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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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QAe


Vol. V, No. 35 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 16 May 1953


RESULTS OF FEBRUARY
PETTY OFFICER EXAMS SLOW IN ARRIVING AT GUANTANAMO BAY

"Have the rates come in?" This has been the question on the lips of over a thousand persons aboard the Naval Base during the past several weeks.
As The Indian went to press, only a few commands had received results of the Petty Officer examinations held last February. Jt is expected that these results will soon become available to The Ir, dian and will be printed in a subsequent edition.
Over one thousand four hundred men took the tests here last February.
Personnel promoted 'to chief petty officer will get their rates effective 16 June. All other promotions will be made effective as of today.
It was expected that about half of the men competing for a first or second class crow will be promoted. Approximately 57 per cent of those trying for third class were expected to have made the grade, according to an early BuPers notice.
Advancements to all petty officer grades are subject to service-wide quota control. The quota limitations explain why men in certain rates have not been promoted even though they have a higher final multiple than some of those promoted in other rates.


MUSIC FESTIVAL CAPS WEEK'S OBSERVANCE OF NATIONAL AND INTERAMERICAN MUSIC WEEK

Filling the Naval Station Lyceum beyond its intended capacity, hundreds of anxious music lovers thronged to the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival Sunday evening in observance of National and inter-American Music Week.
More than eighteen groups and individuals presented music representative of all races, creeds and nationalities. In a two-hour program, every type of music from American Jazz to the Hawaiian Hula was presented. Groups ranged in character from the Nursery School Rhythm -Band to the Protestant and Catholic Choir.
Music Week is a major special event for the Armed Forces. All nf the resources for music of all branches of the Armed Services are geared to observance of the occasion. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine bands last week presented a solid week of concerts in widely scattered sections of the United States.
From its initial observance on a synchronized, national basis in 1924, Music Week has grown in extent until it now reaches annually some 3,200 cities, towns and villages in every part of the United States.
Representing the Cuban people was Sra. Argentina Rodriguez de Velazco, who presented two Spanish dances.


FROM AMERICAN JAZZ... High lighting the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival were the "Six Hits and a Miss," playing "Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue." In a two-hour program, every type of music from American Jazz to the Hawaiian Hula was presented Sunday evening at *the Naval Station Lyceum. More pictures of the Music Festival can be found on page three.


A PROCLAMATION

BY THE PRESIDENT OF:THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA I WHEREAS the men and women of the armed forces of the United States are constantly demonstrating their loyalty and devotion to the service of their country; and
WHEREAS these armed forces are now engaged in combat against ruthless aggression and despotism, which threatens to destroy the freedom that this Nation cherishes; and
WHEREAS these fighting forces help to maintain the strength and security of .our nation and to provide the power for peace needed in the world; and
WHEREAS it is fitting and proper that we devote one day each year to paying special tribute to those whose constancy and courage constitute one of the bulwarks guarding the freedom of this Nation and the peace of the free world:
NOW, THEREFORE, I DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, do hereby prpclaim Saturday, May 16, 1953, as Armed Forces Day; and I direct the Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force, as well as the Secretary of the Treasury, on behalf of the Coast Guard, to mark the designated day with appropriate ceremonies, and to cooperate with other public authorities in suitable observances.
I also invite the Governors of the States, Territories, and possessions of the United States to provide for the celebration of the day in such manner as to pay suitable honor to the members of our armed forces; and I call upon my fellow citizens not only to display the flag of the United States on Armed Forces Day, but also to show their recognition of the gallantry, sacrifice, and devotion to duty of the men and women of the armed forces by cooperating in local observances of the day.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.
DONE at the City of Washington this seventeenth day of
March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fiftythree; and of the Independence of the United States of America
the one hundred and seventy-seventh.
DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER.


TO THE HAWAIIAN HULA . . . Taking the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival audience to the land of the whikey-wakey-woo was Mrs. Effie Jankosky, who did an interpretation of the Hawaiian Hula. Presenting music representative of all races, creeds and nationalities, more than eightoen groups and individuals helped celebrate the thirtieth observance of National and Inter-American Music Week.


INTRAMURAL GOLF

The Intramural Golf Championships will be played off Sunday 17 May in a match to be held at the local golf course and commencing at 0700. VU-10, the winner of the first half of play will meet a Naval Station team who were the champs of the second half to determine the Intramural winners.
A Scotch foursome will also be held at 12 o'clock noon on the same day.

'"My what a strange looking cow," exclaimed the city gal. "But why hasn't she any horns."
"Wal, you see," said the farmer patiently, "some cows we de-horn and some cows shed 'em. There's a lot of reasons why some cows ain't got horns. But the reason that cow ain't got horns is she ain't a cow. She's a mule."


CAPTAIN L. A. ARTHUR, F.T.G. AIR DEPT HEAD, DEPARTS FOR MEMPHIS

CAPT L. A. Arthur, who has been serving as Head of the Air Department of the Fleet Training Group for the past two years, has received orders to Memphis, Tennessee where he will act as Chief of Staff to the Commander Naval Air Technical Training.
CAPT and Mrs. Arthur are leaving today and after five days of leave are scheduled to arrive ii, Memphis 28 May.
CAPT Arthur graduated from the United States Naval Academy 2 June 1932 and was designated a Naval Aviator in December of 1935.

A diplomat is a man who knows what it isn't safe to laugh at.


0


- - -








Pare Two THE INDIA?' Saturday, 16 May 1953


U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer CAPT Jack Mvi. Howel
Executive Officer
Editorial Staff
Ensign J. McMahon ------....Staff
Al Henderson, JOSN------------J. C. Dierks, SN------------Sport
S. E. Cobbs, SN-------- ----Photo
THE INDIAN is published week anced by non-appropriated funds, on government equipment, for fre bution on the U. S. Naval Base tanamo Bay, Cuba by order of Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in com with the provisions of NAVEX (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS 1 AFPS material appearing herein c reprinted without written permis Armed Forces Press Service, 641 W ton Street, New York 14, New Yo







Xi


HAROLD E. TALBOTT


The Air Force Secretary on Charles Wilson's defense team has kept his eyes on the skyof aviation enterprise and his hands on the pulse of the assembly line for' the better part of his 65 years.
Harold E. Talbott was appointed to the defense post by President Eisenhower Jan. 20, received' Senate confirmation Feb. 4 and was sworn in the same day. This was his second highly responsible government job in less than a decade. He was director of aircraft production of the War Production Board in WWII.
In the spring of 1916, the Orville Wright aircraft company was reorganized into the DaytonWright Co. by Mr. Talbott's father and two other partners. Orville Wright was vice president. When war broke out the size of the plant was doubled and by 1918 turned out 38 planes daily, more than any other aircraft plant in the U. S.
In September 1918, Mr. Talbott was commissioned a major in the Air Service of the Signal Corps. He was assigned with a group of officers to take charge of maintenance and repair of aircraft in France, but the Armistice came before the group left the U. S.
He returned to the H. E. Talbott Co. as vice president and general-' manager, posts he had held since his graduation from Yale in 1911. He retained these and similar posts in the Dayton Metals Products Co. until 1920.
In the fall of 1919 DaytonWright, his father's company, merged with General Motors and the new Air Force Secretary was named Dayton-Wright's new president as well as president of Inland Manufacturing Co. In 1925 he moved to New York and became director of the Chrysler Corp. (AFPS)


r.; USN







Advisor
__Editor ts Editor


-ARMEDFORCESDAY PRAYER
printed
e distri, Guan- Prepared by The Armed Forces Chaplains' Board the Base 10-God who teachest mankind by word and example the way to
true peacenpliance Inspire the minds of all our leaders with the wisdom to bring about
a peace according to Thy designs.
material. Strengthen the wills of our fighting men and women lest in the pursuit annot be of their vocations they succumb to the temptations to rejoice in the Ssion of power of material might and gain over true righteousness. Washingrk. Enlighten the minds of those in positions of responsibility to an
awareness of Thy Commandments which must be the basis for a
true peace.
Touch with Thy outstretched hand of forgiveness the souls of tyrants
who would, by abandoning Thy teachings, lead us to disaster.
With humility and sincerity, do we beg Thy blessings on all those
throughout the world who strive to bring about a peace which can be
gained by Thy leadership. Amen.


I&E CURRICULUM EXPANDS TO
INCLUDE DISCUSSION GROUPS
The Information and Education Program at Guantanamo Bay has recently been expanded by the addition of five new courses, some of which are already in progress. Plans are also underway to include two others, bringing the curriculum offered through the Naval Station I&E Office to a total of eight courses. This includes several discussion groups and the already popular course in basic Spanish.
The course in basic Spanish, already popular and presented sev- Chaplains Stephenson and Agnew, eral times in the past, lasts a total begins its Sunday meetings at of eight weeks. Currently under- seven-thirty. way, the classes are taught in Military personnel interested in room nine of the Naval Base School enrolling in a group study class in Wednesday evenings between six iamerican literaure or in developand seven-thirty. ing art skills should contact the
One of the first new classes to be Naval Station Information and added to the I&E curriculum is a Education Officer, Bay Hill Barcurrent events discussion class, racks FOUR (9-564). Any addiPlanned to meet Monday through tional information about the above Friday evenings at Bay Hill Bar- groups or classes can also be obracks Four between seven and tained from the I&E Officer. nine-thirty, the classes are of an
indefinite period. ARMED FORCES Overheard: "You never kiss me TALK will be used asa text. anymore. Why can't you be like
A course in stewardship is being the man next door?" presented by Chiefs Claude and
Knight each Wednesday afternoon
at the Marina Point B. 0. Q. Class
time is from two to three-thirty.
Under the direction of Father
J. Spinney, an educational study-,. and discussion group for Catholics
is meeting for an indefinite period W A S Monday evenings from seven-thirty to Eight-thirty in the Base
Chapel. (AFPS)-Special silver statuettes
An educational Bible study and Air Force Special Services to the discussion group for Protestants, and barber shop quartet contests. under the direction of Chaplains The awards will be made annual M. 0. Stephenson and J. F. Agnew, will be held on May 23 at the Rapid is meeting Wednesday evenings City AFB, S. D., while the finals for an indefinite period in the for the barbershop quartet contest auditorium of the Naval Base will be held June 6 at Selfridge School. Time: seven-thirty to eight- AFB, Mich. thirty.
Meeting Sunday evenings in the Congressional approval has been school auditorium is another Pro- granted to proceed with negotiatestant group, the Christian fel- tions for construction in France, lowship and study group. This under a rental guarantee plan, of group, also under the direction of approximately 2,000 family dwelllug 15J1O i+.Q fnr nfitue Ut


ican personnel, the Defense Department announces.
The rental guarantee plan contemplates agreements with foreign sponsors to finance, construct and maintain housing for occupancy by U. S. personnel and their dependents on a rental basis.

Transfer of the Separation Center at Ft. Custer, Battle Creek, Mich., to Ft. Sheridan, near Highwood, Ill., has been revealed. The Army also announced plans to move the Reception Center at Ft. Sheridan to Ft. Riley, Kans.

An agreement providing for construction by Portugal of minesweepers and escort vessels destined for use by NATO nations has been announced by the U. S. Navy. The U. S. share of the costs will be about $7.5 million, paid under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program.

Eighteen contracts, totalling $15,


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center

Saturday, 16 May 1953


)q r AL'n

-fINGTON


s called "Rogers" will be awarded by winners of the coming talent show ly. The finals for the talent cont st


071,639, have been awarded in connection with Navy construction projects since the Feb. 3 constructtion freeze, the Defense Department has announced. Utilities, quarters, fuel storage facilities, piers, hangars, storehouses, repair shops, cafeterias, fire alarm systems and certain repairs to the Naval Academy were listed among the contracts.

Instructions to restrict purchase of blankets to 11 different types for all purposes have been issued
to the Army, Navy and Air Force, the Defense Department has revealed. Previously, 22 types of blankets have been stocked and issued.

The simplified list was compiled through the joint efforts of standardization personnel of the military departments and the Office of standardization, Defense Supply Management Agency.
Lt. Gen. Edward H. Brooks, CG of the Second Army at Ft. Mead, Md., retired from the Army, April 30, after 39 years of military service. A successor will be named at a later date.

The rush of CPO's to the insurance yeoman prophet has predicted the sudden death of a man who was instrumental in winning the war.


'2


Sunday, 17 May 1953
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 17301800; 1930 - 2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant).
LCDR W. J.-Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)

HOSPITAL NOTES
HEIRPORT NEWS: Michael Charles Pitre, born 22 April, is the son of YN2 and Mrs. R. C. Pitre. Emma Maura Sims, born-29 April is the daughter of HMC and Mrs. C. Sims. ICT and Mrs. J. McGee announce the arrival of their son, Dennis Michael, born 8 May. EM3 and Mrs. D. R. Morgan are the proud parents of a daughter, Claudia Ann, born 11 May. Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Goldman are happy to announce the arrival of their son, John Wiley Porter, born 25 April. Gail Marie Roberts, born 24 April is the baby daughter of AL2 and Mrs. E. L. Roberts. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Pinckard are the proud parents of a daughter, Sauree Nina, born 24 April. John James Young, born 29 April is the son of ADAN and Mrs. W. J. Young. LT and Mrs. L. G. Little are happy to announce the arrival of their son Lawrence Michael, born 2 May. ET1 and Mrs. A. L. Hay are the proud parents of a son, Larry Edwin, born 21 April. PN3 and Mrs. Muldez are the prou6d parents of a baby boy born 8 May. M/Sgt and Mrs. K. E. Graham announce the arrival of their daughter, Susanne Marie, born 2 May.

Kingston, R.I. (AFPS)-A heman note from the University of Rhode Island reveals that 12 male students are taking a course in "flower arrangement."


i


---I


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 16 May 1953


Page Two








e


Saturday, 9 May 1953


THE INDIAN


National And


InterAmerican


Music


Week Celebrated At Guantanamo With


Music


SO DEAR TO THEIR HEARTS . .. So dear to their hearts has music become that many, like these members of the Naval Base Band, have chosen.to make music their life-long profession. Under the direction of J. Lundgren, MUC, the band entertained the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival audience with many popular numbers.


ON WINGS OF SONG . . . On wings of song, the Protestant Choir, under the direction of Lieutenant Commander Henry (MC), took their audience closer to a spiritual understanding of God with the singing of "Seek Ye The Lord" and "The Fair Lord Jesus." Music is common to all religions and creeds.


WHERE EVER FREE MEN GATHER . . . Where ever free men gather, their spirits will raise together in harmonious song. A quartet from Mobile Construction Battalion Four was but one of the many groups to * rate National and InterAmerican Music Week with song. They sang a Moth asong and a hymn.


F estival


'FROM DIXIE TO THE NORTH ... From Dixie to the North, from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Statue of Liberty, Americans play, sing and make music as they feel it. It is expressive of their way of life, whether they live on Park Avenue or Skid Row. Above is Chief T. C. Maybury, BMC, and his Dixieland Band.


IN HUSHED ADMIRATION . . . In hushed admiration, the festival audience listened to the Catholic Choir, under the direction of A. Totilo, MU3, sing "O'Most Holy One" and "Panis Angelicus." Music is the international language; it knows no rac-, nor cred nor color.


WITH YOUTHFUL VIGOR . . . With youthful vigor and disdain for sonhisti-ation, these three- four- and five-year-old nursery school children soberly observed Music Week with a remarkable sense of rhythm. Most were making their first public appearance as they cart *stage with-tambourines, drums and triangles.


Page Thre








THE INDIAN


HAND FLYERS OSS, WIN 11-6


ie Marine Leathernecks poundut 11 runs on 11 hits Monday it to snatch an 11-6 victory topple the NAS Flyers from ranks of the unbeaten in spite four run rally by the Flyers he top half of the eighth. rchibald started on the mound NAS, with Relyea handling the hing chores for the Marines.
Flyers started it off in the first a walk and two hits, and the ei moved along at a rapid pace I the third when the Leathers tied it up in virtually the e manner, combining two bases als and a single by Trabucco Iheir first score.
he fifth saw a three run rally the Leathernecks come about ai Relyea walked, took second a passed ball and moved to d on Romano's long-fly to right. bucco got on due to an error


LEAGUE SCHEDULES 16 THROUGH 22 MAY


NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday, 16 May
Philadelphia at Milwaukee
Brooklyn at Cincinnati Pittsburgh at Chicago New York (Night) at St. Louis Sunday, 17 May
Philadelphia (2) at Milwaukee
Brooklyn (2) at Cincinnati Pittsburgh (2) at Chicago New York at St. Louis Monday, 1S May
Newv York at St. Louis Tuesday, 19 May Brooklyn (Night) at Milwaukee Philadelphia (Night) at


Cincinnati
New Yorkat Chicago Pittsburgh (Night) at St. Louis Wednesday, 20 May Brooklyn at Milwaukee Philadelphia at Cincinnati New York at Chicago Pittsburgh (Night) at St. Louis Thursday, 21 May
Brooklyn (Night) at New York Cincinnati (Night) at St. Louis Friday22 May Brooklyn at New York Milwaukee at Chicago
Cincinnati (Night) at St. Louis


AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE
Saturday, 16 May St. Louis at Boston
St. Louis (Night) at Washington Wednesday, 20 May
Detroit at Philadelphia Cleveland (Night) at Washington Chicago at New York Chicago (Night) at Philadelphia
Cleveland at Boston Detroit at New York Sunday, 17 May St. Louis at Boston
Chicago at Washington
Cleveland (2) at Philadelphia Thursday, 21 May
St. Louis (2) at New York NTew York (Ni-htl'at
Detroit (2) at Boston Washington
Monday, 18 May Philadelphia at Boston
Chicago (Night) atWasington Friday, 22 May
Tuesday, 19 May Chicago (Night) at Detroit Cleveland (Night) at Washington St. Louis at Cleveland Chicago (Night) at Philadelphia New York at Washington
Detro (Night) at New York Philadelphia at Boston
GUANTANAMO LEAGUE SCHEDULE


SEABEE BOBBLES AID MALLARDS IN 16-4 WIN

The VU-10 Mallards converted nine hits and 18 Seabee errors into 16 runs to trounce MCB-4 in a Tuesday night game at the Fleet Recreation Center.
Huber was credited with the victory for the Mallards while Zicolello took the loss. VU-10 walked off to an early lead in the first inning when they pushed across three runs on two hits, but it was in the second frame that the victory minded Mallards really turned on the steam to the tune of seven tallies and a 10-0 lead.
Aninette singled to center to start off the inning, and moved to second when Hickman likewise hit safely to left. Dieden then drove one over second into center field for another base hit, Annette going to third and Hickman to second. A passed ball advanced the runners, allowing Annette to score, and Kubic, the next batter worked Zicolello for a base on balls. Log-


t Marine Site S at Marine Site


Tuesday, 19 May
Marines vs FTG at
Fleet Recreation Center Wednesday, 20 May
MCB-4 vs Hospital at
Fleet Recreation Center Thursday, 21 May
NSD vs NAS at
Fleet Recreation Center


as the winning pitcher id the loser, both men nine during the course


SPORTS PERSONALITY

Playing a hot game at second base this season for the MCB-4 Seabee nine is Henry Richardson, a 5'81/" 170 pounder hailing from West Virginia. Fans in the Guantanamo Bay area may remember the 25 year old keystoner as having batted an impressive .450 in the five games his team played in the league last year and arelooking forward to another good season as the Seabees will be down here for the complete schedule this year.
Before entering the Navy Richardson picked up some usefLi experience while playing for the Hurricane, West Virginia club i an industrial League in that state, as well as performing for the team representing the carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt. The fancy fielding infielder will receive his discharge from the Navy in January of 1955, and upon leaving the service hopes to continue in the baseball direction, probably returning to play for the Hurricane squad once more.

Widow at seance: "Is that you Harry ?"
Ghost: "Yes."
"Are you happier than you were with me?"
"Much happier."
"Heaven must be a beautiful place."
"I'm not in heaven."


Graham . N.. W Cherepanya NAS35 1 Hoime run Leaders
Cherepanya, NAS, and Grey, MCB-4 tied with 2.
Six players tied with I each.


Player Ziarnek Cherepanya Grey Blog Marshall Tobin King Palmer


Player Kiehl Mashaw Smith Trapp Poe Novak Archibald Royal Walters Zicolello Snyder Burton Huber Esbin Brooks


RBI Leaders
Team
MCB-4
NAS
MCB-4
NavSta
FTG
NSD NSD NAS

Pitching Records,


Team NAS NavSta Marines NAS NAS
. NAS NAS NavSta FTG
MCB-4 NSD NSD VU-10
VU-10
MCB-4


A man ambled into a tennis tournament and sat down on a bench.
"Whose game?" he asked.
A shy, young thing sitting next to him looked up hopefully. " I! am, FJiereplied.


Lost
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1


CPO: How did your wife get along with her reducing diet? AB1: Fine. She disappeared completely last week.

The poor house is always the last house on Easy Str . ..


bere. The Mviiae varsity, consisting of eight men who won all their races last year including the intercollegiate and Olympic titles, recorded its tenth straight victory.

Hamilton, Bermuda (AFPS)Sgt. Thorne Wood, USAF, of Asheboro, N. C., became the second member of t -e Air Force to ever win a Bermuda Amateur Golf Championship by defeating Ronnie Dwyer of England 10 and 8. Three years ago, Maj. Bernard Burkett, USAF, accomplished the feat.

Cherry Pt., N. C. (AFPS)-AllMarine boxing champs recently selected in a four-day tourney here are: Flyweight -Johnny Fusco (Cherry Pt.), Bantamweight-Herman Galvao (Cherry Pt.), Featherweight-Walter Byars (FMF Paci fic), Lightweight - Francis Bond (MAS Miami, Fla.), Light-welterweight-Henry Abner (MAS Miami, Fla.), Welterweight -Rudy Gwin (Cherry Pt.), Al Hood (Cherry Pt.), Middleweight - Richard Hill (Camp Lejeune, N. C.), Light Heavryeight-Pat Murtry (El Toro, Calif.) and Heavyweight-Bud House (Camp Lejeune, N. C.)

New York (AFPS)-Mal Whitfield, former Ohio State and Air Force star, has been selected as the outstanding performer of the 1953 indoor track season by the New York Track Writers Association. The fleet runner won 14 straight races and broke three world indoor records this season.

Remember when a guy told a girl a naughty story and she blushed? "Nowadays she memorizes it.

"Any nice girls in this town?"
"Sure, they're all nice."
"How far is it to the next town?"


Player Suter Ziarnek


Four:









Saturday, 16 May 1958 THE INDIAN Page Five


FISHING CONTEST
REPORT

SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Bolkcom, W. W..... 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L.-.-------3 lbs.
Scott, B. R.--------- 3 lbs.
Croakers
Lowenhayen, N. A. I lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E --------I lb. 8 ozs.
Gralish, G. E._------- lb. 4 ozs.
Shark
Gennaria, R. L. _- 56lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J.---------43 lb. 8 oz.
Chelf, R. L. --------40 lbs.
Trigger Fish
Dirkson, S.---------3 lb. 8 oz.
Kamwick, C. S..... 1_lb. 12 ozs.
Hogfish
Blount, J.M. -------1 lb. 12 ozs
Ladyfish
Hoff, E. F..----------5 lbs.
Puckett, C.C.-.-----3 lbs. 4oss.
Mowery, J. W ......-1 lb. 4 ozs.
Parrot Fish
Horner, T.A..-------1 lb.
No entries on the following fish!
Albacore Bonito Dolphin Tuna Pompano Sailfish Marlin Hogfish
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper
Matson, J.---------20 lb. 12 oz.
Hillyer, L.E.-------19 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tucker, J. L._------- 15 lbs. 8 ozs
Jacks
Eyster, G. W.-------22 lbs.
Allen, M. R. _I_---- 17 lbs.
Mackerel
(King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P.------- 7 lbs.
Phillips, H. R..-------5 lb. 8 oz.
Snappers
Prejean, J. W.- _---25 lbs. Roos, F.H._---------13 lbs.
Abbott, G. ---------- 8 lbs.
Hogfish
Foy, F. D._---------6lb. 12 oz.
Pompano
Tucker, J. L.--------5 lbs.
Parrot Fish
Sheppard, M. E.. _ 23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Cavanaugh, E. H. _ 23 lbs. Franklin, E.M. 18lbs. Williams, R. G. 16 lbs.
Trigger Fish
Mullins, P.---------2 lbs.
No entries in the following fish.
Albacore Bonito Bonefish Croakers Mackerel (Spanish) Marlin Tuna Dolphin Sailfish Snook
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Cheney, W. M.- 20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A.------ 16 lb.
Dupree, W. L.- ------15 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Lantzinheiser,-------2 lbs. 12 ozs.
Snappers
Reynolds, Laura --- 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A.- 13lbs. Morris, H. F.. --__ 12 lbs. 4 ozs.
Grouper
Gadoury, R.J.-------7 lbs.
Bell, J. Jr.---------6 lb. 8 oz.
Gorecki, R.J.-.-------2 lbs.
Jacks
Perkins, F. G..---19 lbs. Loomis, C. E.-------11 lbs. 12 ozs: Featheringill, W. E._ 11 lbs.
Tarpon
Smith, C. C.-------13 lb.
No entries in the following fish:
Snook
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Wahoo
BOAT DIVISION
Jacks
Drake, R. J.--------21 lbs.
Wood, C. N.-------- 10 lbs. 8 ozs.
Swisher, C. L.----10 lbs.
Barracuda
Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Massingill, J. H.... 9 lbs. Parker, T. R.--------4 lbs. 8 ozs.
Delaney, R. E.-------4 lb.
Snappers
Remaly, D. H..---56 lbs. 8 ozs. Esquerdo, G.------- 21 lbs. 4 ozs.
Snook
Lightfoot, L. H. --- 22 lbs. Hardin, J.--------- 15 lb. 8 oz.
Mowery, J. W. ___ 14lb. 8 oz.
Tarpon
Lightfoot, L. H.... 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P..---49 lbs. 8 ozs. Garrison, R. L.- ----36 lbs.
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Pass, J. S.----------.2 lbs. 8 ozs.
No entries in the following fish:
Wahoo Grouper

A woman used to go to the doctor to see if she could have children. Now she has to go to the landlord.


FINAL RESULTS OF THE
KIDS' CONTEST

Prizes for the "Kids' Fishing Derby" will be awarded at seven p.m. tonight at the Naval Station Lyceum.


Across 1-Manifest 5-First man 9-Music: as written
12-Young salmon 13-Spanish-coin
-4-Be ill 15-Three-toed
sloth
16-Period of time 18-Conjunction 20-Japanese
measure 22-Dry 24-Cushions 27-Skin ailment 29-Ardent 31-Pinch 32-Undressed kid 34-Organs of
hearing 36-Therefore 37-Beef animal, 39-Newest 41-Pronoun 42-Memorandum 44-Peakless cap 45-Series 47-Classify


49-Indefinite
number 50-Snare 52-Separate 54-Steamship
(abbr.)
55-Soft food 57-District in
Germany
59-Supposing that 61-Mohammedan
name
63-Artificial alloy
of gold
65-Ox of Celebes 67-Atmosphere 68-Edible fish 69-Small horse

Down
1-Resort 2-Barbers 3-Conjunction 4-Preverted 5-Three-banded armadillo 6-Deduce 7-While 8-Unruly crowd 9-Mephistopheles


WARMIN' THE BENCH

Yankee Stadium-The young kid was standing on the edge of the dugout steps getting ready for an afternoon game with the Boston Red Sox. It wasn't hard to recognize Mickey Mantle. His smiling young face, huge shoulders and that number "7" meant none other than the Commerce (Okla.) Comet.
Only a week previous the 21year-old Mantle had hit one of the longest home runs in history. The ball caromed out of Griffith Stadium and landed in a Washington back yard some 565 feet from home plate. As Casey Stengel commented: "It was the longest ball I ever saw."
Just what heights this diamond prodigy will reach are not known, but already those who have seen him perform believe he will become the game's greatest switch hitter-if not the game's greatest hitter. He can hit equally well batting righthanded or lefthanded. His Hall of Fame homer was from the right side, but his lefthanded wallop on top of the right field roof in Pittsburgh in an exhibition game a week before was a feat only two men had ever accomplished.
At 19 Mantle found himself in a Yankee uniform. being groomed to fill Joe DiMaggio's shoes. Probably no other modern-day rookie had ever received such advance notices
-and yet come through. Although he hit only .267 his first year, nevertheless, he pounded out 13 homers and had 65 RBI's.
Last year in his first full season he upped his batting average to .311 and hit 23 round trippers. And the fleet-footed outfielder covered as much ground as any centerfielder in the league that season.
Down on the field the fans were streaming for the exits. The inevitable had happened. With the score deadlocked at 3-3 in the last of the ninth and two on-Mickey tagged one of Ellis Kinder's pitches. The ball landed in what the bleacherites call "Ruthville"-a fitting place.


1.0-Note of scale 11-Indian mulberry 17-Babylonian deity 19-Above 21-Arrow poison 23-Clock face 25-Discord 26-Stained 27-Help 28-Paradise 30-Colorless p3-God of love 35-Stalk 38-Cease 40-Periods of time 43-Rubber on pencil 46-Central American
mammal
48-lalk heavily 51-A state (abbr.) 53-Symbol for
tantalum 56-Toccasin 58-Knock 60-Woman's name 61-Cooled lava 62-Chinese mile 64-A continent
(abbr.)
66-Negative


This type of fish not listed in contest:


Gar
Carroll, D. Age 12 --1lb. Bowers, Roy, Age 12 Calamaras, D. Age 8 ......


1 lb. 8 oz.


Angelfish
McNeil, Linda,Age 4 10 ozs.
Sergeant Major
Martz, Glenn, Age 5 2 ozs.
French Gruat
Brooks, W. F., Jr. Age 4 6 ozs.
Schoolmaster
Martz, Glenn, Age 5 12 ozs.
Sand Perch
Scarborough, Truman, Age 9 1 lb.


Grunt
Lightfoot Larry, Age 8 Lightfoot, Bobby, Age 6
Rock Hind
Airheart, Penney, Age 9
Blowfish
Lightfoot, Larry, Age 8
Park Fish
Haymes, Carl, Age 11


I lb. 13 ozs. 8 ozs. 8 ozs. 8 ozs.


FERMIN PAVILA SEZ:
"Take good care of your fishing line-Dry it out after each trip. I have a large drying rack at the Fishing Gear Locker for your use. Remember: that BIG one may break a rottenline."



















Minister: "We will now have a few minutes of prayer, Deacon Brown, will you lead?" Deacon Brown, absent-mindedly: "Tain't my lead, I ji oealt."


LAND DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4
Snappers
McNeil, Linda------1 lb. McNeil, Linda.------1 lb. Reynolds, R. C. Hardin, J-..........
Reynold, Richard _-Barracuda
Reynolds, Richard -Jacks
McNeil, Linda .....
Grouper
McNeil, Linda .....
Age Group 5 thru 7
Snappers
Anderson, Richard -- 1 lb. Carothers, Stephen-. 1lb. Martz, Murray ..... Martz, Glenn ...... Moales, Reggie Martz, Murray .... Scarborough, SallyMartz, Glenn ......
Barracuda
Rehkopf, B.---------Ilb.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Grouper
Price, Raymond ....
Jacks


14 ozs. 8 ozs.
12 oz. 8 ozs. 8 ozs.

8 ozs.

11ozs.

12 ozs.


8 ozs.

14 ozs. 12 ozs. 12 oz.
9 ozs. 8 ozs. 6 ozs.



14 ozs.


Davis, Chris----..... 8 ozs.
Snappers
Few, Raymond------llb. 8 ozs. Carothers, Linda---------10 oz.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Croaker
Kler, Clara Sue --- 14 ozs.
Grouper
Gennaria, Joanne -- 1 lb. 8 ozs.
Snappers
Howell, Johnny ---- 1 lb. 8 oz. Haymes, Carl------1 lb. 4 ozs.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Jacks
Miles, Jimmy-------1 lb.
Snappers
Roessler, Dick------2 lbs. Carroll, Dennis _----1 lb. 8 ozs. Carroll, Dennis .... 14 ozs. Gewertz, R. M.-----------8 oz.
No entries in the following fish: Mackerel (King)
Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common)
Snook
BOAT DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 No Entries.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Jacks
Sauborn, Mike------ 8 ozs.
Snappers
Puckett, Pam Jo .... 1 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Snappers
Price, R. V., Jr...... 2 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Jacks
Kler, Clara S.------------ 8oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Snappers
Hill, Jane----------- ozs.
Snook
Hill, Jane---------1 lb.
No entries in the following fish:
Barracuda Grouper
Mackerel (King)
Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common
SPECIAL DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4
Croakers
Jogan, Karen-----------12 oz.
Rehkopf, Jimmy --- 10 ozs. Williams, Ann ---- 8 ozs. Carothers, Douglas- 8 ozs.
Bonefish
Rehkopf, Jimmy ___ 12 ozs. Hardin, J .......... 8 ozs.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Bonefish
Anderson, Ricky ___ 8 ozs. Rehkopf, Brian .... 8 ozs.
Croakers
Puckett, Puck-------1 lb. 8 oz. Lightfoot, Bobby 1-_ I lb.
Parrot Fish
Gennaria, Terry L. -- I lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Parrotfish
Airheart, John------- 8 ozs.
Croakers
Carothers, Steve --- 8 ozs.
Age Group 10thru 11
Bonefish
Hale, Robert-------I lb. Howell, Johnny----------8 oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Bonefish
Howell, Dorothy----------8 oz.
Carroll, D .--.------------- 8 oz.
Croakers
Hill, Jane----------I lb. 8 ozs.
No entries in the following fish:
Albacore Bonito Dolphin Hogfish Lady fish Marlin Pompano Sailfish Shark Triggerfish
Tuna


Saturday, 16 May 1953


THE INDIAN


Page Viw









Pag~ Six THE INDIAN Saturday, 16 May 1953


PRESENTS CLASSES IN SPANISH ... A graduate of the Kingston Tutorial College, Kingston, Jamaica, Mr. A. G. Jones is pictured above as he recently lectured a class in the fine points of the Spanish language. Designed to give a speaking acquaintance with the language, these classes meet every Wednesday evening.


PART OF EXPANDING I&E PROGRAM . . . As part of the expanding Information and Education Program presented by the Naval Station, the course in basic Spanish has become ever increasingly popular among Base personnel. Length of each class is eight weeks.


ADVISORY COMMITTEE WILL STUDY MEDICAL CARE FOR DEPENDENTS

Washington (AFPS) -A fivemember Citizens Advisory Commission on Medical Care of Dependents of Military Personnel has been appointed by Defense Secretary Charles E. Wilson, the Defense Department has announced.
The Commission has been asked by Sec. Wilson to make an overall study of policies for the provision of medical and dental care for such dependents, and recommend any changes needed to establish a long-range, uniform program for administering medical and dental care for them.
Dr. Harold G. Moulton, president emeritus of the Brookings Institution, Washington, D. C., has been appointed chairman of the Commission.
In particular, the Commission will study the type and extent of care to be provided; categories of military persohnei whose dependents should receive medical care; types of dependents who should be provided with medical care and the extent of establishment of facilities for the medical and dental care of dependents.

.INEW RECORDS

All ears are tuned to two new releases that promise big things for vocalists Ella Mae Morse and Mr. Eddie Fisher. They are, first of all, a composition from the pen of Link Davis. It's called "Big Mamou." With musical backing of Nelson Riddle and his orchestra, the dulcet tones of that "cow-cow boogie gal," Ella Mae Morse, should indicate a.great future lor this rhythmic ditty. From the distaff side of sharps and fiats, we turn our musical attention to Eddie Fisher, recently discharged from the Army. After touring many bases the world over, Eddie has concentrated full effort on his latest disc, augmented by the scintillating strings of Hugo Winterhalter and company. Unlike Ella Mae's "Big Mamou." with its fast tempo, Eddie's latest, titled "I'm Walking Behind You," is a relaxed ballad by composer Billy Reid. Yes indeed, despite the fact that both artists record for different labels, plus the fact that Ella Mae has had a head start on Eddie in the recording business, this reporter cannot help but state that both cuttings will be in big demand from music lovers the world over. "Big Mamou" and "I'm Walking Behind You," our elected musical selections for this week's "tops in pops." ...
Sylvania, Ohio (AFPS) - Mrs. Roy Ferry thought she had bats in her belfry but it turned out to be a mink in the sink. Mrs. Ferry discovered a strange black animal feeding on a box of cookies it had pulled in the sink. On further inspection the animal was revealed as a mink.
(AFPS)-Baseball Fan (proposing): How would you like to sign up for a life game?"
Gal: "O.K. Where's your diamond?"


My first few words in this column will be of gratitude to all those who, in a way or the other, have contributed to my being here, writing for the readers of The Indian. in a humble, but sincere attempt to promote better friendship and understanding between Americans visiting territorial Cuba and Cubans, and 'also with the idea to indicate some facts that I may consider of importance about the history, traditions and legends of this Island, called by Columbus "the most beautiful land ever seen by the human eyes." I should also like to especially express my deepest appreciation to the Base Commander who made it possible for me to be in this publication to give Americans an insight in this land of romance and enchantment which they helped to liberate from Spanish oppression, and which in turn is doing its best at the present time, in just reciprocation, to cooperate with the United States, physically and spiritually, to overcome the obstacles laid in her way by the enemies of the American Democracy throughout the world.
I think that instead of "better understanding between Americans and Cubans," I could and should have said "better understanding between Americarns FROM THE UNTED STATES and Americans FROM CUBA," because, although for centuries we have been told that we are different, because we differ in customs and in looks, most of us, are bound together by something that binds nations together even more than common looks and common speech, and that is a common history, a share of the experiences of the past, and a genuine identification in our ideals for the future, trying to preserve what our ancestors fought for, and to see that our sacred ideals "shall not perish from the earth."
Therefore, because of the above, and according to the definition given by the Dictionary of the word "American," due to our geographical location-in the Western


Hemisphere-Cubans can be considered as Americans. and we cmn also be considered Americans i something even more important than that: in our history, in our ideals, and in our American way of looking forward to understanding and peace between all the peoples of the World. This, I believe, is as important as the phenomena of birth and of origin ....
Americans (from the United States) helped us to attain our liberty, writing unforgettable chapters of heroism in San Juan Hill, Santiago de Cuba, and consequently any true Cuban considers himself more American than anything else, because a nation, like an individual, is not obliged to those who are responsible for her physical existence, when this existence bring a withit boundage, servitude, humiliations, but to those who have contributed to her Liberty, because Liberty is the very essence of life....

ABOUT MR. GARCIA

Mr. Henry Garcia, an employee of the Marine Corps Exchange, has graciously volunteered to write for the readers of The Indian. A descendent of General Calixto Garcia of "A Message to Garcia" fame, his reason for doing so is to acquaint naval personnel with the history, customs, culture and ideals of the Cuban people.
"From Garcia" is Mr. Garcia's frst endeavor at writing in English for publication.
Born in Holguin, Cuba and rai ed in Havana, Mr. Garcia comes from a family of professional journalists His father, Enrique Garcia, is a professional newspaper man and his mother, Marilola Suarez, is a radio and television writer. Mr. Garcia's brother, Mr. Pedro Garcia, is one of Havana's well-known radio and television writter.
While living in Havana, Mr. Garcia became a professional radio announcer and amateur journalist.


The day of the "Western" is over. Gone is the two-fisted, gunsmoke and whiskey drinking cowboy. He takes his place with those other two vanishing Americansthe Indian and the Buffalo. His demise was sudden and saddens all. The killer was a Paramount vehicle called "Shane," a very good picture, by the way. Jack Palance, who portrays the "bad guy" is the villain who does in our boy. In the picture he plays the part of the hired Gunsel . .. But not once does he take a drink of old red-eye! He steels himself for all the killing he does on COFFEE! A fate worse than death for any good sidewinder. There's empty saddles in America tonight. We houe that Paramount at least has the good grace to replace him with a twodisintegrator toting, radiated-coke drinking space pirate ... Jose Ferrer signed for the part of LT Greenwald, in the Cain Mutiny; how many leads can a guy sign for at one time? He also signed for "Miss Sadie Thompson" . . . Joan Welton has been signed by Warner Bros., for the lead in "The System." Frank Lovejoy will co-star. It will be a shoot 'em-up drama of alleged syndicated gambling in the U. S. It will also mark the first time that Lovejoy is "agin" the law .... British actor Alan Badel is really getting a workout. In his first picture in this country he portrayed John The Baptist in Columbia's Salome. His next appearance will be as Romeo in the Old Vic's new production of the Shakespeare classic . . . The Benny GoodmanLouis Armstrong tour which got off to a so-so start at New York's Carnegie Hall will continue without Goodman. He was felled by a heart attack in Boston the day after he opened . . . "Song From Moulin Rouge" made the jump from the number ten to the number four slot on the Variety Popularity poll in just one week. "Doggie in the Window" continues as number one tune throughout the country.
A famous Washington newspaperman who was dining at Galatoire's, in the old French quarter of New Orleans, raved over the trout Marquery. He summoned the proprietor and said, "I'd like to have the recipe for this dish.". The proprietor smiled, and answered suavely, "I'm sorry sir, but we have the same policy here as you journalists. We never reveal our sauce."
Getting things free is a favorite thought with nearly everybody, including the two small boys who were overheard discussing the subject. Said one of them:
"My father is a doctor, so I can be sick for nothing."
The other kid was not to be outdone and he replied:
"My dad's a minister, so I can be good for nothing."


A MESSAGE FROM GARCIA
By Henry Garcia


Pag6 Six


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 16 May 1953


w







Saturday. 16 May 1953 THE INDIAN Pae~e Seven


NAVY BLASTS RED POSITIONS


A two-gun salvo from the forward 16-inch guns of the Battleship New Jersey is just a part of the havoc and destruction rained on Communist installations and shore batteries by Navy ships ranging up and down the Korean coastline.

FOURTH ARMED FORCES DAY FINDS
ALL SERVICES READY
The theme for this year's Armed Forces Day--"Power For Peace"is a fitting tribute to the buildup and reorganization undergone since the first observance in 1949.
Power for peace means our own military power and helping other free nations build up their mili- mains as the specialist in amtary strength so that together we phibious warfare, continues in thshall be stronger than the forces search for new and improved that seek to destroy us. methods in that field.
We swing a heavier punch than The approximately 74,000 the Communists where it counts strength of the Corps at the start
-in know-how, productive capaci- of the Korean fighting has been ty, equipment, teamwork and the increased to about 230,000. In Koideals men live by. rea the Corps, which has been i,
The principles we defend are action since the summer of 1950, that we believe in democracy- has pioneered the use of the helithe dignity and worth of the in- copter for assault movement of dividual and government for and troops and for the evacuation of by the people; that other nations the wounded. Another item which have a right to establish the kind is saving lives in Korea, the "Arof government they want; and mored vest," was developed aftethat -mutual 'security is needed eight years of research in conamong free nations, junction with the Bureau of MediForced to meet Communist ag- cine and Surgery.
gression in Korea-and its threat When the war started in Korea all around the world, the Armed the United States found itself with Forces urgently went about the a 48 wing air force. As the Air business of expansion and im- Force grew from 48 to 68 to 84 and provement., then to the 95 authorized wings the
In 1950 the Army had but 10 di- increases in strength and money visions, 12 separate regimental- authorizations of the other services sized units and 48 anti-air-craft moved up correspondingly. Howbattalions. Today there are 20 full- ever, Congress has agreed to give strength divisions-Infantry, Ar- the Air Force a 50% increase-to mored and Airborne-re-organized 126 wings plus 17 troop carrier and re-equipped to meet changing wings. conditions; 18 regimental combat The increase from 95 wings in teams and 110 anti-aircraft bat- 1952 to the planned .143 wings will talions. More than 700,000 men are required an increase of only 14% in combat or in posts of readiness in military personnel. This will b overseas, accomplished by increased effecThe Army has grown from , tiveness in personnel utilization, strength of approximately 560,000 management and'training. in July 1950 to about 1,600,000 Air Force "Sabres-the F-86s today. -continue to down Russian-made
One of the more important fac- MIG-15s at a better than 11 to 1 tors in these buildup figures is ratio. By February of this year 26 the increase in combat efficiency. USAF pilots had become aces. Although the manpower of the In conjunction with Navy and Infantry division, for example, has Marine aviation, and United Nabeen increased only by 30% over tions support, the Air Force has WWII divisions, it has been pos- conducted a strangling attack sible by developing new and better against Communist supply lines. weapons to increase the ratio 01 Air superiority has been maintainfirepower by some 75%. ed over Korea in the face of a
At the outbreak of war in Korea steady increase in enemy ground the Navy had about 376,000 per- defenses and a greatly enlarged sonnel and 573 active vessels. In enemy air force.. two years, by June 30, 1952 there Our united power for peace is the was a strength of approximately power to assure peace-by meeting 827,000 and 1,200 active vessels. It and surpassing the Communist should be noted that "de-moth- world's power for war. (AFPS) balling" 648 ships from the reserve
fleet, our most valuable and potent COPIES OF MARINE strategic stockpile, and previously
maintaining them in reserve, cost AVIATION HISTORY less than 41/% of their estimated STILL AVAILABLE replacement cost.
In addition, the Navy is being Gen. Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr., strengthened by new and im- Commandant of the Marine Corps, proved ships -nuclear powered, in a letter to Lewis K. Gough, Nahunter killer and fast attack sub- tional Commander of the Amerimarines; the Forrestal class of can Legion, stated that "There are carriers, largest ever laid down; still unclaimed copies of the 'Hisand guided missile ships are a few tory of Marine Corps Aviation in examples. The Navy has also fur- World War II,' by Robert Sherther improved its weapons in its rod. This is to remind all hands determination to be second to none. who have not requested a gift
The Marine Corps, which re- copy to d"+ow.


DEFENSE LEADERS PRAISE SERVICES
ON 4TH AF DAY
Washington (AFPS)-In observance of the fourth annual Armed Forces Day, Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson joined the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, Air Force in issuing the following statements:
The Secretary of Defense,
Charles E. Wilson: "Armed Forces to our national security and lends Day is a day dedicated to do honor firmness to our foreign policy. to the united men and women of "We of the Navy and Marine our nation, at home and abroad, Corps are proud of our basic miswho proudly wear the uniforms sion to control the seas. Command of the Army, the Navy, the Air of the seas by-our naval air, surForce and the Marine Corps. face and submarine fleets stands "On this fourth observance of today as a powerful deterrent to our Armed Forces Day, it is a world conquest by any would-be privilege for me to greet warmly aggressor. Seapower is an effective
the men and women in uniform 'Power for Peace'." and all of those others who hayw The Secretary of the Air Force. contributed so much toward plac- Harold Talbott: "The Department ing in their hands the spiritual of the Air Force, together with and material strength that makes the Army and Navy, will observe them the balanced positive force this fourth annual Armed Forces for peace they are today. To the Day fully aware of its responsimen in Korea who are fighting so bility in the joint effort to prenobly and ably for the ideals we serve world peace and to insure cherish, I send particular greet- our national security. Power for ings, confident of their ultimate Peace means that a strong Amervictory." ica can be a peaceful America. As
The Secretary of the Army, our strength increases, the Air Robert T. Stevens: "I am proud to Force will keep in mind the need join in a salute to all of our men for teamwork in the Armed Forces and women in uniform on this and for coordinated effort among Armed Forces Day of 1953. The all our citizens. In this way we Army can be counted upon for can best protect our heritage of complete teamwork with its sis- freedom." ter services, the Navy and Air
Force, in the great task of defend- OF 'MILITARY LIFE'-AS ing our nation throughout the years A USMC "BOOT" to come. And we join with all
Americans in the prayer that our San Diego, Calif., (AFPS)combined power for peace shall From an officer's status to the be sustained and effective." ranks of a recruit at the Marine
The Secretary of the Navy, R. Corps RecruitDepot here is the B. Anderson: "Armed Forces Day story of Pvt. Don E. Johnson. 1953 is a forceful reminder that a A former U. S. Army and U. S. strong and well balanced military Air Force captain, Johnson enestablishment offers America its listed in the Marines recently to best hope for peace in this cen- "serve and work with the militury of continuing crisis. The unity tary organization I've read and of- our Armed Forces adds strength heard so much about."

AF's ALL-WEATHER EYES


Roaming the skies in tight formation, these F-94 all-weather jet interceptors typify the readiness of the Air Force to meet and repulse any attack-in any kind of weather.

'OUTGOING MAIL'


A 4.2 mortar crew, shown just after dispatching some "S-cci l Delivery" mail off to Red positions in Korea; mans one of the heavier weapons of the infantryman. It exemplifies the close -oprtion needed for ultimate victory.


Saturday, 16 May 1953


THE INDIAN


Page Seven








Navy 1ONDPPO-Gtmo. 5567-B THE INDIAN Saturday, 16 May 1953


WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Regular Programs - Monday Through Friday


0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0830 Bill Ring 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 Solitary Singer 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home


Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Behind The Story 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Sports Answer Man 1745 Personal Album 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News 1830 Bing Crosby 1900 Hollywood Star Playhouse 1930 Ozzie and Harriet 1955 Solitary Singer 2000 Life With Luigi 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out .2100 Fibber McGee & Molly 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News
2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
00 M usic For You 0815 News
0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Behind The Story 1045 You And The World 2100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News
1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1,445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 Personal Album 1815 News
1830 Charlie McCarthy 1900 Jack Smith 1930 Martin and Lewis 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Big Time 2100 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2155 News


A young mechanic thought he'd like a job in the country for a change. "Can you shoe a horse?" a farmer asked him. He said h was willing to try, so the farmer left him with the horse and went to the village on an errand. Returning, he found the horse lying on its back, all four feet up in the air. It had been shoed though and the job had been well done.
"Not bad at all" remarked the farmer, "but what's wrong with the horse? He looks a bit odd."
"I've been worrying about that", replied the young mechanic. "He's been likb that ever since I took him out of the vice!"


1215
1230 1330 1400 1500
1700 1800 1815 1845 1955 2055 2155 2230
2400


News
Hillbilly Jamboree At Ease Musical Matinee Parade of Sports/AFRS Story Teller Time From The Pressbox News
Requestfully Yours This I Believe Knox ManninA-Time Out News
Sandman Show Sign Off'


2200 One Night Stand 2230 Musicland USA 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off

Monday
0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Jo Stafford 1930 Groucho Marx 2000 Broadway's My Beat 2030 Big Town 2100 Piano Playhouse 2130 Great Gildersleeve 2200 Symphonies For Youth

Tuesday
0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 From The Bookshelf ,1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Playboys 1930 Dragnet 2000 Vaughn Monroe 2030 Suspense 2100 Mr. and Mrs. North 2130 People Are Funny 2200 American Music Hall

Wednesday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Francis Farwell Sings 1730 Secret Mission 1830 Jo Stafford 1930 Arthur Godfrey 2000 Al Goodman 2030 December Bride 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2155 News
2200 Howard Barolow Presents

Thursday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Playboys 1930 The Greatest Story 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200'Music From America

Friday
0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Jo Stafford 1930 Twenty Questions 2000 Two Thousand Plus 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Syncopation Piece 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


MOVIE PREVIEWS

Scotland Yard Inspector
This is the story, of a magazine writer who becomes involved with a girl whose brother has been run over by a car in the fog. She thinks it's murder, but has no evidence to prove it. The picture centers around them getting evidence of the murder and bringing the murderers to justice.
She's Back On Broadway
A beautiful motion picture star finds herself washed up at the age of 27. Her agent advises her to do a musical comedy on stage, directed by an old sweetheart of hers. However, the play only gets lukewarm reviews until she and the director agree to renew their old romance and the show becomes a big hit.
Confidentially Connie
As a teacher in a small college town in Maine, a young man doesn't earn enough money to support his wife in the highest manner. Although his father is a wealthy Texan, he prefers his independence. The father comes to visit the couple and, in attempting to adjust their lives, almost succeeds in ruining their marriage.
Angels In The Outfield
No information available. Supposedly a baseball picture, starring Paul Douglas and Janet Leigh.
Excuse My Dust
A small town boy, Red Skelton, goes through with his idea at inventing a horseless carriage. After much ado, he not only succeeds but also wins the girl in the story. A technicolor movie.
Rhubarb
This is the story of "Rhubarb," a cat who inherits a fortune. A very hilarious hour and a half with Ray Milland and Janet Sterling that will tintilate your funny bone.

MOVIE SCHEDULE

Saturday, 16 May
SCOTLAND YARD INSPECTOR C. Romero L. Maxwell
plus
DON'T GIVE UP THE SHEEP and
SWEET MEMORIES
Sunday, 17 May
SHE'S BACK ON BROADWAY V. Mayo G. lNelson
plus
SPORTS REVIEW
Monday, 18 May
CONFIDENTIALLY CONNIE V. Johnson J. Leigh
plus
FIESTA FOR SPORT
and
LET'S HAVE A PARADE
Tuesday, 19 May
ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD P. Douglas J. Leigh
Wednesday, 20 May EXCUSE MY DUST
R. Skelton N. Lewis
plus
SCREEN ACTORS
Thursday, 21 May
RHUBARB
R. Milland J. Sterling


Customer: "Have you the book called, "Man, Master of Women?"
Salesgirl: "The fiction counter is to your left, sir."

Daisy: "Clem, you've jest got to buy me some new clothes. Purty soon, I'll have nary a stitch to wear, then what'll I do ?"
Clem: "Pull down the shades. We can't be scaring the neighbors."

Wife at the train: "Oh, dear. I knew I would forget something. I forgot my bathing suit." Husband seeing her off: Don't worry, dear. I'll put it in an envelope and send it to you."


0


WHAT LINES!


Competing in the Miss Miami Beach of 1953 beauty contest is slender 19year-old Lana Bashama. Sporting a zebra striped bathing suit, the sun-tanned lass gives a few pointers on how to pose for beauty finals.

LITTLE THEATRE NOTES

By Jerry Lewis
The finishing touches and the last minute preparations are being administered as the opening day nears! The curtain will go up the 25th of this month, at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre building on Marina Point! Of course, you all know of what I'm referring to, but in case you don't, it's the opening performance of the new stage-play "Strange Bedfellows" presented by the Little Theatre Group of Guantanamo Bay.
I can't speak enough for it, judging by the rehearsals I've seen, in as much as it's- one of the finest comedy shows yet to be staged in Gtmo. Every scene is filled with 'good-taste' comedy and the players work it to the hilt for maximum effect.
It's comedy for the whole family E'nd is certainly worth the seventyfive cents the ducats will go for.
This is one investment that can't miss! Please, for your own sake, don't leave it for the last minute and say, "Oh, I'll meander up there during the last performance or so," because it's a guaranteed full house! Listen to your Armed Forces Radio Station, W.G.B.Y. fon all details and keep an eye out for the clever advertising stunts rigged up by the Theatre Group.
It's a must from the.word GO!
I wish I could give credit lines to all concerned with this wonderful production but time and space does not allow for same, so, give yourself a treat and see "Strange Bcdfellows" by the Little Theatre Group at Marina Point, 25 May at 8 p.m. There'll be enough laughs and refreshments to go around to keep everybody happy and in a good frame of mind.
Next week's column will give all pertinent info on the latest names, places and where you can purchase tickets for the play.
Make it a date! The 25th of May!

A current favorite of night club comics concerns the French horn player whose toupee fell into his instrument and who spent the rest of the evening blowing his top.

A man from the country went into the nearby village and bought a pair of shoes. The next day the shoe salesman met him on the street and asked him if the shoes were comfortable.
"They're quite comfortable."
"Well, if that's so" said the salesman, "why in the world do you shuffle along so slowly?"
"Oh," the man answered resignedly, "that's because you forgot to cut the string that ties them together."


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Saturday, 16 May 1953


Naiy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 3867-B


THE INDIAN.




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e I? QA-e Vol. V, No. 35 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 16 May 1953 RESULTS OF FEBRUARY PETTY OFFICER EXAMS SLOW IN ARRIVING AT GUANTANAMO BAY "Have the rates come in?" This has been the question on the lips of over a thousand persons aboard the Naval Base during the past several weeks. As The Indian went to press, only a few commands had received results of the Petty Officer examinations held last February. 7i is expected that these results will soon become available to The I dian and will be printed in a subseauent edition. Over one thousand four hundred men took the tests here last February. Personnel promoted to chief petty officer will get their rates effective 16 June. All other promotions will be made effective as of today. It was expected that about half of the men competing for a first or second class crow will be promoted. Approximately 57 per cent of those trying for third class were expected to have made the grade, according to an early BuPers notice. Advancements to all petty officer grades are subject to service-wide quota control. The quota limitations explain why men in certain rates have not been promoted even though they have a higher final multiple than some of those promoted in other rates. MUSIC FESTIVAL CAPS WEEK'S OBSERVANCE OF NATIONAL AND INTERAMERICAN MUSIC WEEK Filling the Naval Station Lyceum beyond its intended capacity. hundreds of anxious music lovers thronged to the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival Sunday evening in observance of National and in ter-American Music Week. More than eighteen groups and individuals presented music representative of all races, creeds and nationalities. In a two-hour program, every type of music from American Jazz to the Hawaiian Hula was presented. Groups ranged in character from the Nursery School Rhythm Band to the Protestant and Catholic Choir. Music Week is a major special event for the Armed Forces. Al' ef the resources for music of all branches of the Armed Services are geared to observance of the occasion. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine bands last week presented a solid week of concerts in widely scattered sections of the United States. From its initial observance on a synchronized, national basis in 1924, Music Week has grown in extent until it now reaches annually some 3,200 cities, towns and villages in every part of the United States. Representing the Cuban people was Sra. Argentina Rodriguez de Velazco, who presented two Spanish dances. FROM AMERICAN JAZZ .High lighltingthe 19 3 tuaantnam Bay Music Festival were the "Six Hits and a Miss," playing "Five Fost Two, Eyes st Rlue." n a twonhsorprgram, every type ofamusic from AmericanLJazz to the Hawaiian Hla was presented Sunday evening at the Naval Statin Lyherm. Mae piet.res of the Music Festival can be found an page three. A PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA WHEREAS the men and women of the armed forces of the United States are constantly demonstrating their loyalty and devotion to the service of their country; and WHEREAS these armed forces are now engaged in combat against ruthless aggression and despotism, which threatens to destroy the freedom that this Nation cherishes; and WHEREAS these fighting forces help to maintain the strength and security of.our nation and to provide the power for peace needed in the world; and WHEREAS it is fitting and proper that we devote one day each year to paying special tribute to those whose constancy and courage constitute one of the bulwarks guarding the freedom of this Nation and the peace of the free world: NOW, THEREFORE, I DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Saturday, May 16, 1953, as Armed Forces Day; and I direct the Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force, as well as the Secretary of the Treasury, on behalf of the Coast Guard, to mark the designated day with appropriate ceremonies, and to cooperate with other public authorities in suitable observances. I also invite the Governors of the States, Territories, and possessions of the United States to provide for the celebration of the day in such manner as to pay suitable honor to the members of our armed forces; and I call upon my fellow citizens not only to display the flag of the United States on Armed Forces Day, but also to show their recognition of the gallantry, sacrifice, and devotion to duty of the men and women of the armed forces by cooperating in local observances of the day. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. DONE at the City of Washington this seventeenth day of March, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fiftythree; and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and seventy-seventh. DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER. TO THE HAWAIIAN HULA ...Taking the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival audience to the land of the whikey-wakey-woo was Mrs. Effie Jankosky, who did an interpretation of the Hawaiian Hula. Presenting music representative of all races. creeds and nationalities, more than eighteen groups and individuals helped celebrate the thirtieth observance of National and Inter-American Music Week. INTRAMURAL GOLF The Intramural Golf Championships will be played off Sunday 17 May in a match to be held at the local golf course and commencing at 0700. VU-10, the winner of the first half of play will meet a Naval Station team who were the champs of the second half to determine the Intramural winners. A Scotch foursome will also be held at 12 o'clock noon on the same day. "My what a strange looking cow," exclaimed the city gal. "But why hasn't she any horns." "Wal, you see," said the farmer patiently, "some cows we de-horn and some cows shed 'em. There's a lot of reasons why some cows ain't got horns. But the reason that cow ain't got horns is she ain't a cow. She's a mule." CAPTAIN L. A. ARTHUR, F.T.G. AIR DEPT HEAD, DEPARTS FOR MEMPHIS CAPT L. A. Arthur, who has been serving as Head of the Air Department of the Fleet Training Group for the past two years, has received orders to Memphis, Tennessee where he will act as Chief of Staff to the Commander Naval Air Technical Training. CAPT and Mrs. Arthur are leaving today and after five days of leave are scheduled to arrive i. Memphis 28 May. CAPT Arthur graduated from the United States Naval Academy 2 June 1932 and was designated a Naval Aviator in December of 1935. A diplomat is a man who knows what it isn't safe to laugh at. ee

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PaCe Two THE INDTA?~ Saturday, 16 May 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 16 May 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Ensign J. McMahon-Staff Advisor Al Henderson, JOSN--------Editor J. C. Dierks, SN-------Sports Editor S. E. Cobbs, SN----------Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed an government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay. Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. HAROLD E. TALBOTT The Air Force Secretary on Charles Wilson's defense team has kept his eyes on the sky of aviation enterprise and his hands on the pulse of the assembly line for the better part of his 65 years. Harold E. Talbott was appointed to the defense post by President Eisenhower Jan. 20, received Senate confirmation Feb. 4 and was sworn in the same day. This was his second highly responsible government job in less than a decade. He was director of aircraft production of the War Production Board in WWII. In the spring of 1916, the Orville Wright aircraft company was reorganized into the DaytonWright Co. by Mr. Talbott's father and two other partners. Orville Wright was vice president. When war broke out the size of the plant was doubled and by 1918 turned out 38 planes daily, more than any other aircraft plant in the U. S. In September 1918, Mr. Talbott was commissioned a major in the Air Service of the Signal Corps. He was assigned with a group of officers to take charge of maintenance and repair of aircraft in France, but the Armistice came before the group left the U. S. He returned to the H. E. Talbott Co. as vice president and generalmanager, posts he had held since his graduation from Yale in 1911. He retained these and similar posts in the Dayton Metals Products Co. until 1920. In the fall of 1919 DaytonWright, his father's company, merged with General Motors and the new Air Force Secretary was named Dayton-Wright's new president as well as president of Inland Manufacturing Co. In 1925 he moved to New York and became director of the Chrysler Corp. (AFPS) ARMED FORCESDAY PRAYER Prepared by The Armed Forces Chaplains' Board 0 God who teachest mankind by word and example the way to true peaceInspire the minds of all our leaders with the wisdom to bring about a peace according to Thy designs. Strengthen the wills of our fighting men and women lest in the pursuit of their vocations they succumb to the temptations to rejoice in the power of material might and gain over true righteousness. Enlighten the minds of those in positions of responsibility to an awareness of Thy Commandments which must be the basis for a true peace. Touch with Thy outstretched hand of forgiveness the souls of tyrants who would, by abandoning Thy teachings, lead us to disaster. With humility and sincerity, do we beg Thy blessings on all those throughout the world who strive to bring about a peace which can be gained by Thy leadership. Amen. I&E CURRICULUM EXPANDS TO INCLUDE DISCUSSION GROUPS The Information and Education Program at Guantanamo Bay has recently been expanded by the addition of five new courses, some of which are already in progress. Plans are also underway to include two others, bringing the curriculum offered through the Naval Station I&E Office to a total of eight courses. This includes several discussion groups and the already popular course in basic Spanish. The course in basic Spanish, already popular and presented hevChaplainstStephenson and Agnew, eral times in the past, lasts a total begins its Sunday meetings at of eight weeks. Currently underseven-thirty. way, the classes are taught in Military personnel interested in room nine of the Naval Base School enrolling in a group study class in Wednesday evenings between six American literature or in developand seven-thirty. ing art skills should contact the One of the first new classes to be Naval Station Information and added to the I&E curriculum is a Education Officer, Bay Hill Barcurrent events discussion class, racks FOUR (9-564). Any addiPlanned to meet Monday through tional information about the above Friday evenings at Bay Hill Bargroups or classes can also be obracks Four between seven and tained from the I&E Officer. nine-thirty, the classes are of an indefinite period. ARMED FORCES Overheard: "You never kiss me TALK will be used as a text. anymore. Why can't you be like A course in stewardship is being the man next door?" presented by Chiefs Claude and Knight each Wednesday afternoon at the Marina Point B. 0. Q. Class time is from two to three-thirty. Under the direction of Father J. Spinney, an educational study and discussion group for Catholics is meeting for an indefinite period Monday evenings from seven-thirty to eight-thirty in the Base Chapel. An educational Bible study and Air Force Special Services to the discussion group for Protestants, and barber shop quartet contests. under the direction of Chaplains The awards will be made annual M. 0. Stephenson and J. F. Agnew, will be held on May 23 at the Rapid is meeting Wednesday evenings City AFB, S. D., while the finals for an indefinite period in the for the barbershop quartet contest auditorium of the Naval Base will be held June 6 at Sefridge School. Time: seven-thirty to eightAFB, Mich. thirty. Meeting Sunday evenings in the Congressional approval has been school auditorium is another Progranted to proceed with negotiatestant group, the Christian feltons for construction in France, lowship and study group. This under a rental guarantee plan, of group, also under the direction of approximately 2,000 family dwellin T awrdsill benmadeoannual I M'os 3'lf ie I'. ,p'c c ad1 : ng unit sor aepenaents of merican personnel, the Defense Department announces. The rental guarantee plan contemplates agreements with foreign sponsors to finance, construct and maintain housing for occupancy by U. S. personnel and their dependents on a rental basis. Transfer of the Separation Center at Ft. Custer, Battle Creek, Mich., to Ft. Sheridan, near Highwood, Ill., has been revealed. The Army also announced plans to move the Reception Center at Ft. Sheridan to Ft. Riley, Kans. An agreement providing for construction by Portugal of minesweepers and escort vessels destined for use by NATO nations has been announced by the U. S. Navy. The U. S. share of the costs will be about $7.5 million, paid under the Mutual Defense Assistance Program. Eighteen contracts, totalling $15, Sunday, 17 May 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturday, 17301800; 19302015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) HOSPITAL NOTES BEIRPORT NEWS: Michael Charles Pitre, born 22 April, is the son of YN2 and Mrs. R. C. Pitre. Emma Maura Sims, born 29 April is the daughter of HMC and Mrs. C. Sims. ICT and Mrs. J. McGee announce the arrival of their son. Dennis Michael, born 8 May. EM3 and Mrs. D. R. Morgan are the proud parents of a daughter, Claudia Ann, born 11 May. Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Goldman are happy to announce the arrival of their son, John Wiley Porter, born 25 April. Gail Marie Roberts, born 24 April ;s the baby daughter of AL2 and Mrs. E. L. Roberts. Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Pinckard are the proud parents of a daughter, Sauree Nina, born 24 April. John James Young, born 29 April is the son of ADAN and Mrs. W. J. Young. LT and Mrs. L. G. Little are happy to announce the arrival of their son Lawrence Michael, born 2 May. ET1 and Mrs. A. L. Hay are the proud parents of a son, Larry Edwin, born 21 April. PN3 and Mrs. Muldez are the proud parents of a baby boy born 8 May. M/Sgt and Mrs. K. E. Graham announce the arrival of their daughter, Susanne Marie, born 2 May. Kingston, R. I. (AFPS)-A heman note from the University of Rhode Island reveals that 12 male students are taking a course in "flower arrangement." HI ONGosoTON s called "Rogers" will be awarded by winners of the coming talent show ly. The finals for the talent cont est 071,639, have been awarded in connection with Navy construction projects since the Feb. 3 constructtion freeze, the Defense Department has announced. Utilities, quarters, fuel storage facilities, piers, hangars, storehouses, repair shops, cafeterias, fire alarm systems and certain repairs to the Naval Academy were listed among the contracts. Instructions to restrict purchase of blankets to 11 different types for all purposes have been issued to the Army, Navy and Air Force, the Defense Department has revealed. Previously, 22 types of blankets have been stocked and issued. The simplified list was compiled through the joint efforts of standardization personnel of the military departments and the Office of standardization, Defense Supply Management Agency. Lt. Gen. Edward H. Brooks, CG of the Second Army at Ft. Mead, Md., retired from the Army, April 30, after 39 years of military service. A successor will be named at a later date. The rush of CPO's to the insurance yeoman prophet has predicted the sudden death of a man who was instrumental in winning the war. THE INDIANtr Saturday, 16 May 1953 Page Two

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Saturday, 9 May 1953 National And THE INDIAN I Page Three nter-American Music Week Celebrated At Guantanamo With Music SO DEAR TO THEIR HEARTS .So dear to their hearts has music become that many, like these members of the Naval Base Band, have chosen tomake music their life-long profession. Under the direction of J. Lundgren, MUC, the band ente:tained the 1953 Guantanamo Bay Music Festival audience with many popular numbers. ON WINGS OF SONG .On wings of song, the Protestant Choir, under the direction of Lieutenant Commander Henry (MC), took their audience closer to a spiritual understanding of God with the singing of "Seek Ye The Lord" and "The Fair Lord Jesus." Music is common to all religions and creeds. WHERE EVER FREE MENGATHERs. Where eer free men garter, their spirits till raise together in harmonious song. A quartet from Moile Constroction Battalion Four was but one of the many groups to c rate National and Inter' American Music Week with song. They sang a Motle song and a hymn. Festival FROM DIXIE TO THE NORTH .From Dixie to the North, from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Statue of Liberty, Americans play, sing and make music as they feel it. It is expressive of their way of life, whether they live on Park Avenue or Skid Row. Above is Chief T. C. Maybury, BMC, and his Dixieland Band. IN HUSHED ADMIRATION .In hushed admiration, the festival audience listened to the Catholic Choir, under the direction of A. Totilo, MU3, sing "O'Most Holy One" and "Panis Angelicus." Music is the international language; it knows no rae, nor creed, nor color. WITH YOUTHFUL VIGORe.aroWith youthful vigoriand disdain for eoshisti-atio. these ttree fur-anvd fie-ear-old nursryschtoolrchildren soberly ovrssred Music Week with a remarkable sense of rhythm. Most were making their first public appearance as they car -stage with tambourines, drums and triangles.

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Pae or HEIDINSaura, 6 a 15 __ J* MARINES HAND FLYERS FIRST LOSS, WIN 11-6 The Marine Leathernecks pounded out 11 runs on 11 hits Monday night to snatch an 11-6 victory and topple the NAS Flyers from the ranks of the unbeaten in spite of a four run rally by the Flyers in the top half of the eighth. Archibald started on the mound for NAS, with Relyea handling the pitching chores for the Marines. The Flyers started it off in the first on a walk and two hits, and the game moved along at a rapid pace until the third when the Leathernecks tied it up in virtually the same manner, combining two bases on balls and a single by Trabucco for their first score. The fifth saw a three run rally by the Leathernecks come about when Relyea walked, took second on a passed ball and moved to third on Romano's long fly to right. Trabucco got on due to an error by Rodkey and a minute later came in to score on a double by Bradshaw to left center. Bradshaw himself came in for the third run of the inning when Rodkey let the throw get away from him temporarily. The Marines continued to chalk them up in the scoring column in the sixth when Felkness led off the inning with a double to left center and scored on Arnold's error. Smith then singled, and Ludwick who had walked, came in to score on a bad throw by Palmer in center field, Romano also tallying on the play. Both teams picked up a run in the seventh, and the Flyers started off the eighth with every intention of overtaking the leading Leathernecks. Wakefield drew a base on balls, and after Conti had gone down swinging, moved to third on a single by Arnold. Novak then stepped up and slashed another single over second, Wakefield scoring and Arnold taking third when Trabucco juggled the ball in center. Cherepanya singled scoring Arnold, and -when the ball got away from Malkin, also came across the plate with another run, Cherepanya going to third and coming in himself when Palmer, the next batter, flied deep to Malkin. This eighth inning four run splurge brought the score to 8-6 and had Flyer rooters still hoping until the last half of the inning when the Marines put the contest away for good by virtue of three more runs collected on three hits, winding it all up with an 11-6 victory. Relyea was the winning pitcher and Archibald the loser, both men striking out nine during the course of the game. SPORTS PERSONALITY Playing a hot game at second base this season for the MCB-4 Seabee nine is Henry Richardson, a 5'81/" 170 pounder hailing from West Virginia. Fans in the Guantanamo Bay area may remember the 25 year old keystone as having batted an impressive .450 in the five games his team played in the league last year and are looking forward to another good season as the Seabees will be down here for the complete schedule this year. Before entering the Navy Richardson picked up some useful experience while playing for the Hurricane, West Virginia club ir an industrial League in that state, as well as performing for the team representing the carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt. The fancy fielding infielder will receive his discharge from the Navy in January of 1955, and upon leaving the service hopes to continue in the baseball direction, probably returning to play for the Hurricane squad once more. Widow at seance: "Is that you Harry?" Ghost: "Yes." "Are you happier than you were with me?" "Much happier." "Heaven must be a beautiful place." "I'm not in heaven." 5p orts LEAGUE SCHEDULES 16 THROUGH 22 MAY SEABEE BOBBLES AID MALLARDS IN 16-4 WIN NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 16 May Philadelphia at Milwaukee Brooklyn at Cincinnati Pittsburgh at Chicago New York (Night) at St. Louis Sunday, 17 May Philadelphia (2) at Milwaukee Brooklyn (2) at Cincinnati Pittsburgh (2) at Chicago New York at St. Louis Monday, 18 May New York at St. Louis Tuesday, 19 May Brooklyn (Night) at Milwaukee Philadelphia (Night) at Cincinnati New York at Chicago Pittsburgh (Night) at St. Louis Wednesday, 20 May Brooklyn at Milwaukee Philadelphia at Cincinnati New York at Chicago Pittsburgh (Night) at St. Louis Thursday, 21 May Brooklyn (Night) at New York Cincinnati (Night) at St. Louis Friday, 22 May Brooklyn at New York Milwaukee at Chicago Cincinnati (Night) at St. Louis AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 16 May St. Louis (Night) at Washington Detroit at Philadelphia Chicago at New York Cleveland at Boston Sunday, 17 May Chicago at Washington Cleveland (2) at Philadelphia St. Louis (2) at New York Detroit (2) at Boston Monday, 18 May Chicago (Night) at Washington Tuesday, 19 May Cleveland (Night) at Washington Chicago (Night) at Philadelphia Detroit (Night) at New York St. Louis at Boston Wednesday, 20 May Cleveland (Night) at Washington Chicago (Night) at Philadelphia Detroit at New York St. Louis at Boston Thursday, 21 May New York (Nightl at Washington Philadelphia at Boston Friday, 22 May Chicago (Night) at Detroit St. Louis at Cleveland New York at Washington Philadelphia at Boston GUANTANAMO LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 16 May Marines vs VU-10 at Marine Site MCB-4 vs Naval Station at Marine Site Sunday, 17 May FTG vs NSD at Marine Site Hospital vs NAS at Marine Site Monday, 18 May VU-10 vs Naval Station at Fleet Recreation Center Tuesday, 19 May Marines vs FTG at Fleet Recreation Center Wednesday, 20 May MCB-4 vs Hospital at Fleet Recreation Center Thursday, 21 May NSD vs NAS at Fleet Recreation Center GUANTANAMO LEAGUE LEADERS (1st Round) Batting Average Player Suter Ziarnek Tobin Palmer Murray Carr Todd Diano Graham Cherepanya Team VU-10 MCB-4 NSD NAS MCB-4 FTG NavSta Marines NSD NAS AB 9 32 28 35 23 27 20 18 12 35 H 4 14 12 14 9 10 7 6 4 11 Home run Leaders Cherepanya, NAS, and Grey, MCB-4 tied with 2. Six players tied with 1 each. RBI Leaders Player Ziarnek Cherepanya Grey Blog Marshall Tobin King Palmer Player Kieh1 Mashaw Smith Trapp Poe Novak Archibald Royal Walters Ziccolello Snyder Burton Huber Esbin Brooks Team MCB-4 NAS MCB-4 NavSta FTG NSD NSD NAS Pitching Records Team NAS NavSta Marines NAS NAS NAS NAS NavSta FTG MCB-4 NSD NSD VU-10 VU-10 MCB-4 A man ambled into a tennis tournament and sat down on a bench. "Whose game?" he asked. A shy, young thing sitting next to him looked up hopefully. "I am," she replied. Won 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 2 AVG. .444 .437 .428 .400 .391 .370 .350 .333 .333 .314 RBI 9 8 8 7 7 7 6 6 Lost 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 CPO: How did your wife get along with her reducing diet? A1: Fine. She disappeared completely last week. The poor house is always the last house on Easy Str' t) The VU-10 Mallards converted nine hits and 13 Seabee errors into 16 runs to trounce MCB-4 in a Tuesday night game at the Fleet Recreation Center. Huber was credited with the victory for the Mallards while Zicolello took the loss. VU-10 walked off to an early lead in the first inning when they pushed across three runs on two hits, but it was in the second frame that the victory minded Mallards really turned on the steam to the tune of seven tallies and a 10-0 lead. Annette singled to center to start off the inning, and moved to second when Hickman likewise hit safely to left. Dieden then drove one over second into center field for another base hit, Annette going to third and Hickman to second. A passed ball advanced the runners, allowing Annette to score, and Kubic, the next batter worked Zicolello for a base on balls. Loggins then walked, and a wild throw by the pitcher brought Dieden and Kubic across the plate. A passed ball scored Loggins, and two more errors brought in Suter and Rea, who had got on with an error and a walk, respectively. Huber got a base on balls and a moment later scored the seventh and final run of the inning when Hansen errored at first. The Mallards picked up two more runs in the third and three in the fourth while Huber was holding the Seabees hitless and scoreless, but the Seabees finally entered the scoring column in the sixth when they managed to drive in two runs off the Mallards hurler. MCB-4's final marker came in the ninth when Ziarnek stole home to wind the game up as a 16-4 Mallard victory. VU-10 scored 16 runs on nine hits and committed two errors. For the Seabees, four runs on five hits and 13 errors. Annapolis, Md. (AFPS)-Navy's Olympic champion oarsmen scored their first victory of the 1953 season, outrowing a Yale crew by four lengths on the Severn River here. The Middie varsity, consisting of eight men who won all their races last year including the intercollegiate and Olympic titles, recorded its tenth straight victory. Hamilton, Bermuda (AFPS)Sgt. Thorne Wood, USAF, of Asheboro, N. C., became the second member of the Air Force to ever win a Bermuda Amateur Golf Championship by defeating Ronnie Dwyer of England 10 and 8. Three years ago, Maj. Bernard Burkett, USAF, accomplished the feat. Cherry Pt., N. C. (AFPS)-AllMarine boxing champs recently selected in a four-day tourney here are: Flyweight -Johnny Fusco (Cherry Pt.), Bantamweight-Herman Galvao (Cherry Pt.), Featherweight-Walter Byars (FMF Pacific), Lightweight -Francis Bond (MAS Miami, Fla.), Light-welterweight-Henry Abner (MAS Miami, Fla.), WelterweightRudy Gwin (Cherry Pt.), Al Hood (Cherry Pt.), Middleweight -Richard Hill (Camp Lejeune, N. C.), Light Heavyweight-Pat Murtry (El Toro, Calif.) and Heavyweight-Bud House (Camp Lejeune, N. C.) New York (AFPS)-Mal Whitfield, former Ohio State and Air Force star, has been selected as the outstanding performer of the 1953 indoor track season by the New York Track Writers Association. The fleet runner won 14 straight races and broke three world indoor records this season. Remember when a guy told a girl a naughty story and she blushed? "Nowadays she memorizes it. "Any nice girls in this town?" "Sure, they're all nice." "How far is it to the next town?" THE INDIAN Saturday, 16 May 1953 Page Four

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Saturday, 16 May 1953 TIlE INDIAN Page Five FISHING CONTEST REPORT SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Bolkcom, W. W. 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L. -3 lbs. Scott, B. R.-1--------3 lbs. Croakers Lowenhayen, N. A. 1lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E.1 lb. 8 ozs. Gralish, G. E.1 lb. 4 ozs. Shark Gennaria, R. L. 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J. --------43 lb. 8 oz. Chelf, R. L. _____ 40 lbs. Trigger Fish Dirkson, S. ______ 3lb. 8 oz. Kamwick, C. S. 1lb. 12 ozs. Hogfish Blount, J. M.-______ 1 lb. 12 ozs Ladyfish Hoff, E. F.---------5 lbs. Puckett, C. C. -.3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J. W. -1 lb. 4 ozs. Parrot Fish Horner, T. A. ---1 lb. No entries on the following fish: Albacore Bonito Dolphin Tuna Pompano Sailfish Marlin Hogfish SPEAR FISHING Grouper Matson, J. -______ 20 lb. 12 oz. Hillyer, L. E. -----19 lbs. 8 ozs. Tucker, J. L. -Jac 15 lbs. 8 ozs Jacks Eyster, G. W.22 lbs. Allen, M. R. -____ 17 lbs. Mackerel (King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P. -7 lbs. Phillips, H. R.5 lb. 8 oz. Snappers Prejean, J. W.25 lbs. Roos, F. H. 13 lbs. Abbott, G. ----------8 lbs. Hogfish Foy, F. D. ---------6 lb. 12 oz. Pompano Tucker, J. L.5 lbs. Parrot Fish Sheppard, M. E. 23 lbs. 8 oss. Tarpon Cavanaugh, E. H. __ 23 lbs, Franklin, E. M. 18 lbs. Williams, R. G. 16 lbs. Trigger Fish Mullins, P. ---------2 lbs. No entries in the following fish. Albacore Bonito Bonefish Croakers Mackerel (Spanish) Marlin Tuna Dolphin Sailfish Snook LAND DIVISION Barracuda Cheney, W. M.20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A. -16 lb. Dupree, W. L.15 lbs. Mackerel (King) Lantzinheiser,2 lbs. 12 ozs. Snappers Reynolds, Laura 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. -13 lbs. Morris, H. F. ____12 lbs. 4 ozs. Grouper Gadoury, R. J.7 lbs. Bell, J. Jr. ---------6 lb. 8 oz. Gorecki, R. J.2 lbs. Jacks Perkins, F. G. ___ 19 lbs. Loomis, C. E. ---__11lbs. 12 ozs. Featheringill, W. E._ 11lbs. Tarpon Smith, C. C.13 lb. No entries in the following fish: Snook Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Wahoo BOAT DIVISION Jacks Drake, R. J. __21lbs. Wood, C. N._-10 lbs. 8 ozs. Swisher, C. L. __ 10 lbs. Barracuda Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Mackerel (King) Massingill, J. H. 9 lbs. Parker, T. R. -4 lbs. 8 ozs. Delaney, R. E.4 lb. Snappers Remaly, D. H.56 lbs. 8 ozs. Esquerdo, G. -21lbs. 4 ozs. Snook Lightfoot, L. H. 22 lbs. Hardin, J. ---------15 lb. 8 oz. Mowery, J. W. 14lb. 8 oz. Tarpon Lightfoot, L. H. 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P.-___49 lbs. 8 ozs. Garrison, R. L.36 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Pass, J. S.----------2 lbs. 8ozs. No entries in the following fish: Wahoo Grouper A woman used to go to the doctor to see if she could have children. Now she has to go to the landlord. Across 1-Manifest 5-First man 9-Music: as written 12-Young salmon 13-Spanish-coin 14-Be ill 15-Three-toed sloth 16-Period of time 18-Conjunction 20-Japanese measure 22-Dry 24-Cushions 27-Skin ailment 29-Ardent 31-Pinch 32-Undressed kid 34-Organs of hearing 36-Therefore 37-Beef animal; 39-Newest 41-Pronoun 4?-Memorandum 44-Peakless cap 45-Series 47-Classify 49-Indefinite number 50-Snare 52-Separate 54-Steamship (abbr.) 55-Soft food 57-District in Germany 59-Supposing that 61-Mohammedan name 63-Artificial alloy of gold 65-Ox of Celebes 67-Atmosphere 68-Edible fish 69-Small horse Down 1-Resort 2-Barbers 3-Conjunction 4-Preverted 5-Three-banded armadillo 6-Deduce 7-While 8-Unruly crowd 9-Mephistopheles WARMIN' THE BENCH Yankee Stadium-The young kid was standing on the edge of the dugout steps getting ready for an afternoon game with the Boston Red Sox. It wasn't hard to recognize Mickey Mantle. His smiling young face, huge shoulders and that number "7" meant none other than the Commerce (Okla.) Comet. Only a week previous the 21year-old Mantle had hit one of the longest home runs in history. The ball caromed out of Griffith Stadium and landed in a Washington back yard some 565 feet from home plate. As Casey Stengel commented: "It was the longest ball I ever saw." Just what heights this diamond prodigy will reach are not known, but already those who have seen him perform believe he will become the game's greatest switch hitter-if not the game's greatest hitter. He can hit equally well batting righthanded or lefthanded. His Hall of Fame homer was from the right side, but his lefthanded wallop on top of the right field roof in Pittsburgh in an exhibition game a week before was a feat only two men had ever accomplished. At 19 Mantle found himself in a Yankee uniform being groomed to fill Joe DiMaggio's shoes. Probably no other modern-day rookie had ever received such advance notices -and yet come through. Although he hit only .267 his first year, nevertheless, he pounded out 13 homers and had 65 RBI's. Last year in his first full season he upped his batting average to .311 and hit 23 round trippers. And the fleet-footed outfielder covered as much ground as any centerfielder in the league that season. Down on the field the fans were streaming for the exits. The inevitable had happened. With the score deadlocked at 3-3 in the last of the ninth and two on-Mickey tagged one of Ellis Kinder's pitches. The ball landed in what the bleacherites call "Ruthville"-a fitting place. 1.0-Note of scale 11-Indian mulberry 17-Babylonian deity 19-Above 21-Arrow poison 23-Clock face 25-Discord 26-Stained 27-Help 28-Paradise 30-Colorless 73-God of love 35-Stalk 38-Cease 40-Periods of time 43-Rubber on pencil 46-Central American mammal 48-Walk heavily 51-A state (abbr.) 53-Symbol for tantalum 56-Moccasin 58-Knock 60-Woman's name 61-Cooled lava 62-Chinese mile 64-A continent (abbr.) 66-Negative This type of fish not listed in contest: Gar Carroll, D. Age 12 _1lb. Bowers, Roy, Age 12 1lb. Calamaras, D. Age 8 -8 oz. Angelfish McNeil, Linda,Age 4 10 ozs. Sergeant Major Martz, Glenn, Age 5 2 ozs. French Gruat Brooks, W. F., Jr. Age 4 6 ozs. Schoolmaster Martz, Glenn, Age 5 12 ozs. Sand Perch Scarborough, Truman, Age 9 1lb. Grunt Lightfoot Larry, Age 8 1lb. Lightfoot, Bobby, Age 6 13 ozs. Rock Hind Airheart, Penney, Age 9 8 ozs. Blowfish Lightfoot, Larry, Age 8 8 ozs. Park Fish Haymes, Carl, Age 11 8 ozs. FERMIN PAVILA SEZ: "Take good care of your fishing line-Dry it out after each trip. I have a large drying rack at the Fishing Gear Locker for your use. Remember: that BIG one may break a rottenline." Minister: "We will now have a few minutes of prayer, Deacon Brown, will you lead?" Deacon Bsown, absent-mindedly: "Ta't my lead, I eialt." FINAL RESULTS OF THE KIDS' CONTEST Prizes for the "Kids' Fishing Derby" will be awarded at seven p.m. tonight at the Naval Station Lyceum. LAND DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 Snappers McNeil, Linda1 lb. 14 ozs. McNeil, Linda-1 lb. 8 ozs. Reynolds, R. C. -----------12 oz. Hardin, J. --S--__-_ 8 ozs. Reynold, Richard -_8 ozs. Barracuda Reynolds, Richard -8 ozs. Jacks McNeil, Linda ----11 ozs. Grouper McNeil, Linda ----_ 12 ozs. Age Group 5 thru 7 Snappers Anderson, Richard __ 1lb. 8 ozs. Carothers, Stephen.1lb. Martz, Murray ___14 ozs. Martz, Glenn -_-__ 12 ozs. Moales, Reggie-----------12 oz. Martz, Murray --_ 9 ozs. Scarborough, Sally_ 8 ozs. Martz, Glenn ----_ 6 ozs. Barracuda Rehkopf, B. --------lib. Age Group 8 thru 9 Grouper Price, Raymond -14 ozs. Jacks Davis, Chris_-8 ozs. Snappers Few, Raymondllb. 8 ozs. Carothers, Linda ---------10 oz. Age Group 10 thru 11 Croaker Kler, Clara Sue 14 ozs. Grouper Gennaria, Joanne -1 lb. 8 ozs. Snappers Howell, Johnny 1lb. 8 oz. Haymes, Carl1 lb. 4 ozs. Age Group 12 thru 15 Jacks Miles, Jimmy1lb. Snappers Roessler, Dick2 lbs. Carroll, Dennis 1lb. 8 ozs. Carroll, Dennis 14 ozs. Gewertz, R. M. -----------8 oz. No entries in the following fish: Mackerel (King) Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common) Snook BOAT DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 No Entries. Age Group 5 thru 7 Jacks Sauborn, Mike-------8 ozs. Snappers Puckett, Pam Jo 1 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 8 thru 9 Snappers Price, R. V., Jr. ___ 2 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 10 thru 11 Jacks Kler, Clara S. ------------8 oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Snappers Hill, Jane ---------9 ozs. Snook Hill, Jane1----------1-lb. No entries in the following fish: Barracuda Grouper Mackerel (King) Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common SPECIAL DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 Croakers Jogan, Karen -----------12 oz. Rehkopf, Jimmy 10 ozs. Williams, Ann 8 ozs. Carothers, Douglas 8 ozs. Bonefish Rehkopf, Jimmy --12 ozs. Hardin, J. 8 ozs. Age Group 5 thru 7 Bonefish Anderson, Ricky ___ 8 ozs. Rehkopf, Brian 8 ozs. Croakers Puckett, Puck1 lb. 8 oz. Lightfoot, Bobby 1lb. Parrot Fish Gennaria, Terry L. -1 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 8 thru 9 Parrotfish Airheart, John-_ _-__8 ozs. Croakers Carothers, Steve__ 8 ozs. Age Group 10 thru 11 Bonefish Hale, Robert1 lb. Howell, Johnny -----------8 oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Bonefish Howell, Dorothy ----------8 oz. Carroll, D. ---------------8 oz. Croakers Hill, Jane-1---------1 lb. 8 ozs. No entries in the following fish: Albacore Bonito Dolphin Hogfish Lady fish Marlin Pompano Sailfish Shark Triggerfish Tuna Saturday, 16 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Page Six THE INDIAN Saturday, 16 May 1953 PRESENTS CLASSES IN SPANISH ..A graduate of the Kingston Tutorial College, Kingston, Jamaica, Mr. A. G. Jones is pictured above as he recently lectured a class in the fine points of the Spanish language. Designed to give a speaking acquaintancewith the language, these classes meet every Wednesday evening. PART OF EXPANDING I&E PROGRAM .As part of the expanding Information and Education Program presented by the Naval Station, the course in basic Spanish has become ever increasingly popular among Base personneL Length of each class is eight weeks. ADVISORY COMMITTEE WILL STUDY MEDICAL CARE FOR DEPENDENTS Washington (AFPS) -A fivemember Citizens Advisory Commission on Medical Care of Dependents of Military Personnel has been appointed by Defense Secretary Charles E. Wilson, the Defense Department has announced. The Commission has been asked by Sec. Wilson to make an overall study of policies for the provision of medical and dental care for such dependents, and recommend any changes needed to establish a long-range, uniform program for administering medical and dental care for them. Dr. Harold G. Moulton, president emeritus of the Brookings Institution, Washington, D. C., has been appointed chairman of the Commission. In particular, the Commission will study the type and extent of care to be provided; categories of military personnel whose dependents should receive medical care; types of dependents who should be provided with medical care and the extent of establishment of facilities for the medical and dental care of dependents. NEW RECORDS All ears are tuned to two new releases that promise big things for vocalists Ella Mae Morse and Mr. Eddie Fisher. They are, first of all, a composition from the pen of Link Davis. It's called "Big Mamou." With musical backing of Nelson Riddle and his orchestra, the dulcet tones of that "cow-cow boogie gal," Ella Mae Morse, should indicate a .great future for this rhythmic ditty. From the distaff side of sharps and flats, we turn our musical attention to Eddie Fisher, recently discharged from the Army. After touring many bases the world over, Eddie has concentrated full effort on his latest disc, augmented by the scintillating strings of Hugo Winterhalter and company. Unlike Ella Mae's "Big Mamou." with its fast tempo, Eddie's latest, titled "I'm Walking Behind You," is a relaxed ballad by composer Billy Reid. Yes indeed, despite the fact that both artists record for different labels, plus the fact that Elia Mae has had a head start on Eddie in the recording business, this reporter cannot help but state that both cuttings will be in big demand from music lovers the world over. "Big Mamou" and "I'm Walking Behind You," our elected musical selections for this week's "tops in pops." ... Sylvania, Ohio (AFPS) -Mrs. Roy Ferry thought she had bats in her belfry but it turned out to be a mink in the sink. Mrs. Ferry discovered a strange black animal feeding on a box of cookies it had pulled in the sink. On further inspection the animal was revealed as a mink. (AFPS)-Baseball Fan (proposing): How would you like to sign up for a life game?" Gal: "O.K. Where's your diamond?" My first few words in this column will be of gratitude to all those who, in a way or the other, have contributed to my being here, writing for the readers of The Indian. in a humble, but sincere attempt to promote better friendship and understanding between Americans visiting territorial Cuba and Cubans, and also with the idea to indicate some facts that I may consider of importance about the history, traditions and legends of this Island, called by Columbus "the most beautiful land ever seen by the human eyes." I should also like to especially express my deepest appreciation to the Base Commander who made it possible for me to be in this publication to give Americans an insight in this land of romance and enchantment which they helped to liberate from Spanish oppression, and which in turn is doing its best at the present time, in just reciprocation, to cooperate with the United States, physically and spiritually, to overcome the obstacles laid in her way by the enemies of the American Democracy throughout the world. I think that instead of "better understanding between Americans and Cubans," I could and should have said "better understanding between Americans FROM THE UNTED STATES and Americans FROM CUBA," because, although for centuries we have been told that we are different, because we differ in customs and in looks, most of us, are bound together by something that binds nations together even more than common looks and common speech, and that is a common history, a share of the experiences of the past, and a genuine identification in our ideals for the future, trying to preserve what our ancestors fought for, and to see that our sacred ideals "shall not perish from the earth." Therefore, because of the above, and according to the definition given by the Dictionary of the word "American," due to our geographical location-in the Western Hemisphere-Cubans can be considered as Americans. and we can also be considered Americans iP something even more important than that: in our history, in our ideals, and in our American way of looking forward to understanding and peace between all the peoples of the World. This, I believe, is as important as the phenomena of birth and of origin ... Americans (from the United States) helped us to attain our liberty, writing unforgettable chanters of heroism in San Juan Hill, Santiago de Cuba, and consequently any true Cuban considers himself more American than anything else, because a nation, like an individual, is not obliged to those who are responsible for her physical existence, when this existence bring a with it boundage, servitude, humiliations, but to those who have contributed to her Liberty, because Liberty is the very essence of life .. ABOUT MR. GARCIA Mr. Henry Garcia, an employee of the Marine Corps Exchange, has graciously volunteered to write for the readers of The Indian. A descendent of General Calixto Garcia of "A Message to Garcia" fame, his reason for doing so is to acquaint naval personnel with the history, customs, culture and ideals cf the Cuban people. "From Garcia" is Mr. Garcia's frst endeavor at writing in English for publication. Born in Holguin, Cuba and raised in Havana, Mr. Garcia comes from a family of professional journalists His father, Enrique Garcia, is a professional newspaper man and his mother, Marilola Suarez, is a radio and television writer. Mr. Garcia's brother, Mr. Pedro Garcia, is one of Havana's well-known radio and television writter. While living in Havana, Mr. Garcia became a professional radio announcer and amateur journalist. The day of the "Western" is over. Gone is the two-fisted, gunsmoke and whiskey drinking cowboy. He takes his place with those other two vanishing Americansthe Indian and the Buffalo. His demise was sudden and saddens all. The killer was a Paramount vehicle called "Shane," a very good picture, by the way. Jack Palance, who portrays the "bad guy" is the villain who does in our boy. In the picture he plays the part of the hired Gunsel ...But not once does he take a drink of old red-eye! He steels himself for all the killing he does on COFFEE! A fate worse than death for any good sidewinder. There's empty saddles in America tonight. We hone that Paramount at least has the good grace to replace him with a twodisintegrator toting, radiated-coke drinking space pirate ...Jose Ferrer signed for the part of LT Greenwald, in the Cain Mutiny; how many leads can a guy sign for at one time? He also signed for "Miss Sadie Thompson" .Joan Welton has been signed by Warner Bros., for the lead in "The System." Frank Lovejoy will co-star. It will be a shoot 'em-up drama of alleged syndicated gambling in the U. S. It will also mark the first time that Lovejoy is "agin" the law ... British actor Alan Badel is really getting a workout. In his first picture in this country he portrayed John The Baptist in Columbia's Salome. His next appearance will be as Romeo in the Old Vie's new production of the Shakespeare classic ...The Benny GoodmanLouis Armstrong tour which got off to a so-so start at New York's Carnegie Hall will continue without Goodman. He was felled by a heart attack in Boston the day after he opened ..."Song From Moulin Rouge" made the jump from the number ten to the number four slot on the Variety Popularity poll in just one week. "Doggie in the Window" continues as number one tune throughout the country. A famous Washington newspaperman who was dining at Galatoire's, in the old French quarter of New Orleans, raved over the trout Marquery. He summoned the proprietor and said, "I'd like to have the recipe for this dish." The proprietor smiled, and answered suavely, "I'm sorry sir, but we have the same policy here as you journalists. We never reveal our sauce." Getting things free is a favorite thought with nearly everybody, including the two small boys who were overheard discussing the subject. Said one of them: "My father is a doctor, so I can be sick for nothing." The other kid was not to be outdone and he replied: "My dad's a minister, so I can be good for nothing." A MESSAGE FROM GARCIA By Henry Garcia Page Six THE INDIAN Saturday, 16 May 1953

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Saturday, 16 May 1953 THR INDIAN Paee Seven NAVY BLASTS RED POSITIONS A two-gun salvo from the forward 16-inch guns of the Battleship New Jersey is just a part of the havoc and destruction rained on Communist installations and shore batteries by Navy ships ranging up and down the Korean coastline. FOURTH ARMED FORCES DAY FINDS ALL SERVICES READY The theme for this year's Armed Forces Day-"Power For Peace"is a fitting tribute to the buildup and reorganization undergone since the first observance in 1949. Power for peace means our own military power and helping other free nations build up their milimains as the specialist in amtary strength so that together we phibious warfare, continues in thshall be stronger than the forces search for new and improved that seek to destroy us. methods in that field. We swing a heavier punch than The approximate ly 74,000 the Communists where it counts strength of the Corps at the start -in know-how, productive capaciof the Korean fighting has been ty, equipment, teamwork and the increased to about 230,000. In Koideals men live by. rea the Corps, which has been i' The principles we defend are action since the summer of 1950, that we believe in democracyhas pioneered the use of the helithe dignity and worth of the incopter for assault movement of dividual and government for and troops and for the evacuation of by the people; that other nations the wounded. Another item whicb have a right to establish the kind is saving lives in Korea, the "Arof government they want; and more vest," was developed af=( that mutual security is needed eight years of research in conamong free nations. junction with the Bureau of MediForced to meet Communist agcine and Surgery. gression in Korea and its threat When the war started in Korea all around the world, the Armed the United States found itself with Forces urgently went about the a 48 wing air force. As the Air business of expansion and imForce grew from 48 to 68 to 84 and provement. then to the 95 authorized wings the In 1950 the Army had but 10 diincreases in strength and money visions, 12 separate regimentalauthorizations of the other services sized units and 48 anti-air-craft moved up correspondingly. Howbattalions. Today there are 20 fullever, Congress has agreed to give strength divisions-Infantry, Arthe Air Force a 50% increase-to mored and Airborne-re-organized 126 wings plus 17 troop carrier and re-equipped to meet changing wings. conditions; 18 regimental combat The increase from 95 wings in teams and 110 anti-aircraft bat1952 to the planned 145 wings will talons. More than 700,000 men are required an increase of only 14% in combat or in posts of readiness in military personnel. This will b overseasaccomplished by increased effecThe Army has grown from, tiveness in personnel utilization, strength of approximately 560,000 management and training. in July 1950 to about 1,600,000 Air Force "Sabres"-the F-86s today. -continue to down Russian-made One of the more important facMI-s at a better than 11 to 1 tors in these buildup figures is ratio. By February of this year 26 the increase in combat efficiency. USAF pilots had become aces. Although the manpower of the In conjunction with Navy and Infantry division, for example, has Marine aviation, and United Nabeen increased only by 10% over tons support, the Air Force has WWII divisions, it has been poWconducted a strangling attack sible by developing new and better against Communist supply lines. weapons to increase the ratio c Air superiority has been maintainfirepowver by some 75%. ed over Korea in the face of a At the outbreak of war in Korea steady increase in enemy ground the Navy had about 376,000 perdefenses and a greatly enlarged sonnel and 573 active vessels. In enemy air force. two years, by June 30, 1952 there Our united power for peace is the was a strength of approximately power to assurenpeace-by meeting 827,000 and 1,200 active vessels. It and surpassing the Communist should be noted that "de-mothworld's power for war. (AFPS) balling" 648 ships from the reserve v fleet, our most valuable and potent COPIES OF MARINE strategic stockpile, and previously AVIATION HISTORY maintaining them in reserve, cost less than a f 1952of their estimated STILL AVAILABLE replacement cost. In addition, the Navy is being Gen. Lenuel C. Shepherd Jr., strengthened by new and imCommandant of the Marine Corps, proved ships -nuclear powered, in a letter to Lewis K. Gough, Nahunter killer and fast attack subtional Commander of the Amenimarines; the Forrestal class uf can Legion, stated that "There are carriers, largest ever laid down; still unclaimed copies of the 'Hisand guided missile ships are a few tory of Marine Corps Aviation in examples. The Navy has also furWorld War II,' by Robert Sherthr improved its weapons in its rod. This is to remind all hands determinationto besecond to none. who have not requested a gift The Marine Corps, which recopy to do i now. DEFENSE LEADERS PRAISE SERVICES ON 4TH AF DAY Washington (AFPS)-In observance of the fourth annual Armed Forces Day, Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson joined the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, Air Force in issuing the following statements: The Secretary of Defense, Charles E. Wilson: "Armed Forces to our n security and lends Day is a day dedicated to do honor firmnesstoo r l to the united men and women of "We of the Navy and Marine our nation, at home and abroad, Corps are proud of our basic miswho proudly wear the uniforms sion to control the seas. Command of the Army, the Navy, the Air of the seas by our naval air, surForce and the Marine Corps. face and submarine fleets stands "On this fourth observance of today as a powerful deterrent to our Armed Forces Day, it is a world conquest by any would-be privilege for me to greet warmly aggressor. Seapower is an effective the men and women in uniform 'Power for Peace. and all of those others who hav The Secretary of the Air Force. contributed so much toward placHarold Talbott: "The Department ing in their hands the spiritual of the Air Force, together with and material strength that makes the Army and Navy, will observe them the balanced positive force this fourth annual Armed Forces for peace they are today. To the Day fully aware of its responsimen in Korea who are fighting so ability in the joint effort to prenobly and ably for the ideals we serve world peace and to insure cherish, I send particular greetour national security. Power for ings, confident of their ultimate Peace means that a strong Amervictory." ica can be a peaceful America. As The Secretary of the Army, our strength increases, the Air Robert T. Stevens: "I am proud to Force will keep in mind the need join in a salute to all of our men for teamwork in the Armed Forces and women in uniform on this and for coordinated effort among Armed Forces Day of 1953. The all our citizens. In this way we Army can be counted upon for can best protect our heritage of complete teamwork with its sis-freedom. ter services, the Navy and Air Force, in the great task of defending our nation throughout the years A USMC "BOOT" to come. And we join with all Americans in the prayer that our San Diego, Calif., (AFPS) combined power for peace shall From an officer's status to the be sustained and effective." ranks of a recruit at the Marine The Secretary of the Navy, R. Corps Recruit Depot here is the B. Anderson: "Armed Forces Day story of Pvt. Don E. Johnson. 1953 is a forceful reminder that a A former U. S. Army and U. S. strong and well balanced military Air Force captain, Johnson enestablishment offers America its listed in the Marines recently to best hope for peace in this cen"serve and work with the militury of continuing crisis. The unity tary organization I've read and of our Armed Forces adds strength heard so much about." AF's ALL-WEATHER EYES Roaming the skies in tight formation, these F-94 all-weather jet interceptors typify the readiness of the Air Force to meet and repulse any attack-in any kind of weather. 'OUTGOING MAIL' A-4.2emortar crew, shown just after dispatchineoee"Svccia1lDelivery" mail off to Red positions in Korea, mans one of the heavier weapons of the infantryman. It exemplifies the close 'ooneration needed for ultimate victory. Saturday, 16 May 1953 0 w THE INDIAN Page Seven

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Navy-S5NOPPO-Gteo. 3867-B THE INDIAN Saturday, 16 May 1953 WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE Regular Programs -Monday Through Friday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0830 Bill Ring 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 Solitary Singer 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Behind The Story 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Sports Answer Man 1745 Personal Album 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News 1830 Bing Crosby 1900 Hollywood Star Playhouse 1930 Ozzie and Harriet 1955 Solitary Singer 2000 Life With Luigi 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Fibber McGee & Molly 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Music For You 0815 News 0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Behind The Story 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 Personal Album 1815 News 1830 Charlie McCarthy 1900 Jack Smith 1930 Martin and Lewis 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Big Time 2100 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2155 News A young mechanic thought he'd like a job in the country for a change. "Can you shoe a horse?" a farmer asked him. He said h was willing to try, so the farmer left him with the horse and went to the village on an errand. Returning, he found the horse lying on its back, all four feet up in the air. It had been shoed though and the job had been well done. "Not bad at all" remarked the farmer, "but what's wrong with the horse? He looks a bit odd." "I've been worrying about that", replied the young mechanic. "He's been like that ever since I took him out of the vice!" 1215 News 1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 At Ease 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Story Teller Time 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News 1845 Requestfully Yours 1955 This I Believe 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Musicland USA 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Jo Stafford 1930 Groucho Marx 2000 Broadway's My Beat 2030 Big Town 2100 Piano Playhouse 2130 Great Gildersleeve 2200 Symphonies For Youth Tuesday 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Playboys 1930 Dragnet 2000 Vaughn Monroe 2030 Suspense 2100 Mr. and Mrs. North 2130 People Are Funny 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Francis Farwell Sings 1730 Secret Mission 1830 Jo Stafford 1930 Arthur Godfrey 2000 Al Goodman 2030 December Bride 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2155 News 2200 Howard Barolow Presents Thursday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Playboys 1930 The Greatest Story 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Jo Stafford 1930 Twenty Questions 2000 Two Thousand Plus 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Syncopation Piece 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall MOVIE PREVIEWS Scotland Yard Inspector This is the story of a magazine writer who becomes involved with a girl whose brother has been run over by a car in the fog. She thinks it's murder, but has no evidence to prove it. The picture centers around them getting evidence of the murder and bringing the murderers to justice. She's Back On Broadway A beautiful motion picture star finds herself washed up at the age of 27. Her agent advises her to do a musical comedy on stage, directed by an old sweetheart of hers. However, the play only gets lukewarm reviews until she and the director agree to renew their old romance and the show becomes a big hit. Confidentially Connie As a teacher in a small college town in Maine, a young man doesn't earn enough money to support his wife in the highest manner. Although his father is a wealthy Texan, he prefers his independence. The father comes to visit the couple and, in attempting to adjust their lives, almost succeeds in ruining their marriage. Angels In The Outfield No information available. Supposedly a baseball picture, starring Paul Douglas and Janet Leigh. Excuse My Dust A small town boy, Red Skelton, goes through with his idea at inventing a horseless carriage. After much ado, he not only succeeds but also wins the girl in the story. A technicolor movie. Rhubarb This is the story of "Rhubarb," a cat who inherits a fortune. A very hilarious hour and a half with Ray Milland and Janet Sterling that will tintilate your funny bone. MOVIE SCHEDULE Saturday, 16 May SCOTLAND YARD INSPECTOR C. Romero L. Maxwell plus DON'T GIVE UP THE SHEEP and SWEET MEMORIES Sunday, 17 May SHE'S BACK ON BROADWAY V. Mayo G. Nelson plus SPORTS REVIEW Monday, 18 May CONFIDENTIALLY CONNIE V. Johnson J. Leigh plus FIESTA FOR SPORT and LET'S HAVE A PARADE Tuesday, 19 May ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD P. Douglas J. Leigh Wednesday, 20 May EXCUSE MY DUST R. Skelton N. Lewis plus SCREEN ACTORS Thursday, 21 May RHUBARB R. Milland J. Sterling Customer: "Have you the book called, "Man, Master of Women?" Salesgirl: "The fiction counter is to your left, sir." Daisy: "Clem, you've jest got to buy me some new clothes. Purty soon, I'll have nary a stitch to wear, then what'll I do ?" Clem: "Pull down the shades. We can't be scaring the neighbors." Wife at the train: "Oh, dear. I knew I would forget something. I forgot my bathing suit." Husband seeing her off: Don't worry, dear. I'll put it in an envelope and send it to you." WHAT LINES! Competing in the Miss Miami Beach of 1953 beauty contest is slender 19year-old Lana Bashama. Sporting a zebra striped bathing suit, the sun-tanned lass gives a few pointers on how to pose for beauty finals. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES By Jerry Lewis The finishing touches and the last minute preparations are being administered as the opening day nears! The curtain will go up the 25th of this month, at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre building on Marina Point! Of course, you all know of what I'm referring to, but in case you don't, it's the opening performance of the new stage-play "Strange Bedfellows" presented by the Little Theatre Group of Guantanamo Bay. I can't speak enough for it, judging by the rehearsals I've seen, in as much as it's one of the finest comedy shows yet to be staged in Gtmo. Every scene is filled with 'good-taste' comedy and the players work it to the hilt for maximum effect. It's comedy for the whole family and is certainly worth the seventyfive cents the ducats will go for. This is one investment that can't miss! Please, for your own sake, don't leave it for the last minute and say, "Oh, I'll meander up there during the last performance or so," because it's a guaranteed full house! Listen to your Armed Forces Radio Station, W.G.B.Y. for. all details and keep an eye out for the clever advertising stunts rigged up by the Theatre Group. It's a must from the .word GO! I wish I could give credit lines to all concerned with this wonderful production but time and space does not allow for same, so, give yourself a treat and see "Strange Bedfellows" by the Little Theatre Group at Marina Point, 25 May at 8 p.m. There'll be enough laughs and refreshments to go around to keep everybody happy and in a good frame of mind. Next week's column will give all pertinent info on the latest names, places and where you can purchase tickets for the play. Make it a date! The 25th of May! A current favorite of night club comics concerns the French horn player whose toupee fell into his instrument and who spent the rest of the evening blowing his top. A man from the country went into the nearby village and bought a pair of shoes. The next day the shoe salesman met him on the street and asked him if the shoes were comfortable. "They're quite comfortable." "Well, if that's so" said the salesman, "why in the world do you shuffle along so slowly?" "Oh," the man answered resignedly, "that's because you forgot to cut the string that ties them together." 0 Saturday, 16 May 1953 Navy-10ND PP O-Gtmo. 3867-B THE INDIAN