLISH, LITERATURE CLASSES TO BE
ADDED TO I&E PROGRAM
Two additional classes, "The Mechanics of English and Building Good Sentences" and "America in Literature" are being organized by the Base Information and Education Department. For further information concerning these classes and enrollment therein contact the Naval Station, I&E Officer, or call 9-564.
ADDITIONAL CLASSES; ORGANIZATION OF COURSE NAME: The Mechanics of English and Building Good Sentences
INSTRUCTOR: GODGART, Martin D., Phone 8-824 PLACE: Information & Education Office, Bay Hill Bks. #4
TIME: Tuesday and Thursday, 1930-2030 (Tentative) LENGTH OF COURSE: 12 weeks (six 'weeks covering the Mechanics of English -the remaining six weeks on Building Good Sentences)
TEXTS: EM 101 - EM 102 COURSE NAME: America in Literature INSTRUCTOR: ALLEN, Richard E. PLACE: Information & Education Office, Bay Hill Bks #4
TIME: Monday and Wednesday LENGTH OF COURSE: 12 weeks ,TEXTS: EM 612 (America in Literature)
In order to receive credit and texts books enrollees are required to enroll with USAFI at the Information & Education Office. Purchase a money order in the amount of $2.00 payable to the Treasury of the U. S. (USAFI). This is your chance to earn English credits!


SKINDIVERS SNAG A SIZABLE TROPHY- It takes three brawny lads to hold .up this catch, a 165 lb. jewfish captured recently off Leeward Point by J. A. Tull, SW3, (right hand on scales). Aiding him in displaying the prize are other members of th- local skin diving clan.


TARPON FALLS PREY TO SPEARMAN -Norman Warner of VF-171 bends under the weight of 67 lb. tarpon he speared last weekend in an under water trip off Leeward Point. In his left hand Warner holds his trusty un.
st


The National League', leading home run hitters Ralph Kiner and Hank Sauer may find themselves playing second fiddle in that department this season to young Eddie Mathews, Milwaukee Braves third baseman.
Mathews, now in his second year with the Tribesmen, has apparently laughed off the "sophomore" jinx and has continued his sensational hitting that won him many laurels as a rookie.
The texarkana, Tex., slugger wounded out 25 homers and 58 RBIs for the seventh place Braves last year and with six homers in his first 14 games in the present campaign, he's given a good chance of taking the home run title. In fact, some observers have gone so far as to class him as one of baseball's most feared hitters.
Oddly enough it was Rogers Hornsby, the present Cincinnati Redlegs manager and one of the game's greatest hitters, who gave Mathews some vital tips on hitting. Eddie was in the middle of a drastic slump last season when he asked Hornsby what he was doing wrong. The "Rajah," always eager to help anybody out, told Eddie he was swinging at too many bad pitches and also suggested a different batting stance. Immediately Mathews regained his old hiting form.
Teammate Joe Adcock, himself quite a slugger, says that Mathews hits the longest ball in baseball. He was referring to one of Mathews' home runs in Chicago recently which he said was hit 500 feet on the fly.
As some sort of a comparison, Ralph Kiner in his first season with the Pirates hit 23 homers, but he was 24 at the time. Mathews was 20 when he set the new NL homer mark for a rookie. It's hard to see how the kid can miss becoming one of the league's great batsmen.


BASEBALL (AFPS)-The Ft. Meade (Md.) Generals are hoping to repeat last year's sensational 50-12 record with such former minor league stars as Tony Campos (Toronto), Charlie Wilhelm (Buffalo) and John Rommel (Chattanooga) pacing the 1953 edition. Finalists in the National Baseball Congress tournament at Wichita, Kans, last year, the Generals are coached by Capt. Charles Brockoff . . . The Ft. McPherson (Ga.) pitching staff is led by ex-Red Sox hurler John Wall, who won 15 games for Birmingham in 1951.

Boston, Mass. (AFPS) -The Boston Celtics of tie NBA have signed Ernie Barrett, former Kansas State basketball ace, to a contract. An officer in the Air Force, he starred at Sandia Base, N.M., this past season. He was voted honorable mention in the AFPS basketball selections.

New York (AFPS)-Tryouts for the All-Navy Track and Field Championships to be held at Camp Lejeune, N. C., June 11-13, are now being held at Naval installations.
Eligible performers must have attained prescribed standards of achievement and competitive requirements during the year in order to qualify for the championship meet.
Individuals finishing first, second and third in the All-Navy tourney will comprise the Navy entry in the inter-Service Track and Field Championships at Ft. Jackson, S. C., Jan 19-20.

Hamilton AFB volleyball team copped the double elimination worldwide Air Force tournament with a final round victory over Itasuke AB, Japan, 10-15, 15-4, and 12-6, here recently.


saturday, 30' May 1953


THE INDIAN


Page Five







Navy-1oND:PPO-Gtrno. 3867-B


9


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 30 May 1953


WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Regular Programs - Monday Through Friday


GYRATING GRAYSON


0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 Solitary Singer 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's -Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 NewsSaturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning .ariavan 0800 Jewish eligious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Stience Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS
1 7 3 0 J u b ile e .. . . . 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News
1830 if with Luigi 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Time 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Two Thousand Plus 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Hymns of World 0815 News
0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Greitest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 N ews'
1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Time 2000, Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News


A woman missed her gloves as she was leaving a restaurant. Asking her husband to wait, she hurried back to look for them, searching first on the table and finally peering under it.
The waiter who had served them hurried up to her. "Pardon me, madam," he said, "But the gentleman is there by the door."

"What I can't understand", observes Salty Sam, "is how a jury composed of six young men and six young women can be locked up in a jury room for twelve hours can come out and say:'not guilty'!"


1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 Storyteller 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 At Ease 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1845 Requestfully Yours 1930 Twilight Time 2025 This I Believe 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News
2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off


2200 Hollywod Radio Theater 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off

Monday
0830 Jo Stafford
0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story
2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Piano Playhouse 2200 Symphonies For Youth

Tuesday
0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0830 Playboys
0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Dragnet .2030 People are Funny 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall

Wednesday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Paulena Carter 1730 Secret Mission 1830 True Adventure 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barolow Presents

Thursday
0830 Playboys
0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730--Dougla-of-the WrIld.. 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father-Knows Best-.. 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America

Friday
0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense
2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


"Is your mother home?" inquired a visitor of a small boy who was mowing the lawn.
"You-don't suppose I'm cutting this grass because it's too long, do you?" replied the youngster.

Different nightclubs in New York have different atmospheres. One takes. you to Algiers, another to Monte Carlo, still another to Havana, others just take you.

Marie Wilson of "My Friend Irma" fame, thought that a submarine was a Marine with a low IQ.


Jack Benny's touring va troupe a smash success West Coast.-Grossed $43 first week . . . Jimmy and Dorsey to be combined for time in too long. They accepting bookings for the Latest survey by Variety that radio is still top-dog money making departmen for '52 was $473,100,000 $336,300,000 for TV . . . of Variety, we like their comment on the number of songs that are coming ou days, "Tin 'Pan Alley's Footed Kick Makes ASCAI like ASPCA" . . . Edward row, CBS commentator, ceived the Lord and Taylo award for being an "Inte Adventurer"... Lizabeth S Charlton Heston set for bia's "Scalpel" . Latest to men's clothing as offer several of the better mags vests and shorts for summ
-make "crazy" suntans bie Reynolds had the right at the right time last week asked if she had experienc romance department she s ... but I'd like to try it". television seems to be gettin and closer. The RCA syst has the edge and compet servers say it's just a ma time . . The television i incidently, is much more in in color than 3-D ...Th rumors making the roun the Ford Foundation's prese "Omnibus," which just wound up a 26-week sti CBS-TV, will be back in thi with a formal aimed at tl Nothing definite yet. "O probably did more to raise f of television entertainment adult pitch than anything s cathode tube came on the




Saturday, 30 May
THE TALL TEXAN L. Bridges
Plus
Too Much Speed
Atomic Bomb Effects (1
Sunday, 31 May GIRL WHO HAD EVERY E. Taylor F
Plus
Forward March Hai
Canadian Mounties
Monday, 1 June
ONE GIRL'S CONFESS H. Hass C
Plus
Hare Lift
They Fly Through The
Tuesday, 2 June
SEMINOLE
R. Hudson
Plus
Sportsman's Playgrou
Wednesday, 3 June
I'LL GET YOU G. Raft
Plus
Barney's Hungry Cou
Little Expert On
Yesterday's Champio
Thursday, 4 June
WHITE LIGHTNIN S. Clements B
Plus
The Hoaxters Friday, 5 June
THE PRESIDENT'S LJ S. Hayward C.
Sports Review


audeville on the ,000 the i Tommy the first are now fall ..", y shows g in the t-gross against Speaking
headline f animal ut these
FourP Sound
R. Murhas reor $1000
ellectual cott and Columaddition ered by
is straw .er wear
* . Debanswer k. When e in the aid "No 1.. Color rg closer em now tent obatter of ndustry,


Kathryn Grayson sheds her usual demure inhibitions and does a "shimmy" in her new picture, "So This Is Love." the story of Grace Moore. Miss Grayson has been selected by the Veterans of Foreign Wars organization as 1953 Buddy Poppy Girl.

LITTLE THEATRE NOTES


terested
iere are By Jerry Lewis ds that It's all over but the shouting! The entation, final curtain has fallen on the last recently act of the fifth and final performint over ance of "Strange Bedfellows" last he fall- night amid the roar of applause he kids. that fairly shook the very foundamnibus" tions of the Little Theatre building the level on Marina Point. I'm sure we can t to the all agree that the small group of since the talented players that comprise the scene. organization, have truly outdone
themselves in what is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the finest pro06 duction yet.
Not forgetting to give much
credit to the boys behind the scenes, working in the wings beyond the reach of the glamorous footlights, operating the lights,
L. Cobs sound, curtain and making sure of
the million-and-one big and small things that are so important to
I&E) the plays' perfection. Hat's off to
the unsung heros of the play VTHING the ever present stage crew. Lamas Although the play is over, the group will be far from resting on re its' laurels in the coming weeks.
As the last curtain closed the show last night, the wheels were set in motion for the new forthcoming ION production. Moore With a -receptive audience attending the plays like the Group a Air enjoyed for the last five nights,
they can't miss from here in. Inspiration for better and better plays is born from the warm reH. Hale ception given by the audience. The
incentive is there and the Little nd Theatre has proved the need for
more and more 'live' entertainment.
On behalf of the entire Little
Theatre Organization, I've' been S. Gray asked to thank you and express
the sincere appreciation for the ksin tremendous response by practically
all hands in the Guantanamo Bay, ns Naval Base.
Now, the cry goes out once G again. How would you like to be Bester a working part of the group? Did you ever feel a hidden urge to stand before the footlights and thrill to the final curtain applause, lauding ADY a fine performance? Well, if this
is so, your chance has come. The Heston Little Theatre Group is holding a regular business meeting next Tuesday, June 2nd at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre Buildink. Everyone is invited to come up and sit in and watch how the Group works.
The Organizations desires ",more members so that they can -build better and better presentations for
the future months.
That's about all there is to say,
the rest is entirely up to you.
Either way, I know that when the next production comes along, you're sure to be either in one of two places . . . on stage or in the
audience.
Thanks again and here's hoping
I'll see you at the Little Theatre Building on Marina Point next
Tuesday at 8 p.m.!




Full Text

PAGE 1

e I? gjAe Vol. V, No. 37 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 May 1953 BOOKKEEPING MACHINES DO THE WORK OF MANY HANDS FOR SUPPLY DEPOT JUNE BEGINS HURRICANE SEASON; PRACTICE DRILLS TRAIN ALL HANDS Call it a hurricane or willy willy or a banguio or a typhoon, call it anything but remember that it's a tropical storm that spells D A N G E R, danger to property and to lives. June begins the hurricane season in the Caribbean area. Any day between now and December we can expect to hear of hurricanes developing in the area. At nine o'clock Tuesday morning, an imaginary hurricane Hurricane Alice -will be within 72 hours of Guantanamo Bay and alert condition four will be set. This drill will be but one of the many drills planned to familiarize base personnel with the measures which must be taken in order to safeguard lives and property. These drills will become increasingly complex until sometime in July when a complete hurricane drill-minus hurricane, we hopewill be put into operation. Various alert conditions tell the proximity of the hurricane -or imaginary hurricane, as the case may be -from the Naval Base. Alert condition four means that the hurricane is 72 hours away. Under this condition, normal work routines are carried out. Under alert condition three; destructive winds are within 48 hours of the Base. Preliminary precautions are carried out. Alert condition two means that destructive winds are but 24 hours away. Loose gear and buildings are secured. Preliminary arrangements are made to take dependents to shelters. Condition one means that you should hold on to your hats, the hurricane's just around the corner! Run for shelter. A series of four groups of nine short blasts indicates alert condition one. GREATER EFFICIENCY AFFORDED BY MACHINES -Employees of the Fiscal Department of the Naval Supply Depot are pictured above operating recently installed bookkeeping machines which produce results faster and more accurately than previous hand methods. The Fiscal Department of the Naval Sunnly Depot recently put into operation four new electrical bookkeeping machines capable of p.fcrming many accounting functions previously accomplished only by hand, states Commander C. A. Messenheimer, Commanding Officer of the Supply Depot. The new machine methods increase efficiency by producing the required results faster and more Washington (AFPS)-President accurately. One outstanding exEisenhower has named ADM Arample is the preparation of civilthur W. Radford as the new Chairian payrolls and the earnings reman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, cord of each employee. The payrolls succeeding Gen. Omar N. Bradley. were previously prepared by typeADM Radford will be the first Navy writer followed by detailed manual man to become Chairman of the postings from payroll to earnings Joint Chiefs. record. The bookkeeping machines now prepare the payrolls and post Visitor (to little girl): "And was simultaneously to the applicable your grandpa covered with insurearnings record in one operation. Installed during April by technicians of the National Cash RegLittle Girl: "No'm, just a nightister Company, further uses of the shirt." machines are currently being developed and it is expected that full utilization will be attained in the near future. Mr. Fred Wiles, sales representative of the National Cash Register Company, and Lieutenant W. N. Haddock of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts visited the Depot in connection with the machine installations and the training of machine operators. MetFphis, Tenn. (AFPS)-The USO has banned sweater wearing by its hostesses because they are "more attracting than attractive." POSTERS TO BE ENTERED IN NATIONAL CONTEST -Winners of the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Poppy Day Poster Contest pose with their winning posters along with Mrs. Peggy Way, Chairman of the Poppy Day Committee for the American Legion Auxiliary. Winner in the fourth-fifth-sixth grade group was Paul Saurbier. Dorothy Howell, center won in the seventh-eigth-ninth grade group. Winner in the 10th-11th-12th grade group was Marilyn Borup, right. The ladies of the Auxiliary collected $446.00 during this past Poppy Day. The money will be put into a special fund for needy veterans and their children. LITTLE THEATRE PRESENTATION DRAWS LARGE CROWDS -Last night the final curtain came down on "Strange Bedfellows," the latest production of the Little Theatre Group. As with the preceding presentations of "You Can't Take It With You" and "Ten Little Indians," large crowds turned out for the hilarious comedy. Pictured above taking their final curtain call is the cast of "Strange Bedfellows." They are, from left to right: Dav:d humes as Mayor Tebbett, Jackie Hardy as Mrs. Worley, Don MacQuarrie as Gifford; Helen DeWing as Addie, Pat Ornelas a Tillie Sparker, Marie MacCarthy as Julia, Doris Sigler as Beulah, David Doyle as the Senator, Ronnie Ornelas as Nicky, Sugar Livdahl as Opal, Margo Anderson as Lillian, Claudette Fisher as Birdie, Pierce Lehmbeck as Vincent, Barbara Bates as Zita, Claire Sharpe as Clarissa, Jan Janecek as Mathew and Bob Brady as Lire. Today, Memorial Day, will be observed as a holiday at this Naval Base. At noon, the Naval Station and all saluting vessels in commission in the harbor, not alongside the dock, will fire a salute of 21 minute-guns and will display the National Ensign at halfmast from eight a.m. until the completion of the salute, or until 12:20 p.m. if no solute is fired. Local units of the Fleet Reserve Association and the American Legion will hold memorial services at the Naval Station Administration Building Flag pole, at 12 noon. All Base personnel are invited. All activity except necessary work, drills and exercises will be suspended. /LaI

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Saturday, 30 May 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 30 May 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Ensign J. McMahon-Staff Advisor Al Henderson.0-iOo---Edit r J. C. Dierks, J03-----Sports Editor S. E. Cobbs, SN-Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, inanced by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. WILFRED JAMES McNEIL The job of Assistant Defense Secretary and Comptroller is not a new one for Wilfred James McNeal. When President Eisenhower approved him for the Defense Department staff it was a continuation of the same job. Secretary McNeil was first appointed to the post by former President Truman in September 1949. He has been responsible for all budget, accounting, reporting, auditing and fiscal activities of the Department since then. During WWII he was a Rear Admiral, Naval Reserve, in the Supply Corps and was appointed Fiscal Director of the Navy Department in January 1945. His previous experience included assignment as the Navy Disbursing Officer, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. In February 1947 Sec. McNeil became Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Navy. He was appointed Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense in September 1947 and served in that position until September 1949, when he took office as Assistant Secretary. The 52-year old Secretary had experience in banking, automobile merchandising and newspaper circulation besides his government service. (AFPS) Memphis, Tenn. (AFPS) -The coat was the latest style so its well-worn look puzzled Mrs. Daisy Roe. The wearer explained that the coat was worn by her mother 32 years ago and now that it was back in style she was wearing it. How true Dept: A lot of girls buy soap that promises "skin you love to touch." But just try to. TRAFFICMEMORIAL On this as on other Memorial Days, many words will be spoken in honor of those who gave their lives for their country. Once again we shall remember Valley Forge, Bull Run, Belleau Woods, Salerno and Seoul. These in turn will remind us of other battles and beachheads where men died for a cause. But how shall we remember the thousands who gave their lives in vehicle accidents? To erect a monument in their memory would not commemorate a noble cause, but would only be the raising of a memorial to a waste of life and property. During the first three months of this year 109 Navy men died in auto crashes. Let us resolve not only that our honored dead shall not have died in vain, but also that this horrible, needless slaughter of human lives in vehicles shall not continue. A MESSAGEFROM GARCIA By Henry Garcia Jose Marti, poet, philosopher, orator-and above all, a great patriotis to Cubans what Abraham Lincoln is to Americans. Recently the Republic of Cuba celebrated her Independence Day. On this national holiday, 20 May, 'CARRIERS CHEAPER toasts were made that the RepubTHAN AIRFIELDS' lie might always be "with alland"_sremt_ for the welfare of all," as dreamt Aircraft carriers are less expenMart. 'esive than a series of land air bases. Marti, who was born in a humble says Vice Adm. Matthias B. Gardhouseinhavanas28rnJ auy b853 ner Deputy Chief of Naval Operhouse in Havana 28 January 1853. ations for Air. lived in extreme poverty with his Spanish-born parents. Cuba was Striking back as critics say and then under the domination of Spain are not subject to an undue amount and only the wealthy could eduof mechanical failures. cate their children. Despite his He was one of several top dehumble birth and the desires of fense officers who spoke to the his father, Marti acquired an exAmerican Legion's National Sectensive education and became a urity Commission recently. notorious public speaker. Those Adm. W. M. Fechteler, Chief of who heard him said his speeches Naval Operations, said the Navy were of such a terrific force that controls the seas around Korea and they destroyed all barriers of opis ready to set up and hold a position. blockade of the Chinese coast at At 17, physically an adolescent any time. but intellectually and emotionally Rear Adm. R. N. Smoot said the adult a Marti wasaccused of. Navy is having trouble getting awcs career officers because of "depraved aoanst e P a and continual harping" against against therment
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Saturdy, 23May_153 TH INDIN Pag Thre *j % -,SNYDER NOTCHES WIN AS NSD TOPS INDIANS 6-4 Making the most of four hits, the NSD Suppliers pulled an upset Monday night as they knocked the Naval Station Indians out of a tie for first place with a 6-4 victory. With Meh1 handling the pitching chores for Naval Station and Snyder hurling for the Suppliers, things went along smoothly until the third, when NSD brought five runs across the plate on two hits. Meh1 issued a base on balls to Milnikel, and after Blair had struck out Milnikel and Toomey were both safe when Webb dropped Plaskett's throw on an attempted force play at second. Shaeff struck out, but Snyder was safe on an errorby Knight, and Tobin walked, forcing a run across the plate. Janowski replaced Mehl on the mound for the Indians, and Graham, the first man to face him tripled deep to left center, scoring three runs, King following with a single to score Graham. The Suppliers picked up another run in the fifth and Naval Station three in the sixth to narrow the Suppliers' lead to three runs. Webb singled, and burned up the base paths a minute later to score all the way from first when Knight followed with another single. Knight took second on a wild pitch, Blog walked, and the runners advanced to second and third as Snyder was throwing out Spillane. Both men then came across the plate when Milnikel bobbled Plaskett's grounder. The indians managed to squeeze across another run in the seventh on a fielder's choice, Rodriguez' single, and an error by King, making the score 6-4 but Snyder set them down in the last two frames without a hit, and that was the way the game ended. Meh1 allowed one hit in two and two thirds innings, and Janowski three in five and one third innings, while Snyder, the winner, went all the way for the Suppliers, holding Naval Station to six safeties. Questions (AFPS)-1. What active Major Leaguer has the most hits? 2. In table tennis what constitutes a "rest"? 3. Who won the American League home run title in 1952? 4. Paavo Nurmi was the first athlete to run a mile under four minutes-10 seconds. (True-False) 5. What present American League pitcher once won three World Series games while pitching for the St. Louis Cardinals? Answers il ut er501 deathX"5 P5K uo~sog Ofic p byj: 'sag sin I 'S Bo (lteneMr'uly): "TenH tha 1561 011 9601,' JO xau n oraf H'ter you cllef esterda o s afternon obu y ogandfa-nop she ngcame itO: s ueqeau A nutst a'OTl. t teweesp lmseag aInto~su o4 slqs JAanu SEASut, slqsucnp pune a 5Wal "a 'l." '545dd1.i punoa 3g 'i4im (pus~alaal) Aqo( I iM1 Apeachopn1.htisrigh 'peloas 4s ltiAk Jo 41 514ag A c y lutod n t ro5Lua SiO2s S rLit 10 olnsaad toigsqht. V ld 01 S i ll14 5l4 i ABuiIOn3pot~led ago 5w0tu i s qEn4 ul sa y -ejs 30'S 1UmllMIisnOW 0Rn45I Boss: "My boy, do you believe in life after death?" Office boy: "Yes, sir."~ Boss (tenderly) : "Then that makes everything just fine. About an hour after you left yesterday afternoon to bury your grandfather he came in to see you." A nut at the wheel A peach on his right A curve on the road Fruit salad tonight. WINNERS OF RIFLE MATCH RECEIVE TROPHIES -The sextet pictured above comprise most of the winners of the M-1 Rifle Match held at the Marine Rifle Range on 14 and 15 May. From left to right are: Bailey, 294 points, Smigla, 302; Owens, 302; Ray, 315; Mikulecky, 323; Dunbar, 326. Missing from the picture are Seeba, 294; and Woodard, 286. The Marine team took first place with a total of 2443 points. TABLE FULL OF AWARDS GOES TO THIS LEATHERNECK -PFC U. S. J. Dunbar walked off with honors in the M-1 Rifle Match with 326 points. LEDDICK TO MATCH STRIDES WITH NAVY'S BEST AT CAMP LEJEUNE For those of you who may have been alarmed at the sight of a lightly clad figure racing madly about the recreation and golf course areas at various hours, the following information is directed in the hope that it will defray observers' intentions to notify the Base Police or some equally competent authority. The runner is former N. Y. U. track star Warren Leddick, the Naval Supply Depot's contribution to the ranks of the thinclads. Leddick, 26, a member of the Grand Street Boys Association, has, for the past few weeks been braving GTMO heat, dust, and insects to round himself into shape for the coming All-Navy Track and Field meet to be held on 11 and 12 June at Camp Lejeune, N. C. Primarily a distance man, Leddick plans on competing in the mile and three mile runs at this gathering of the Navy's best. If successful in qualifying at Lejeune, he will run in the big Interservice competition at Fort Jackson on 19 and 20 June, a meet which will bring together the top service track and field stars in Uncle Sam's fold. Hailing from Schenectady, New York, and holder of six high school monograms in track and cross country, Leddick has every intention of keeping up his running after his discharge, with his eye set especially on a try at the grueling Boston marathon, a 26 mile grind which is famous for discouraging even the most iron lunged enthusiasts. Due to the lack of proper facilities for the purpose, the New Yorker has met with some difficulty right along in carrying through a proper training program for topflight competition, but has managed to carry on by running anywhere that is fairly flat, and for that matter some places that aren't, as he can readily testify by telling of his meeting and subsequent conquest of a good sized hill out Kittery beach way which he happened to encounter during one of his six mile jaunts. The GTMO heat, as we all know, can be bad, and it seems much worse when starting on the last lap of a fast two-mile, but Leddick hopes to find pleasant relief from the tropical summer in the "cool, northern" climate of South Carolina. At least he is sure that he wont be any hotter than anyone else, and hopes to cut a little time off the 4:20 plus mile performances he has been turning out lately. At any rate, everyone is hoping that the flying Supplier will pocket a couple of trophies to bring back and show around the old home port. CARBINE CHAMPS POSE FOR PICTURE -Champions with the carbine in the recent meet and their scores are as follows: Bailey, 253; Smigla, 222; Tribie, 247; Graham, 248; Ray, Team Captain, Mikulecky, 253; Dunbar, 293; Seeba, 249; and Woodard, 235 are missing from the picture. Sizes often are deceiving. Sometimes a woman's thumb has a man under it. u Then there was the girl who wanted to be a bubble dncer but her dad said "no soap. Saturday, 23 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Three SPT.JOF02pts

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Page Four FISHING CONTEST REPORT SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Bolkcom, W. W. 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L. -3 1bs. Scott, B. R. ---------3 lbs. Croakers Lowenhayen, N. A. 1lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E. -1 lb. 8 ozs. Gralish, G. E.1 lb. 4 ozs. Shark Gennaria, R. L. 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J. ___---43 lb. 8 oz. Chelf, R. L.40 lbs. Trigger Fish Endicott, C. R.8 lbs. 8 ozs. Dirkson, S.-------3 lb. 8 oz. Kamwick, C. S. 1 lb. 12 ozs. Hogfish Blount, J. M. -1 lb. 12 ozs. Ladyfish Hoff, E. F.5 lbs. Puckett, C C. 3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J. W.1lb. 4 ozs. Parrot Fish Krifha, J.2----------1lbs. 8 ozs. Brooks, W. F.1 lb. 10 ozs. Horner, T. A. -1b. Albacore Wilkinson, R. H.__ 6 lbs. Pompano French, C.D.13lbs. SPEAR FISHING Grouper Matson, J. ---------20 lb. 12 oz. Hillyer, L. E.19 lbs. 8 ozs. Billings, H. R.14 lbs. Jacks Eyster, G. W.22 lbs. Allen, M. R. ___--17 lbs. Mackerel (King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P. -7 lbs. Phillips, H. R.5 lb. 8 oz. Snappers Prejean, J. W.25 lbs. Roos, F. H. -___--13 lbs. Abbott, G. ----------8 lbs. Hogfish Foy, F. D. ---------6 lb. 12 oz. McAlister, R. E. 5 lbs. 4 ozs. Pompano Tucker, J. L. ___-5 lbs. Parrot Fish Sheppard, M. E. 23lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Cavanaugh, E. H. -23 lbs. Franklin, E. M. 18 lbs. Williams, R. G. 16 lbs. Trigger Fish Mullins, P. ---------2 lbs. LAND DIVISION Barracuda Cheney, W. M.20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A. 16 lb. Dupree, W. L.15 lbs. Mackerel (King) Berggren, R. T. 3 lbs. 8 ozs. Lantzinheiser,2 lbs. 12 ozs. Snappers Reynolds, Laura 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. -13lbs. Morris, H. F.12 lbs. 4 ozs. Grouper Gadoury, R. J.7 lbs. Bell, J. Jr. ---------6 lb. 8 oz. Manning, W. B. 3 lbs. 12 ozs. Jacks Perkins, F. G.19 lbs. Loomis, C. E.11lbs. 12 ozs. Featheringill, W. E. 11lbs. Tarpon Smith, C. C.13 lb. BOAT DIVISION Jacks Drake, R. J.21lbs. Bubalka, J. M.14 lbs. 4 ozs. Wood, C. N.10 lbs. 8 ozs. Barracuda Joyner, T. H.21lbs. Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Mackerel (King) Massingill, J. H. 9 lbs. Parker, T. R. ---_4 lbs. 8 ozs. Delaney, R. E.41b. Snappers Remaly, D. H. -56 lbs. 8 ozs. Chandler, C. A. 28 lbs. 8 ozs. Esquerdo, G.21lbs. 4 ozs. Snook Rehkopf, L. P.22 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 22 lbs. Hardin, J._----------15 lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Lightfoot, L. H. 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P. __49 lbs. 8 ozs. Garrison, R. L.36 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Pass, J. S.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs. Wilkinson, R. H. 3 lbs. Franklin, B. A. 3lbs. 8 ozs. FERMIN PAVILA SEZ: Fishing is good in the bay with the moon at night using shrimp or white bait such as herring fillet, and four fathoms of line. Principal factor in catching fish is to have a little luck and lots of patience. CROSSW'/ORD PUZZLE Across 1-Jump 4-Bloodless 9-Wooden pin 12-Fuss 13-Hostelry 14-Grain 15-Fracases 17-Regard 19-Bury 21-Consume 22-Agreement 24-Goal 26-Chief Memphis god 29-Spirited horse 31-Encountered 33-Affirmative 34-Exclamation 35-Uncooked 37-Born 39-Japanese measure 40-Staff 42-Decree 44-Be of use 46-On the occan 48-Ethiopian title 50-Roman dL te 51-Suitable 53-Burn with water 55-Macaws 58-Parts of stairs 61-Fabulous bird 62-Earn 64-Decay 65-Man's nickname 66-Leaks through 67-Ocean Down 1-Meat from thigh of hogs 2-Poem 3-Protective organization 4-Stimulate 5-Minor Hebrew prophet 6--Pronoun 7--Golf mound 8Otherwise 9-Comely 10-Organ of sight 11-Precious stone 16-Go in 18-Knock 20-Edge 22-Scabies 23-One of Three Musketeers 25-Males 27-Eagle's nest 28-Calls 30-Pigeon pea 32-Afternoon party 36-Armed conflict 38-Sins 41-Mar 43-Existed 45-Snakes 47-Ventilate 49-Shinplaster (colloq.) 52-Scottis caps 54-River islands 55-Macaw 56-Pilfer 57-Perceive by the eye 59-Fish eggs 60-Music: as written 63-Note of scale BASEBALL SCHEDULES TO 5 JUNE AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 30 May Cleveland (2) at Chicago St. Louis (2) at Detroit Boston (2) at Washington New York (2) at Philadelphia Sunday, 31 May St. Louis (2) at Chicago Cleveland at Detroit Philadelphia at New York Washington (2) at Boston Monday, 1 June No games Tuesday, 2 June New York (night) at Chicago Washington (night) at St. Louis Philadelphia (night) at Detroit Boston (night) at Cleveland Wednesday, 3 June New York at Chicago Washington (night) at St. Louis Philadelphia at Detroit Boston (night) at Cleveland Thursday, 4 June New York at Chicago Washington (night) at St. Louis Philadelphia at Detroit Boston at Cleveland Friday, 5 June Washington (night) at Chicago New York (night) at St. Louis Boston (night) at Detroit Philadelphia (night) at Cleveland NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 30 May Brooklyn (2) at Pittsburgh Philadelphia (2) at New York Chicago (2) at Cincinnati Milwaukee (2) at St. Louis Sunday, 31 May Pittsburgh (2) at Brooklyn New York at Philadelphia Milwaukee (2) at Cincinnati Chicago at St. Louis Monday, 1 June No games Tuesday, 2 June Chicago (night) at Pittsburgh Milwaukee (night) at Brooklyn Cincinnati (night) at New York U'TANTANAMO St. Louis (night) at Philadelphia Wednesday, 3 June Chicago (night) at Pittsburgh Milwaukee at Brooklyn Cincinnati at New York St. Louis (night) at Philadelphia Thursday, 4 June Chicago at Pittsburgh Milwaukee at Brooklyn St. Louis (night) at Philadelphia Friday, 5 June Cincinnati (night) at Pittsburgh St. Louis (night) at Brooklyn Chicago (night) at New York Milwaukee (night) at Philadelphia EAGUE SCHEDULE WARD, BACK FROM SERVICE, CLICKING IN CHICAGO OUTFIELD This is the story of a veteran who "came home" to discover someone else in his job-an unusual job, at that! The vet is Preston Ward, who, after accepting his discharge at Ft. Leonard Wood, Mo., came home to Wrigley Field., the home of the Chicago Clubs, to find his regular first baseman's job cornered by Dee Fondy. Despite the fact that Pres had held the spot for the Cubs until sidelined by a broken ankle in midseason 1950, he was still uncertain of his future status. Pres didn't get the blanket assurances that Willie Mays, Don Newcombe, and other major leaguers got from their club bosses that "your spot will be held open for you." The first day that Pres reported to Catalina Island, the spring training home of the Chicagoans, Manager Phil Cavarretta called him aside. The old pro explained to Ward that club officials had decided to test him as an outfielder. The only spot that could be classified as "open" was in center where Hal Jeffcoat, a capable fielder but weak hitter, held forth in '52. Hank Sauer, the National League's Most Valuable Player in '52, was in left with Frankie Baumholtz, who battled Stan Musial right down to the wire for the '52 NL batting crown, in right. "Getting my timing back and trying to play into shape were my biggest troubles," Ward reveals. "Those two years at Ft. Wood helped me stay in condition. I was lucky enough to face big league pitching once in awhile-but it just isn't the same." The pitching Ward refers to was that of Johnny Antonelli, Erv Palica, Tom Poholsky, Ray Herbert and Harvey Haddix. In five games played in the National Semi-Pro tourney at Wichita for Ft. Wood last year, Ward bashed out three long home runs and sparked the Hilltoppers to second place. Antonelli and Poholsky were on the winning Ft. Myer, Va., Colonials. In two years at the Missouri installation, Ward batted .382 leading the team in home runs and RBIs both years. The former football and basketball star at Southwest Missouri State (Springfield, Mo.) revealed that he had never played the outfield until the Cub manager asked him to give it a trial. And that's the story of a vet, blocked from his job, who made his way to a regular position-admittedly, under unusual circumstances! Blind man: "Ain't you got two singles, buddy? These two-dollar bills are bad luck." DT3: "How do you know it's a two-dollar bill, if you're blind?" Blind man: "Oh, I ain't blind. My partner is. It's his day off and he went to the movies. Me, I'm a deaf mute." Wife: "Your honor, my husband is never sober. I want a divorce." Judge: "Indeed? Has he ever tried Alcoholics Anonymous?" Wife: "Judge, that man will drink anything." BASEBALL STANDINGS Team Won Lost VU-10 Mallards_----------8 3 Naval Station Indians 7 4 NAS Flyers-------------7 4 Marine Leathernecks 7 4 MCB-4 Seabees----------7 4 NSD Suppliers----------6 6 Hospital Corpsmen2 10 FTG Trainers ------------1 10 Saturday, 30 May Fleet Recreation Center 1355 8 Naval Station vs Hospital at Tuesday, 2 June Marine Site Marine vs Naval Station at a51 FTG vs VU-10 atF en Marine Site Sunday, 31 May Wednesday, 3 June Marines vs NSD at MCB-4 vs NSD at Marine Site MCB-4 vs NAS at Marine Site Thursday, 4 June .onday, 1 June FTG vs Hospital at NAS vs VU-10 at Fleet Recreation Center Just once we'd like to see a Famous Last Words: "Would 1 rij~er crM'rageous enough to place you like to step outdoors and sa the tjFe n the table face-up. that againC?" Wensdy 3Jn 1d H 040 M dN THE INDIA A Saturday, 30 May 1953 S 5 V M' W Iv S' 10

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Saturday, 10 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five INTERESTED IN UNDERWATER THRILLS? JOIN SKINDIVERS! One of the fast growing organizations in the Guantanamo Bay area is the one known as the GTMO Bay Denizens of the Deep, a group making up those of local residence who enjoy the fine art of spear fishing. In existence for approximately two months the Denizens of the Deep now boast more than 50 members and are growing by leaps and bounds as tales of large catches and fascinating sights beneath the blue Caribbean waters have encouraged more and more fishing enthusiasts to take up the sport of spear fishing, or skin diving as it is popularly called. The local organization was set up for the following purposes: To organize local skindivers and to promote interest in skindiving in the area. To take proper precautions to insure as much as possible the safety of those participating as well as to indoctrinate newcomers in the science of spearfishing, and to evaluate new equioment to be used in connection with the sport by demonstrating its uses, advantages, etc. with members of the group. The Denizens of the Deep, always anxious to lure new members into their ranks have planned on being in a big Spear Fishing Regatta to be held at Port Antonio, Jamaica during the 4th of July weekend. Those interested will find the trip enjoyable as a good time is expected to be had by all. NEW RECORDS Nat "King" Cole Scores Again! Yes, once again Nat comes to bat with another hit that will cause many a record collector or disc jockey a double play on his turn-table when the many fans cry out, "play it again." We refer, of course, to Nat's etching of "Blue Gardenia" from the motion picture of the same name. Needless to say, Nat weaves this ballad throughout the picture with a nostalgic backing from Nelson Riddle that makes this record a matchless product of needle point finish. Bob Russell and Lester Lee cop honors for the words and music to "Blue Gardenia." We look forward to many more promising hits to pour forth from their talented pens in the near future. This looks like another home run for Nat "King" Cole. The final decision rests with you. Return of the Thin Man! As many of you may already know, Frank Sinatra has switched recording labels and contracts. Just recently, Frank made his introductory disc for one of the country's leading record companies with an opus recorded not too long ago for the same recording outfit by bandleader Billy May. In fact, Billy wrote the instrumental portion of "Lean Baby." Now with lyrics added by Roy Alfred and the orchestra of Axel Stordah backing Sinatra, the crooner rides again in the top 10 bracket, certainly disproving the theory about never changing horses in mid-stream. Stone Age lover's slogan: "I came, I saw, I conked her." TAKES TIME FOR TOMORROW --James R. Kerr, TESN, of the Second Division, Naval Station, "took time for tomorrow" by successfully completing the USAFI course "Introduction to Accounting." Kerr is pictured above receiving a certificate in recognition of his efforts from Ensign R. E. Allen, Second Division Officer. The presentation was made recently in the Naval Station I&E office. ENGLISH, LITERATURE CLASSES TO BE ADDED TO I&E PROGRAM Two additional classes, "The Mechanics of English and Building Good Sentences" and "America in Literature" are being organized by the Base Information and Education Department. For further information concerning these classes and enrollment therein contact the Naval Station, I&E Officer, or call 9-564. ADDITIONAL CLASSES; ORGANIZATION OF COURSE NAME: The Mechanics of English and Building Good Sentences INSTRUCTOR: GODGART, Martin D., Phone 8-824 PLACE: Information & Education Office, Bay Hill Bks. #4 TIME: Tuesday and Thursday, 1930-2030 (Tentative) LENGTH OF COURSE: 12 weeks (six weeks covering the Mechanics of English -the remaining six weeks on Building Good Sentences) TEXTS: EM 101-EM 102 COURSE NAME: America in Literature INSTRUCTOR: ALLEN, Richard E. PLACE: Information & Education Office, Bay Hill Bks #4 TIME: Monday and Wednesday LENGTH OF COURSE: 12 weeks TEXTS: EM 612 (America in Literature) In order to receive credit and texts books enrollees are required to enroll with USAFI at the Information & Education Office, Purchase a money order in the amount of $2.00 payable to the Treasury of the U. S. (USAFI). This is your chance to earn English credits! v SRWO SKINDIVERS SNAG A SIZABLE TROPHY -It takes three brawny lads to hold up this catch, a 165 lb. jewfish captured recently off Leeward Point by J. A. Tull, SW3, (right hand on scales). Aiding him in displaying the prize are other members of the local skin diving clan. TARPON FALLS PREY TO SPEARMAN-Norman Warner of VF-171 bends under the weight of 67 lb. tarpon he speared last weekend in an under water trip off Leeward Point. In his left hand Warner holds his trusty afun. The National League's leading home run hitters Ralph Kiner and Hank Sauer may find themselves playing second fiddle in that department this season to young Eddie Mathews, Milwaukee Braves third baseman. Mathews, now in his second year with the Tribesmen, has apparently laughed off the "sophomore" jinx and has continued his sensational hitting that won him many laurels as a rookie. The texarkana, Tex., slugger pounded out 25 homers and 58 RBIs for the seventh place Braves last year and with six homers in his first 14 games in the present campaign, he's given a good chance of taking the home run title. In fact, some observers have gone so far as to class him as one of baseball's most feared hitters. Oddly enough it was Rogers Hornsby, the present Cincinnati Redlegs manager and one of the game's greatest hitters, who gave Mathews some vital tips on hitting. Eddie was in the middle of a drastic slump last season when he asked Hornsby what he was doing wrong. The "Rajah," always eager to help anybody out, told Eddie he was swinging at too many bad pitches and also suggested a different batting stance. Immediately Mathews regained his old biting form. Teammate Joe Adcock, himself quite a slugger, says that Mathews hits the longest ball in baseball. He was referring to one of Mathews' home runs in Chicago recently which he said was hit 500 feet on the fly. As some sort of a comparison, Ralph Kiner in his first season with the Pirates hit 23 homers, but he was 24 at the time. Mathews was 20 when he set the new NL homer mark for a rookie. It's hard to see how the kid can miss becoming one of the league's great batsmen. BASEBALL (AFPS)-The Ft. Meade (Md.) Generals are hoping to repeat last year's sensational 50-12 record with such former minor league stars as Tony Campos (Toronto), Charlie Wilhelm (Buffalo) and John Rommel (Chattanooga) pacing the 1953 edition. Finalists in the National Baseball Congress tournament at Wichita, Kans, last year, the Generals are coached by Capt. Charles Brockoff ...The Ft. McPherson (Ga.) pitching staff is led by ex-Red Sox hurler John Wall, who won 15 games for Birmingham in 1951. Boston, Mass. (AFPS) -The Boston Celtics of the NBA have signed Ernie Barrett, former Kansas State basketball ace, to a contract. An officer in the Air Force, he starred at Sandia Base, N. M., this past season. He was voted honorable mention in the AFPS basketball selections. New York (AFPS)-Tryouts for the All-Navy Track and Field Championships to be held at Camp Lejeune, N. C., June 11-13, are now being held at Naval installations. Eligible performers must have attained prescribed standards of achievement and competitive requirements during the year in order to qualify for the championship meet. Individuals finishing first, second and third in the All-Navy tourney will comprise the Navy entry in the inter-Service Track and Field Championships at Ft. Jackson, S. C., Jan 19-20. Hamilton AFB volleyball team copped the double elimination worldwide Air Force tournament with a final round victory over Itasuke AB, Japan, 10-15, 15-4, and 12-6, here recently. Saturday, 30 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Nsvv-SONnFPO-Gtmo. 5567-B THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 May 1953 WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE Regular Programs -Monday Through Friday GYRATING GRAYSON 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 Solitary Singer 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish. Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Lina Romay 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News 1830 Life with Luigi 1900 Bing Crosby 1930 Twilight Time 2000 Hollywood Star Playhouse 2025 This I Believe 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Two Thousand Plus 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Hymns of World 0815 News 0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Lina Romay 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Behind The Story 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Greatest Story 1800 Eddie Fisher 1815 News 1830 Martin and Lewis 1900 Jack Benny 1930 Twilight Time 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Piano Playhouse 2100 Charlie McCarthy 2130 Twenty Questions 2155 News A woman missed her gloves as she was leaving a restaurant. Asking her husband to wait, she hurried back to look for them, searching first on the table and finally peering under it. The waiter who had served them hurried up to her. "Pardon me, madam," he said, "But the gentleman is there by the door." "What I can't understand", observes Salty Sam, "is how a jury composed of six young men and six young women can be locked up in a jury room for twelve hours can come out and say 'not guilty'!" 1230 1330 1400 1500 1700 1800 1815 1845 1930 2025 2055 2155 2230 2400 Hillbilly Jamboree Storyteller Musical Matinee Parade of Sports/AFRS At Ease From The Pressbox News Requestfully Yours Twilight Time This I Believe Knox Manning-Time Out News Sandman Show Sign Off 2200 Hollywod Radio Theater 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Inside Track 2000 Groucho Marx 2030 Big Story 2100 Broadway's My Beat 2130 Piano Playhouse 2200 Symphonies For Youth Tuesday 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0830 Playboys 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Dragnet 2030 People are Funny 2100 Vaughn Monroe 2130 Mr. and Mrs. North 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Paulena Carter 1730 Secret Mission 1830 True Adventure 2000 Al Goodman 2030 Arthur Godfrey 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2200 Howard Barolow Presents Thursday 0830 Playboys 0845 Frances Farwell Sings 1045 Personal Album 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Sports Answer Man 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0830 Jo Stafford 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Inside Track 2000 Suspense 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Jazz Nocturne 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall "Is your mother home?" inquired a visitor of a small boy who was mowing the lawn. "You don't suppose I'm cutting this grass because it's too long, do you?" replied the youngster. Different nightclubs in New York have different atmospheres. One takes you to Algiers, another to Monte Carlo, still another to Havana, others just take you. Marie Wilson of "My Friend Irma" fame, thought that a submarine was a Marine with a low IQ. Jack Benny's touring vaudeville troupe a smash success on the West Coast.-Grossed $43,000 the first week ..Jimmy and Tommy Dorsey to be combined for the first time in too long. They are now accepting bookings for the fall ... Latest survey by Variety shows that radio is still top dog in the money making department-gross for '52 was $473,100,000 against $336,300,000 for TV ...Speaking of Variety, we like their headline comment on the number of animal songs that are coming out these days, "Tin Pan Alley's FourFooted Kick Makes ASCAP Sound like ASPCA" ...Edward R. Murrow, CBS commentator, has received the Lord and Taylor $1000 award for being an "Intellectual Adventurer" .Lizabeth Scott and Charlton Heston set for Columbia's "Scalpel" ...Latest addition to men's clothing as offered by several of the better mags is straw vests and shorts for summer wear -make "crazy" suntans ...Debbie Reynolds had the right answer at the right time last week. When asked if she had experience in the romance department she said "No .but I'd like to try it". .Color television seems to be getting closer and closer. The RCA system now has the edge and competent observers say it's just a matter of time ...The television industry, incidently, is much more interested in color than 3-D ..There are rumors making the rounds that the Ford Foundation's presentation, "Omnibus," which just recently wound up a 26-week stint over CBS-TV, will be back in the fallwith a formal aimed at the kids. Nothing definite yet. "Omnibus" probably did more to raise the level of television entertainment to the adult pitch than anything since the cathode tube came on the scene. Saturday, 30 May THE TALL TEXAN L. Bridges L. Cobs Plus Too Much Speed Atomic Bomb Effects (I&E) Sunday, 31 May GIRL WHO HAD EVERYTHING E. Taylor F. Lamas Plus Forward March Hare Canadian Mounties Monday, 1 June ONE GIRL'S CONFESSION H. Hass C. Moore Plus Hare Lift They Fly Through The Air Tuesday, 2 June SEMINOLE R. Hudson H. Hale Plus Sportsman's Playground Wednesday, 3 June I'LL GET YOU G. Raft S. Gray Plus Barney's Hungry Cousin Little Expert On Yesterday's Champions Thursday, 4 June WHITE LIGHTNING S. Clements B. Bester Plus The Hoaxters Friday, 5 June THE PRESIDENT'S LADY S. Hayward C. Heston Sports Review Kathryn Grayson sheds her usual demure inhibitions and does a "shimmy" in her new picture, "So This Is Love." the story of Grace Moore. Miss Grayson has been selected by the Veterans of Foreign Wars organization as 1953 Buddy Poppy Girl. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES By Jerry Lewis It's all over but the shouting! The final curtain has fallen on the last act of the fifth and final performance of "Strange Bedfellows" last night amid the roar of applause that fairly shook the very foundations of the Little Theatre building on Marina Point. I'm sure we can all agree that the small group of talented players that comprise the organization, have truly outdone themselves in what is, beyond a shadow of a doubt, the finest production yet. Not forgetting to give much credit to the boys behind the scenes, working in the wings beyond the reach of the glamorous footlights, operating the lights, sound, curtain and making sure of the million-and-one big and small things that are so important to the plays' perfection. Hat's off to the unsung heros of the play the ever present stage crew. Although the play is over, the group will be far from resting on its' laurels in the coming weeks. As the last curtain closed the show last night, the wheels were set in motion for the new forthcoming production. With a receptive audience attending the plays like the Group enjoyed for the last five nights, they can't miss from here in. Inspiration for better and better plays is born from the warm reception given by the audience. The incentive is there and the Little Theatre has proved the need for more and more 'live' entertainment. On behalf of the entire Little Theatre Organization, I've been asked to thank you and express the sincere appreciation for the tremendous response by practically all hands in the Guantanamo Bay, Naval Base. Now, the cry goes out once again. How would you like to be a working part of the group? Did you ever feel a hidden urge to stand before the footlights and thrill to the final curtain applause, lauding a fine performance? Well, if this is so, your chance has come. The Little Theatre Group is holding a regular business meeting next Tuesday, June 2nd at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre Building. Everyone is invited to come up and sit in and watch how the Group works. The Organizations desires more members so that they can build better and better presentations for the future months. That's about all there is to say, the rest is entirely up to you. Either way, I know that when the next production comes along, you're sure to be either in one of two places ...on stage or in the audience. Thanks again and here's hoping I'll see you at the Little Theatre Building on Marina Point next Tuesday at 8 p.m.! Navy-10NDPP O-Gtmo. 3867-B THE INDIAN Saturday, 30 May 1953


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