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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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Vol. V, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 May 1953


ISLAND GOVERNOR AND FAMILY STOP AT GUANTANAMO - While on their way to Miami recently, Governor Munoz Main of Puerto Rico, his family and Navy escort stopped over at Guantanamo Bay, Pictured above, from left to right: Lieutenant Commander W.W. Christine, Aide to ComTEN; the governor's two daughters; the governor and his wife. Greeting them is Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Base Commander; Captain R. H. Wilkinson, Chief of Staff and Captain Frank Bruner, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station. The man on the ladder is unidentified.


VETS' ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCES REDUCTION
IN PREMIUM RATES

The Veterans' Administration has announced a reduction in premium rates charged for the total disability benefits .on five-year level premium term national service life insurance policies.
This benefit, states a BuPers Notice, provides monthly income for the insured and continues his insurance in effect without the jayment of premiums during any period that he should become totally disabled for six months or more.
The new rates are on a graduate scale, becoming increasingly higher with each renewal.
Persons who have previously taken out five-year level premium term national life insurance policies contain the total disability benefit will have their insurance accounts adjusted to the new rates.
Each of these persons will receive a personal letter from the VA explaining, the adjustment that has been made in his account and what action he must take. Checks for reimbursement for the amount overpaid for this benefit will be mailed to each individual.
The VA requests that individuals refrain from initiating correspondence on this matter other than to reply promptly to the inquires propounded in VA Form Letter 9-484. Adjustments are being made as quickly as possible and unecessary correspondence will only tend to retard the progress.

NAVY ANNOUNCES TEST
DATES FOR ACADEMY PREP SCHOOL OPENING

Washington (A F P S) - Navywide preliminary tests for qualified men to enter the Preparatory School as candidates for the U.S. Naval Academy, Md., will be given July 6.
All commands will nominate enlisted men to participate in the examinations. Regular Navy and Marine Corps enlisted personnel and members of Reserve components serving on active duty other than active duty for training are eligible for nomination. Those selected for the Naval Preparatory School must have obligated service to July 1, 1954.
Candidates will submit applications on Form NavPers 675. Completed applications and physical examinations will be forwarded to the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Attn: Pers-C1214, in accordance with BuPers Manual article D2309(3).


MUSIC FESTIVAL TO BE HELD TOMORROW
NIGHT AT NAVAL STATION LYCEUM

This week marks the thirtieth observance of National and InterAmerican Music.Veek. From its initial observance on a synchronized, national basis in 1924, Music Week has grown in extent until it now reaches annually some 3,200 cities, towns and villages in every part of the United States. It also reaches places in Hawaii, the West Indies and Canada.
Music Week is a major special event for the Armed Forces. All of the resources for music of all branches of the Armed Services are geared to observance of the occasion.
Locally, Music Week will be celebrated by the presentation of a Music Festival Sunday evening at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum. Featuring the Naval Base Band, both the Catholic and Protestant church choirs and a number of individual performers, hours for the festival will be from eight to 10 p.m. Specifically chosen to suit all tastes and temperaments, the music will cover a wide selection. Everything from the "Mom and Dad Waltz" to Chopin's "'Polonaise" will be presented.
For the third successive year, the Department of Defense and branches of the Armed Forces had been brought into the advance planning for the celebration of Music Week. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine bands have been presenting a solid week of concerts in widely scattered sections of the United States. Feature appearances of Armed Service music talent were presented on major television and radio productions.

U. S. NAVY CANCELS PRODUCTION CONTRACTS FOR 100 JET FIGHTERS

Washington (AFPS) -Production contracts for 100 of the Navy's latest carrier jet fighters, the F10F Grumman Jaguar, have been cancelled, the Navy has announced.
The cancellation was ordered when it became apparent that necessary design and configuration changes would result in a delay in production. However, 12 additional Jaguars on order will be completed for further evaluation of the variable sweep wing principle and other experimental work.

Teacher: "In what battle did General Wolfe cry, "I die happy."
Student~His last one."


OWNERS OF MOTOR VEHICLES TO BE
REQUIRED TO HOLDAUTO INSURANCE

No privately owned motor vehicle will be registered or operated on the Naval Base after 1 July unless the owner presents proof of financial responsibility to the Base Provost Marshal, states NavBase Notice 1741. Automobile insurance will be considered proof of financial responsibility.
This action is being taken to
provide protection to governmental Anyone experiencing difficulty in and individual interests against obtaining the insurance may obtain loss due to damage or injury aris- the names of several insurance ing from the negligent operation companies doing business in Cuba of a privately owned vehicle, from the Base Legal Office.
After 1 July owners of motor The care and operation of a vehicles must have in their pos- motor vehicle, the NavBase notice session an effective, unexpired states, is a grave responsibility policy of insurance issued for the which rests upon the owner and following insurance covera: vehicles can be extended only to
"On account of injury or death those who are financially capable of any one person, in an amount of bearing the responsibility. of at least $5,000.00 and subject
to such limit for any one person COURT TAX RULE injured or killed, in an amount of FAVORS SERVICEMEN at least $10,000.00 for injury to or
death of two or more persons in
any one accident. Servicemen and women are ex"On account of damage to pro- empt from local taxes on perperty, in an amount of at least sonnal property other than in their $5,000.00, resulting from any one home states, the United States accident. Supreme Court ruled Apr. 6.
"Any policy presented must con- The decision reversed a pretain a territorial clause including vious ruling by the Colorado Suspecifically Cuba or the Naval Base, preme Court against an Air Force Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. officer, Clairborne Dameron, Den"The definition of 'insured' con- ver, Colo. City and county offitained in any such policy must cials attempted to collect personal include the owner of the motor Ye- property tax on household goods hicle and any person using the belonging to Dameron, a native of motor vehicle with the permission Port Allen, La., who was assigned of the named owner." to Lowry AFB, Denver.


ANNUAL MUSIC RECITAL PRESENTED -Pictured above are members of the Junior Music Makers Club, piano pupils of Mrs. H. P. McNeal, who last night presented their annual recital in the patio of the Base School. Pictured in the first row are Rodney Sparks, Bob Huston, Dolores Sierra, Patty Miller, Frances Linder and Ralph Sierra, Jr. Second row: Susan Wright, Garry Huston, Dolly Nixon, Danny Ornelas. Third row: Sandra Krifka, Glenna Wright, Martha Livdahl, Joan Fowles and Kay Roessler.


MISS SPELLERS AND MASTER SPELLERS SPELL OKAY -Keeping afresh the old-time spirit of an American tradition, the spelling bee, the American Legion Auxiliary of Guantanamo Bay recently sponsored a spelling contest. Pictured above are the contestants, students from the fourth, fifth and sixth grades. First row, left to right: Clara Sue Kier, Linda McLeod, Lynn Graham, Margery Miller. Second row, left to right: Ursuls Teagle, Bryan Borup, Emil Kloske, David LaVack, Jack Jones, runner-up, and G&An winner.








Pare Two TH~ II~DTAN Saturday, 9 May 1953


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center

Saturday, 9 May 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral-C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer
CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer
Editorial Staff
Ensign J. McMahon ---------.Staff Advisor
Al Henderson, JOSN-------------Editor
J. C. Dierks, SN-----------.Sports Editor
S. E. Cobbs, SN------------Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.


ON MOTHER'S DAY

By Marina Heimer
In all justice to our mothers, we should dedicate all the days of every year to them. In spite of this, we have set aside one special day to be called Mother's Day. On this day, which is the second Sunday in May, all children express their love and devotion to their mothers. It is a day in which they pay homage to each wrinkle in her forehead, to each white hair in her 'head and to her unending patience. Only the loving heart of a mother can guide and protect us in life's weary struggle.
On this day, we toast our mothers for long life and good health. And on this day we remember mothers who are no longer with us-with our tears, pain and sorrow.
Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia has the honor of being the first person to set aside a special day for her mother. She presented her mother with a bunch of red carnations. And she continued this practice as long as her mother lived. Upon her mother's death, she placed white carnations upon her mother's burial place instead of red. To this day, the tradition is observed in the United "States.
'In Cuba, the unforgetable Victor Munoz was the person who implanted the idea of celebrating Mother's Day. In Cuba, red roses are presented to the mothers. What better way is there to show our love than by presenting our mothers with a rose?
A red rose that speaks of life. The sun is red when it rises or sets; red is the blood that gives us life; red is the purifying fire; red also is the love that enlightens our soul.
A. white rose is the symbol of purity, both mortal and infinite. The white rose is devotion to the mother who, although she may not be here in body, is always embedded in the heart. White represents eternal life for the mother who has gone from an earthly place to a heavenly paradise.


HOW NOT TO DRIVE AN AUTOMOBILE - Flying low in a twenty-miles-perhour zone isn't necessarily the quickest way to traverse between two points, as the driver of the above vehicle has learned much to his chagrin. While traveling east on Kittery Beach Road recently, he lost control of his car and had to be removed in an unconscious state from the scene of the accident.-His two passengers were uninjured.


THE CHAPLAIN'S WORD

Do you believe in ghosts? WellI happen to know two ghosts, and so do you! The first one -is: the boy I used to be. The second: the man I ought to be.
I often think of the boy I was-what hope and what promise he held. Look at a young boy-his clean mind, his open heart, and his honest and forthright response to life. That was you. That was me. Have you really been faithful to that boy?, He is a beautiful ghost-but I shudder when I see him, for I see before him-myself, just as I am!
The second ghost continually haunts me, for I know that there are only rare moments when I begin to be what I ought to be. Because that ghost makes the real me look so small and ugly, I am often tempted to pull in my horizons-lower my aim, that is, reduce the picture of what I ought to be-make it fit what I am. But thank God the ghost returns, full size, and I realize that the only thing to do is work on myself as I am and try to improve that picture.
After all, that is the only way to avoid being "haunted" by these two ghosts: do your very best, continually, to make the REAL picture like the ghostly one. Keep doing the very best you know and you need not be ashamed to meet the boy you were, or the man you ought to be.
-Chaplain Daniel XVI. Jordan


"COLLEGE AT SEA"-OFFERED TO USS
MONTEREYPERSONNEL

In keeping with the tradition of having Navy men well-trained ana well-educated, college classes sponsored by Tulane University have recently been instituted aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. MONTEREY. The program, believed to be the first of its kind, is unique in that the classes are held while the ship is underway. Taught by university accredited instructors, the courses furnish regular semester credits acceptable at any college in the country.
When the Tulane-Pensacola University was established at the which personnel could gain college Naval Air Station, the officers and credits was through correspondence men of the MONTEREY knew they courses, a method which is also were missing their education' As very widely and successfully used it was impossible for them to at- aboard the ship. tend regularly scheduled classes
ashore, MONTEREY representatives met with university officials
to present their idea. Although
Tulane realized such a program
was without precedent and several
specific difficulties seemed insurmountable, they agreed with the SI idea in essence and plans were
begun to make it a reality.
The problem of instructors was (AFPS)-A return to the one-ye solved when it was discovered that Conduct Medal has been announced men aboard the ship possessed the tive Order 10444, dated April 10, lis necessary qualifications and ability Enlisted men with the necessary q to conduct the courses. Two of the after each year of honorable servMONTEREY's enlisted personnel ice during WWII, but after the were attached to the Tulane-Pensa- war, the two services upped the cola faculty. required time to three years.
One of the new features of the
Alvin Roemerhauser, Radarman order states that the GCM may be 3/c, a graduate of Louisiana State awarded to any EM who hasn't University, formerly employed by received one, as long as he has the Texas Oil Co., is teaching Col- honorable service after June 27, lege Algebra. Roemerhauser is a 1950. Radar Controlman aboard ship. Ed- New regs by both services, yet ward Cortese, a seaman in the to ship's Administrative Department tobe printed, will outline proshi's dmiistatve.Deprtmnt cedures on how the medal is to is teaching English I. Cortese grad- be e awarded. uated from Fordham University * , * with a major in Journalism. Before
being activated from his reserve Immediate reactivation of Ft. status, Cortese was a publicity Niagara, about 10 miles north of writer with Leow's-MGM Studios. Niagara Falls, N. Y., has been orThe courses taken aboard ship dered by the Department of Army. are considered over and above the The installation will be used to government aid in education the support activities of AAA units in servicemen are entitled to receive the Niagara Falls-Buffalo area. upon release from active duty. The The fort was inactivated Decemcourse will not in any way reduce ber 1945. the servicemen's GI education priv- * * * ileges. More than 40 per cent of the
The student pays $19.50 for each -Air National Guardsmen called to course taken with the government active service have rejoined the contributing an equal amount. Guard upon return to civilian life,
The "college at sea" presents an Maj. Gen. Earl T. Ricks, Acting opportunity for men anxious to Chief, NG Bureau, and Chief of advance their education. The re- the Bureau's Air Division, has reaction to the courses has been ported. excellent. t The current strength of the Heretoi the only method by AMG is approximat~a\30,000 A


Sunday, 10 May 1953
Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 17301800; 1930-2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000-Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN
(Catholic)


PUBLIC RELATIONS IS AN
ALL-HANDS JOB!

Millions of dollars could be spent in trying to get and maintain a favorable opinion of the Navy throughout the nation. If however, even a comparatively insignificant minority of men wearing the Navy blue, should lower the dignity of that uniform in public, much of these millions would be wasted.
An organization like the Navy without millions to spend in public relations endeavors must rely at least 95% on the day-to-day actions of the individual men and women who collectively make up. the Navy. Their deeds must constantly precede any words put-out. on the manner in which they are fulfilling the Navy's assigned missions.
The Chief of Naval Operations has stated more than once that he considers the Navy's best public information medium to be every individual man and woman in uniform-all 800,000 of them!

K-TROOPS DONATE
$124,867 TO AMERICAN
RED CROSS

Washington (AFPS)-A total of $124,867 has been contributed to the Red Cross by servicemen and women serving in Korea, the American National Red Cross announces. Contributions from the whole Far East area have reached $203,740. This sum is almost twice that contributed last year by Mar. 20. This year's figures are as of Mar. 15.


IING TON


ear Service requirement for a Good by the Army and Air Force. Executs the change.
qualifications could receive the award
phased program calls for attainment of the full authorized 85,000 strength by the end of 1956.


A contract to construct 21.forty: foot wooden rescue boats has been awarded to the Thomas Knutson Shipbuilding Corp., Halesite, L. I., N. Y., RADM Homer N. Wallin, USN, Chief of Bureau of ships, has announced.
The vessels are being procured ry the Navy for the AF under single Service procurement. They will be used for air-sea rescue work in lakes or coastal waters.

The Air National Guard will add 110 completely rebuilt T-6G training planes to its unit training program by fall, it has been revealed by the NG Bureau. Approximately 470 T-6Gs will then be used for instrument and tactical training of unit rated personnel.

The training program calls for eventual equipping of the 27 ANG wings, composed principally of tactical squadrons, with jet planes and the latest type equipment in the shortest time consistent with military and personnel factors.


----I


Saturday, 9 May 1953


THE MINA


Page Two







Saturday, 9 May 1953


I


THE INDIAN


INDIANS HOLD
CORPSMEN TO FOUR
HITS, WIN 9-2

The Naval Station Indians combined a collection of nine runs with a three hit pitching performance by Royal to blast out a victory over the Hospital Corpsmen 9-2 Monday night.
The Indians started off the scoring in the third when Royal was safe on a two base error by Taylor and then took third when Fauth made a bad throw. Greaner then flied deep to center with Royal coming in to score. Livingston stepped up and singled to center, stole second, and scored when Spillane slashed one through the infield for a base hit. After Doles had thrown out Knight, Webb singled to left, took second on Corradetti's balk, stole third, and scored on a wild pitch, Spillane also coming across the plate in the meantime. The rally resulted in four runs and the Indians led, 4-0.
The Indians picked up two more runs in the fifth and one in the sixth and held a 7-0 lead before the Corpsmen managed to push across two markers in the top half of the seventh. Mills started the inning off with a double, stole third, and came into score a minute later when Hart poled a long one to Blog in right. Doles was safe on an error and when Rodriguez threw wild to first on Kraft's ground ball, Doles came across the plate with the Corpsmen's second run.
The Indians tallied twice more in the seventh to increase their scoring output to nine. Blog stepped up and lined the first pitch into center for a base hit. Kaft came in to field the ball but it took a hop over his glove rolling all the way to the fence, Blog pulling up at third with a triple. Rodriguez then rapped a double to left and Blog came in to score. Aasen- singled, Rodriguez pulling up at third, but Aasen was thrown out trying to stretch it, Blomberg to Taylor.
Another run came across the plate as Janowski, batting for Royal, ground out, short to first, and the rally ended when Mills fielded Spillane's hot grounder and tossed him out.
Butler relieved Royal in the eighth and retired the remaining Corpsmen without getting into any difficulty, allowing one hit and a walk in the two innings he worked.
The winning pitcher was Royal, who struck out nine and allowed three hits in seven innings, and the loser was Corradetti, who went all the way for the Corpsmen, allowing nine runs on twelve hits.

MALLARDS OUTSCORE
TRAINERS 10-8

The VU-10 Mallards piled up nine runs in the first three innings and added another in the seventh to fight off a rally in the late innings by the FTG Trainers and defeat them 10-8 in Tuesday night's game at the Recreation Center.
The Mallards wasted no time and got off to a three run advantage in the first inning. Long led off with a double to left center and then stole third. Kubic then walked and Rea lashed a single through short, scoring Long and sending Kubic to third, where he scored a minute later as Mikel was thrown out, second to first. Rea moved into scoring position and came across the plate when Huber singled to center.
The Trainers worked Esbin for a run in the bottom half of the first on a single by Carr, a stolen base, a wild throw by the pitcher and a long fly to right, which allowed Carr to score after the catch.
In the second frame VU-10 continued to keep the scorekeepers busy. With one out Pressler singled to right and went all the way to third when walters juggled the ball. Esbin walked, and both he and Pressler tallied on Long's double to left. In the third, VU-10, seemingly not satisfied with a 5-1 lead scored four runs on only one hit, a home run by Pressler. Rea led Gff the inning with a base on balls and went to second when Carr bobbled Mikel's ground ball. Loggins then stepped up and bounced one down to Kelley who threw wild to first, allowing Rea to score, and


FISHING EXPERT MAKES READY TO CAST FOR BAIT - Mr. Fermin Pavila, Cuban fishing expert prepares to cast his live bait net into the bay just off shore from the sailboat and fishing gear locker. With him in the boat is C. E. Genthner, SN, co-manager of the sailboat locker. Mr. Pavila's advice and assistance on matters pertaining to fishing in these waters is available free of charge to all interested personnel in the area.


FERMIN HOPES FOR A BIG CATCH- Creating an impressive umbrella effect as Mr. Pavila lets it go, the large net settles down over the water. A series of helpful fishing tips, entitled "Fermin Pavila sez" . . . . will begin in this week's issue of the Indian with the hope that they will prove useful as an aid to local fishermen,


a few minutes later Mikel and Loggins crossed the plate on a passed ball and wild pitch, respectively. Huber and Dieden went down swinging, and the next batter, Pressler, stepped up and pasted Dickinson's offering over the right center field fence for a home run.
The Trainers picked up a run in the fifth and three in the seventh to bring them within striking distance. Collins drove a single to left, stole second and took third on Carr's base hit, Carr pulling up at second on the attempt to nail Collins at third, Marshal singled for the Trainers' third straight hit, and then Walters stepped into the batter's box and drove a long fly to center, Marshall tagging up after the catch for the third run of the inning.
The Mallards picked up another run in the seventh, and the Trainers, trying for a last inning rally, one in the ninth, but they fell a little short and VU-10 copped another victory by the score of 10-8.
Esbin went the full route for the Mallards, allowing 11 hits and being credited for the win, while Gettle started on the mound for the Trainers, being relieved by Dickinson after one and two thirds innings.

As the mother lamb said to her daught-on't let anyone kid you.
I o


AMATEUR ANGLERS
TURN TO CUBAN FISHING
EXPERT FOR ADVICE

Anglers in the Guantanamo Bay area find themselves turning time and again to a Cuban fishing expert named Fermin Pavila for advice and assistance.
Mr. Pavila, an employee of the Naval Station Special Services Division, has had a great deal of experience in Caribbean waters, having been associated with commercial fishing along with his father both in Caimanera and in Santiago for more than twenty years. It is only natural that fishermen can turn to Mr. Pavila with confidence to settle their disputes, offer advice and in other ways to assist amateurs with their facinating hobby, fishing.
Available at the Sailboat Locker for advice, Mr. Pavila is also available to accompany, free of charge, large fishing groups operating in nearby waters. Arrangements may be made by contacting the Special Services Office (9-617).
In order to help as many anglers as possible, Mr. Pavila has consented to offer helpful tips on fish and techniques in these waters through a weekly feature beginning in this week's edition of The Indian, "Fermin Q Sez."
IV


KIDS' CONTEST
LAND DIVISION

Age Group 1 thru 4
Snappers
McNeil, Linda------1 lb. 8 ozs. Reynolds, R.C.----------12 oz.
Barracuda
Reynolds, Richard -- 8 ozs.
Jacks
McNeil, Linda ..... 11 ozs.
Grouper
McNeil, Linda ..... 12 ozs.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Snappers
Anderson, Richard -- 1 lb. 8 ozs. Martz, Murray --... 14 ozs. Martz, Glenn ...... 12 ozs. Moales, Reggie----------12 oz.
Martz, Murray .... 9 ozs. Martz, Glenn ...... 6 ozs.
Barracuda
Rehkopf, B.--------1 lb.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Snappers
Few, Raymond------1lb. 8 ozs. Carothers, Linda---------10 oz.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Snappers
Howell, Johnny ....-1 lb. 8 oz. Haymes, Carl------1 lb. 4 ozs.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Snappers
Roessler, Dick-------2 lbs. Gewertz, R. M.-----------8 oz.
No entries in the following fish:
Mackerel (King)
Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common)
Snook
BOAT DIVISION
Age Group 1 thru 4 No Entries.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Snappers
Puckett, Pam Jo .... 1 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Snappers
Price, R. V., Jr.. 2lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Jacks
Kler, Clara S.------------8 oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Snappers
Hill, Jane 9 ozs.
Snook
Hill, Janel----------lb.
No entries in the following fish:
Barracuda Grouper
Mackerel (King)
Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common
SPECIAL DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4
Croakers
Jogan, Karen-----------12 oz.
Rehkopf, Jimmy ___ 10 ozs.
Bonefish
Rehkopf, Jimmy ___ 12 ozs.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Bonefish
Anderson, Ricky ___ 8 ozs. Rehkopf, Brian .... 8 ozs.
Croakers
Puckett, Puck-------1 lb. 8 oz.
Parrot Fish
Gennaria, Terry L. -- I lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Croakers
Carothers, Steve ___ 8 ozs.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Bonefish
Howell, Johnny-----------8 oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Bonefish
Howell, Dorothy----------8 oz.
Carroll, D.---------------8 oz.
Croakers
Hill, Jane----------1 lb. 8 ozs.
No entries in the following fish:
Albacore Bonito Dolphin Hogfish
Lady fish Marlin
Pompano Sailfish Shark Triggerfish


This type contest:


Tuna of fish


not listed in


Gar
Carroll, D. Age 12 - - lb. Calamaras, D. Age 8-------8 oz.
Angelfish
McNeil, Linda,Age 4 10 ozs.
Sergeant Major
Martz, Glenn, Age 5 2 ozs.

FERMIN PAVILA SEZ:

"Live Herring is the best bait for the Horse-Eye Jack found inside the bay."
Hey kids! Remember that the fishing contest will close at midnight on 10 May 1953.
Be sure and get your entries in.


Page Three









Page Poui~ ~IIF~ INDIAN Saturday, 9 May 1953


MARINES WITH SMITH
STOP SUPPLIERS 6-1

A six hitter by Smith of the Marines gave the Leathernecks a 6-1 victory over the NSD Suppliers in a Wednesday night contest played at the Recreation Center diamond. Smith, although relieved by Relyea in the top half of the ninth was credited with the win while King of the Suppliers went all the way and took the loss.
The Marines jumped off to an early advantage, tallying twice in the first inning when Tresch was 9afe on Milnikel's error and scored in Bradshaw's double. Toomey then fumbled Ferris' grounder, scoring Bradshaw for the second run.
The third inning saw the Leathernecks drive in three more runs when Smith waited King out for a base on balls and moved down to second on Romano's sacrifice. Tresch then doubled, scoring Romano, and Trabucco followed with a single which sent Tresch to third. Trabucco stole second, pulled up at third when Snyder threw the ball into center field, and tagged up and came in to score after Bradshaw flied to center.
Smith held the Suppliers to two hits until the seventh when they got their first run of the game. Blair hit a roller down the third base line and went down to second when Romano made a bad throw to Tresch. Milnikel moved Blair to third as he grounded out, Smith to Tresch, and Leddick's long fly enabled him to score.
The eighth brought NSD another run and ended their scoring for the night. Graham led off the inning with a single and pulled up safely at third when Tobin lined one over second into center for another base hit, coming into score when Drew also singled.
The Marines collected another run in the seventh but Smith didn't need it and held the Supliers in check for the rest of the game until he was relieved of his duties by Relyea in the ninth. Tobin had the best night at the plate for NSD, collecting three hits in four times at bat, while Tresch managed to bang out two of four for LeathernecksA.

SERVICE SPORTS
ROUNDUP

BASEBALL (AFPS) -Former big leaguers now performing for Service nines include Detroit catcher Frank House (Ft. Jackson, S. C.), Cardinal pitcher Tom Poholsky (Ft. Belvoir, Va.), former Brownie J.W. Porter (Ft. Ord, Calif.) and Dodger pitcher Glenn Mickens, now tossing them for Brooke Army Medical Center, Tex. Former Giant fastball artist Alex Konikowski is at Ft. Myer, Va., Dodger pitcher Joe Landrum at Ft. Jackson, S. C. and Tiger pitcher Ken Fremming at Indiantown Gap, Pa.

Camp Lejeune, N. C. (AFPS)Already conducting spring football tryouts for next season, Marine coach Maj. John Crawley recently greeted 110 candidates. Among the early gridders were Bill DeChard (Holy Cross), Howard Hostettler (Quantico) and Lejeune's Frank Nastro, a star halfback last season.

New York (AFPS)-Servicemen visiting this city will again be able to attend Major League baseball games free. The managements of the New York Yan~kees, New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers have established policies which will admit servicemen in uniform free of charge to all home games.


HARBOR POLICEMAN SHOWS OFF BIG SNAPPER -Currently leading the snapper division in the GTMO fishing contest is Donald H. Remaly of the harbor police, who proudly displays the 56 lb. 8 oz. specimen he caught recently. Remaly landed the catch from the waters between Lizard Island and the Naval Station boat shed.


LEAGUE SCHEDULES 9 THROUGH 15 MAY

NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday, 9 May
Philadelphia at Brooklyn
- Pittsburgh at New York Chicago at Milwaukee St. Louis at Cincinnati Sunday, 10 May
Philadelphia at Brooklyn
Pittsburgh (2) at New York
Chicago (2) at Milwaukee St. Louis (2) at Cincinnati Monday, 11 May No Games Scheduled This Date Tuesday, 12 May
New York (Night) at
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh (Night) at
Cincinnati
Brooklyn at Chicago


Wednesday, 13 May
Philadelphia (Night) at
St. Louis
New York at Milwaukee Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
Brooklyn at Chicago
Philadelphia (Night) at St.
Louis
Thursday, 14 May
Pittsburgh (Night) at
Milwaukee
New York (Night) at
Cincinnati
Philadelphia at Chicago
Brooklyn (Night) at St. Louis Friday, 15 May
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee New York at Cincinnati Philadelphia at Chicago Brooklyn at St. Louis


AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday, 9 May
Detroit at Chicago
Cleveland (Night) at St. Louis
Washington at Philadelphia
New York at Boston Sunday, 10 May
Detroit (2) at Chicago
Washington (2)at Philadelphia
Cleveland at St. Louis
New York at Boston Monday, 11 May
Chicago (Night) at Cleveland Tuesday, 12 May
Detroit (Night) at Washington
St. Louis (Night) at
Philadelphia
Cleveland (Night)at New York
Chicago (Night) at Boston


Wednesday, 13 May
Detroit (Night) at Washington
St. Louis (Night) at
Philadelphia
Cleveland at New York
Chicago at Boston Thursday, 14 May
St. Louis (Night) at
Washington
Detroit (Night) at
Philadelphia
Chicago at New York
Cleveland at Boston Friday, 15 May
St. Louis (Night) at
Washington
Detroit (Night) at
Philadelphia
Chicago at New York Cleveland at Boston


GUANTANAMO LEAGUE SCHEDULE


Saturday, 9 May
NAS vs VU-10 at Marine Site
Marine vs Naval Station at Marine Site
Sunday, 10 May
MCB-4 vs NSD at Marine Site
FTG vs Hospital at Marine Site Monday, 11 May
NAS vs Marines at Fleet Recreation Center


WARMIN' THE BENCH


Baseball may be this country's national pastime, but at the present there are 25 performers listed on Major League rosters who were not born in one of the 48 states.
This large number of "outside" baseball talent, especially from Latin America offers proof of the in- one. creasing popularity of the game Elsewhere around the Junior cirthroughout the world. In many cuit we find the White Sox with South American nations baseball Cubans Louis Aloma, Mike Foris played all year round and is nieles and Orestes Minoso; and followed as rabidly as it is at Chico Carrasquel, a native of Ebbets Field. Venezuela. Cleveland's Bob Hooper
Of the 25 players born outside was born in Canada while Jose of the U.S., 19 of them are from Santiago is from Puerto Rico and south of the border. Cuba has con- infielder Bob Avila is from Mexico. tributed 11 men to the majors, Czechoslovakia has contributed DePuerto Rico four, and Mexico and troit's Carl Linhart and the AthVenezuela two each. Other coun- letics' Elmer Valo. Much traded tries listed as the birthplace of Guillermo "Willie" Miranda of the ballplayers are Canada three. St. Louis Bins is also a native Czechoslovakia two, and Scotland of Cuba.


Tuesday, 12 May VU-10 vs MCB-4 at Fleet Recreation Center Wednesday, 13 May Naval Station vs FTG at Fleet Recreation Center Thursday, 14 May
NSD vs Hospital at Fleet Recreation Center


BASEBALL STANDINGS
Team Won Lost NAS------------------5 0
VU-10-----------------5 1
MCB-4----------------4 1
Naval Station-----------4 2
Marines----------------3 3
NSD------------------2 4
Hospital---------------1 5
FTG------------------0 6

Youngstown, Ohio (AFPS) - A gasoline truck delivery driver swears he will take another cup of coffee to wake him up before he goes to work again, provided he still has a job. Making an early morning stop he stuck the hose into a sewer drain instead of a filling station tank opening. Six thousand gallons of ga ,line went down the drain. It's c p1700.


FISHING CONTEST
REPORT

SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Bolkcom, W. W ..... 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L.--------3 lbs.
Scott, B. R ..---3 lbs.
Croakers
Lowenhayen, N. A. -1 lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J.E .--------1 lb. 8 ozs.
Gralish, G. E.-------1 lb. 4 ozs.
Shark
Gennaria, R. L ..... 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J.---------43 lb. 8 oz.
Berke, L. W.-------38lb.
Trigger Fish
Dirkson, S.-3--------3lb. 8 oz.
Kamwick, C. S.....-1 lb. 12 ozs.
Hogfish
Blount, J. M.--------1 lb. 12 ozs.
Ladyfish
Hoff, E. F.----------5 lbs.
Puckett, C. C.-------3 lbs. 4 ozs.
Mowery, J. W. -- - 1 lb. 4 ozs.
Parrot Fish
Homer, T. A. ...-- 1 lb.
No entries on the following fish:
Albacore Bonito Dolphin Tuna Pompano Sailfish Marlin Hogfish
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper
Matson, J . ........ 20 lb. 12 oz.
Tucker, J. L. 15 lbs. 8 ozs Billings, H. R. ..... 14lbs.
Jacks
Eyster, G. W.-------22 lbs.
Allen, M. R.--------17 lbs.
Mackerel
(King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P.------- 7 lbs.
Phillips, H. R.-----5 lb. 8 oz.
Snappers
Prejean, J. W .-.--- 25 lbs. Roos, F. H.---------13 lbs.
Eyster, G. W. - -- 9 lbs.
Hogfish
Foy, F. D. .....- 6lb. 12 oz. Prejean, J. W. - -- 6 lbs. 2 ozs.
Pompano
Tucker, J. L.--------5 lbs.
Parrot Fish
Sheppard, M. E..... 23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Franklin, E. M ..... 18 lbs. Williams, R. G..... 16 lbs.
No entries in the following fish;
Albacore Bonito Bonefish Croakers
Mackerel (Spanish) Marlin Sailfish Trigger Fish Tuna Dolphin
Snook
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Cheney, W. M..---20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A.------16 lb.
Esquerdo, G..-------15 lbs.
Dupree, W, L .-------15 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Lantzinheiser, 2 lbs. 12 ozs.
Snappers
Reynolds, Laura _-- 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. - 13 lbs. Morris, H. F.-------12 lbs. 4 ozs.
Grouper
Gadoury, R. J- .---- 7 lbs. Bell, J. Jr.--------6 lb. 8 oz.
Gorecki, R. J.-------2 lbs.
Jacks
Perkins, F. G..---19 lbs. Endicott, C. R...... 10 lbs. Adams, Mary-------8 lbs.
Tarpon
Smith, C. C.-------13 lb.
No entries in the following fish:
Snook
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Wahoo
BOAT DIVISION
Jacks
Drake, R. J.--------21 lbs.
Wood, C. N.--------10 lbs. 8 ozs.
Hardin, J.---------10 lbs. 1 oz.
Barracuda
Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mackerel
(King)
Massingill, J. H.... 9 lbs. Parker, T. R ....... 4 lbs. 8 ozs. Delaney, R. E-....... 4 lb.
Snappers
Remaly, D. H-..---56 lbs. 8 ozs. Rightfoot, L. H..... 14 lbs. 8 ozs. Berke, L. W. ---- 14 lb.
Snook
Hardin, J .....--- 15 lb. 8oz. Mowery, J. W..... 14 lb. 8 oz. Colvin, W.---------13 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Lightfoot, L. H.... 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P...... 49 lbs. 8 ozs. Garrison, R. L...... 36 lbs.
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Pass, J. S.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs.
No entries in the following fish:
Wahoo Grouper
Civilian: "The girls run after my kisses."
Sailor: "So what? After mine, they limp."


0-)


Page Four


Saturday, 9 May 1959


TIRE INDIAN









Saturday, 9 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five


WIN ALL-SERVICE
BASKETBALL TITLE

Omaha, Neb. (AFPS) -Disregarding advance press notices, the well-balanced Los Alamitos NAS (Calif.) Skyraiders routed the highly regarded Quantico Marines 91-77 to clinch the first All-Service basketball championship. The twoday tournament at Offutt AFB brought together the outstanding teams of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps.
Sampson AFB, N.Y., Air Force champs, 'defeated the Ft. Belvoir, Va. Engineers in the consolation game, 86-76.
In the final, Quantico ace Paul Arizin hit the nets for 30 points, but the Skyraiders displayed a deadly shooting attack and excellent ball control to down the Marine finalists. Center Al Roges (CCNY) was high man for the Skyraiders with 28 points. He was given fine support from teammates George Yardley (Loyola), Rollen Hans (LIU), George Stanich (UC LA), Grover Luchsinger (UCLA) and Hal Uplinger (LIU). Arndt, smallest man in the finals at 5'10" was voted the tourney's outstanding player.
Los Alamitos made its way into the championship game by defeating a stubborn Ft. Belvoir team 77-70 in first round play. The contest was tied six times in the first half but the 'Raiders pulled away 43-35 at halftime and were never headed thereafter. Stanford AllAmerican George Yardley led Navy scorers with 23 points.
Quantico - won its playoff spot by drubbing the Sampson Sabres 79-60, as Arizin tallied 29 points.
The Skyraiders advanced to the All-Service tournament by defeating the Great Lakes Bluejackets twice in the All-Navy eliminations. Los Alamitos also finished in the AAU finals only to be edged by the Peoria Caterpillars for the national crown.

ALL-NAVY BOXING
TITLES POSTED

Bainbridge, Md. (AFPS)-Navy heavyweight Don Lee scored a sensational three-round knockout over Marlin Mettler (Pearl Harbor Sub Base) for the heavyweight title in the feature bout of the recent AllNavy boxing finals held here.
Lee, a 25-year-old Atlantic Fleet finalist the past three years, represented the USS Mississippi.
Other results and All - Navy champs are:
Flyweight-Ralph Medina (USS Mississippi) KO'd Gerald Johnson (Fleet Air Wing Four).
Bantamweight -Ferrel Snider (USS Cecil) decisioned Glenn Erwin (Amphib Base, San Diego).
Featherweight- Archie Norton (Amphib Base, San Diego) decisioned Bob Nichols (USS Cecil).
Lightweight-Bob Jackson (USS Bauer) decisioned Manuel Anchondo (Hawaii Naval Base).
L i g h t Welterweight -A b e Haynes (NAS, San Diego) KO'd Raymond Allen (Bainbridge NTC).
Welterweight- Felix Franklin (USS Winston) decisioned Rudy Sawyer (Great Lakes NTC).
L i g h t Middleweight - Nolan Davis (Amphib Base, Coronado, Calif.) decisioned Cliff Thomas (Great Lakes NTC).
Middleweight-Bill Tate (Great Lakes NTC) decisioned Ray Walters (Amphib Base, Coronado, Calif.).
Light Heavyweight - Charles Butler (Bainbridge NTC) won by default over Ronald Clark (NAS Alameda, Calif.).


TWO CIVILIANS WIN SUGGESTION AWARDS- Safety improvements suggested by two Marine Barracks employees through the Beneficial Suggestion Program won them awards of $10.00 each. Colonel John B. Hill, Commanding Officer, is shown above as he presented checks to Daniel A. Branford, Clerk GS-4, left, and Alfred Reed, Quarterman.


SPORTS PERSONALITY

One Leatherneck with plenty of experience is Pete Trabucco, currently holding down the center field position for the Marine Barracks nine. A resident of Clovis, New Mexico, Pete is starting his second year in the GTMO League, and if his 1952 .349 batting average is any criterion, it should be a good one.
The 24 year old outfielder broke into baseball in 1948 with Marion of the Class D Ohio-Indiana league, and the following year roamed the pastures for the Clovis, New Mexico club in the Chicago Cub chain. Pete kept improving and in 1950 moved up to Des Moines of the Class A Western League, and in 1951 just before entering the service he worked out with Springfield of the International circuit.
Standing 5' 10" and weighing a compact 185, Trabucco covers a lot of outfield territory for the Marines, and with a batting eye that is not to be sneezed at hopes to make good use of his talents when he is discharged from the service, probably with Springfield or another club in the Cub organization.

TOP ATHLETIC COACHES PLAN EUROPEAN TOUR TO INSTRUCT TROOPS

Washington (AFPS)-A group of the country's top athletic coaches will make their annual tour to Europe this summer to conduct instruction clinics for U.S. military personnel stationed there.
The instructors include some of the country's finest swimming, football and boxing coaches. Among them are Bob Kiphuth, swimming coach at Yale; Clarence "Biggie" Munn, foQtball coach at Michigan State, and Dudley DeGrott, former grid coach at the Univ. of New Mexico.
The clinics are conducted by the Army's Special Services and are held for personnel of the Army, Navy, and Air Force stationed in Germany, Austria, Italy, France and England.
The first clinics were held in 1949 and since then have been a regular part of the Services' program to better train personnel in athletics and improve recreational programs.


INTRA-COMMAND GOLF STANDINGS

Team Points Naval Station-------------82Y
VU-10-------------------802
Hosp-Dent----------------48
NAS7---------------------37Y
FTG---------------------26
NSD ---------------13Y
Results of Saturday, May 2
NavSta .... 23 NSD1-------1
Results of Sunday, May 3
VU-10 ---.14 Hosp-Dent - 10 NAS-------15 FTG9-------9
Matches to make up FTG vs Hosp-Dent
FTG vs NSD NAS vs NSD








Questions
1. Who was voted "Most Valuable player" in the National League last year?
2. Eddie Arcaro's victory in the 1952 Kentucky Derby established what three records?
3. Emil Zatopek ran more than 40 miles in the 1952 Olympic Games (True-False) ?
4. What is called the "fastest" sport?
5. Which basketball championship is older-The National Invitation, N.C.A.A. or Olympic?
Answers
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'WOODEN SHIPS AND IRON MEN' RETURN TO NAVY

Washington (AFPS) - Days of "wooden ships and iron men" are again looming on the horizon for the Navy.
Two wooden minesweepers, the Bold and Bulwark, were christened at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va., recently. The only metal on the two ships is to be found in the pipes, fastenings and in the engine-and that metal is of the non-magnetic variety.
The wood is supposed to counteract the magnetic mine which was developed during WWII. Steel hulled ships draw the mines to themselves.
The 650-ton ships are the first wooden vessels to be built at that yard since 1918.

The greatest genfa a to emerge from any war is tiefiiL axation.


STRANGE, NEW WORLD EXPLORED BY NEWLY
ORGANIZED CLUB

By LCDR J. E. Harper
Monday night marked the first organized meeting of the newly formed Skin Divers Club of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Skin divers dive without the aid of helmets or diving suits to a strange new world beneath the sea. They dive in their skin-hence the name Skin Divers.
Officers of the newly organized club include Mr. Glen Abott as president, C. C. Smith as vice president, LCDR Woodward as secretary and LTJG Howard as liaison officer.
A skin diver, equipped with a face mask, a pair of flippers for faster swimming and a snorkel which allows him to breathe with his face underwater, floats on the surface searching for game fish or simply enjoying the myriad unusual sights denied to another man not thus equipped.
Sighting his prey, a few quick strokes of the swimmer's powerful flippers brings the fish within range of the rubber propelled spear he carries as a weapon. A quick shot and-if he's lucky-he has a fine fish impaled on the end of his spear. If not, he returns to he surface to search again through the glass plate of his face piece.
These adventurers use a device which allows them to swim underwater for upwards of two hours at a time and to penetrate to depths of 300 feet or more. Designed by a French Naval Officer and called the "Aqualung," it consists of two cylinders filled with compressed air, a tube leading to the swimmer's mouth and- a simple valve to control the flow of air. Hundreds of our "Frogmen" used them during World War Two for more serious purposes.
Although a few persons have been skin diving in the waters around Guantanamo for several years, it was only recently decided to organize into a club. Some sort of an organization became necessary because of the increasingly greater numbers of swimmers who had heard of this new sport and wanted to find out more about it. The most important reason for organizing was so that proper precautions for the safety of all personnel could be promulgated. This sport is safe and sane only as long as all personnel are taught how to take care of themselves in the water and continually observe certain basic precautions for the preservation of life.
Meetings of the Skin Divers Club are to be held each Monday evening in the Little Theatre building, Marina Point. The Club extends its invitation to those of you interested in diving under the surface of the sea and entering a strange new world.

SERVICE PLAYOFFS


Attempting to retrieve the ball during the Los Alamitos-Quantico playoff game for the All-Service basketball title are, Los Alamito's Harold Uplinger (5) and Quantico's Rip Gish (42) and Frank Fuqua (24). The Navy Raiders finished strong to sink the Marines 91-77, to take the coveted Service crown.
Modern girl telephoning home at 3 a.m.: "Don't worry about me, Mom. I'm all right. I'm in jail."


Saturday, 9 May 1953


THE INDIAN


Page Five,










WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Regular Programs- Monday Through Friday ...........


0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Bogs 0830 Bill Ring 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 This I Believe 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home

Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Behind The Story 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News
1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Sports Answer Man 1745 Personal Album 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News
1830 Bing Crosby 1900 Hollywood Star Playhouse 1930 Ozzie and Harriet 1955 Solitary Singer 2000 Life With Luigi 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Fibber McGee & Molly 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Music For You 0815 News
0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Behind The Story 1045 You And The World 2100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News
1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 Personal Album 1815 News
1830 Charlie McCarthy 1900 Jack Smith 1930 Martin and Lewis 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Big Time 2100 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2155 News


1215 News
1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 At Ease 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Story Teller Time 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News
1845 Requestfully Yours 1955 Solitary Singer 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News
2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

2200 One Night Stand 2230 Musicland USA 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off

Monday
0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Caval~ade of America 1830 Club 15 1930 Groucho Marx 2000 Broadway's My Beat 2030 Big Town 2100 Piano Playhouse 2130 Great Gildersleeve 2200 Symphonies For Youth

Tuesday
0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Playboys
1930 Dragnet 2000 Vaughn Monroe 2030 Suspense
2100 Mr. and Mrs. North 2130 People Are Funny 2200 American Music Hall

Wednesday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Terrea Lea 1730 Secret Mission 1830 Club 15
1930 Arthur Godfrey 2000 Al Goodman 2030 December Bride 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2155 News
2200 Howard Barolow Presents

Thursday
0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Playboys
1930 The Greatest Story 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America

Friday
0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Club 15
1930 Twenty Questions 2000 Two Thousand Plus 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Syncopation Piece 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


(AFPS)-Sneak preview reports on the new 3-D pictures opening this week have this to say--"Good process, still needs some development-story and acting leave much to be desired."... It fails us why Hollywood will invest so much in a new type of motion picture presentment and then not spend a few more bucks for a good story to shore up the whole works. Sooner or later they will realize people
will p a y to
s e e phenomena the first
time around
but eventual.....ly the novelty wears off.
Will we have
to sit through
five years of
early Technicolor - t y p e
failure? . . .
The flamenco
bit in MGM's
"Sombrero"
by Cyd Charisse is reportedly the greatest thing for perking up the system since Hadacol. On the strength of the dance, which is the foot stomping, hip-bomping type, she was awarded the lead opposite Fred Astaire in the forthcoming "Bandwagon" . . . Johnny Burke, of the Burke-Van Husen combo, which has turned out so many hit movie tunes, is also the K. C. Rogan who penned "Wild Horses" and "Now That I'm in Love." Both were gleaned from the classics . . . Can't see any reason for the pseudonym, unless Johnny is loath to inform his more hep followers that he is also acquainted with the more serious stuff... We had the good luck the other night to witness one of the beot bits of straight theater we have ever seen. The occasion was the revival of the Paul Osborn comedy "On Borrowed Time." You get the feeling, no matter how many times you have seen it, that you never really saw it until Victor Moore did it. Moore's interprecation of the wonderful old man is so believably great that it becomes practically a one man show. He is ably assisted, however, by Beulah Bondi and David Stollery-one of the first kid actors we have not hated on sight in a long time. Melinda Markey, whose chief claim to fame is being the daughter of Joan Bennett, is also in the cast-although we cannot say why. However, Miss Markey is a very beautiful and young little girl-in time she might progress to being an actress.


A MEMORIAL POPPY ON POPPY DAY...


When you put on a memorial poppy on Poppy Day, 23 May, you will be paying tribute to those who have died for America in the three wars of the twentieth century. .Although the custom of wearing poppies in honor of the war dead sprang from World War I when the little red flowers grew in such profusion "between the crosses, row on row," the flowers have come to symbolize sacrifice of life for America wherever it occurred. We wear the flowers for those who died in the Far Pacific in World War II, as well as those who gave their lives in the European theater


where the poppy is a native wild flower. And now we wear them for the dead of the Korean conflict.
Wearing poppies enables us to help disabled veterans and the children of veterans who also face privation and hardship because their fathers served. The contributions made on Poppy Day not only pay the disabled veterans who shape the little crepe paper flowers, but form the chief source of support for the vast rehabilitation and child welfare programs carried out continuously by the American Legion Auxiliary.


"Is he a reckless driver?" 'I'll say. When the road turns the same way he does, its purely coincidental."


Bound to be popular on any easel board is Republic film lovely Eileen Charity, posing beside the insignia of the 45th Inf. Division. Her latest picture is Republic's "Thunder-birds," the story of the famous National Guard Division.

LITTLE THEATRE NOTES

Another week of substantial progress has gone by in that very busy building atop Marina Point. Results - - - Excellent! Your's Truly has watched each rehearsal with careful scrutiny and is convinced that this new play entitled, "Strange Bedfellows," is going to be far better, more jam-packed with belly laughs, and truly the best production to come from the organization yet!
This gem will be discussed for many weeks afterwards and it would be a shame if you heard others doing the talking! There are scenes in this play that are equal to the original production presented on the Great White Way January, 1948.
You'll never make a better investment for an evening of the tops in family entertainment. The stage crew, headed by Joe Knepper, have out-done themselves with a superb set, backing up the nineteenth century motif during which the story takes place.
Make it a date to see a little bit of Broadway brought to the stage of the Little Theatre in Guantamano Bay. All hands are cordially invited. There's plenty of room for all, and more than enough laughs to go around!
'Nuff for now. Be looking for you in this column next week.

SUPERFORT'S CREW
SWEARS FLYING HORSE WASN'T IMAGINARY

Tokyo (AFPS)-A few years ago Walt Disney startled and pleased audiences with his story of "Dumbo-The Flying Elephant." The Air Force has gone him one better.
First Lt. Jack Hunter, a Superfort commander, was bringing his plane into the 98th Bomb Wing's base a short distance from here. At 500 feet an object appeared floating toward them.
"It's a bird. It's a plane. It's Superman," rang through the ship as the crew strained to see what it was. They were all wrong. It was a horse.
The Superfort banked to avoid hitting him. The horse seemed to nod its head and then continued on its way. The tail gunner disagreed. He said it was a goat.
The pilot was about to call the tower to report the incident but he decided he had worked too hard and too long for his wings.
It turned out that the airborne horse was an advertising balloon, frequently used by'the department stores here, which had broken loose from its moorings.

A hillbilly and his wife had at least one child every year and sometimes more. Then came the war, and planes on maneuvers dropped paratroopers. The hillbilly saw them dropping and yelled: "Hey Maw, get the shotgun-that blamed stork is abringin' 'em full growed now."


T.1E INDIAN


Saturday, 9 May 1953


Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 3887-A




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Q g z0 Vol. V, No. 34 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 May 1953 ISLAND GOVERNOR AND FAMILY STOP AT GUANTANAMO -While on their way to Miami recently, Governor Munoz Marin of Puerto Rico, his family and Navy escort stopped over at Guantanamo Bay, Pictured above, from left to right: Lieutenant Commander W. W. Christine, Aide to ComTEN: the governor's two daughters; the governor and his wife. Greeting them is Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Base Commander; Captain R. H. Wilkinson, Chief of Staff and Captain Frank Bruner, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station. The man on the ladder is unidentified. VETS' ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCES REDUCTION IN PREMIUM RATES The Veterans' Administration has announced a reduction in premium rates charged for the total disability benefits on five-year level premium term national service life insurance policies. This benefit, states a BuPers Notice, provides monthly income for the insured and continues his insurance in effect without the payment of premiums during any period that he should become totally disabled for six months or more. The new rates are on a graduate scale, becoming increasingly higher with each renewal. Persons who have previously taken out five-year level premium term national life insurance policies contain the total disability benefit will have their insurance accounts adjusted to the new rates. Each of these persons will receive a personal letter from the VA explaining the adjustment that has been made in his account and what action he must take. Checks for reimbursement for the amount overpaid for this benefit will be mailed to each individual. The VA requests that individuals refrain from initiating correspondence on this matter other than to reply promptly to the inquires propounded in VA Form Letter 9-484. Adjustments are being made as quickly as possible and unecessary correspondence will only tend to retard the progress. NAVY ANNOUNCES TEST DATES FOR ACADEMY PREP SCHOOL OPENING Washington (A F P S) -Navywide preliminary tests for qualified men to enter the Preparatory School as candidates for the U.S. Naval Academy, Md., will be given July 6. All commands will nominate enlisted men to participate in the examinations. Regular Navy and Marine Corps enlisted personnel and members of Reserve components serving on active duty other than active duty for training are eligible for nomination. Those selected for the Naval Preparatory School must have obligated service to July 1, 1954. Candidates will submit applications on Form NavPers 675. Completed applications and physical examinations will be forwarded to the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Attn: Pers-C1214, in accordance with BuPers Manual article D2309(3). MUSIC FESTIVAL TO BE HELD TOMORROW NIGHT AT NAVAL STATION LYCEUM This week marks the thirtieth observance of National and InterAmerican Music Week. From initial observance on a synchronized, national basis in 1924, Music Week has grown in extent until it now reaches annually some 3,200 cities, towns and villages in every part of the United States. It also reaches places in Hawaii, the West Indies and Canada. Music Week is a major special event for the Armed Forces. All of the resources for music of all branches of the Armed Services are geared to observance of the occasion. Locally, Music Week will be celebrated by the presentation of a Music Festival Sunday evening at the Naval Station Movie Lyceum. Featuring the Naval Base Band, both the Catholic and Protestant church choirs and a number of individual performers, hours for the festival will be from eight to 10 p.m. Specifically chosen to suit all tastes and temperaments, the music will cover a wide selection. Everything from the "Mom and Dad Waltz" to Chopin's "'Polonaise" will be presented. For the third successive year, the Department of Defense and branches of the Armed Forces had been brought into the advance planning for the celebration of Music Week. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine bands have been presenting a solid week of concerts in widely scattered sections of the United States. Feature appearances of Armed Service music talent were presented on major television and radio productions. U. S. NAVY CANCELS PRODUCTION CONTRACTS FOR 100 JET FIGHTERS Washington (AFPS) -Production contracts for 100 of the Navy's latest carrier jet fighters, the F10F Grumman Jaguar, have been cancelled, the Navy has announced. The cancellation was ordered when it became apparent that necessary design and configuration changes would result in a delay in production. However, 12 additional Jaguars on order will be completed for further evaluation of the variable sweep wing principle and other experimental work. Teacher: "In what battle did General Wolfe cry, "I die happy." Student:sdHis last one." OWNERS OF MOTOR VEHICLES TO BE REQUIRED TO HOLDAUTO INSURANCE No privately owned motor vehicle will be registered or operated on the Naval Base after 1 July unless the owner presents proof of financial responsibility to the Base Provost Marshal, states NavBase Notice 1741. Automobile insurance will be considered proof of financial responsibility. This action is being taken to provide protection to governmental Anyone experiencing difficulty in and individual interests against obtaining the insurance may obtain loss due to damage or injury aristhe names of several insurance ing from the negligent operation companies doing business in Cuba of a privately owned vehicle. from the Base Legal Office. After 1 July owners of motor The care and operation of a vehicles must have in their posmotor vehicle, the NayBase notice session an effective, unexpired states, is a grave responsibility policy of insurance issued for the which rests upon tbe owner and following insurance covera: vehicles can be extended only to "On account of injury or death those who are financially capable of any one person, in an amount of bearing tbe responsibility. of at least $5,000.00 and subject to such limit for any one person COURT TAX RULE injured or killed, in an amount of FAVORS SERVICEMEN at least $10,000.00 for injury to or death of two or more persons in any one accident. Servicemen and women are ex"On account of damage to proempty from local taxes on perperty, in an amount of at least sonnal property other than in tbeir $5,000.00, resulting from any one bome states, the United States accident. Supreme Court ruled Apr. 6. "Any policy presented must conThe decision reversed a pretain a territorial clause including vious ruling by the Colorado Suspecifically Cuba or the Naval Base, preme Court against an Air Force Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. officer, Clairborne Dameron, Den"The definition of 'insured' conver, Coo. City and county offitained in any such policy must dais attempted to collect personal include the owner of the motor veproperty tax on household goods hicle and any person using the belonging to Dameron, a native of motor vehicle with the permission Port Allen, La., who was assigned of the named owner." to Lowry AFB, Denver. ANNUAL MUSIC RECITAL PRESENTED -Pictured above are members of the Junior Music Makers Club, piano pupils of Mrs. H. P. McNeal, who last night presented their annual recital in the patio of the Base School. Pictured in the first row are Rodney Sparks, Bob Huston, Dolores Sierra, Patty Miller, Frances Linder and Ralph Sierra, Jr. Second row: Susan Wright, Garry Huston, Dolly Nixon, Danny Ornelas. Third row: Sandra Krifka, Glenna Wright, Martha Livdahl, Joan Fowles and Ray Roessler. MISS SPELLERS AND MASTER SPELLERS SPELL OKAY -Keeping afresh the old-time spirit of an American tradition, the spelling bee, the American Legion Auxiliary of Guantanamo Bay recently sponsored a spelling contest. Pictured above are the contestants, students from the fourth, fifth and sixth grades. First row, left to right: Clara Sue Kier, Linda McLeod, Lynn Graham, Margery Miller. Second row, left to right: Ursula Teagle, Bryan Borup, Emil Kloske, David LaVack, Jack Jones, runner-up, and G't Allen, winner.

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Saturday, 9 May 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 9 May 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdah1 Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Ensign J. McMahon_-Staff Advisor Al Henderson, JOSN---------Editor J. C. Dierks, SN--Sports Editor S. E. Cobbs, SN--Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Cuantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. ON MOTHER'S DAY By Marina Heimer In all justice to our mothers, we should dedicate all the days of every year to them. In spite of this, we have set aside one special day to be called Mother's Day. On this day, which is the second Sunday in May, all children express their love and devotion to their mothers. It is a day in which they pay homage to each wrinkle in her forehead, to each white hair in her head and to her unending patience. Only the loving heart of a mother can guide and protect us in life's weary struggle. On this day, we toast our mothers for long life and good health. And on this day we remember mothers who are no longer with us -with our tears, pain and sorrow. Anna Jarvis of Philadelphia has the honor of being the first person to set aside a special day for her mother. She presented her mother with a bunch of red carnations. And she continued this practice as long as her mother lived. Upon her mother's death, she placed white carnations upon her mother's burlalplace instead of red. To this day, the tradition is observed in the United States. In Cuba, the unforgetable Victor Munoz was the person who implanted the idea of celebrating Mother's Day. In Cuba, red roses are presented to the mothers. What better way is there to show our love than by presenting our mothers with a rose? A red rose that speaks of life. The sun is red when it rises or sets; red is the blood that gives us life; red is the purifying fire; red also is the love that enlightens our soul. A white rose is the symbol of purity, both mortal and infinite. The white rose is devotion to the mother who, although she may not be here in body, is always embedded in the heart. White represents eternal life for the mother who has gone from an earthly place to a heavenly paradise. "Howfast were you nmving to oin pay rollI savings beore you ran info the crowded HOW NOT TO DRIVE AN AUTOMOBILE -Flying low in a twenty-miles-perhour zone isn't necessarily the quickest way to traverse between two points, as the driver of the above vehicle has learned much to his chagrin. While traveling east on Kittery Beach Road recently, he lost control of his car and had to be removed in an unconscious state from the scene of the accident. His two passengers were uninjured. THE CHAPLAIN'S WORD Do you believe in ghosts? WellI happen to know two ghosts, and so do you! The first one is: the boy I used to be. The second: the man I ought to be. I often think of the boy I was-what hope and what promise he held. Look at a young boy-his clean mind, his open heart, and his honest and forthright response to life. That was you. That was me. Have you really been faithful to that boy? He is a beautiful ghost-but I shudder when I see him, for I see before him-myself, just as I am! The second ghost continually haunts me, for I know that there are only rare moments when I begin to be what I ought to be. Because that ghost makes the real me look so small and ugly, I am often tempted to pull in my horizons-lower my aim, that is, reduce the picture of what I ought to be-make it fit what I am. But thank God the ghost returns, full size, and I realize that the only thing to do is work on myself as I am and try to improve that picture. After all, that is the only way to avoid being "haunted" by these two ghosts: do your very best, continually, to make the REAL picture like the ghostly one. Keep doing the very best you know and you need not be ashamed to meet the boy you were, or the man you ought to be. -Chaplain Daniel VI. Jordan "COLLEGE AT SEA" OFFERED TO USS MONTEREYPERSONNEL In keeping with the tradition of having Navy men well-trained ana well-educated, college classes sponsored by Tulane University have recently been instituted aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. MONTEREY. The program, believed to be the first of its kind, is unique in that the classes are held while the ship is underway. Taught by university accredited instructors, the courses furnish regular semester credits acceptable at any college in the country. When the Tulane-Pensacola University was established at the which personnel could gain college Naval Air Station, the officers and credits was through correspondence men of the MONTEREY knew they courses, a method which is also were missing their education. As very widely and successfully used it was impossible for them to ataboard the ship. tend regularly scheduled classes ashore, MONTEREY representatives met with university officials to present their idea. Although Tulane realized such a program was without precedent and several/ EP specific difficulties seemed insurmountable, they agreedlwith the idea in essence and plans were begun to make it a reality. (AFPS)-A return to the oneThe problem of instructors was Conduct Medal has been announce solved when it was discovered that CnutMdlhsbe none men aboard the ship possessed the tive Order 10444, dated April 10, l necessary qualifications and ability Enlisted men with the necessary tc conduct the courses. Two of the after each year of honorable servMONTEREY's enlisted personnel ice during WWII, but after the were attached to the Tulane-Pensawar, the two services upped the cola faculty. required time to three years. cli faculty. .One of the new features of the 3/c, a graduate of LouisianadState ardeadate ea M who has University, formerly employed by awrecied tone ongasM hehas' the Texas Oil Co., is teaching Colhonorable service after June 27 lege Algebra. Roemerhauser is a 1950.l Radar Controlman aboard ship. EdNe1 eg9y5oh0evie,.e hwr Cort se raatseamade ndeNewrs gs by both serviesisyet ward Corteseratis eatmin tedtosbe printed, will outline proship's Adiitatv rearten ceue n how the mlnedale is to is teaching English I. Cortese gradbe awarded. uated from Fordham University with a major in Journalism. Before being activated from his reserve Immediate reactivation of Ft. status, Cortese was a publicity Niagara, about 10 miles north of writer with Leow's-MGM Studios. Niagara Falls, N. Y., has been orThe courses taken aboard ship dered by the Department of Army. are considered over and above the Theinstallation will be used tc government aid in education the support activities of AAA units ir servicemen are entitled to receive the Niagara Falls-Bufalo area upon release from active duty. The The fort was inactivated Decem course will not in any way reduce her 1945. the servicemen's GI education privM 4 ileges. .More than 40 per cent of tht The student pays $19.50 for each Air National Guardsmen called to course taken with the government active service have rejoined tht contributing an equal amount. Guard upon return to civilian life The "college at sea" presents an Maj. Gen. Earl T. Ricks, Acting opportunity for men anxious to Chief, NG Bureau, and Chief of advance their education. The rethe Bureau's Air Division, has re action to the courses has been ported. excellent. The current strength of th Hereto.4.; the only method by AMG is approximate' N30,000: A Sunday, 10 May 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturday, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) PUBLIC RELATIONS IS AN ALL-HANDS JOB! Millions of dollars could be spent in trying to get and maintain a favorable opinion of the Navy throughout the nation. If however, even a comparatively insignificant minority of men wearing the Navy blue, should lower the dignity of that uniform in public, much of these millions would be wasted. An organization like the Navy without millions to spend in public relations endeavors must rely at least 95% on the day-to-day actions of the individual men and women who collectively make up. the Navy. Their deeds must constantly precede any words put out. on the manner in which they are fulfilling the Navy's assigned missions. The Chief of Naval Operations has stated more than once that he considers the Navy's best public information medium to be every individual man and woman in uniform-all 800,000 of them! K-TROOPS DONATE $124,867TOSAMERICAN RED CROSS Washington (AFPS)-A total of $124,867 has been contributed to the Red Cross by servicemen and women serving in Korea, the American NationalmRed Cross announces.aContributions from the whole Far East area have reached $203,740. This sum is almost twice that contributed last year by Mar. 20. This year's figures are as of Mar. 15. ORr T ~ year Service requirement for a Good Id by the Army and Air Force. Execuists the change. qualifications could receive the award phased program calls for attainmnent of the full authorized 85,000 strength by the end of 1956. foA contract to construct 21 fortyotfoot wooden rescue boats has been awarded to the Thomas Knutson Shipbuilding Corp., Halesite, L. I., N. Y., RADM Homer N. Wallin, USN, Chief of Bureau of ships, 0 has announced. The vessels are being procured y the Navy for the AF under single Service procurement. They .will be used for air-sea rescue work in lakes or coastal waters. The Air National Guard will add 110 completely rebuilt T-6G training planes to its unit training program by fall, it has been revealed by the NG Bureau. Approximately 470 T-6Gs will then be used for e instrument and tactical training of o unit rated personnel. Le. The training program calls for g eventual equipping of the 27 ANG f wings, composed principally of tactical squadrons, with jet planes and the latest type equipment il the shortest time consistent with A military and personnel factors. Page Two 'I THE INDIAN i ub. ,. --1 1 l' 1 1' f 1" f s h

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Saturday, 9 May 1953 I A-' INDIANS HOLD CORPSMEN TO FOUR HITS, WIN 9-2 The Naval Station Indians combined a collection of nine runs with a three hit pitching performance by Royal to blast out a victory over the Hospital Corpsmen 9-2 Monday night. The Indians started off the scoring in the third when Royal was safe on a two base error by Taylor and then took third when Fauth made a bad throw. Greaner then flied deep to center with Royal coming in to score. Livingston stepped up and singled to center, stole second, and scored when Spillane slashed one through the infield for a base hit. After Doles had thrown out Knight, Webb singled to left, took second on Corradetti's balk, stole third, and scored on a wild pitch, Spillane also coming across the plate in the meantime. The rally resulted in four runs and the Indians led, 4-0. The Indians picked up two more runs in the fifth and one in the sixth and held a 7-0 lead before the Corpsmen managed to push across two markers in the top half of the seventh. Mills started the inning off with a double, stole third, and came into score a minute later when Hart poled a long one to Blog in right. Doles was safe on an error and when Rodriguez threw wild to first on Kraft's ground ball, Doles came across the plate with the Corpsmen's second run. The Indians tallied twice more in the seventh to increase their scoring output to nine. Blog stepped up and lined the first pitch into center for a base hit. Kraft came in to field the ball but it took a hop over his glove rolling all the way to the fence, Blog pulling up at third with a triple. Rodriguez then rapped a double to left and Blog came in to score. Aasensingled, Rodriguez pulling up at third, but Aasen was thrown out trying to stretch it, Blomberg to Taylor. Another run came across the plate as Janowski, batting for Royal, ground out, short to first, and the rally ended when Mills fielded Spillane's hot grounder and tossed him out. Butler relieved Royal in the eighth and retired the remaining Corpsmen without getting into any difficulty, allowing one hit and a walk in the two innings he worked. The winning pitcher was Royal, who struck out nine and allowed three hits in seven innings, and the loser was Corradetti, who went all the way for the Corpsmen, allowing nine runs on twelve hits. MALLARDS OUTSCORE TRAINERS 10-8 The VU-10 Mallards piled up nine runs in the first three innings and added another in the seventh to fight off a rally in the late innings by the FTG Trainers and defeat them 10-8 in Tuesday night's game at the Recreation Center. The Mallards wasted no time and got off to a three run advantage in the first inning. Long led off with a double to left center and then stole third. Kubic then walked and Rea lashed a single through short, scoring Long and sending Kubic to third, where he scored a minute later as Mikel was thrown out, second to first. Rea moved into scoring position and came across the plate when Huber singled to center. The Trainers worked Esbin for a run in the bottom half of the first on a single by Carr, a stolen base, a wild throw by the pitcher and a long fly to right, which allowed Carr to score after the catch. In the second frame VU-10 continued to keep the scorekeepers busy. With one out Pressler singled to right and went all the way to third when walters juggled the ball. Esbin walked, and both he and Pressler tallied on Long's double to left. In the third, VU-10, seemingly not satisfied with a 5-1 lead scored four runs on only one hit, a home run by Pressler. Rea led off the inning with a base on balls and went to second when Carr bobbled Mikel's ground ball. Loggins then stepped up and bounced one down to Kelley who threw wild to first, allowing Rea to score, and 5'p~or/s FISHING EXPERT MAKES READY TO CAST FOR BAIT -Mr. Fermin Pavila, Cuban fishing expert prepares to cast his live bait net into the bay just off shore from the sailboat and fishing gear locker. With him in the boat is C. E. Genthner, SN, co-manager of the sailboat locker. Mr. Pavila's advice and assistance on matters pertaining to fishing in these waters is available free of charge to all interested personnel in the area. FERMIN HOPES FOR A BIG CATCH -Creating an impressive umbrella effect as Mr. Pavila lets it go, the large net settles down over the water. A series of helpful fishing tips, entitled "Fermin Pavila sez" ..will begin in this week's issue of the Indian with the hope that they will prove useful as an aid to local fishermen. a few minutes later Mikel and Loggins crossed the plate on a passed ball and wild pitch, respectively. Huber and Dieden went down swinging, and the next batter, Pressler, stepped up and pasted Dickinson's offering over the right center field fence for a home run. The Trainers picked up a run in the fifth and three in the seventh to bring them within striking distance. Collins drove a single to left, stole second and took third on Carr's base hit, Carr pulling up at second on the attempt to nail Collins at third, Marshal singled for the Trainers' third straight hit, and then Walters stepped into the batter's box and drove a long fly to center, Marshall tagging up after the catch for the third run of the inning. The Mallards picked up another run in the seventh, and the Trainers, trying for a last inning rally, one in the ninth, but they fell a little short and VU-10 copped another victory by the score of 10-8. Esbin went the full route for the Mallards, allowing 11 hits and being credited for the win, while Gettle started on the mound for the Trainers, being relieved by Dickinson after one and two thirds innings. As the mother lamb said to her daughter on't let anyone kid you. AMATEUR ANGLERS TURN TO CUBAN FISHING EXPERT FOR ADVICE Anglers in the Guantanamo Bay area find themselves turning time and again to a Cuban fishing expert named Fermin Pavila for advice and assistance. Mr. Pavila, an employee of the Naval Station Special Services Division, has had a great deal of experience in Caribbean waters, having been associated with commercial fishing along with his father both in Caimanera and in Santiago for more than twenty years. It is only natural that fishermen can turn to Mr. Pavila with confidence to settle their disputes, offer advice and in other ways to assist amateurs with their facinating hobby, fishing. Available at the Sailboat Locker for advice, Mr. Pavila is also available to accompany, free of charge, large fishing groups operating in nearby waters. Arrangements may be made by contacting the Special Services Office (9-617). In order to help as many anglers as possible, Mr. Pavila has consented to offer helpful tips on fish and techniques in these waters through a weekly feature beginning in this week's edition of The Indian, "Fermin I Sez." N, KIDS' CONTEST LAND DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 Snappers McNeil, Linda1 lb. 8 ozs. Reynolds, R. C.-----------12 oz. Barracuda Reynolds, Richard -S ozs. Jacks McNeil, Linda ----11 ozs. Grouper McNeil, Linda -----12 ozs. Age Group 5 thru 7 Snappers Anderson, Richard 1lb. 8 ozs. Martz, Murray -14 ozs. Martz, Glenn 12 ozs. Moales, Reggie -----------12 oz. Martz, Murray_9 ozs. Martz, Glenn --6 ozs. Barracuda Rehkopf, B.1--------1lb. Age Group 8 thru 9 Snappers Few, Raymond lib. 8 ozs. Carothers, Linda ---------10 oz. Age Group 10 thru 11 Snappers Howell, Johnny 1lb. 8 oz. Haymes, Carl -1 lb. 4 ozs. Age Group 12 thru 15 Snappers Roessler, Dick ---_2 lbs. Gewertz, R. M.----------8oz. No entries in the following fish: Mackerel (King) Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common) Snook BOAT DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 No Entries. Age Group 5 thru 7 Snappers Puckett, Pam Jo ___ 1lb. 8Soz. Age Group 8 thru 9 Snappers Price, R. V., Jr. 2 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 10 thru 11 Jacks Kler, Clara S.8------------oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Snappers Hill, Jane-----------9 ozs. Snook Hill, Jane ----------1 lb. No entries in the following fish: Barracuda Grouper Mackerel (King) Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common SPECIAL DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 Croakers Jogan, Karen------------12 oz. Rehkopf, Jimmy 10 ozs. Bonefish Rehkopf, Jimmy 12 ozs. Age Group 5 thru 7 Bonefish Anderson, Ricky 8 ozs. Rehkopf, Brian S ozs. Croakers Puckett, Puck1 lb. 8 oz. Parrot Fish Gennaria, Terry L. -1 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 8 thru 9 Croakers Carothers, Steve ___ 8ozs. Age Group 10 thru 11 Bonefish Howell, Johnny8-----------oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Bonefish Howell, Dorothy8----------oz. Carroll, D.8---------------oz. Croakers Hill, Jane-1---------1 lb. 8 ozs. No entries in the following fish: Albacore Bonito Dolphin Hogfish Lady fish Marlin Pompano Sailfish Shark Triggerfish Tuna This type of fish not listed in contest: Gar Carroll, D. Age 12 _1lb. Calamaras, D. Age 8 8 oz. Angelfish McNeil, Linda,Age 4 10 ozs. Sergeant Major Martz, Glenn, Age 5 2 ozs. FERMIN PAVILA SEZ: "Live Herring is the best bait for the Horse-Eye Jack found inside the bay." Hey kids! Remember that the fishing contest will close at midnight on 10 May 1953. Be sure and get your entries in. ", THE INDIAN Page Three

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PBge Pour THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 May 1953 MARINES WITH SMITH STOP SUPPLIERS 6-1 A six hitter by Smith of the Marines gave the Leathernecks a 6-1 victory over the NSD Suppliers in a Wednesday night contest played at the Recreation Center diamond. Smith, although relieved by Relyea in the top half of the ninth was credited with the win while King of the Suppliers went all the way and took the loss. The Marines jumped off to an early advantage, tallying twice in the first inning when Tresch was safe on Milnikel's error and scored on Bradshaw's double. Toomey then fumbled Ferris' grounder, scoring Bradshaw for the second run. The third inning saw the Leathernecks drive in three more runs when Smith waited King out for a base on balls and moved down to second on Romano's sacrifice. Tresch then doubled, scoring Romano, and Trabucco followed with a single which sent Tresch to third. Trabucco stole second, pulled up at third when Snyder threw the ball into center field, and tagged up and came in to score after Bradshaw flied to center. Smith held the Suppliers to two hits until the seventh when they got their first run of the game. Blair hit a roller down the third base line and went down to second when Romano made a bad throw to Tresch. Milnikel moved Blair to third as he grounded out, Smith to Tresch, and Leddick's long fly enabled him to score. The eighth brought NSD another run and ended their scoring for the night. Graham led off the inning with a single and pulled up safely at third when Tobin lined one over second into center for another base hit, coming into score when Drew also singled. The Marines collected another run in the seventh but Smith didn't need it and held the Supliers in check for the rest of the game until he was relieved of his duties by Relyea in the ninth. Tobin had the best night at the plate for NSD, collecting three hits in four times at bat, while Tresch managed to bang out two of four for Leathernecks. SERVICE SPORTS ROUNDUP BASEBALL (AFPS) -Former big leaguers now performing for Service nines include Detroit catcher Frank House (Ft. Jackson, S. C.), Cardinal pitcher Tom Poholsky (Ft. Belvoir, Va.), former Brownie J. W. Porter (Ft. Ord, Calif.) and Dodger pitcher Glenn Mickens, now tossing them for Brooke Army Medical Center, Tex. Former Giant fastball artist Alex Konikowski is at Ft. Myer, Va., Dodger pitcher Joe Landrum at Ft. Jackson, S. C. and Tiger pitcher Ken Fremming at Indiantown Gap, Pa. Camp Lejeune, N. C. (AFPS)Already conducting spring football tryouts for next season, Marine coach Maj. John Crawley recently greeted 110 candidates. Among the early gridders were Bill DeChard (Holy Cross), Howard Hostettler (Quantico) and Lejeune's Frank Nastro, a star halfback last season. New York (AFPS)-Servicemen visiting this city will again be able to attend Major League baseball games free. The managements of the New York Yankees, New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers have established policies which will admit servicemen in uniform free of charge to all home games. HARBOR POLICEMAN SHOWS OFF BIG SNAPPER -Currently leading the snapper division in the GTMO fishing contest is Donald H. Remaly of the harbor police, who proudly displays the 56 lb. 8 oz. specimen he caught recently. Remaly landed the catch from the waters between Lizard Island and the Naval Station boat shed. LEAGUE SCHEDULES 9 THROUGH 15 MAY NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 9 May Philadelphia at Brooklyn Pittsburgh at New York Chicago at Milwaukee St. Louis at Cincinnati Sunday, 10 May Philadelphia at Brooklyn Pittsburgh (2) at New York Chicago (2) at Milwaukee St. Louis (2) at Cincinnati Monday, 11 May No Games Scheduled This Date Tuesday, 12 May New York (Night) at Milwaukee Pittsburgh (Night) at Cincinnati Brooklyn at Chicago Wednesday, 13 May Philadelphia (Night) at St. Louis New York at Milwaukee Pittsburgh at Cincinnati Brooklyn at Chicago Philadelphia (Night) at St. Louis Thursday, 14 May Pittsburgh (Night) at Milwaukee New York (Night) at Cincinnati Philadelphia at Chicago Brooklyn (Night) at St. Louis Friday, 15 May Pittsburgh at Milwaukee New York at Cincinnati Philadelphia at Chicago Brooklyn at St. Louis AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 9 May Detroit at Chicago Cleveland (Night) at St. Louis Washington at Philadelphia New York at Boston Sunday, 10 May Detroit (2) at Chicago Washington (2) at Philadelphia Cleveland at St. Louis New York at Boston Monday, 11 May Chicago (Night) at Cleveland Tuesday, 12 May Detroit (Night) at Washington St. Louis (Night) at Philadelphia Cleveland (Night)at New York Chicago (Night) at Boston Wednesday, 13 May Detroit (Night) at Washington St. Louis (Night) at Philadelphia Cleveland at New York Chicago at Boston Thursday, 14 May St. Louis (Night) at Washington Detroit (Night) at Philadelphia Chicago at New York Cleveland at Boston Friday, 15 May St. Louis (Night) at Washington Detroit (Night) at Philadelphia Chicago at New York Cleveland at Boston GUANTANAMO LEAGUE SCHEDULE Saturday, 9 May NAS vs VU-10 at Marine Site Marine vs Naval Station at Marine Site Sunday, 10 May MCB-4 vs NSD at Marine Site FTG vs Hospital at Marine Site Monday, 11 May NAS vs Marines at Fleet Recreation Center WARMIN' THE BENCH Baseball may be this country's national pastime, but at the present there are 25 performers listed on Major League rosters who were not born in one of the 48 states. This large number of "outside" baseball talent, especially from Latin America offers proof of the inone. creasing popularity of the game Elsewhere around the Junior irthroughout the world. In many cuit we find the White Sox with South American nations baseball Cubans Louis Alota, Mike Foris played all year round and is nieles and Orestes Minoso; and followed as rabidly as it is at Chico Carrasquel, a native of Ebbets Field. Venezuela. Cleveland's Bob Hooper Of the 25 players horn outside was born in Canada while Jose of the U.S., 19 of them are from Santiago is from Puerto Rico and south of the border. Cuba has coninfielder Bob Avila is from Mexico. tributed 11 men to the majors, Czechoslovakia has contributed DePuerto Rico four, and Mexico and troit's Carl Linhart and the AthVenezuela two each. Other counletics' Elmer Valo. Much traded tries listed as the birthplace of Guillermo "Willie" Miranda of the ballplayers are Canada three. St. Louis Bs is also a native Czechoslovakia two, and Scotland of Cuba. Tuesday, 12 May VU-10 vs MCB-4 at Fleet Recreation Center Wednesday, 13 May Naval Station vs FTG at Fleet Recreation Center Thursday, 14 May NSD vs Hospital at Fleet Recreation Center BASEBALL STANDINGS Team Won Lost NAS -------------------5 0 VU-10 ----------------5 1 MCB-4 -----------------4 1 Naval Station -----------4 2 Marines3----------------3 NSD -------------------2 4 Hospital --------------1 5 FTG -------------------0 6 Youngstown, Ohio (AFPS) -A gasoline truck delivery driver swears he will take another cup of coffee to wake him up before he goes to work again, provided he still has a job. Making an early morning stop he stuck the hose into a sewer drain instead of a filling station tank opening. Six thousand gallons of gap line went down the drain. It's c lt.1700. FISHING CONTEST REPORT SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Bolkcom, W. W. 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L. -3 lbs. Scott, B. R. -3lbs. Croakers Lowenhayen, N. A. 1lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E. 1 lb. 8 ozs. Gralish, G. E.1 lb. 4 ozs. Shark Gennaria, R. L. 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J. --------43 lb. 8 oz. Berke, L. W.38 lb. Trigger Fish Dirkson, S.3-------lb. 8 oz. Kamwick, C. S. 1lb. 12 ozs. Hogfish Blount, J. M.1 lb. 12 ozs. Ladyfish Hoff, E. F. 5 lbs. Puckett, C. C.3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J. W.1 lb. 4 ozs. Parrot Fish Horner, T. A.1 lb. No entries on the following fish: Albacore Bonito Dolphin Tuna Pompano Sailfish Marlin Hogfish SPEAR FISHING Grouper Matson, J._--------20 lb. 12 oz. Tucker, J. L._-__--_15 lbs. 8 ozs Billings, H. R. -_-_14 lbs. Jacks Eyster, G. W.22 lbs. Allen, M. R._17 lbs. Mackerel (King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P. -7 lbs. Phillips, H. R.5 lb. 8 oz. Snappers Prejean, J. W.25 lbs. Roos, F. H.--------13 lbs. Eyster, G. W.9 lbs. Hogfish Foy, F. D. ---------6 lb. 12 oz. Prejean, J. W.6 lbs. 2 ozs. Pompano Tucker, J. L.5 lbs. Parrot Fish Sheppard, M. E. 23lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Franklin, E. M. 18 lbs. Williams, R. G. 16 lbs. No entries in the following fish; Albacore Bonito Bonefish Croakers Mackerel (Spanish) Marlin Sailfish Trigger Fish Tuna Dolphin Snook LAND DIVISION Barracuda Cheney, W. M.20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A. -16 lb. Esquerdo, G.15 lbs. Dupree, W. L.15 lbs. Mackerel (King) Lantzinheiser,2 lbs. 12 ozs. Snappers Reyniolds, Laura 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. -13 lbs. Morris, H. F.12 lbs. 4 ozs. Grouper Gadoury, R. J.7 lbs. Bell, J. Jr.-----------6 lb. 8 oz. Gorecki, R. J.2 lbs. Jacks Perkins, F. G.19 lbs. Endicott, C. R.10 lbs. Adams, Mary8 lbs. Tarpon Smith, C. C.-13 lb. No entries in the following fish: Snook Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Wahoo BOAT DIVISION Jacks Drake, R. J.21lbs. Wood, C. N._-10 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J.----------10 lbs. 1 oz. Barracuda Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 16 lbs. 8 ozs. Mackerel (King) Massingill, J. H. 9 lbs. Parker, T. R. --__ 4 lbs. 8 ozs. Delaney, R. E.--__ 4 lb. Snappers Remaly, D. H.56 lbs. 8 ozs. Rightfoot, L. H. 14 lbs. 8 ozs. Berke, L. W.--__ -14 lb. Snook Hardin, J.--------15 lb. 8 oz. Mowery, J. W. 14 lb. 8 oz. Colvin, W.__--13 lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Lightfoot, L. H. 58 lb. Rehkopf, R. P. -__49 lbs. 8 ozs. Garrison, R. L. -_36 lbs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Pass, J. S._--------_2lbs. 8ozs. No entries in the following fish: Wahoo Grouper Civilian: "The girls run after my kisses." Sailor: "So what? After mine, they limp." TTIE INDIAN Page Four Saturday, 9 May 1953

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Saturday, 9 May 1953 WIN ALL-SERVICE BASKETBALL TITLE Omaha, Neb. (AFPS) -Disregarding advance press notices, the well-balanced Los Alamitos NAS (Calif.) Skyraiders routed the highly regarded Quantico Marines 91-77 to clinch the first All-Service basketball championship. The twoday tournament at Offutt AFB brought together the outstanding teams of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Sampson AFB, N.Y., Air Force champs, defeated the Ft. Belvoir, Va. Engineers in the consolation game, 86-76. In the final, Quantico ace Paul Arizin hit the nets for 30 points, but the Skyraiders displayed a deadly shooting attack and excellent ball control to down the Marine finalists. Center Al Roges (CCNY) was high man for the Skyraiders with 28 points. He was given fine support from teammates George Yardley (Loyola), Rollen Hans (LIU), George Stanich (UC LA), Grover Luchsinger (UCLA) and Hal Uplinger (LIU). Arndt, smallest man in the finals at 5'10" was voted the tourney's outstanding player. Los Alamitos made its way into the championship game by defeating a stubborn Ft. Belvoir team 77-70 in first round play. The contest was tied six times in the first half but the 'Raiders pulled away 43-35 at halftime and were never headed thereafter. Stanford AllAmerican George Yardley led Navy scorers with 23 points. Quantico won its playoff spot by drubbing the Sampson Sabres 79-60, as Arizin tallied 29 points. The Skyraiders advanced to the All-Service tournament by defeating the Great Lakes Bluejackets twice in the All-Navy eliminations. Los Alamitos also finished in the AAU finals only to be edged by the Peoria Caterpillars for the national crown. ALL-NAVY BOXING TITLES POSTED Bainbridge, Md. (AFPS)-Navy heavyweight Don Lee scored a sensational three-round knockout over Marlin Mettler (Pearl Harbor Sub Base) for the heavyweight title in the feature bout of the recent AllNavy boxing finals held here. Lee, a 25-year-old Atlantic Fleet finalist the past three years, represented the USS Mississippi. Other results and All -Navy champs are: Flyweight-Ralph Medina (USS Mississippi) KO'd Gerald Johnson (Fleet Air Wing Four). Bantamweight -Ferrel Snider (USS Cecil) decisioned Glenn Erwin (Amphib Base, San Diego). Featherweight -Archie Norton (Amphib Base, San Diego) decisioned Bob Nichols (USS Cecil). Lightweight-Bob Jackson (USS Bauer) decisioned Manuel Anchondo (Hawaii Naval Base). Light Welterweight -Abe Haynes (NAS, San Diego) KO'd Raymond Allen (Bainbridge NTC). Welterweight -Felix Franklin (USS Winston) decisioned Rudy Sawyer (Great Lakes NTC). L i g h t Middleweight -Nolan Davis (Amphib Base, Coronado, Calif.) decisioned Cliff Thomas (Great Lakes NTC). Middleweight-Bill Tate (Great Lakes NTC) decisioned Ray Walters (Amphib Base, Coronado, Calif.). Light Heavyweight -Charles Butler (Bainbridge NTC) won by default over Ronald Clark (NAS Alameda, Calif.). TWO CIVILIANS WIN SUGGESTION AWARDS -Safety improvements suggested by two Marine Barracks employees through the Beneficial Suggestion Program won them awards of $10.00 each. Colonel John B. Hill, Commanding Officer, is shown above as he presented checks to Daniel A. Branford, Clerk GS-4, left, and Alfred Reed, Quarterman. SPORTS PERSONALITY One Leatherneck with plenty of experience is Pete Trabucco, currently holding down the center field position for the Marine Barracks nine. A resident of Clovis, New Mexico, Pete is starting his second year in the GTMO League, and if his 1952 .349 batting average is any criterion, it should be a good one. The 24 year old outfielder broke into baseball in 1948 with Marion of the Class D Ohio-Indiana league, and the following year roamed the pastures for the Clovis, New Mexico club in the Chicago Cub chain. Pete kept improving and in 1950 moved up to Des Moines of the Class A Western League, and in 1951 just before entering the service he worked out with Springfield of the International circuit. Standing 5' 10" and weighing a compact 185, Trabucco covers a lot of outfield territory for the Marines, and with a batting eye that is not to be sneezed at hopes to make good use of his talents when he is discharged from the service, probably with Springfield or another club in the Cub organization. TOP ATHLETIC COACHES PLAN EUROPEAN TOUR TO INSTRUCT TROOPS Washington (AFPS)-A group of the country's top athletic coaches will make their annual tour to Europe this summer to conduct instruction clinics for U.S. military personnel stationed there. The instructors include some of the country's finest swimming, football and boxing coaches. Among them are Bob Kiphuth, swimming coach at Yale; Clarence "Biggie" Munn, football coach at Michigan State, and Dudley DeGrott, former grid coach at the Univ. of New Mexico. The clinics are conducted by the Army's Special Services and are held for personnel of the Army, Navy, and Air Force stationed in Germany, Austria, Italy, France and England. The first clinics were held in 1949 and since then have been a regular part of the Services' program to better train personnel in athletics and improve recreational programs. INTRA-COMMAND GOLF STANDINGS Team Points Naval Station --------------82% VU-10--------------------80% Hosp-Dent ----------------48 NAS ----------------------37% FTG ----------------------26 NSD ----------------------13% Results of Saturday, May 2 NavSta 23 NSD1 Results of Sunday, May 3 VU-1014 Hosp-Dent -10 NAS15 FTG9 Matches to make up FTG vs Hosp-Dent FTG vs NSD NAS vs NSD Questions 1. Who was voted "Most Valuable player" in the National League last year? 2. Eddie Arcaro's victory in the 1952 Kentucky Derby established what three records? 3. Emil Zatopek ran more than 40 miles in the 1952 Olympic Games (True-False) ? 4. What is called the "fastest" sport? 5. Which basketball championship is older-The National Invitation, N.C.A.A. or Olympic? Answers '6W6O utSVVDN AN8861 no plaq lsaop sCM ;usureuanoL uoo7 -BIAN MEuolnN' RET lRN TitO SIB 9261 t no esq toM sdtjsuoodutreql lWlesolasn AFu) d-alO ays o "woodse sas;a irn sen spareB asoomngO n61 ut huoion fu pue s.oel.su ooo'oi 'saooaou 000 To uwXoodenlt mieseeAOeIrs tne tenz Butzethe Nor'linvapue shq 8uo~jllnb 8uoluno3 Sa0n.1yJ"g y tsstnl y.eql .oj 5p.Io0B.I le-Spxts sauo f usg is toe fpunde pip smueesaftnis 05[5 sn5 l 1 aoto1A gaQ~i'111st5 SnM IeD anHu nthe engine-an that etalis ofthe on-mgnti Tewo o7 10 s Suppoeto c'WOODEN SHIPS AND IRON MEN' RETURN TO .NAVY Washington (AFPS) -Days of "wooden ships and iron mens are again looming on the horizon for the Navy. Two wooden minesweepers, the Bold and Bulwark, were christened at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va., recently. The only metal on the two ships is to be found in the pipes, fastenings and in the engine-and that metal is of the non-magnetic variety. The wood is supposed to counteract the magnetic mine which was developed during WWII. Steel hulled ships draw the mines to themselves. The 650-ton ships are the first wooden vessels to be built at that yard since 1918. The greatest gcnexral to emerge from any war is tG ei*Taxation. STRANGE, NEW WORLD EXPLORED BY NEWLY ORGANIZED CLUB By LCDR J. E. Harper Monday night marked the first organized meeting of the newly formed Skin Divers Club of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Skin divers dive without the aid of helmets or diving suits to a strange new world beneath the sea. They dive in their skin-hence the name Skin Divers. Officers of the newly organized club include Mr. Glen Abott as president, C. C. Smith as vice president, LCDR Woodward as secretary and LTJG Howard as liaison officer. A skin diver, equipped with a face mask, a pair of flippers for faster swimming and a snorkel which allows him to breathe with his face underwater, floats on the surface searching for game fish or simply enjoying the myriad unusual sights denied to another man not thus equipped. Sighting his prey, a few quick strokes of the swimmer's powerful flippers brings the fish within range of the rubber propelled spear he carries as a weapon. A quick shot and-if he's lucky-he has a fine fish impaled on the end of his spear. If not, he returns to he surface to search again through the glass plate of his face piece. These adventurers use a device which allows them to swim underwater for upwards of two hours at a time and to penetrate to depths of 300 feet or more. Designed by a French Naval Officer and called the "Aqualung," it consists of two cylinders filled with compressed air, a tube leading to the swimmer's mouth anda simple valve to control the flow of air. Hundreds of our "Frogmen" used them during World War Two for more serious purposes. Although a few persons have been skin diving in the waters around Guantanamo for several years, it was only recently decided to organize into a club. Some sort of an organization became necessary because of the increasingly greater numbers of swimmers who had heard of this new sport and wanted to find out more about it. The most important reason for organizing was so that proper precautions for the safety of all personnel could be promulgated. This sport is safe and sane only as long as all personnel are taught how to take care of themselves in the water and continually observe certain basic precautions for the preservation of life. Meetings of the Skin Divers Club are to be held each Monday evening in the Little Theatre building, Marina Point. The Club extends its invitation to those of you interested in diving under the surface of the sea and entering a strange new world. SERVICE PLAYOFFS Attempting to retrieve the ball during the Los Alamitos-Quantico playoff game for the All-Service basketball title are, Los Alamito's Harold Uplinger (5) and Quantico's Rip Gish (42) and Frank Fuqua (24). The Navy Raiders finished strong to sink the Marines 91-77, to take the coveted Service crown. Modern girl telephoning home at 3 a.m.: "Don't worry about me, Mom. I'm all right. I'm in jail." THE INDIAN Page Five

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Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 3887-A THE INDIAN Saturday, 9 May 1953 WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE Regular Programs -Monday Through Friday 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0830 Bill Ring 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 This I Believe 1100 Startime 1130 Bud's Bandwagon 1200 Way Back Home Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1100 Behind The Story 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Sports Answer Man 1745 Personal Album 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News 1830 Bing Crosby 1900 Hollywood Star Playhouse 1930 Ozzie and Harriet 1955 Solitary Singer 2000 Life With Luigi 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Fibber McGee & Molly 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Music For You 0815 News 0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Behind The Story 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 America Calling 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Tennessee Ernie 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 Personal Album 1815 News 1830 Charlie McCarthy 1900 Jack Smith 1930 Martin and Lewis 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Big Time 2100 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2155 News 1215 1230 1330 1400 1500 1700 1800 1815 1845 1955 2055 2155 2230 2400 News Hillbilly Jamboree At Ease Musical Matinee Parade of Sports/AFRS Story Teller Time From The Pressbox News Requestfully Yours Solitary Singer Knox Manning-Time Out News Sandman Show Sign Off 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Musicland USA 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Cavalcade of America 1830 Club 15 1930 Groucho Marx 2000 Broadway's My Beat 2030 Big Town 2100 Piano Playhouse 2130 Great Gildersleeve 2200 Symphonies For Youth Tuesday 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 From The Bookshelf 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 Playboys 1930 Dragnet 2000 Vaughn Monroe 2030 Suspense 2100 Mr. and Mrs. North 2130 People Are Funny 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Terrea Lea 1730 Secret Mission 1830 Club 15 1930 Arthur Godfrey 2000 Al Goodman 2030 December Bride 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2155 News 2200 Howard Barolow Presents Thursday 0845 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Douglas of the World 1830 Playboys 1930 The Greatest Story 2000 Music With The Girls 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day 2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0845 Charleen Hawks 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Invitation To Learning 1830 Club 15 1930 Twenty Questions 2000 Two Thousand Plus 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Syncopation Piece 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall A MEMORIAL POPPY ON POPPY DAY. When you put on a memorial poppy on Poppy Day, 23 May, you will be paying tribute to those who have died for America in the three wars of the twentieth century. Although the custom of wearing poppies in honor of the war dead sprang from World War I when the little red flowers grew in such profusion "between the crosses, row on row," the flowers have come to symbolize sacrifice of life for America wherever it occurred. We wear the flowers for those who died in the Far Pacific in World War II, as well as those who gave their lives in the European theater where the poppy is a native wild flower. And now we wear them for the dead of the Korean conflict. Wearing poppies enables us to help disabled veterans and the children of veterans who also face privation and hardship because their fathers served. The contributions made on Poppy Day not only pay the disabled veterans who shape the little crepe paper flowers, but form the chief source of support for the vast rehabilitation and child welfare programs carried out continuously by the American Legion Auxiliary. (AFPS)-Sneak preview reports on the new 3-D pictures opening this week have this to say-"Good process, still needs some development-story and acting leave much to be desired." .It fails us why Hollywood will invest so much in a new type of motion picture presentment and then not spend a few more bucks for a good story to shore up the whole works. Sooner or later they will realize people will pa y to s e e phenomena the first t i m e around .3? but eventually the novelty wears off. Will we have to sit through a n o t h e r five years of early Technicolor -t y p e failure? ... The flamenco bit in MGM's on 4 "Sombrero" by Cyd Charisse is reportedly the greatest thing for perking up the system since Hadacol. On the strength of the dance, which is the foot stomping, hip-bomping type, she was awarded the lead opposite Fred Astaire in the forthcoming "Bandwagon" ...Johnny Burke, of the Burke-Van Husen combo, which has turned out so many hit movie tunes, is also the K. C. Rogan who penned "Wild Horses" and "Now That I'm in Love." Both were gleaned from the classics ...Can't see any reason for the pseudonym, unless Johnny is loath to inform his more hep followers that he is also acquainted with the more serious stuff .We had the good luck the other night to witness one of the beet bits of straight theater we have ever seen. The occasion was the revival of the Paul Osborn comedy "On Borrowed Time." You get the feeling, no matter how many times you have seen it, that you never really saw it until Victor Moore did it. Moore's interprecation of the wonderful old man is so believably great that it becomes practically a one man show. He is ably assisted, however, by Beulah Bondi and David Stollery-one of the first kid actors we have not hated on sight in a long time. Melinda Markey, whose chief claim to fame is being the daughter of Joan Bennett, is also in the cast-although we cannot say why. However, Miss Markey is a very beautiful and young little girl-in time she might progress to being an actress. -'Now you knsow how t ereverile props work!" "Is he a reckless driver?" 'I'll say. When the road turns the same way he does, its purely coincidental." Bound to be popular on any easel board is Republic film lovely Eileen Charity, posing beside the insignia of the 45th Inf. Division. Her latest picture is Republic's "Thunder-birds," the story of the famous National Guard Division. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES Another week of substantial progress has gone by in that very busy building atop Marina Point. Results ---Excellent! Your's Truly has watched each rehearsal with careful scrutiny and is convinced that this new play entitled, "Strange Bedfellows," is going to be far better, more jam-packed with belly laughs, and truly the best production to come from the organization yet! This gem will be discussed for many weeks afterwards and it would be a shame if you heard others doing the talking! There are scenes in this play that are equal to the original production presented on the Great White Way January, 1948. You'll never make a better investment for an evening of the tops in family entertainment. The stage crew, headed by Joe Knepper, have out-done themselves with a superb set, backing up the nineteenth century motif during which the story takes place. Make it a date to see a little bit of Broadway brought to the stage of the Little Theatre in Guantamano Bay. All hands are cordially invited. There's plenty of room for all, and more than enough laughs to go around! 'Nuff for now. Be looking for you in this column next week. SUPERFORT'S CREW SWEARS FLYING HORSE WASN'T IMAGINARY Tokyo (AFPS)-A few years ago Walt Disney startled and pleased audiences with his story of "Dumbo-The Flying Elephant." The Air Force has gone him one better. First Lt. Jack Hunter, a Superfort commander, was bringing his plane into the 98th Bomb Wing's base a short distance from here. At 500 feet an object appeared floating toward them. "It's a bird. It's a plane. It's Superman," rang through the ship as the crew strained to see what it was. They were all wrong. It was a horse. The Superfort banked to avoid hitting him. The horse seemed to nod its head and then continued on its way. The tail gunner disagreed. He said it was a goat. The pilot was about to call the tower to report the incident but he decided he had worked too hard and too long for his wings. It turned out that the airborne horse was an advertising balloon, frequently used by the department stores here, which had broken loose from its moorings. A hillbilly and his wife had at least one child every year and sometimes more. Then came the war, and planes on maneuvers dropped paratroopers. The hillbilly saw them dropping and yelled: "Hey Maw, get the shotgun-that blamed stork is abringin' 'em full growed now." .a.y .., .,. ..,.