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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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QAe


Vol. V, No. 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 2 May 1953


NAVAL HOSPITAL SEEKS BLOOD DONORS;
CLINICAL LABORATORY ACCEPTING
CALLS

Captain J. W. Kimbrough (MC), USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Hospital, has sent out a call for volunteer blood donors. "Volunteer blood donors are needed for blood transfusions at our Naval Hospital," states Captain Kimbrough. "Last year over 100 blood transfusions were given. This blood was donated by personnel from the Naval Base."
Due to transfers of personnel,
the Blood Donor List is urgently
in need of new donors who can be MIDSHIPMAN CRUISE called upon in an emergency. Any- TO ARRIVE 28 JULY; one interested in assisting this
vital service should call the Clinic- USE OF RECREATIONAL al Laboratory (8-659) for an appointment for an examination and FACILITIES REQUESTED blood tests.
All types of blood are in demand. After visiting eight ports in the However, type "0" Negative is Caribbean and on the East Coast especially desired since it can be of South and Central America, given to persons with any other Midshipman Cruise ABLE, consisttype blood. Rare blood types in- ing of nearly thirty ships, will arclude, "AB" and "B" negative. rive at Guantanamo Bay Tuesday
The actual transfusion takes but morning, 28 July. The Task Group from 20 to 25 minutes. There is will leave Guantanamo 1 August. little if any pain felt and the donor Departing from Norfolk, Virgifeels no ill effects. All blood is nia, 8 June, the cruise will include replaced by the donors body with- the battleships Missouri and Wisin 72 hours. consin, the heavy cruisers Macon
Every quarter or so, states Coin- and Albany, the aircraft carrier mander V. W. H. Campbell (MC), Saipan, 18 destroyer-type vessels, USN, it becomes necessary due to two high speed transports, four transfers of personnel to renew Fleet oilers and one stores ship. the Hospital's Blood Donor List. According to the tentative operThis is what the Hospital is now ating schedule, it is expected that attempting. The actual typing of all, or nearly all, ships will be in blood takes but a minute or two port during the afternoon and and consist merely of a pin prick nights between-28 and 31 July. in one of the donor's fingers. Upon Last year during a similar visit, an emergency the donor will be the Naval Base made special arcalled upon to volunteer blood. rangements for the use of athletic
All but a few persons are poten- and recreational facilities and servtial blood donors, says B. J. Gray, ices. Commander Battleship-CruisHM3, Clinical Laboratory techni- er Force has requested Commandcian. All but enemic and pregnant er Naval Base to, once again persons and persons with case his- make these tfacili ie and services tori es of malaria, pneumonia, rheu- available. matic fever and tuberculosis are It has been anticipated that the wanted as blood donors. Navy and Marine Corps Exchanges
It has been the policy of the will extend store hours until nine Naval Hospital to pay Naval per- p.m. each evening. In addition, it sonnel $25.00 for blood donations.has been requested that all softball and baseball diamonds, volley7,208 NAVY RESERVES ball and tennis courts be made
ELIGIBLE FOR 2-WEEK available to ships of the Task Group during the afternoons and
ATLANTIC FLEET evenings.
CRUISES The use of certain other recreational facilities has been requested, including Kittery and WindWashington (AFPS) - Atlantic mill Beaches and Phillips Park. Fleet Reserve cruises will be avail- The use of the Petty Officers' Club able to about 1,058 officers and 6,150 for Midshipmen has also been reenlisted men in "pay" and "non- quested. pay" units during the months of Use of the Officers' Club facilApril, May, and June, the Navy ities has been requested for genhas announced. eral use by ships' officers and for
Personnel from the First, Third, special parties upon request.
Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and The Midshipmen will come from Ninth Naval Districts and the Poto- the U. S. Naval Academy and the mac River Naval Command will be Naval Reserve Training Corps eligible to take the cruises. Units of 52 colleges and universi'Pay and allowances are author- ties. It is also expected that 50 ized for two weeks only, and this West Point Cadets and one officer rule will apply on any cruises will arrive at Guantanamo Bay by which are longer than the regular air 27 July. The Cadets will embark two weeks duration. However, most in battleships and cruisers 28 July of the cruises will not be longer for gunnery exercises and the rethan two weeks, the Navy said. turn trip to Norfolk, Virginia.


DESIGNED TO PUT THE HEX ON COMMUNIST MIGS - Designed to put the hex on Communist MIGs in Korea, the F9F-6 (Cougar) is reported to be in the 650 m.p.h. and above class. Two of the latest Gruman fighters are pictured during a formation take-off from Leeward Point Field, an auxiliary of the Naval Air Station. The planes are part of a squadron which is presently underoing training exercises in the Guantanamo Bay area.


COMMANDER WINSLOW NEW NAS EXEC; COMMANDER SHILLING TO DOVER, N. J.


CDR W. G. Winslow


CDR S. G. Shilling


Commander Walter G. Winslow, USN, will relieve Commander Samuel G. Shilling, USN, as Executive Officer of the Naval Air Station 9 May, it was recently announced.
Having joined the Navy in September 1935, Commander Winslow became a Naval Aviator in January 1939. Prior to his reporting to Guantanamo Bay in January 1951 as Operations Officer, he had served as Public Information Officer to Vice Admiral Price, Chief of Naval Air Training, Pensacola, Florida.
Commander Shilling has received orders to report to the Naval Air
Rocket Test Station, Lake Denmark, Dover, New Jersey, to assume duties as Executive Officer.
Commissioned an Ensign upon his graduation from the Naval Academy in June 1936, Commander Shilling has been a Naval Aviator since April 1943. Prior to his reporting to Guantanamo Bay, he had served in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.


CIVILIAN LEADERS
RECLASSIFIED BY AREA CLASSIFICATION BOARD

Two outstanding civilian employees of the Naval Base have recently been reclassified from grade GS-12 to grade GS-13 by the Area Wage and Classification Office, Jackson-, ville, Florida.
The two are: Mr. H. P. McNeal, Industrial Relations Officer, and Mr. J. E. Roembke, Special Assistant to the Naval Station Public Works Officer.
Responsible for the activities of Naval Base employees, Mr. McNeal had served in his former grade since the time of his reporting to Guantanamo Bay nearly six years ago. Prior to his assuming his position at the Naval Base, he had served in a simular capacity at Key West, Florida, as a lieutenant commander in the U. S. Naval Reserve.
Formerly designated Design Director, Mr. Roembke has both been reclassified and promoted to his present position as Special Assistant to the Naval Station Public Works Officer and Acting Design Director. Mr. Roembke's reclassification was made in accordance with standard public works organization for naval stations. The entire Naval Station Public Works Department has been evolving under a reorganization program during the last year or so.
Also a lieutenant commander in the U. S. Naval Reserve, Mr. Roembke has recently been transfered to the Civil Engineering Corps. He had been a line officer since May 1942.

NEW NAVY EM RAINCOAT
NOW AVAILABLE FOR
$11.80

Washington (AFPS)-The Navy is now issuing the new-style enlisted men's blue raincoat.
The garment is made of lightweight navy blue cotton cloth and is double breasted. It is now available for $11.80 at most continental clothing and small stores. It can be obtained in either small, large or regular, sizes 34 through 40.
The present canvas-type raincoat will not be sold Aftr July 1, but may be worn until ' ) 1955.
I Iv


MARINE CORPS TO HOLD NEXT EXAMINATIONS IN
MAY-JUNE

Marine corporals and sergeants can try for promotion in the next testing period with one and two months' less time in grade, respectively, than was required earlier this year, but staff and tech sergeants will need three extra months in grade to apply for exams.
Disclosed in Memo 25, which was just sent to the field, it was also stated that the summer round of enlisted tests will be given to qualified Marines between May 25 and June 24.
Headquarters is still working on the results of the January-February exams. It expects to make the first of some 25,000 advancements shortly.
Under the new changes, male and female Regular and Reserve privates first class, corporals and sergeants must have 10 months in rank by Oct. 1 to qualify for testing. This reflects no change for E2s, but cuts a month for the latter two.
Staff sergeants must have 15 months and techs 18 months in grade. In each case three months were tacked on to the former time requirements.
Privates first class and corporals will compete for advancement on the basis of testing and composite scores, while sergeants, staff sergeants and tech sergeants have to pass technical tests and be considered by non-commissioned officer selection boards scheduled to meet in July.
First general military subjects tests for promotion to E-5, E-6, and E-7 will be given May 25 and the second, June 22; first GMST tests for advancement to E-3 and E-4, May 27 and the second, June 24; and the first technical tests (primary forms) will be held May 26 and the second, June 23.
Waivers granted for any previous testing period are not valid for the summer exams, Memo 25 pointed out.

Beautiful new neighbor: "Little boy, I need a quart of milk from the store. Do you think you could go for me ?"
Little boy: "No, but I heard pop say he sure could."









Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 2 May 1953


SIGN OF THE TIMES


a-RZ


Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base
Special Services Department
Fleet Recreation Center

Saturday, 2 May 1953
U. S. NAVAL BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN
Commander
CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson
Chief of Staff
U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl
Commanding Officer
CAPT Jack M. Howell
Executive Officer
Editorial Staff
Ensign J. M. McMahon -----.Staff Advisor Al Henderson, JOSN.--------------.Editor
J. C. Dierks, SN-----------Sports Editor
S. E. Cobbs, SN.------------.Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 641 Washington Street, New York 14, New York.













ROBERT BERNERD ANDERSON


Secretary of the Navy Robert Bernerd Anderson was born in Burleson, Tex., 43 years ago. He was graduated from Weatherford College in Texas in 1927, and received the degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of Texas in 1932.
The new Navy secretary was elected to the Texas State Legislature in 1932 and was named Assistant Attorney General of Texas that same year.
In 1933 Secretary Anderson returned to the University of Texas as a professor of law. The following year he was appointed State Tax Commissioner and Racing Commissioner.
In 1936 he was made chairman and executive director of the State Unemployment Commission.
Since 1941 he has been general manager for the W. T. Waggoner Estate; since 1943, vice president of the Associate Refineries, Inc.
And now he holds the following offices: president, Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association; director, American Petroleum Institute; deputy chairman, board of directors, Federal Reserve Bank of Texas; president, Vernon Industrial Institute and director, Vernon Transit Co.
Meanwhile civic responsibility has been placed on him too, in Vernon, Tex. where he, his wife and two sons reside when they aren't in Washington.
Secretary Anderson is director of Texas Wesleyan College, president of Vernon Board of Education and a director of the Vernon Times Publishing Co. (AFPS)


FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITIES
By CHAPLAIN ROMUALD J. WALSH
Freedom does not mean that we can do what we want without concern or regard for the rights of others. True freedom demands that we be aware of and assume and fulfill our responsibilities. Then only can there be peace, progress, stability, order-the necessary atmosphere for true freedom.
In our day we need to emphasize that freedom is endangered by those who shirk their responsibilities. The thief endangers our freedom to possess property; the man who respects his neighbor's right to property .preserves that freedom. The speeder, the Jasper, endangers the freedom of everyone else on the highway, and in many cases endangers the very right to life which others possess; the same motorist, aware of his responsibilities when he gets behind the wheel, makes the road safe for others. The American who joins the Communist party is undermining all our constitutional guarantees of freedom. Any revolt from, or shirking of our responsibilities to God, to conscience, to positive law is a perversion of freedom, and must lead either to the slavery of sin, which deprives us of the liberty of the sons of God, or to anarchy which prevents others from exercising their God-given rights and from enjoying the blessings and benefits of social and political freedom.
Freedom is everybody's business! Responsibilities, too, must be everybody's' business if we are to preserve true freedom. The "freedom" which shirks responsibilities is a counterfeit, a sham, and, worse of all, a destroyer of true freedom.


SEC. HANNAH LISTS AIMS,
DUTY OF SERVICE IN
I & E PROGRAM

Washington (AFPS)-Dr. John A. Hannah, Assistant Secretary of Defense, told an Army Information and Education conference here that the basic society in America may not continue unless a few fundamental convictions are held by a majority of the people in the country.
The uniformed Services have society's last chance to make good citizens of those individuals who have not been fully influenced in the home, school or church, Dr. Hannah said.
"There is a basic obligation to do what we can in inculcating those who don't have these fundamental convictions . . . with the idea that they are going to be better citizens after they get through," he opined.
Necessary fundamental convictions were defined by the Assistant Secretary as basic differences between the American and Soviet communist philosophy:
1-We believe every individual is a dignified being-he is the basis on which our society and state have been developed. In the Soviet, the individual is an automaton, whose one purpose is to serve the state.
2.L-We believe in a respect for the truth-agreements, written or verbal, are to be kept. The communist philosophy does not subscribe to that at all.
3-We believe in the sovereignty of the people, and in a government or society regulated by written laws. Communist society is governed by a dictator and his whim is supreme.
4-We believe in a good Godthat our life is worthwhile. In Soviet society God is denied-it is impossible to make life meaningful and worthwhile.
"I believe this I&E program is of great importance. I think if it is well done, people in the Services will be more effective in whatever their job is in the Service," Dr. Hannah said." "I am certain if we do this job as well as it can be done we can send people out of the Armed Services equipped to be better.,giiens of this democracy than ro night otherwise be."


THE SAFESIDE
A man's home is his castle (or death trap).
Statistically speaking, the home is a booby-trap. In 1952 accidents in the home brought death to 28,000 Americans.
In one household out of every five someone has suffered a disabling accident. Accidents now kill six times as many Americans in their late teens and twenties as heart disease, the next big killer.

A parking space is where you leave your car to have the wheel base shortened and the trunk caved in.


Sunday, 3 May 1953
Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions: S a t u r d a y, 1730
1800; 1930- 2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on
Sunday.
Protestant Services
Sunday: 0930-Sunday School
1000Adult Bible Class
1100-Divine Worship
1930-Christian Fellowship
Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer
Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal
Chaplains at this Activity
CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN
LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR
(Protestant)
LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC,- USN
(Catholic)

WHAT THE G. I. BILL
MEANS TO YOU

Q. I meet all the eligibility requirements for training under the Korean GI Bill. However, I've recently gone back on active duty. May I take a correspondence course under the program, even though I'm now in uniform?
A. No. Even though you meet all the eligibility requirements, the law requires that you be a civilian when you take your training. Veterans back on active duty may not train under the law.
Q. Is there any time limit I have to meet, in starting training under the Korean GI Bill? I have just received my discharge.
A. You must begin your training within two years of the date of your discharge. Veterans discharged before August 20, 1952, however, must begin by August 20, 1954.
Q. I have quite a large number of bills I'm trying to pay. One of my creditors is getting impatient, and has threatened to take over my disability compensation, until his bill is paid off. Can he do this?
A. No. Disability compensation payments-as well as all other VA benefit payments - are exempt from the claims of creditors, under the law.
Q. Is a service-connected disability, incurred since Korea, enough in itself to entitle me to vocational training under Public Law 16? I have an honorable discharge.
A. No. In addition, you must have a need for training to overcome the handicap of your disability.


PEo.Rr
WASHINGTOAI


(AFPS)-GEN. Lemuel C. Shepherd Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps, has authorized any marine prisoners of war repatriated by the Chinese Reds to receive preferential treatment in processing or records, leave, pay and promotions.
Marines who require no hospitalization will be allowed to choose their own next duty station and will be


given whatever promotions they may have missed while being held prisoner. However, officers will have to pass a physical examination before promotion could be effected.

The Selective Service System has been requested by the Defense Department to provide the Armed Forces with 266 physicians and 145 dentists during the month of June. All of the physicians will go to the Army while 100 dentists are to be assigned to Army .and 45 t the Air Force.
The Defense Department also asked Selective Service to cut down the number of physicians called for in May because of an unanticipated hike in the number of doctors on acitve duty that have extended their service.

The Navy has named 1800 successful candidates to start their college education with the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program. The grouix was selected from 30,000 hyd A ool seniors


and graduates. They will be distributed to 52 leading colleges and universities around the nation.
Six hundred alternates were also named. The successful candidates applied for the NROTC program last fall and took the Naval College Aptitude Tests last December.

A Warrant Officer selection board will meet early in May, the Navy has announced. Considered for promotion will be those eligible for W-2, W-3 and W-4 pay grades.

Maj. Gen. Bickford E. Sawyer, Army's Chief of Finance, has been elected president of the National Council of the Society of Military Accountants. The society is composed of commissioned and warrant officers of the Armed Forces who are members of the accounting and statistical professions.

Approixmately 2700 Navy POls are slated for promotion to acting CPO next month. The 2700 were selected from 23,000 E-6s who took the service-wide exams, Feb. 3.


Page Two


TEINDIAN


Saturday, 2 May 1953


















MARINES AND LABES SHUT OUT CORPSMEN
WITH THREE HITS, 11-0

A nicely pitched three hitter by Ray Labes and a flock of Hospital errors enabled the Marine Leathernecks to shut out the Corpsmen by a score of 11-0 in Wednesday night's game under the lights at the Fleet Recreation Center.
The game started out as a pitcher's duel, and although the Marines scored a run in the third, two in the sixth, and one in the seventh, they didn't really take command of the contest until the eighth when they batted all the way around and knocked in, six runs o, only three hits.
Labes struck out 14 men and walked 5, while Fauth, on the mound for the Corpsmen, allowed 8 hits and fanned 11 during the evening. Malkin of the Marines hit a home run in the 6th with one man on.
The game:
FIRST INNING
MARINES- Ferris flied to center. Felkness Was called out on strikes. Malkin popped to Bozarth.
-No runs, no hits.
HOSPITAL-Taylor took a third strike. Bozarth was called out on strikes. Blomberg also struck out.
-No runs, no hits.
SECOND INNING
MARINES-Trabucco flied deep to center. Bradshaw grounded out, second to first. Diano singled over third into left field. Prowant popped to Doles.-No runs, one hit.
HOSPITAL - Hart was thrown out on a ground ball, Felkness to Tresch. Doles was called out on strikes. Walters struck out.-No runs, no hits.
THIRD INNING
MARINES - Tresch grounded out, third to first. Taylor also threw out Labes. Ferris went down swinging.-No runs, no hits.
HOSPITAL - Kraft got a base on balls. Webb struck out. Fauth laid down a bunt which was fumbled by Labes. Kraft going to sec ond. Labes then .threw to second in an attempt to pick Kraft off base and he was run down, Felkness to Ferris. Taylor walked. Bozarth was called out on strikes.-No runs, no hits.
FOURTH INNING
MARINES-Felkness struck out. Malkin struck out. Trabucco walked and took second on an error by the catcher, scoring on another error by Kraft in center. Bradshaw grounded out, short to first.-One run, no hits.
HOSPITAL- Blomberg singled to center. Hart forced Blomberg, Diano to Ferris. Doles popped to Ferris. Walters singled through the box. Kraft grounded out to Tresch unassisted.-No runs, two hits.
FIFTH INNING
MARINES - Diano got a base on balls. Prowant struck out. Diano was out stealing, Blomberg to Bozarth. Tresch flied deep to left.
-No runs, no hits.
HOSPITAL - Webb struck out. Fauth was also called out on strikes. Taylor was safe when Felkness booted his grounder. Bozarth popped to the pitcher.-No runs, no hits.
SIXTH INNING
MARINES-Labes was hit by r pitched balL Ferris flied to Kraft in center. Felkness was safe on a fielder's choice, Labes being forced at second. Malkin hit a home run over the left field fence, scoring Felkness ahead of him. Trabucco struck out.-Two runs, one hit.
HOSPITAL-Blomberg was called out on strikes. Hart popped to Diano. Doles grounded out, short to first.-No runs, no hits.
SEVENTH INNING
MARINES - Bradshaw w e n t down swinging. Diano singled to left center and then stole second. Prowant was safe on an error by Taylor, Diano going to third. Tresch flied to center, Diano tagging up and scoring after the catch. Bozarth threw out Labes.
-One run, one hit.
HOSPITAL - Walters led off with a single to center. Kraft walked. Corradetti batted for Webb and struck out on three pitches. Fauth flied to left. Taylor forced Kraft,


"Don't let me stay here all day, do something"-featherweight Dave Gallrado, Los Angeles, lands on the ropes in the third round in Wash., D. C. recently, as Percy Bassett, Philadelphia, stands back wondering what to do next. Gallardo's foot caught in Bassett's trunks as he toppled backwards on the rope and stayed precariously suspended for a split second. He was helped back by the referee, then went on to win the 10-rounder by a unanimous decision.


Knuckling under for the big one, as George W. Smith, SN, U.S. Navy waits his turn, is 80-year-old "Pop" Maynard. The occasion was the annual Marble tournament at Tinsley Greens, Sussex, England where the British All-Star Team scuttled a U.S. Navy team from CINCNELM. Seaman Smith saved face for the Navy boys, however, by defeating "Pop" Maynard, British champion.


Diano to Ferris to retire the side.
-No runs, one hit.
EIGHTH INNING
MARINES-Ferris was safe at first when Bozarth bobbled his ground ball. Ferris stole second. Felkness singled to left, Ferris pulling up at third. Malkin struck out. Trabucco singled to left, and Ferris and Felkness came in to score when the ball got away from Walters. Bradshaw doubled off the center field wall, scoring Trabucco. Diano was safe on Doles' error but was picked off at first, Fauth to Hart. Prowant hit a grounder and was safe when Hart dropped the throw at first. Prowant went down to second for a stolen base. Tresch was safe on another error by Hart, and then he and Prowant worked a double steal, Prowant scoring. Labes singled to left, bringing in Tresch. Ferris was called out on strikes.-Six runs, three hits.
HOSPITAL - Bozarth grounded out, short to first. Blomberg struck out. Hart got a base on balls. Doles flied to Prowant.-No runs, no hits.
NINTH INNING
MARINES - Felkness took a third strike. Malkin was thrown out on a grounder, short to first. Trabucco and Bradshaw hit successive doubles, Trabucco scoring on Bradshaw's hit. Riley was hit by a pitched ball. Prowant struck out.
-One run, two hits.
HOSPITAL - Walters walked. Kraft went down swinging. Maddix walked. Fauth popped to short. Taylor struc, out.-No runs, no hits.


AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE FOR 2 TO 8 MAY

Saturday, 2 May
New York at Chicago
Washington at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Detroit
Boston at Cleveland Sunday, 3 May
Philadelphia (2) at Chicago
Boston (2) at St. Louis
New York at Detroit
Washington (2) at Cleveland Monday, 4 May
Boston at St. Louis
(Night Game)
New York at Detroit Tuesday, 5 May
Boston at Chicago
(Night Game)
Philadelphia at St. Louis
(Night Game)
Washington at Detroit New York at Cleveland
(Night Game) Wednesday, 6 May
Boston at Chicago
Philadelphia at St. Louis
(Night Game)
Washington at Detroit Thursday, 7 May
No Games Scheduled This Date Friday, 8 May
Detroit at Chicago
(Night Game)
Cleveland at St. Louis
(Night Game)
Washington at Philadelphia (Night Game)
New York at Bostoit (Night Game)


SPORTS PERSONALITY

One of the fixtures in the outfield pastures for the VU-10 Mallards for the past two years is their hard slugging center fielder, Sam Mikel.
Starting his third season with the Mallards, the 24 year old Mikel was one of the top men in the circuit at the plate in 1951 and 1952. In his first year in the Guantanamo League Sam kept his hitting clothes on all year, pounding the horsehide for a stellar .386 average and winding up the season with 16 homers, tops in the league. The following year opposing pitchers concentrated on the 5' 8 " 160 lb. slugger, and as a result his average and homer output dropped somewhat, but Sam still managed to rap out a hefty .365, which put him up among the circuit's top hitters.
Mikel played ball in the St. Louis Cardinal system before joining the Navy, first with the Class D Hamilton, Ontario nine in Canada, and then with the Class C Chanute, Kansas spuad. He was about to go to Duluth, Minnesota when he entered the service.
Unfortunately for the Mallards, Mikel's tour of duty in Guantanamo Bay will be over in about two weeks, and while they will sorely miss his big bat, the Norfolk Flyers, who have next call on his services, will probably be all too glad to get it.

KIDS' CONTEST
LAND DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4
Snappers
Reynolds, R.C.----------12 oz.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Snappers
Moales, Reggie----------12 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Snappers
Carothers, Linda---------10 oz.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Snappers
Howell, Johnny .... 1 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Snappers
Gewertz, R. M.-----------8 oz.
No entries in the following fish:
Barracuda Grouper
Mackerel (King)
Jacks Snook
Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common)
BOAT DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 No Entries.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Snappers
Puckett, Pam Jo ----1 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9
Snappers
Price, R. V., Jr... 2 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Jacks
Kler, Clara S.------------8 oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Snappers
Hill, J. D.---------------9 oz.
Snook
Hill, June----------1 lb.
No entries in the following fish:
Barracuda Grouper
Mackerel (King)
Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common
SPECIAL DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4
Croakers
Jogan, Karen 12 oz.
Age Group 5 thru 7
Croakers
Puckett, Puck------1 lb. 8 oz.
Parrot Fish
Gennaria, Terry L. -_ 1 lb. 8 oz.
Age Group 8 thru 9 No Entries.
Age Group 10 thru 11
Bonefish
Howell, Johnny-----------8 oz.
Age Group 12 thru 15
Bonefish
Howell, Dorothy----------8 oz.
Carroll, D.---------------8 oz.
Croakers
Hill, J. D.----------1lb. 8 oz.
No entries in the following fish:
Albacore Bonito Dolphin Hogfish Lady fish Marlin Pompano Sailfish Shark Triggerfish


This type contest:


Tuna of fish


not listed in


Gar
Carroll, D. Age 12 --1 lb. Calamaras, D. Age 8-------8 oz.








PTSaturday, 2 May 1953


12 ERRORS HELP
MALLARDS TOP NSD 11-4

Scoring in all but three innings and aided immeasurably by 12 NSD errors, the VU-10 Mallards battled the Suppliers to an 11-4 victory Tuesday night. King started on the mound for the Suppliers: while Huber did likewise for VU10, and the Mallards, firm believers in giving their hurler something to work with, jumped off to an early lead, chalking up three runs in the first inning.
Kubic walked, and stole second after Long struck out. Rea was then safe on an error by second baseman Vernneau, Kubic scoring on the play, and after Loggins had grounded out, short to first, Annette lined a two bagger down the left field foul line to score Rea. Annette came in to score a minute later on a bad throw by Vernneau who was attempting to throw out Collins on a ground ball.
The Mallards racked up two more runs in the third frame when, after two were out, Rea got a base or balls. Loggins then stepped up and lashed a single through the box into center field, and when Milnekel cut off the throw from the outfield to make a play on Loggins coming into second, the ball got away and Rea came in to score. Loggins kept right, on going and tallied on P close play when Tobin momentarily bobbled the peg.
NSD's first two runs also came in the third when Leddick, now playing second was hit on the hand by a pitched ball and moved down to second when King was safe on an error. Toomey then singled to right, but Leddick, trying for the plate was thrown out on a play from right fielder Collins to catcher Rea. Snyder and Tobin then hit consecutive singles, but Drew was thrown out, second to first to end the rally.
VU-10 scored again in the 4th and NSD in the 5th on a walk to Toomey, a long triple by Snyder, and a ground ball which enabled Snyder to come across the plate. The Mallards led at this point 6-4 and a 7th inning rally enabled them to put the game away as they worked King for three runs on three hits and three errors. Kubic singled to left and went to second on an error by Leddick. After Rea had taken a third strike Loggins was safe on another error, putting runners on first and second with one away. Annette then singled, loading the bases, and a wild pitch by Long scored Kubic but the, side was retired when-Annette tried to come in on Myer's single to center and was thrown out, Milnikel to Tobin.
The Mallards picked up a run in the 8th and another in the 9th while Myer was holding the Suppliers scoreless, and VU-10 took the game, 11-4.
Hubber was the winning pitcher, giving up six hits, while King was the loser, allowing 10 safeties.
Most men wouldn't mind their wives having the last word if they wouldn't keep repeating it.

SPORTS QUIZ

Questions
1. In which American League park were the most home runs hit in 1952 ?
2. What college basketball player set a new scoring record ithe last three minutes of the 1952 season?
Answers
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tmnlpn;5 S 22Lxa SJ~o.1qG"(


NOT LISTED IN FISHING CONTEST RESULTS - It was a game fight, but Jane D. Hill, thirteen-year-old daughter of Colonel and Mrs. John B. Hill of the Marine Barracks, landed her somewhat unorthodox catch in a style befitting any old-time angler. While fishing off Marine Site ONE recently, Jane felt a tug on her line. Like seasoned fishermen the world over, she played her catch and then swiftly pulled it ashore. The catch: a wallet belonging to Seaman John J. Ivory of the U. S. S. Furse (DDR 882). The wallet, since returned to its owner, contained identification papers and a birth certificate.


FISHING LOCKER OFFERS
BEST ASSISTANCE,
EQUIPMENT TO ANGLERS

For the past five months the Recreation Department has been blessed by the services of a Cuban fishing expert named Fermin Pavila. The fact that he is an expert an in particular an authority on fishing in these waters can be at. tested to by the numerous anglers he has advised and assisted during his stay down here.
Mr. Pavila has had a great deal of experience in Caribbean waters having been associated with commercial fishing along with his father in both Caimanera and Santiago for all of twenty years. In the event of any arguments or discussion concerning fish or fishing techniques in the Bay it might be well to keep in mind that Mr. Pavila will be available at the Sailboat Locker for the purpose of settling all such disputes before they reach the bloodshed stage. Mr. Pavila is also available to accompany, free of charge, large fishing groups operating in nearby waters. Arrangements may be made by contacting the Special Service Officer.
Fishermen are reminded that all equipment, including poles, light and heavy tackel, etc. is available for personnel in the area, but for those of you who feel that you, personnally, always have your best luck with your own personal gear, LT C.C. Puckett, Navy Exchange Officer wishes to remind you that the finest possible fishing equipment can be easily obtained at astonishingly low prices at the Navy Exchange Sport Shop on Sherman Ave. (friendly, courteous service.)
Mr. Pavila, in order to help out those who need it, has consented to offer some helpful tips on fish and techniques in these waters, and in order that everyone may benefit from this advice, will be run weekly in The Indian under the heading: "Fermin Pavila Sez"...


NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE 2 TO 8 MAY


Saturday, 2 May
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Chicago at Brooklyn
St. Louis at New York
Milwaukee at Philadelphia Sunday, 3 May
St. Louis at Pittsburgh Milwaukee at Brooklyn
Cincinnati (2) at New York Chicago (2) at Philadelphia Monday, 4 May
St. Louis (Night) at Pittsburgh Milwaukee (Night) at Brooklyn
Cincinnati at New York
Chicago (Night) at Philadelphia Tuesday, 5 May
St. Louis at Pittsburgh Milwaukee at Brooklyn


Cincinnati at New York Chicago at Philadelphia Wednesday, 6 May
Milwaukee (Night) at Pittsburg
St. Louis (Night) at Brooklyn
Chicago at New York
Cincinnati (Night) at Philadel� phia
Thursday, 7 May
Milwaukee at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Brooklyn Chicago at New York
Cincinnati at Philadelphia Friday, 8 May
Philadelphia (Night) at Brooklyn Pittsburgh "Nitight) at New York
Chicago Iht) at Milwaukee St. Loui ight) at Cincinnati


BASEBALL SCHEDULE

Saturday, May 2
Naval Station vs NSD
VU-10 vs Hospital
Sunday, May 3 NAS vs FTG
Marine Barracks vs MCB-4
Monday, May 4
Naval Station vs Hospital
Tuesday, May 5 FTG vs VU-10
Wednesday, May 6
Marine Barracks vs NSD
Thursday, May 7 NAS vs MCB-4
TRAINERS FALL
VICTIMS TO MCB-4, 10-1

Paced by a 4 hit pitching performance by Brooks, the MCB-4 Seabees outhit the FTG Trainers 10-1 in a contest at the Recreation Center diamond Monday night thereby continuing on the winning path that enable them to romp over the Hospital 21-3 in their previous game.
MCB-4 started things off by pushing across a run in the second on a triple by Ziarnek and a single by Richardson, and picked up another in the fourth on an error, a stolen base, and a single by the pitcher Brooks. The Seabees continued to pull ahead in the 5th when Murray singled. Hansen was hit by a pitched ball, and Richardson lined a double to left center, scoring both men.
The Trainers only run came in the 6th when Conway was safe on an error by Seabee first baseman Hansen. He was then thrown out trying to steal second by Murray, Seabee backstop, but Walak, the next man up was safe on an error, by Ziarnek. Schuleter then singled, driving in Walak, and after Collins had walked, Brooks struck out Perrone and got Gettle on a ground ball.
Two more runs were chalked up for MCB-4 in the 7th on a double by Ziarnek, a triple by Hansen, and an error by left fielder Walak. The Seabees weren't through yet, though, and in the 8th after Adams had singled Grey stepped up and homered, driving in two runs and making the score 8-1. Murray was then safe on a error when Marshall let the ball get away from him at first, and Ziarnek, the next batter picked out a pitch to his liking and tagged it for another four bagger, scoring two more runs. Ziarnek was the big man at the plate for the Seabees, collecting four hits in five times at bat, including a single, double, triple and home run.
Brooks was the winning pitcher. going all the way for MCB-4, and allowing only four hits, while striking out 11 and walking 4. Gettle was the loser, allowing 12 hits before relieved by Byrd s the 8th

-


FISHING CONTEST
REPORT

SPECIAL DIVISION
Bonefish
Bolkcom, W. W...._ 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L.-------- 3 lbs.
Reeder, E. W., Mrs -_ 2 lb. 1-0 oz.
Croakers
Lowenhayen, N.A. 1 lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E.-------1 lb. 8 ozs.
Gralish, G. E.-------1 lb. 4 ozs.
Shark
Gennaria, R. L..... 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J.---------43 lb. 8 oz.
Berke, L. W.-------38lb.
Trigger Fish
Dirkson, S..--------3lb. 8 oz.
Kamwick, C. S..... 1 lb. 12 ozs.
Hogfish
Blount, J. M.--------1 lb. 12 ozs.
Ladyfish
Hoff, E. F.----------5 lbs.
Puckett, C. C.------3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J.W-...... 1 lb. 4 ozs.
Parrot Fish
Horner, T. A.-------1 lb.
No entries on the following fish:
Albacore Bonito Dolphin Tuna Pompano Sailfish
SPEAR FISHING
Grouper
Matson, J ......... 20 lb. 12 oz.
Tucker, J. L.-------15 lbs. 8 ozs.
Billings, H. R-..---14 lbs.
Jacks
Eyster, G. W.-------22 lbs.
Allen, M. R.--------17 lbs.
Mackerel
(King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P.------- 7 lbs.
Phillips, H. R.------ 5 lb. 8 oz.
Snappers
Prejean, J. W-...... 25 lbs. Roos, F. H.---------13 lbs.
Eyster, G. W.-------9 lbs.
Hogfish
Foy, F. D.---------6 lb. 12 oz.
Prejean, J. W.------6 lbs. 2 ozs.
Pompano
Tucker, J. L.--------5 lbs.
Parrot Fish
Sheppard, M. E. ___ 23 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Franklin, E.M..... 18 lbs.
No entries in the following fish:
Albacore Bonito Bonefish Croakers Mackerel (Spanish) Marlin Sailfish Trigger Fish Tuna Dolphin
Snook
LAND DIVISION
Barracuda
Cheney, W. M-..---20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A.------16 lb.
Esquerdo, G..-------15 lbs.
Dupree, W. L.-------15 lbs.
Mackerel
(King)
Lantzinheiser, 2 lbs. 12 ozs.
Snappers
Reynolds, Laura --- 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N.A. - 13 lbs. Morris, H. F.-------12 lbs. 4 ozs.
Grouper
Gadoury, R. J..------7 lbs.
Bell, J. Jr.---------6lb. 8 oz.
Gorecki, R. J.-------2 lbs.
Jacks
Perkins, F. G-..---19 lbs. Endicott, C. R-..---10 lbs. Adams, Mary-------8 lbs.
Tarpon
Smith, C. C.-------13 lb.
No entries in the following fish:
Snook
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Wahoo
BOAT DIVISION
Jacks
Drake, R. J.--------21 lbs.
Hardin, J.---------10 lbs. 1 oz.
Swisher, C. L-..---10 lbs.
Barracuda
Rehkopf, L. D..... 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 16 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mackerel
(King)
Massingill, J. H.... 9 lbs. Delaney, R. E..------ 4 lb.
Esquerdo, G.-1------- lbs. 12 ozs.
Snappers
Remaly, D. H-..---56 lbs. 8 ozs. Rightfoot, L. H..... 14 lbs. 8 ozs. Berke, L. W. - --- 14 lb.
Snook
Hardin, J.---------15 lb. 8 oz.
Mowery, J. W..... 14 lb. 8 oz. Colvin, W.---------13 lbs. 8 ozs.
Tarpon
Lightfoot, L. H .... 58 lb. Garrison, R. L..---36 lbs. . Gennaria, R. L..... 24 lbs. 8 ozs.
Mackerel
(Spanish and Common)
Pass, J. S.----------2 lbs. 8 ozs.
No entries in the following fish:
Wahoo Grouper
"When we arrived in China," a lady, back from a world cruise, told her friends, "we went riding in one of those jinrikishas, and believe it or not,. they have horses that look just like men!"


Page Four


~THE INDIAN








Saturday, 2 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Fiye


BASKETBALL (AFPS)George Yardley, former Stanford U. star who led the Los Alamitos (Calif.) NAS Flyers to the finals of AAU basketball tourney and the championship of the All-Navy finals, has been named Southern California's Athlete of the Month for March by the Helms Athletic Foundation... Elmer Ripley, West Point head basketball coach for the past two years, has resigned to accept a coaching position with the Harlem Globe Trotters. A one-time professional star he also coached basketball at Yale, Notre Dame, Columbia and Georgetown.
BASEBALL (AFPS) -Leading the Camp Lejeune sluggers is third baseman Don Brown with a .389 mark. The former Greensboro (Class C) infielder collected 18 hits in the first 13 games . . . Ron Necciai, one of the Pittsburg Pirates rookie pitchers last year, has been discharged from the Army . . . A U.S. Navy team in London has entered the Third Air Force Division League., The "Navy Yanks" are led by Pfc. Lee Tunison, USMC, who won 24 games in the Miss.Ohio Valley League in 1951... Ted Williams, recuperating aboard the hospital ship, Haven off Korea, predicts the Yanks and Dodgers will repeat as pennant winners this yearI. . . Army has drawn first blood in the 1953 baseball series with Navy. The Cadets scored two unearned runs in the late innings to hand the Middies their first defeat this year, 5-4 . . . Ft. Slocum, N.Y., will engage the Olean Pony Leaguers, Yankee farm club, in a two game exhibition series later this month.
SPORT SHORTS (APFS)-Middleweight contender Chico Vejar is slated to be inducted into the Army in the near future. The 23-yearold Stamford, Conn., boxer was granted a college deferment last summer. He was scheduled to fight Vince Martinez at Madison Square Garden, May 22 . . . Posting a final score of 557 out of a possible 600, marine S/Sgt. Don L. Smith of Camp Lejeune, N. C., walked away with the individual rifle championship honors at the Southeastern Division Rifle and Pistol Competition held recently at Camp Lejeune.

INTRA-COMMAND GOLF STANDINGS


Team P V U -10 ....................
NavSta----------------Hbsp-Dent--------------NAS-------------------FTG-------------------NSD--------------------


Points
66i/s 59 Y2 38
22 17
12/2


TRANSFERS INTO REGULAR MARINE CORPS- Colonel John B. Hill, Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, is pictured above administering the oath of office integrating Major Arthur A. Nelson, Jr., Base Provost Marshal, into the Regular Marine Corps. Commissioned a second lieutenant in the Reserves in March 1943, Major Nelson has been in the Corps since March 1942.


LOS ALAMITOS FLYERS
DEFEAT GREAT LAKES

Great Lakes, Ill. (AFPS)-The Los Alamitos (Calif.) N.A.S. Flyers swept the All-Navy basketball finals, defeating the Great Lakes (Ill.) Bluejackets 82-79 in the second game of a best of three-game series. The Flyers won the first game, 81-61.
Johnny Arndt, former Loyola (Los Angeles) flash, led the 1953 AAU runner-ups to victory with 21 points. His sensational shooting in the last five minutes, broke up the tight contest and assured the Flyers the trip to the AllService finals at Offutt AFB, Neb. Carl McNulty, Purdue great and a member of the 1953 AFPS AllStars, topped the losers with 14 tallies.
Los Alamitos, led by George Yardley's 38 points, crushed the Bluejackets in the first game, 8161. Harvey Fromme (Texas Christian) had 14 points for Great Lakes. The Lakers' advanced to the finals by defeating All-Eastern fleet winner DesLant, 82-67 and 88-63, in the Navy semi-finals at Newport, R.I.


By Hugh Baird, J03, USN
(AFPS Sports Writer)
New York AFRS Sports Director Chief Al Spanjer, sporting a deep sun-tan after, his recent Florida coverage of Major League baseball clubs, dropped in on us for a chat about players, coaches and club officials he interviewed during his escapade into the Everglades.
At Orlando, Fla., spring home
of the Washington Senators, Al now wears a steel-plate inside his cornered Floyd Baker and Bob cap. Porterfield between innings of k Strange thing about Bob is that Washington-Philadelphia scrap for he never played in organized ball a few words. until he went into the Army, where
Baker is one of the better defen- he performed with a Berlin Army inerioeoft teunit team. At 22 he was discharged sive third basemen in the A.L., and now, at 29, he is one of the but his ability at bat has never league's best hurlers. been sensational. In fact, during
his Major League career he has "Staying in shape is important," hit only one home run-and that the big Newport, Va., native excost the Chicago White Sox, $5,000. plained. "While in Service, I espeIt seems that the White Sox in cially did a lot of running, because the legs most of all should be kept
'49 wanted more home runs-so in shape. Once the legs are in they moved their outfield fence in shape, the rest is just a matter of
-at the cost of five G's. Next time time." at bat Baker walloped his homer Porterfield thought that serviceover that same barrier-causing men definitely have a good chance officials to reconsider and move the of returning successfully to orfence back again. After all, what ganized ball. Again, the man who would the opposing power hitters should know, emphasized staying do? in condition.
Bob Porterfield, who has suffered three broken jaws, a broken
leg and a broken arm during his SN: "If you were a poker playpitching career, reports he's in er, what would you call a cheap "best shape ever" this season. The ante ?" hard-luck righthander was traded FN: "My mother's sister." by the Yanks to the Nats in '51 for
Irv Noren and Fred Sanford. Se- In many cases, the chip on a verely beaned three years ago, he person'sAhtlder is just a bark.


TEEN-AGE COLUMN

By Sugar Livdahl
At two-thirty Tuesday afternoon most of the school turned out to see the Guantanamo Bay High School boys tangle with the high school team from Camanera in a tight ball game. Batteries for GTMO High were George Mac Michael, on the mound, and Mike McKinely, behind the plate. Mac Michael held the visiting team to three runs; GTMO High pulled in seven.
Plenty of practice had gone into this game. Norman Huddy and Jimmy Miles had a great old time throwing each other practice balls. "Let's have a high fly, Miles," Huddy would command.
The senior high school girls are disappointed. The "Amazons," one of their softball teams, went down to defeat at the hands of the junior high school "Eagles". Score: 8-12.
Another "adios" was said as Meg Rightmyer left sunny Guantanamo for the States. Marilyn Borup, Linda Thurston, Anita Sierra and Elsie held a surprise party for her at the Teen-Age Club Sunday.
A big "G" was awarded to members of the basketball team at the annual basketball banquet held Monday night. The cheerleaders, basketball team and their managers, Admiral Atkeson, members of the school board, Mr. Scarborough and Mr. Bashaw attended.
Marilyn Borup, Barbara Burke, Carol Currier, Claudette Fisher, Frances Bruner and Gail Walmsley were awarded cheerleading letters.
George Mac Michael, Pierce Lehmbeck, Ramon Alonso, Edgar Heimer, Norman Huddy, Rick Swindell, Carroll Robertson and Mike McKinley received large letters for their basketball playing. Bud Keaton, Charles Collenberger, Jimmy Miles and Donald Moore also received letters.
Mr. Bashaw presented Jim Stuchell and John Moon letters for their managing of the team.
Edgar Heimer received the trophy as the "Most Valuable Basketball Player" on the team as voted by the members of the B. A. A.
Pierce Lehmbeck received an award as "Athlete of the Year," an honor also invested by the B. A. A.


PIANO RECITAL

There will be a piano recital by members of the Junior Music Makers Club on Friday, 8 May at 8:00 p.m., in the patio of the Base School.
Any one interested is cordially invited to attend.

People forget wha t they don't want to remember


HE'S RIGHT

Mt. Clemens, Mich. (AFPS)Melvin Reno, arrested on a drunk and disorderly charge, had this explanation when officers asked him why he was driving' his car on a city sidewalk at 3 a.m.:
"I was in no condition to be on the street."





Saturday, 2 May SAN ANTONE
R. Cameron A. Whelan
plus
HAIR CUT-UPS (T)
CHINESE REDS ENTER WAR Sunday, 3 May
COME BACK LITTLE SHEBA B. Lancaster S. Booth
plus
COMMUNISM Monday, 4 May
JACK McCALL, DESPERADO G. Montgomery A. Stevens
plus
SOAPY OPERA and RUGGED
RANGER
SOVIET UNION AND ITS
PEOPLE
Tuesday, 5 May
TANGIER INCIDENT
G. Brent D. Patrick
plus
FOOL COVERAGE
PARLOR, BEDROOM AND
WHEELS
SELF PRESERVATION IN AN
ATOMIC ATTACK Wednesday, 6 May
NORTHWEST PASSAGE
S. Tracy R. Young
plus
MILITARY PROGRESS
Thursday, 7 May
THE HITCH-HIKER
E. O'Brien F. Lovejoy
plus
SNAPPY SNAPSHOTS AND
CRUISE OF THE ZACA FOR WHICH WE STAND
Friday, 8 May
TREASURE OF THE GOLDEN CONDOR (T)
C. Wilde C. Smith
plus
ARMED FORCES SCREEN
REPORT

San Antone
Bad blod between a Texas cattleman and a lieutenant in the civil war sets off a desperate mission of vengeance through Mexico. This is further complicated by a private war between the female leads. Finally... but that would be telling.
Come Back Little Sheba
A college-bred man, being forced to marry because of a youthful escapade, becomes an alcoholic. He later becomes a member of the AA, goes back to drinking and tries to kill his wife in a confused and blind radge. Finally he is rehabilitated and he and his wife go on as before.
Jack McCall, Desperado
Because his sympathies are with the North, a southern-born soldier fights with the Union Army. He has considerable difficulty keeping out of trouble with southern sympathizers. A girl saves his life and he finally proves himself innocent of alleged crimes.
Tangier Incident
Three atomic scientists plan to meet in Tangiers, pool their secrets and then sell the results to the communists, A U. S. secret agent poses as a black market operator in order to prevent them from carrying out their plans.
Northwest Passage
This is the tale of the Roger's Rangers, a hardy band of Indian fighters, who set out to wipe out an Indian village whose inhabitants have been making devestating raid on New England villages. Their mission is accomplished but only after losing many men. They return heroes.
The Hitch-Hicker.
Two men on vacation give a murderer a ride and are at his mercy for eight days. The police finally catch up with them to save their lives and their sanity.
Treasure of the Golden Condor
A Marquis becomes the guardian of a young man who-actually is the rightful heir to his title and fortune. The young man learns of a treasure in Guatemala which he later locates with the aid of an old friend and his daughter. With his new-found fortune he returns to France to obtain what is rightitlly his.


W V


Saturday, 2 May 1958


Page Five


THE INDIAN






Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 3823-E


q.


THE INDIAN


S.


Saturday, 2 May 1953


0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News
0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0845 Jack Kirkwood 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 This I Believe 1100 Startime 1130 Hot Off The Record Press 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News

Saturday
0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1045 You And The World 1100 Behind The Story 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Music For You 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Sports Answer Man 1745 Personal Album 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News
1830 Bing Crosby
1900 Hollywood Star Playhouse 1930 Ozzie and Harriet 1955 Solitary Singer 2000 Life With Luigi 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Fibber McGee & Molly 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off

Sunday
0800 Nocturnelle 0815 News 0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Behind The Story 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 Broadways' My Beat 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Music For You 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 Personal Album 1815 News
1830 Charlie McCarthy 1900 Jeck Benny 1930 Martin and Lewis 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Big Time 2100 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2155 News


Father: "Are there half fares for children?"
Conductor: "Yes, under fourteen."
Father: "That's all right. I've only five."

"Why do you want to quit? Are your wages too low?"
"The wages are all right, but I'm afraid I'm doing a horse out of a job."

"Have you any good after-shave lotion ?"
"Yes. Here's a number that drives the girls crazy. It smells like money."


1230 Hillbilly Jamboree 1330 At Ease 1400 Musical Matinee 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1700 Story Teller Time 1745 Jack Smith 1800 From The Pressbox 1815 News
1900 Requestfully Yours 1955 Solitary Singer 2055 Knox Manning-Time Out 2155 News 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off


2200 One Night Stand 2230 Musicland USA 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off

Monday
0830 Carolina Cotton Calls 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Club 15 1830 Calvacade of America 1930 Groucho Marx 2000 America Calling 2030 Big Town 2100 Piano Playhouse 2130 Great Gildersleeve 2200 Symphonies For Youth

Tuesday
0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0830 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Play Boys 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 From The Bookshelf 1930 Dragnet 2000 Vaughn Monroe 2030 Suspense
2100 Mr. and Mrs. North 2130 People Are Funny 2200 American Music Hall

Wednesday 0830 Carolina Cotton Calls 1045 Terrea Lea 1730 Club 15 1830 Secret Mission 1930 Arthur Godfrey 2000 Al Goodman 2030 December Bride 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2155 News 2200 Howard Barolow Presents
Thursday
0830 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Playboys
1830 Douglas Of The World 1930 The Greatest Story 2000 Choraliers 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America

Friday
0830 Carolina Cotton Calls 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Club 15 1830 Invitation To Learning 1930 Twenty Questions 2000 Two Thousand Plus 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Syncopation Piece 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall


WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Regular Programs- Monday Through Friday


"Yes, sir," said the company windbag, "There I was marooned on a desert island, with no food or water, but fortunately I had an insurance policy with me that had enough provisions in it to last until I was rescued."

Manicurist: "Do you file your own nails ?"
YN3: "No, I just throw them away after I cut them."

A young lady shrieked at an SP at Fifth and Broadway: "Stop that sailor! He tried to kiss me."
SP: "Take it easy, miss. There'll be another one along in a minute."


SUNNY BREAK


NAVY RELIEF FUND
DRIVE GETS UNDERWAY
4 MAY; $4,000.00
ALLOCATED

The annual Navy Relief Society fund raising drive will get underway 4 May and continue through 6 June. This period commemorates the Navy-Marine air battles of the Coral Sea and Midway.
Society funds are used to assist Navy and Marine Corps personnel, their dependents and dependents of deceased personnel.
Locally, society funds are mainly derived from the proceeds of the annual Guantanamo Bay Charity Carnival. Official tabulations reveal that the carnival, held early in February, netted a total of $23,000 for charities. Of this total, $4,000.00 has been allocated to the Navy Relief Society, National Headquarters.
No further plans for deriving funds locally have been announced as yet.
On a National level during 1952, financial assistance was provided by the society as follows:
No. of cases Amount Outright grants
and conversion
to grants .... 5,691 $ 357,633.00 Loans-------50,464 3,127,526.00
These figures are some 15 per cent higher than for 1951, reflecting the increased demands for society help.
In addition to financial cases, there were 83,297 "service" cases, involving problems of delay in allotments, aid in transportation, housing, arrangements for medical care and advice with all manners of personal and family situations. These service cases, while necessitating no monetary outlay, are nonetheless time consuming and impose additional responsibilities upon the society's staffs.
The society has 46 auxiliaries and 48 branches located at the naval district headquarters and at the larger Navy and Marine Corps stations and bases throughout the world. Through these auxiliaries and branches prompt relief is provided to personnel and their families when needed. Layettes for new babies are furnished as need develops and thrift shops are operated at the larger activities, such as Guantanamo Bay, where articles of clothing and other essentials may be purchased at rock-bottom prices.
The society employs 32 Navy Relief visiting nurses who work among the families at the principal Navy and Marine Corps centers. It also employs 21 professional social workers in the main auxiliaries who are qualified to assist with personal as well as financial problems. Overhead, however, is kept at a minimum through utilization of some 2,000 volunteer wives of naval personnel.
Continued hostilities in Korea and related incidents of service impose ever-increasing demands upon the society for aid. In 1952, financial assistance exceeded any year since the peak year of World War II.


TV starlet Rosemary Colligan takes time out from rehearsal to soak up a little sun outside the NBC studio in Hollywood. Lucky break for us, working clothes and all.

LITTLE THEATRE NOTES
By Jerry Lewis
After a week of sitting on the sidelines during rehearsals, watching the jolly progress which is taking place, I can assure you it's going to be all they say it is! Naturally, I'm speaking of that new production by the group, entitled, "Strange Bedfellows." There have been inumerable laughs during rehearsals alone, a preview of what's to come on opening night.
This little gem is guaranteed to keep 'em rolling, with not a single dull moment. You'll be getting much more than your money's worth when you see this next play at Marina Point.
Set aside one night during the second or third week of May and make it a point to get up to the "Point" for two hours of hilarious entertainment! Over-rating it? Not by a long shot! But there's only one way to tell. . . see it yourself!
The plot evolves around the trials and tribulations of a stubborn, (and might I add, very attractive) girl named Clarissa fighting tooth and nail for Women Suffrage.
Her subsequent campaign becomes a complicated mess of human comedy.
Joe Knepper building a magnificent stage set. Bob Koppit and Anita Yates, co-directors, doing a great job of readying it for you! A beautifully fitted cast living their parts like they meant it! Much time and work going into it. . ... the rest of it is entirely up to you!
Progress is nearing its peak and holds the promise of a big opener. It's the legitimate stage brought to all hands of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, don't turn it away.
From all appearances, it's going to be a typical SRO (standing room only) audience week, so listen for the word as to when and where the ducats can be purchased! WGBY and The Indian will pass the word very shortly. How about two right down front? All hands are cordially invited. Bring friends, relatives and guests but be sure to be there yourself to see "Strange Bedfellows," a presentation by the Little Theatre organization atop Marina Point.

Instructor: "Fifty percent of the people down there thought we were going to be killed during that tailspin."
Aviation student: Yes, sir. And 50 per cent of the people up here thought so, too.
* * *
Wife (to husband reading) "I want to do some shopping today if the weather permits. What does the paper forecast say?"
Husband: "Rain, hail, sleet, snow, thunder, lightning, and fierce winds."




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#1 QAe Vol. V, No. 1 U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 2 May 1953 NAVAL HOSPITAL SEEKS BLOOD DONORS; CLINICAL LABORATORY ACCEPTING CALLS Captain J. W. Kimbrough (MC), USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Hospital, has sent out a call for volunteer blood donors. "Volunteer blood donors are needed for blood transfusions at our Naval Hospital," states Captain Kimbrough. "Last year over 100 blood transfusions were given. This blood was donated by personnel from the Naval Base." Due to transfers of personnel, the Blood Donor List is urgently in need of new donors who can be MIDSHIPMAN CRUISE called upon in an emergency. AnyTO ARRIVE 28 JULY one interested in assisting this vital service should call the ClinicUSE OF RECREATIONAL al Laboratory (8-659) for an appointment for an examination and blood tests. All types of blood are in demand. After visiting eight ports in the However, type "0" Negative is Caribbean and on the East Coast especially desired since it can be of South and Central America, given to persons with any other Midshipman Cruise ABLE, consisttype blood. Rare blood types ining of nearly thirty ships, will arclude "AB" and "B" negative. nyc at Guantanamo Bay Tuesday The actual transfusion takes but morning, 28 July. The Task Group from 20 to 25 minutes. There is will leave Guantanamo 1 August. little if any pain felt and the donor Departing from Norfolk, Virgifeels no ill effects. All blood is nia 8 June, the cruise will include replaced by the donors body withthe battleships Missouri and Wisin 72 hours. cousin, the heavy cruisers Macon Every quarter or so, states Coinand Albany, the aircraft carrier mander V. W. H. Campbell (MC), Saipan, 18 destroyer-type vessels, USN, it becomes necessary due to two high speed transports, four transfers of personnel to renew Fleet oilers and one stores ship. the Hospital's Blood Donor List. According to the tentative operThis is what the Hospital is now sting schedule, it is expected that attempting. The actual typing of blood takes but a minute or two alor nearlyg aleshipsrillnbeni and consist merely of a pin prick nportwrn heanoon and in one of the donor's fingers. Upon nihst an emergency the donor will be year during a similar visit, teNaval Base made special ecarcalled upon to volunteer blood. tranemetfor the use of athletic All but a few persons are potenand recreational facilities adlervtial blood donors, says B. J. Gray, ices.rcoaeatteship-CruisHM3, Clinical Laboratory technier oeasdrquesd Cmancian. All but enemic and pregnant erFN aval Base to once again persons and persons with case hismake these facilities and services tories of malaria, pneumonia, rheua b matic fever and tuberculosis are Ivabee wanted as blood donors. Navyan ai pstexhange It has been the policy of the wilyxtnd stre horsEun e Naval Hospital to pay Naval personnel $25.00 for blood donations. pam. each evening. In addition, it ______________hasbeen requested that all softball and baseball diamonds, volley7,208 NAVY RESERVES ball and tennis courts be made ELIGIBLE FOR 2-WEEK available to ships of the Task ATLANTIC FLEET evngs CRUISES The use of certain other recreational facilities has been requested, including Kittery and WindWashington (AFPS) -Atlantic mill Beaches and Phillips Park. Fleet Reserve cruises will be availThe use of the Petty Officers' Club able to about 1,058 officers and 6,150 for Midshipmen has also been reenlisted men in "pay" and "nonquested. pay" units during the months of Use of the Officers' Club facilApril, May, and June, the Navy cities has been requested for genhas announced. eral use by ships' officers and for Personnel from the First, Third, special parties upon request. Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth and The Midshipmen will come from Ninth Naval Districts and the Potothe U. S. Naval Academy and the mac River Naval Command will be Naval Reserve Training Corps eligible to take the cruises. Units of 52 colleges and universiPay and allowances are authorties. It is also expected that 50 ized for two weeks only, and this West Point Cadets and one officer rule will apply on any cruises will arrive at Guantanamo Bay by which are longer than the regular air 27 July. The Cadets will embark two weeks duration. However, most in battleships and cruisers 28 July of the cruises will not be longer for gunnery exercises and the rethan two weeks, the Navy said. turn trip to Norfolk, Virginia. DESIGNED TO PUT THE HEX ON COMMUNIST MIGS -Designed to put the hex on Communist MIGs in Korea, the F9F-6 (Cougar) is reported to be in the 650 m.p.h. and above class. Two of the latest Gruman fighters are pictured during a formation take-off from Leeward Point Field, an auxiliary of the Naval Air Station. The planes are part of a squadron which is presently undee 'oing training exercises in the Guantanamo Bay area. COMMANDER WINSLOW NEW NAS EXEC; COMMANDER SHILLING TO DOVER, N. J. cDR W. G. Winsow CDR S. G. Shilling Commander Walter G. Winslow, USN, will relieve Commander Samuel G. Shilling, USN, as Executive Officer of the Naval Air Station 9 May, it was recently announced. Having joined the Navy in September 1935, Commander Winslow became a Naval Aviator in January 1939. Prior to his reporting to Guantanamo Bay in January 1951 as Operations Officer, he had served as Public Information Officer to Vice Admiral Price, Chief of Naval Air Training, Pensacola, Florida. Commander Shilling has received orders to report to the Naval Air Rocket Test Station, Lake Denmark, Dover, New Jersey, to assume duties as Executive Officer. Commissioned an Ensign upon his graduation from the Naval Academy in June 1936, Commander Shilling has been a Naval Aviator since April 1943. Prior to his reporting to Guantanamo Bay, he had served in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. CIVILIAN LEADERS RECLASSIFIED BY AREA CLASSIFICATION BOARD Two outstanding civilian employees of the Naval Base have recently been reclassified from grade GS-12 to grade GS-13 by the Area Wage and Classification Office, Jacksonville, Florida. The two are: Mr. H. P. McNeal, Industrial Relations Officer, and Mr. J. E. Roembke, Special Assistant to the Naval Station Public Works Officer. Responsible for the activities of Naval Base employees, Mr. McNeal had served in his former grade since the time of his reporting to Guantanamo Bay nearly six years ago. Prior to his assuming his position at the Naval Base, he had served in a simular capacity at Key West, Florida, as a lieutenant commander in the U. S. Naval Reserve. Formerly designated Design Director, Mr. Roembke has both been reclassified and promoted to his present position as Special Assistant to the Naval Station Public Works Officer and Acting Design Director. Mr. Roembke's reclassification was made in accordance with standard public works organization for naval stations. The entire Naval Station Public Works Department has been evolving under a reorganization program during the last year or so. Also a lieutenant commander in the U. S. Naval Reserve, Mr. Roembke has recently been transfered to the Civil Engineering Corps. He had been a line officer since May 1942. NEW NAVY EM RAINCOAT NOW AVAILABLE FOR $11.80 Washington (AFPS)-The Navy is now issuing the new-style enlisted men's blue raincoat. The garment is made of lightweight navy blue cotton cloth and is double breasted. It is now available for $11.80 at most continental clothing and small stores. It can be obtained in either small, large or regular, sizes 34 through 40. The present canvas-type raincoat will not be sold aft r July 1, but may be worn until 1955. MARINE CORPS TO HOLD NEXT EXAMINATIONS IN MAY-JUNE Marine corporals and sergeants can try for promotion in the next testing period with one and two months' less time in grade, respectively, than was required earlier this year, but staff and tech sergeants will need three extra months in grade to apply for exams. Disclosed in Memo 25, which was just sent to the field, it was also stated that the summer round of enlisted tests will be given to qualified Marines between May 25 and June 24. Headquarters is still working on the results of the January-February exams. It expects to make the first of some 25,000 advancements shortly. Under the new changes, male and female Regular and Reserve privates first class, corporals and sergeants must have 10 months in rank by Oct. 1 to qualify for testing. This reflects no change for E2s, but cuts a month for the latter two. Staff sergeants must have 15 months and techs 18 months in grade. In each case three months were tacked on to the former time requirements. Privates first class and corporals will compete for advancement on the basis of testing and composite scores, while sergeants, staff sergeants and tech sergeants have to pass technical tests and be considered by non-commissioned officer selection boards scheduled to meet in July. First general military subjects tests for promotion to E-5, E-6, and E-7 will be given May 25 and the second, June 22; first GMST tests for advancement to E-3 and E-4, May 27 and the second, June 24; and the first technical tests (primary forms) will be held May 26 and the second, June 23. Waivers granted for any previous testing period are not valid for the summer exams, Memo 25 pointed out. Beautiful new neighbor: "Little boy, I need a quart of milk from the store. Do you think you could go for me?" Little boy: "No, but I heard pop say he sure could." I e *?,

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Saturday, 2 May 1953 Editorial Office, U. S. Naval Base Special Services Department Fleet Recreation Center Saturday, 2 May 1953 U. S. NAVAL BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral C. L. C. Atkeson, Jr., USN Commander CAPT Robert H. Wilkinson Chief of Staff U. S. NAVAL STATION Guantanamo Bay, Cuba CAPT Orlin L. Livdahl Commanding Officer CAPT Jack M. Howell Executive Officer Editorial Staff Ensign J. M. McMahonStaff Advisor Al Henderson, JOSN __--Editor J. C. Dierks, SN --Sports Editor S. E. Cobbs, SN --Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by non-appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. This publication receives AFPS material. AFPS material appearing herein cannot be reprinted without written permission of Armed Forces Press Service, 841 Washington Street, New York 14, New York. ROBERT BERNERD ANDERSON Secretary of the Navy Robert Bernerd Anderson was born in Burleson, Tex., 43 years ago. He was graduated from Weatherford College in Texas in 1927, and received the degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of Texas in 1932. The new Navy secretary was elected to the Texas State Legislature in 1932 and was named Assistant Attorney General of Texas that same year. In 1933 Secretary Anderson returned to the University of Texas as a professor of law. The following year he was appointed State Tax Commissioner and Racing Commissioner. In 1936 he was made chairman and executive director of the State Unemployment Commission. Since 1941 he has been general manager for the W. T. Waggoner Estate; since 1943, vice president of the Associate Refineries, Inc. And now he holds the following offices: president, Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association; director, American Petroleum Institute; deputy chairman, board of directors, Federal Reserve Bank of Texas; president, Vernon Industrial Institute and director, Vernon Transit Co. Meanwhile civic responsibility has been placed on him too, in Vernon, Tex. where he, his wife and two sons reside when they aren't in Washington. Secretary Anderson is director of Texas Wesleyan College, president of Vernon Board of Education and a director of the Vernon Times Publishing Co. (AFPS) SIGN OF THE TIMES ._.ir x. .. FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITIES By CHAPLAIN ROMUALD J. WALSH Freedom does not mean that we can do what we want without concern or regard for the rights of others. True freedom demands that we be aware of and assume and fulfill our responsibilities. Then only can there be peace, progress, stability, order-the necessary atmosphere for true freedom. In our day we need to emphasize that freedom is endangered by those who shirk their responsibilities. The thief endangers our freedom to possess property; the man who respects his neighbor's right to property preserves that freedom. The speeder, the Jasper, endangers the freedom of everyone else on the highway, and in many cases endangers the very right to life which others possess; the same motorist, aware of his responsibilities when he gets behind the wheel, makes the road safe for others. The American who joins the Communist party is undermining all our constitutional guarantees of freedom. Any revolt from, or shirking of our responsibilities to God, to conscience, to positive law is a perversion of freedom, and must lead either to the slavery of sin, which deprives us of the liberty of the sons of God, or to anarchy which prevents others from exercising their God-given rights and from enjoying the blessings and benefits of social and political freedom. Freedom is everybody's business! Responsibilities, too, must be everybody's business if we are to preserve true freedom. The "freedom" which shirks responsibilities is a counterfeit, a sham, and, worse of all, a destroyer of true freedom. SEC. HANNAH LISTS AIMS, DUTY OF SERVICE IN I & E PROGRAM Washington (AFPS)-Dr. John A. Hannah, Assistant Secretary of Defense, told an Army Information and Education conference here that the basic society in America may not continue unless a few fundamental convictions are held by a majority of the people in the country. The uniformed Services have society's last chance to make good citizens of those individuals who have not been fully influenced in the home, school or church, Dr. Hannah said. "There is a basic obligation to do what we can in inculcating those who don't have these fundamental convictions ...with the idea that they are going to be better citizens after they get through," he opined. Necessary fundamental convictions were defined by the Assistant Secretary as basic differences between the American and Soviet communist philosophy: 1-We believe every individual is a dignified being-he is the basis on which our society and state have been developed. In the Soviet, the individual is an automaton, whose one purpose is to serve the state. 2.-We believe in a respect for the truth-agreements, written or verbal, are to be kept. The communist philosophy does not subscribe to that at all. 3-We believe in the sovereignty of the people, and in a government or society regulated by written laws. Communist society is governed by a dictator and his whim is supreme. 4-We believe in a good Godthat our life is worthwhile. In Soviet society God is denied-it is impossible to make life meaningful and worthwhile. "I believe this I&E program is of great importance. I thinkif it is well done, people in the Services will be more effective in whatever their job is in the Service," Dr. Hannah said." "I am certain if we do this jolb as well as it can be done we can send people out of the Armed Cervices equipped to be better., g h"ens of this democracy than ogm eight otherwise be." THE SAFESIDE A man's home is his castle (or death trap). Statistically speaking, the home is a booby-trap. In 1952 accidents in the home brought death to 28,000 Americans. In one household out of every five someone has suffered a disabling accident. Accidents now kill six times as many Americans in their late teens and twenties as heart disease, the next big killer. A parking space is where you leave your car to have the wheel base shortened and the trunk caved in. Sunday, 3 May 1953 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions: Saturday, 1730 1800; 1930 -2015. Confessions are not heard before Mass on Sunday. Protestant Services Sunday: 0930-Sunday School 1000-Adult Bible Class 1100-Divine Worship 1930-Christian Fellowship Wednesday: 1930-Mid-Week Prayer Thursday: 1930-Choir Rehearsal Chaplains at this Activity CDR M. 0. Stephenson, CHC, USN LT J. F. Agnew, CHC, USNR (Protestant) LCDR W. J. Spinney, CHC, USN (Catholic) WHAT THE G. I. BILL MEANS TO YOU Q. I meet all the eligibility requirements for training under the Korean GI Bill. However, I've recently gone back on active duty. May I take a correspondence course under the program, even though I'm now in uniform? A. No. Even though you meet all the eligibility requirements, the law requires that you be a civilian when you take your training. Veterans back on active duty may not train under the law. Q. Is there any time limit I have to meet, in starting training under the Korean GI Bill? I have just received my discharge. A. You must begin your training within two years of the date of your discharge. Veterans discharged before August 20, 1952, however, must begin by August 20, 1954. Q. I have quite a large number of bills I'm trying to pay. One of my creditors is getting impatient, and has threatened to take over my disability compensation, until his bill is paid off. Can he do this? A. No. Disability compensation payments-as well as all other VA benefit payments -are exempt from the claims of creditors, under the law. Q. Is a service-connected disability, incurred since Korea, enough in itself to entitle me to vocational training under Public Law 16? I have an honorable discharge. A. No. In addition, you must have a need for training to overcome the handicap of your disability. WREPOR NT WASHINGTON (AFPS)-GEN. Lemuel C. Shephe Corps, has authorized any marine pi Chinese Reds to receive preferential leave, pay and promotions. Marines who require no hospitaliza own next duty station and will be given whatever promotions they may have missed while being held prisoner. However, officers will have to pass a physical examination before promotion could be effected. The Selective Service System has been requested by the Defense Department to provide the Armed Forces with 266 physicians and 145 dentists during the month of June. All of the physicians will go to the Army while 100 dentists are to be assigned to Army and 45 t the Air Force. The Defense Department also asked Selective Service to cut down the number of physicians called for in May because of an unanticipated hike in the number of doctors on acitve duty that have extended their service. The Navy has named 1800 successful candidates to start their college education with the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps program. The gro. 'was selected from 30,000 hiyrdohool seniors rd Jr., Commandant of the Marine prisoners of war repatriated by the treatment in processing or records, tion will be allowed to choose their and graduates. They will be distributed to 52 leading colleges and universities around the nation. Six hundred alternates were also named. The successful candidates applied for the NROTC program last fall and took the Naval College Aptitude Tests last December. A Warrant Officer selection board will meet early in May, the Navy has announced. Considered for promotion will be those eligible for W-2, W-3 and W-4 pay grades. Maj. Gen. Bickford E. Sawyer, Army's Chief of Finance, has been elected president of the National Council of the Society of Military Accountants. The society is composed of commissioned and warrant officers of the Armed Forces who are members of the accounting and statistical professions. Approixmately 2700 Navy POls are slated for promotion to acting CPO next month. The 2700 were selected from 23,000 E-6s who took the service-wide exams, Feb. 3. Page Two THE INDIAN -t .l

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Saudyr-My15-HEI DAPg he ? Sports MARINES AND LABES SHUT OUT CORPSMEN WITH THREE HITS, 11-0 A nicely pitched three hitter by Ray Labes and a flock of Hospital errors enabled the Marine Leathernecks to shut out the Corpsmen by a score of 11-0 in Wednesday night's game under the lights at the Fleet Recreation Center. The game started out as a pitcher's duel, and although the Marines scored a run in the third, two in the sixth, and one in the seventh, they didn't really take command of the contest until the eighth when they batted all the way around and knocked in six runs o: only three hits. Labes struck out 14 men and walked 5, while Fauth, on the mound for the Corpsmen, allowed 8 hits and fanned 11 during the evening. Malkin of the Marines hit a home run in the 6th with one man on. The game: FIRST INNING MARINES -Ferris flied to center. Felkness was called out on strikes. Malkin popped to Bozarth. -No runs, no hits. HOSPITAL-Taylor took a third strike. Bozarth was called out on strikes. Blomberg also struck out. -No runs, no hits. SECOND INNING MARINES-Trabucco flied deep to center. Bradshaw grounded out, second to first. Diano singled over third into left field. Prowant pop ped to Doles.-No runs, one hit. HOSPITAL -Hart was thrown out on a ground ball, Felkness to Tresch. Doles was called out on strikes. Walters struck out.-No runs, no hits. THIRD INNING MARINES -Tresch grounded out, third to first. Taylor also threw out Labes. Ferris went down swinging.-No runs, no hits. HOSPITAL -Kraft got a base on balls. Webb struck out. Fauth laid down a bunt which was fumbled by Labes. Kraft going to sec ond. Labes then threw to second in an attempt to pick Kraft off base and he was run down, Felkness to Ferris. Taylor walked. Bozarth was called out on strikes.-No runs, no hits. FOURTH INNING MARINES-Felkness struck out. Malkin struck out. Trabucco walked and took second on an error by the catcher, scoring on another error by Kraft in center. Bradshaw grounded out, short to first.-One run, no hits. HOSPITAL -Blomberg singled to center. Hart forced Blomberg, Diano to Ferris. Doles popped to Ferris. Walters singled through the box. Kraft grounded out to Tresch unassisted.-No runs, two hits. FIFTH INNING MARINES -Diano got a base on balls. Prowant struck out. Diano was out stealing, Blomberg to Bozarth. Tresch flied deep to left. -No runs, no hits. HOSPITAL -Webb struck out. Fauth was also called out on strikes. Taylor was safe when Felkness booted his grounder. Bozarth popped to the pitcher.-No runs, no hits. SIXTH INNING MARINES-Labes was hit by pitched ball. Ferris flied to Kraft in center. Felkness was safe on a fielder's choice, Labes being forced at second. Malkin hit a home run over the left field fence, scoring Felkness ahead of him. Trabucco struck out.-Two runs, one hit. HOSPITAL-Blomberg was called out on strikes. Hart popped to Diano. Doles grounded out, short to first.-No runs, no hits. SEVENTH INNING MARINES -Bradshaw went down swinging. Diano singled to left center and then stole second. Prowant was safe on an error by Taylor, Diano going to third. Tresch flied to center, Diano tagging up and scoring after the catch. Bozarth threw out Labes. -One run, one hit. HOSPITAL -Walters led off with a single to center. Kraft walked. Corradetti batted for Webb and struck out on three pitches. Fauth flied to left. Taylor forced Kraft, "Don't let me stay here all day, do something"-featherweight Dave Gallrado, Los Angeles, lands on the ropes in the third round in Wash., D. C. recently, as Percy Bassett, Philadelphia, stands back wondering what to do next. Gallardo's foot caught in Bassett's trunks as he toppled backwards on the rope and stayed precariously suspended for a split second. He was helped back by the referee, then went on to win the 10-rounder by a unanimous decision. Knuckling under for the big one, as George W. Smith, SN, U.S. Navy waits his turn, is 80-year-old "Pop" Maynard. The occasion was the annual Marble tournament at Tinsley Greens, Sussex, England where the British All-Star Team scuttled a U.S. Navy team from CINCNELM. Seaman Smith saved face for the Navy boys, however, by defeating "Pop" Maynard, British champion. Diano to Ferris to retire the side. -No runs, one hit. EIGHTH INNING MARINES-Ferris was safe at first when Bozarth bobbled his ground ball. Ferris stole second. Felkness singled to left, Ferris pulling up at third. Malkin struck out. Trabucco singled to left, and Ferris and Felkness came in to score when the ball got away from Walters. Bradshaw doubled off the center field wall, scoring Trabucco. Diano was safe on Doles' error but was picked off at first, Fauth to Hart. Prowant hit a grounder and was safe when Hart dropped the throw at first. Prowant went down to second for a stolen base. Tresch was safe on another error by Hart, and then he and Prowant worked a double steal, Prowant scoring. Labes singled to left, bringing in Tresch. Ferris was called out on strikes.-Six runs, three hits. HOSPITAL -Bozarth grounded out, short to first. Blomberg struck out. Hart got a base on balls. Doles flied to Prowant.-No runs, no hits. NINTH INNING MARINES -Felkness took a third strike. Malkin was thrown out on a grounder, short to first. Trabucco and Bradshaw hit successive doubles, Trabucco scoring on Bradshaw's hit. Riley was hit by a pitched ball. Prowant struck out. -One run, two hits. HOSPITAL -Walters walked. Kraft went down swinging. Maddix walked. Fauth popped to short. Taylor struck out.-No runs, no hits. AMERICAN LEAGUE SCHEDULE FOR 2 TO 8 MAY Saturday, 2 May New York at Chicago Washington at St. Louis Philadelphia at Detroit Boston at Cleveland Sunday, 3 May Philadelphia (2) at Chicago Boston (2) at St. Louis New York at Detroit Washington (2) at Cleveland Monday, 4 May Boston at St. Louis (Night Game) New York at Detroit Tuesday, 5 May Boston at Chicago (Night Game) Philadelphia at St. Louis (Night Game) Washington at Detroit New York at Cleveland (Night Game) Wednesday, 6 May Boston at Chicago Philadelphia at St. Louis (Night Game) Washington at Detroit Thursday, 7 May No Games Scheduled This Date Friday, 8 May Detroit at Chicago (Night Game) Cleveland at St. Louis (Night Game) Washington at Philadelphia (Night Game) New York at Bostoin (Night Game) SPORTS PERSONALITY One of the fixtures in the outfield pastures for the VU-10 Mallards for the past two years is their hard slugging center fielder, Sam Mikel. Starting his third season with the Mallards, the 24 year old Mikel was one of the top men in the circuit at the plate in 1951 and 1952. In his first year in the Guantanamo League Sam kept his hitting clothes on all year, pounding the horsehide for a stellar .386 average and winding up the season with 16 homers, tops in the league. The following year opposing pitchers concentrated on the 5' 8/2" 160 lb. slugger, and as a result his average and homer output dropped somewhat, but Sam still managed to rap out a hefty .365, which put him up among the circuit's top hitters. Mikel played ball in the St. Louis Cardinal system before joining the Navy, first with the Class D Hamilton, Ontario nine in Canada, and then with the Class C Chanute, Kansas spuad. He was about to go to Duluth, Minnesota when he entered the service. Unfortunately for the Mallards, Mikel's tour of duty in Guantanamo Bay will be over in about two weeks, and while they will sorely miss his big bat, the Norfolk Flyers, who have next call on his services, will probably be all too glad to get it. KIDS' CONTEST LAND DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 Snappers Reynolds, R. C. -----------12 oz. Age Group 5 thru 7 Snappers Moales, Reggie -----------12 oz. Age Group 8 thru 9 Snappers Carothers, Linda --------10 oz. Age Group 10 thru 11 Snappers Howell, Johnny 1lb. 8 oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Snappers Gewertz, R. M.8-----------oz. No entries in the following fish: Barracuda Grouper Mackerel (King) Jacks Snook Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common) BOAT DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 No Entries. Age Group 5 thru 7 Snappers Puckett, Pam Jo 1lb. 8 oz. Age Group 8 thru 9 Snappers Price, R. V., Jr. __ 2 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 10 thru 11 Jacks Kler, Clara S._-----------8 oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Snappers Hill, J. D. 9 oz. Snook Hill, June-1---------1 lb. No entries in the following fish: Barracuda Grouper Mackerel (King) Tarpon Wahoo Mackerel (Spanish & Common SPECIAL DIVISION Age Group 1 thru 4 Croakers Jogan, Karen ------------12 oz. Age Group 5 thru 7 Croakers Puckett, Puck1 lb. 8 oz. Parrot Fish Gennaria, Terry L. __ 1 lb. 8 oz. Age Group 8 thru 9 No Entries. Age Group 10 thru 11 Bonefish Howell, Johnny---------8 oz. Age Group 12 thru 15 Bonefish Howell, Dorothy----------8 oz. Carroll, D. 8 oz. Croakers Hill, J. D.1----------1 lb. 8 oz. No entries in the following fish: Albacore Bonito Dolphin Hogfish Lady fish Marlin Pompano Sailfish Shark Triggerfish Tuna This type of fish not listed in contest: Gar Carroll, D. Age 12 _1 lb. Calamaras, D. Age 8-_____8 oz. Saturday, 2 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Three

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THE INDIAN 12 ERRORS HELP MALLARDS TOP NSD 11-4 Scoring in all but three innings and aided immeasurably by 12 NSD errors, the VU-10 Mallards battled the Suppliers to an 11-4 victory Tuesday night. King started on the mound for the Suppliers. while Huber did likewise for VU10, and the Mallards, firm believers in giving their hurler something to work with, jumped off to an early lead, chalking up three runs in the first inning. Kubic walked, and stole second after Long struck out. Rea was then safe on an error by second baseman Vernneau, Kubic scoring on the play, and after Loggins had grounded out, short to first, Annette lined a two bagger down the left field foul line to score Rea. Annette came in to score a minute later on a bad throw by Vernneau who was attempting to throw out Collins on a ground ball. The Mallards racked up two more runs in the third frame when, after two were out, Rea got a base or balls. Loggins then stepped up and lashed a single through the box into center field, and when Milnekel cut off the throw from the outfield to make a play on Loggins coming into second, the ball got away and Rea came in to score. Loggins kept right, on going and tallied on close play when Tobin momentarily bobbled the peg. NSD's first two runs also came in the third when Leddick, now playing second was hit on the hand by a pitched ball and moved down to second when King was safe on an error. Toomey then singled to right, but Leddick, trying for the plate was thrown out on a play from right fielder Collins to catcher Rea. Snyder and Tobin then hit consecutive singles, but Drew was thrown out, second to first to end the rally. VU-10 scored again in the 4th and NSD in the 5th on a walk to Toomey, a long triple by Snyder, and a ground ball which enabled Snyder to come across the plate. The Mallards led at this point 6-4 and a 7th inning rally enabled them to put the game away as they worked King for three runs on three hits and three errors. Kubic singled to left and went to second on an error by Leddick. After Rea had taken a third strike Loggins was safe on another error, putting runners on first and second with one away. Annette then singled, loading the bases, and a wild pitch by Long scored Kubic but the side was retired when Annette tried to come in on Myer's single to center and was thrown out, Milnikel to Tobin. The Mallards picked up a run in the 8th and another in the 9th while Myer was holding the Suppliers scoreless, and VU-10 took the game, 11-4. Hubber was the winning pitcher, giving up six hits, while King was the loser, allowing 10 safeties. Most men wouldn't mind their wives having the last word if they wouldn't keep repeating it. SPORTS QUIZ Questions 1. In which American League park were the most home runs hit in 1952 ? 2. What college basketball player set a new scoring record i the last three minutes of the 1952 season? Answers *531na jo ;uoaD fa Q Xq los 'sluiod 988'I jo 1rum .asa&-aatGl 2urlsoxa usto op; a;;q of ;uiod -CIV sBsISBY 'SHOiaIIOAo'ISXD uwltlS sKltg sBtoJlaf G 1 NOT LISTED IN FISHING CONTEST RESULTS -It was a game fight, but Jane D. Hill, thirteen-year-old daughter of Colonel and Mrs. John B. Hill of the Marine Barracks, landed her somewhat unorthodox catch in a style befitting any old-time angler. While fishing off Marine Site ONE recently, Jane felt a tug on her line. Like seasoned fishermen the world over, she played her catch and then swiftly pulled it ashore. The catch: a wallet belonging to Seaman John J. Ivory of the U. S. S. Furse (DDR 882). The wallet, since returned to its owner, contained identification papers and a birth certificate. FISHING LOCKER OFFERS BEST ASSISTANCE, EQUIPMENT TO ANGLERS For the past five months the Recreation Department has been blessed by the services of a Cuban fishing expert named Fermin Pavila. The fact that he is an expert an in particular an authority on fishing in these waters can be at tested to by the numerous anglers he has advised and assisted during his stay down here. Mr. Pavila has had a great deal of experience in Caribbean waters having been associated with commercial fishing along with his father in both Caimanera and Santiago for all of twenty years. In the event of any arguments or discussion concerning fish or fishing techniques in the Bay it might be well to keep in mind that Mr. Pavila will be available at the Sailboat Locker for the purpose of settling all such disputes before they reach the bloodshed stage. Mr. Pavila is also available to accompany, free of charge, large fishing groups operating in nearby waters. Arrangements may be made by contacting the Special Service Officer. Fishermen are reminded that all equipment, including poles, light and heavy tackel, etc. is available for personnel in the area, but for those of you who feel that you, personnally, always have your best luck with your own personal gear, LT C. C. Puckett, Navy Exchange Officer wishes to remind you that the finest possible fishing equipment can be easily obtained at astonishingly low prices at the Navy Exchange Sport Shop on Sherman Ave. (friendly, courteous service.) Mr. Pavila, in order to help out those who need it, has consented to offer some helpful tips on fish and techniques in these waters, and in order that everyone may benefit from this advice, will be run weekly in The Indian under the heading: "Fermin Pavila Sez". NATIONAL LEAGUE SCHEDULE 2 TO 8 MAY Saturday, 2 May Cincinnati at Pittsburgh Chicago at Brooklyn St. Louis at New York Milwaukee at Philadelphia Sunday, 3 May St. Louis at Pittsburgh Milwaukee at Brooklyn Cincinnati (2) at New York Chicago (2) at Philadelphia Monday, 4 May St. Louis (Night) at Pittsburgh Milwaukee (Night) at Brooklyn Cincinnati at New York Chicago (Night) at Philadelphia Tuesday, 5 May St. Louis at Pittsburgh Milwaukee at Brooklyn Cincinnati at New York Chicago at Philadelphia Wednesday, 6 May Milwaukee (Night) at Pittsburg St. Louis (Night) at Brooklyn Chicago at New York Cincinnati (Night) at Philadelphia Thursday, 7 May Milwaukee at Pittsburgh St. Louis at Brooklyn Chicago at New York Cincinnati at Philadelphia Friday, 8 May Philadelphia (Night) at Brooklyn Pittsburgh t'5Jight) at New York Chicago 0 ht) at Milwaukee St. Loui *,fght) at Cincinnati BASEBALL SCHEDULE Saturday, May 2 Naval Station vs NSD VU-10 vs Hospital Sunday, May 3 NAS vs FTG Marine Barracks vs MCB-4 Monday, May 4 Naval Station vs Hospital Tuesday, May 5 FTG vs VU-10 Wednesday, May 6 Marine Barracks vs NSD Thursday, May 7 NAS vs MCB-4 TRAINERS FALL VICTIMS TO MCB-4, 10-1 Paced by a 4 hit pitching performance by Brooks, the MCB-4 Seabees outhit the FTG Trainers 10-1 in a contest at the Recreation Center diamond Monday night thereby continuing on the winning path that enable them to romp over the Hospital 21-3 in their previous game. MCB-4 started things off by pushing across a run in the second on a triple by Ziarnek and a single by Richardson, and picked up another in the fourth on an error, a stolen base, and a single by the pitcher Brooks. The Seabees continued to pull ahead in the 5th when Murray singled. Hansen was hit by a pitched ball, and Richardson lined a double to left center, scoring both men. The Trainers only run came in the 6th when Conway was safe on an error by Seabee first baseman Hansen. He was then thrown out trying to steal second by Murray, Seabee backstop, but Walak, the next man up was safe on an error, by Ziarnek. Schuleter then singled, driving in Walak, and after Collins had walked, Brooks struck out Perrone and got Gettle on a ground ball. Two more runs were chalked up for MCB-4 in the 7th on a double by Ziarnek, a triple by Hansen, and an error by left fielder Walak. The Seabees weren't through yet, though, and in the 8th after Adams had singled Grey stepped up and homered, driving in two runs and making the score 8-1. Murray was then safe on a error when Marshall let the ball get away from him at first, and Ziarnek, the next batter picked out a pitch to his liking and tagged it for another four bagger, scoring two more runs. Ziarnek was the big man at the plate for the Seabees, collecting four hits in five times at bat, including a single, double, triple and home run. Brooks was the winning pitcher going all the way for MCB-4, and allowing only four hits, while striking out 11 and walking 4. Settle was the loser, allowing 12 hits before relieved by Byrd -the 8th FISHING CONTEST REPORT SPECIAL DIVISION Bonefish Bolkcom, WW. ._ 4 lbs. Seeger, G. L.-3 lbs. Reeder, E. W., Mrs -_ 2 lb. 10 oz. Croakers Lowenhayen, N. A. -1 lb. 12 ozs. Arrant, J. E.1 lb. 8 ozs. Gralish, G. E. ----1 lb. 4 ozs. Shark Gennaria, R. L.__ 56 lbs. 8 ozs. Hardin, J._--------43 lb. 8 oz. Berke, L. W.-38 lb. Trigger Fish Dirkson, S.--------3 lb. 8 oz. Kamwick, C. S._1lb. 12 ozs. Hogfish Blount, J. M. --__ 1 lb. 12 ozs. Ladyfish Hoff, E. F._---------5 lbs. Puckett, C. C. ---3 lbs. 4 ozs. Mowery, J. W. --_1 lb. 4 ozs. Parrot Fish Horner, T. A._------_1 lb. No entries on the following fish: Albacore Bonito Dolphin Tuna Pompano Sailfish SPEAR FISHING Grouper Matson, J. _-_-_-_20 lb. 12 oz. Tucker, J. L. -_15 lbs. 8 ozs. Billings, H. R.14 lbs. Jacks Eyster, G. W. ---22 lbs. Allen, M. .--17 lbs. Mackerel (King and Wahoo) Ahlberg, T. P.-___ 7 lbs. Phillips, H. R.5 lb. 8 oz. Snappers Prejean, J. W.25 lbs. Roos, F. H. ---------13lbs. Eyster, G. W.9 lbs. Hogfish Foy, F. D._---------6 lb. 12 oz. Prejean, J. W. -----6 lbs. 2 ozs. Pompano Tucker, J. L.-5 lbs. Parrot Fish Sheppard, M. E. 23lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Franklin, E. M. 18 lbs. No entries in the following fish: Albacore Bonito Bonefish Croakers Mackerel (Spanish) Marlin Sailfish Trigger Fish Tuna Dolphin Snook LAND DIVISION Barracuda Cheney, W. M.20 lbs. 8 ozs. McNeil, D. A. -16 lb. Esquerdo, G.15lbs. Dupree, W. L.15 lbs. Mackerel (King) Lantzinheiser,2 lbs. 12 ozs. Snappers Reynolds, Laura 15 lb. 4 oz. Lowenhayen, N. A. -13lbs. Morris, H. F.12 lbs. 4 ozs. Grouper Gadoury, R. J.7 lbs. Bell, J. Jr. -6 lb. 8 oz. Gorecki, R.J.-2lbs. Jacks Perkins, F. G.19 lbs. Endicott, C. R.10 lbs. Adams, Mary8 lbs. Tarpon Smith, C. C.13 lb. No entries in the following fish: Snook Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Wahoo BOAT DIVISION Jacks Drake, R. J.21lbs. Hardin, J. ----------10 lbs. 1 oz. Swisher, C. L.10 lbs. Barracuda Rehkopf, L. D. 20 lb. 8 oz. Gennaria, R. L. 18 lbs. Lightfoot, L. H. 16 lbs. 8 ozs. Mackerel (King) Massingill, J. H. 9 lbs. Delaney, R. E.4 lb. Esquerdo, G.1 lbs. 12 ozs. Snappers Remaly, D. H.56 lbs. 8 ozs. Rightfoot, L. H. 14 lbs. 8 ozs. Berke, L. W.14 lb. Snook Hardin, J. 15 lb. 8 oz. Mowery, J. W. 14 lb. 8 oz. Colvin, W. --------13 lbs. 8 ozs. Tarpon Lightfoot, L. H. 58 lb. Garrison, R. L.36 lbs. Gennaria, R. L. 24 lbs. 8 ozs. Mackerel (Spanish and Common) Pass, J. S. ----------2 lbs. 8 ozs. No entries in the following fish: Wahoo Grouper "When we arrived in China," a lady, back from a world cruise, told her friends, "we went riding in one of those jinrikishas, and believe it or not, they have horses that look just like men!" Page Four Saturday, 2 May 1953

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Saturday, 2 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five BASKETBALL (AFPS)George Yardley, former Stanford U. star who led the Los Alamitos (Calif.) NAS Flyers to the finals of AAU basketball tourney and the championship of the All-Navy finals, has been named Southern California's Athlete of the Month for March by the Helms Athletic Foundation. Elmer Ripley, West Point head basketball coach for the past two years, has resigned to accept a coaching position with the Harlem Globe Trotters. A one-time professional star he also coached basketball at Yale, Notre Dame, Columbia and Georgetown. BASEBALL (AFPS) -Leading the Camp Lejeune sluggers is third baseman Don Brown with a .389 mark. The former Greensboro (Class C) infielder collected 18 hits in the first 13 games ...Ron Necciai, one of the Pittsburg Pirates rookie pitchers last year, has been discharged from the Army ...A U.S. Navy team in London has entered the Third Air Force Division League. The "Navy Yanks" are led by Pfc. Lee Tunison, USMC, who won 24 games in the Miss.Ohio Valley League in 1951 Ted Williams, recuperating aboard the hospital ship Haven off Korea, predicts the Yanks and Dodgers will repeat as pennant winners this year ...Army has drawn first blood in the 1953 baseball series with Navy. The Cadets scored two unearned runs in the late innings to hand the Middies their first defeat this year, 5-4 ...Ft. Slocum, N. Y., will engage the Olean Pony Leaguers, Yankee farm club, in a two game exhibition series later this month. SPORT SHORTS (APFS)-Middleweight contender Chico Vejar is slated to be inducted into the Army in the near future. The 23-yearold Stamford, Conn., boxer was granted a college deferment last summer. He was scheduled to fight Vince Martinez at Madison Square Garden, May 22 ...Posting a final score of 557 out of a possible 600, marine S/Sgt. Don L. Smith of Camp Lejeune, N. C., walked away with the individual rifle championship honors at the Southeastern Division Rifle and Pistol Competition held recently at Camp Lejeune. INTRA-COMMAND GOLF STANDINGS Team Points VU-10--------------------6 NavSta --------------------591/2 Hosp-Dent -----------------38 NAS-----------------------221/ FTG -----------------------17 NSD----------------------12 TRANSFERS INTO REGULAR MARINE CORPS -Colonel John B. Hill, Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, is pictured above administering the oath of office integrating Major Arthur A. Nelson, Jr., Base Provost Marshal, into the Regular Marine Corps. Commissioned a second lieutenant in the Reserves in March 1943, Major Nelson has been in the Corps since March 1942. LOS ALAMITOS FLYERS DEFEAT GREAT LAKES Great Lakes, Ill. (AFPS)-The Los Alamitos (Calif.) N.A.S. Flyers swept the All-Navy basketball finals, defeating the Great Lakes (Ill.) Bluejackets 82-79 in the second game of a best of three-game series. The Flyers won the first game, 81-61. Johnny Arndt, former Loyola (Los Angeles) flash, led the 1953 AAU runner-ups to victory with 21 points. His sensational shooting in the last five minutes broke up the tight contest and assured the Flyers the trip to the AllService finals at Offutt AFB, Neb. Carl McNulty, Purdue great and a member of the 1953 AFPS AllStars, topped the losers with 14 tallies. Los Alamitos, led by George Yardley's 38 points, crushed the Bluejackets in the first game, 8161. Harvey Fromme (Texas Christian) had 14 points for Great Lakes. The Lakers' advanced to the finals by defeating All-Eastern fleet winner DesLant, 82-67 and 88-63, in the Navy semi-finals at Newport, R.I. ~ENCR1O By Hugh Baird, J03, USN (AFPS Sports Writer) New York AFRS Sports Director Chief Al Spanjer, sporting a deep sun-tan after his recent Florida coverage of Major League baseball clubs, dropped in on us for a chat about players, coaches and club officials he interviewed during his escapade into the Everglades. At Orlando, Fla., spring home of the Washington Senators, Al now wears a steel-plate inside his cornered Floyd Baker and Bob cp. Porterfield between innings of a Strange thing about Bob is that Washington-Philadelphia scrap for he never played in organized ball a few words. until he went into the Army, where Baker is one of the better defenhe performed with a Berlin Army sive third basemen in the A. L., unit team. At 22 he was discharged but his ability at bat has never and now, at 29, he is one of the been sensational. In fact, during his Major League career he has Staying in shape is important," hit only one home run-and that the big Newport, Va., native excost the Chicago White Sox, $5,000. plained."While in Service, I espeItcially did a lot of running, because I4 tedmsoharte hte ruox-in the legs most of all should be kept '49 wanted more home runs-so i hp.Oc h esaei they moved their outfield fence in -at the cost of five G's. Next time shape, the rest is just a matter of at bat Baker walloped his homer Poerv over that same barrier-causing mentdefiely havgh gotha ce officials to reconsider and move the ofeturninglsucessuloo orfence back again. After all, what ganiedual.ngainces manl ho would the opposing power hitters should know.emaizedang do? Bob Porterfield, who has sufin condition. fered three broken jaws, a broken leg and a broken arm during his SN: "If you were a poker playpitching career, reports he's in as, what would you call a cheap "best shape ever" this season. The ante? hard-luck righthander was traded FN: "My mother's sister." by the Yanks to the Nats in '51 for Irv Noren and Fred Sanford. SeIn many cases, the chip on a merely beaned three years ago, he person'sgder is just a bark. TEEN-AGE COLUMN By Sugar Livdahl At two-thirty Tuesday afternoon most of the school turned out to see the Guantanamo Bay High School boys tangle with the high school team from Camanera in a tight ball game. Batteries for GTMO High were George Mac Michael, on the mound, and Mike McKinely, behind the plate. Mac Michael held the visiting team to three runs; GTMO High pulled in seven. Plenty of practice had gone into this game. Norman Huddy and Jimmy Miles had a great old time throwing each other practice balls. "Let's have a high fly, Miles," Huddy would command. The senior high school girls are disappointed. The "Amazons," one of their softball teams, went down to defeat at the hands of the junior high school "Eagles". Score: 8-12. Another "adios" was said as Meg Rightmyer left sunny Guantanamo for the States. Marilyn Borup, Linda Thurston, Anita Sierra and Elsie held a surprise party for her at the Teen-Age Club Sunday. A big "G" was awarded to members of the basketball team at the annual basketball banquet held Monday night. The cheerleaders, basketball team and their managers, Admiral Atkeson, members of the school board, Mr. Scarborough and Mr. Bashaw attended. Marilyn Borup, Barbara Burke, Carol Currier, Claudette Fisher, Frances Bruner and Gail Walmsley were awarded cheerleading letters. George Mac Michael, Pierce Lehmbeck, Ramon Alonso, Edgar Heimer, Norman Huddy, Rick Swindell, Carroll Robertson and Mike McKinley received large letters for their basketball playing. Bud Keaton, Charles Collenberger, Jimmy Miles and Donald Moore also received letters. Mr. Bashaw presented Jim Stuchell and John Moon letters for their managing of the team. Edgar Heimer received the trophy as the "Most Valuable Basketball Player" on the team as voted by the members of the B. A. A. Pierce Lehmbeck received an award as "Athlete of the Year," an honor also invested by the B. A. A. PIANO RECITAL There will be a piano recital by members of the Junior Music Makers Club on Friday, 8 May at 8:00 p.m., in the patio of the Base School. Any one interested is cordially invited to attend. People forget whet they don't want to remember HE'S RIGHT Mt. Clemens, Mich. (AFPS)Melvin Reno, arrested on a drunk and disorderly charge, had this explanation when officers asked him why he was driving his car on a city sidewalk at 3 a.m.: "I was in no condition to be on the street." Saturday, 2 May SAN ANTONE R. Cameron A. Whelan plus HAIR CUT-UPS (T) CHINESE REDS ENTER WAR Sunday, 3 May COME BACK LITTLE SHEBA B. Lancaster S. Booth plus COMMUNISM Monday, 4 May JACK McCALL, DESPERADO G. Montgomery A. Stevens plus SOAPY OPERA and RUGGED RANGER SOVIET UNION AND ITS PEOPLE Tuesday, 5 May TANGIER INCIDENT G. Brent D. Patrick plus FOOL COVERAGE PARLOR, BEDROOM AND WHEELS SELF PRESERVATION IN AN ATOMIC ATTACK Wednesday, 6 May NORTHWEST PASSAGE S. Tracy R. Young plus MILITARY PROGRESS Thursday, 7 May THE HITCH-HIKER E. O'Brien F. Lovejoy plus SNAPPY SNAPSHOTS AND CRUISE OF THE ZACA FOR WHICH WE STAND Friday, 8 May TREASURE OF THE GOLDEN CONDOR (T) C. Wilde C. Smith plus ARMED FORCES SCREEN REPORT San Antone Bad blod between a Texas cattleman and a lieutenant in the civil war sets off a desperate mission of vengeance through Mexico. This is further complicated by a private war between the female leads. Finally .but that would be telling. Come Back Little Sheba A college-bred man, being forced to marry because of a youthful escapade, becomes an alcoholic. He later becomes a member of the AA, goes back to drinking and tries to kill his wife in a confused and blind radge. Finally he is rehabilitated and he and his wife go on as before. Jack McCall, Desperado Because his sympathies are with the North, a southern-born soldier fights with the Union Army. He has considerable difficulty keeping out of trouble with southern sympathizers. A girl saves his life and he finally proves himself innocent of alleged crimes. Tangier Incident Three atomic scientists plan to meet in Tangiers, pool their secrets and then sell the results to the communists, A U. S. secret agent poses as a black market operator in order to prevent them from carrying out their plans. Northwest Passage This is the tale of the Roger's Rangers, a hardy band of Indian fighters, who set out to wipe out an Indian village whose inhabitants have been making devestating raid on New England villages. Their mission is accomplished but only after losing many men. They return heroes. The Hitch-Hicker. Two men on vacation give a murderer a ride and are at his mercy for eight days. The police finally catch up with them to save their lives and their sanity. Treasure of the Golden Condor A Marquis becomes the guardian of a young man who actually is the rightful heir to his title and fortune. The young man learns of a treasure in Guatemala which he later locates with the aid of an old friend and his daughter. With his new-found fortune he returns to France to obtain what is rights'lly his. *# Saturday, 2 May 1953 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Navy-10NDPPO-Gtmo. 3823-E THE INDIAN S. Saturday, 2 May 1953 0700 Morning Caravan 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Lucky U Ranch 0825 101 Ranch Boys 0845 Jack Kirkwood 0900 House of Music 1000 Curt Massey 1015 Ronnie Kemper 1030 Bob Hope 1040 This I Believe 1100 Startime 1130 Hot Off The Record Press 1200 Way Back Home 1215 News Saturday 0700 Morning Caravan 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0715 News 0730 Morning Caravan 0800 Jewish Religious Program 0830 Space Patrol 0900 Gene Autry 0930 The Lone Ranger 1000 Tales of the Texas Ranger 1030 Let's Pretend 1045 You And The World 1100 Behind The Story 1115 You And The World 1130 Symphonette 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Saturday Swing Session 1400 Mr. President 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Music For You 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Sports Answer Man 1745 Personal Album 1800 From The Pressbox 1810 Smoke Signals 1815 News 1830 Bing Crosby 1900 Hollywood Star Playhouse 1930 Ozzie and Harriet 1955 Solitary Singer 2000 Life With Luigi 2030 Gordon MacRae Show 2055 Time Out 2100 Fibber McGee & Molly 2130 Grand Ole Opry 2155 News 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Sandman Show 2400 Sign Off Sunday 0800 Nocturnelle 0815 News 0830 Music by Mantovani 0900 Journey Into Song 1000 Catholic Religious Program 1030 Behind The Story 1045 You And The World 1100 Protestant Divine Service 1200 Sports Memory Book 1215 News 1230 Heard At Home 1300 Hollywood Bowl 1400 Broadways' My Beat 1430 Science Magazine 1445 Music For You 1500 Parade of Sports/AFRS 1730 Jubilee 1800 Personal Album 1815 News 1830 Charlie McCarthy 1900 Jeck Benny 1930 Martin and Lewis 2000 Phil Harris 2030 Big Time 2100 Hollywood Radio Theatre 2155 News Father: "Are there half fares for children?" Conductor: "Yes, under fourteen." Father: "That's all right. I've only five." "Why do you want to quit? Are your wages too low?" "The wages are all right, but I'm afraid I'm doing a horse out of a job." "Have you any good after-shave lotion?" "Yes. Here's a number that drives the girls crazy. It smells like money." 1230 1330 1400 1500 1700 1745 1800 1815 1900 1955 2055 2155 2230 2400 Hillbilly Jamboree At Ease Musical Matinee Parade of Sports/AFRS Story Teller Time Jack Smith From The Pressbox News Requestfully Yours Solitary Singer Knox Manning-Time Out News Sandman Show Sign Off 2200 One Night Stand 2230 Musicland USA 2300 Orchestras of the West 2400 Sign Off Monday 0830 Carolina Cotton Calls 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Club 15 1830 Calvacade of America 1930 Groucho Marx 2000 America Calling 2030 Big Town 2100 Piano Playhouse 2130 Great Gildersleeve 2200 Symphonies For Youth Tuesday 0705 Gtmo. Smoke Signals 0830 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Play Boys 1810 Smoke Signals 1830 From The Bookshelf 1930 Dragnet 2000 Vaughn Monroe 2030 Suspense 2100 Mr. and Mrs. North 2130 People Are Funny 2200 American Music Hall Wednesday 0830 Carolina Cotton Calls 1045 Terrea Lea 1730 Club 15 1830 Secret Mission 1930 Arthur Godfrey 2000 Al Goodman 2030 December Bride 2100 Night Beat 2130 Our Miss Brooks 2155 News 2200 Howard Barolow Presents Thursday 0830 Lina Romay 1045 Meredith Willson 1730 Playboys 1830 Douglas Of The World 1930 The Greatest Story 2000 Choraliers 2030 Father Knows Best 2100 Doris Day2130 Meet Millie 2200 Music From America Friday 0830 Carolina Cotton Calls 1045 Strike It Rich 1730 Club 15 1830 Invitation To Learning 1930 Twenty Questions 2000 Two Thousand Plus 2030 Meet Corliss Archer 2100 Syncopation Piece 2130 FBI In Peace and War 2200 Hollywood Music Hall WGBY'S PROGRAM SCHEDULE Regular Programs -Monday Through Friday "Yes, sir," said the company windbag, "There I was marooned on a desert island, with no food or water, but fortunately I had an insurance policy with me that had enough provisions in it to last until I was rescued." Manicurist: "Do you file your own nails?" YN3: "No, I just throw them away after I cut them." A young lady shrieked at an SP at Fifth and Broadway: "Stop that sailor! He tried to kiss me." SP: "Take it easy, miss. There'll be another one along in a minute." 4s N5'?. 5rM1E2t'NTA't C'MtJON COtBRlING A B.AT'S A 604P OH, -~, TEI E T .SITSccH ZES'T wo/wM swiN5 Ct-i K J !tseo EN f n AQEHE s r E --OMOSSEN---'~T tJ P/ SUNNY BREAK NAVY RELIEF FUND DRIVE GETS UNDERWAY 4 MAY; $4,000.00 ALLOCATED The annual Navy Relief Society fund raising drive will get underway 4 May and continue through 6 June. This period commemorates the Navy-Marine air battles of the Coral Sea and Midway. Society funds are used to assist Navy and Marine Corps personnel, their dependents and dependents of deceased personnel. Locally, society funds are mainly derived from the proceeds of the annual Guantanamo Bay Charity Carnival. Official tabulations reveal that the carnival, held early in February, netted a total of $23,000 for charities. Of this total, $4,000.00 has been allocated to the Navy Relief Society, National Headquarters. No further plans for deriving funds locally have been announced as yet. On a National level during 1952, financial assistance was provided by the society as follows: No. of cases Amount Outright grants and conversion to grants 5,691 $ 357,633.00 Loans50,464 3,127,526.00 These figures are some 15 per cent higher than for 1951, reflecting the increased demands for society help. In addition to financial cases, there were 83,297 "service" cases, involving problems of delay in allotments, aid in transportation, housing, arrangements for medical care and advice with all manners of personal and family situations. These service cases, while necessitating no monetary outlay, are nonetheless time consuming and impose additional responsibilities upon the society's staffs. The society has 46 auxiliaries and 48 branches located at the naval district headquarters and at the larger Navy and Marine Corps stations and bases throughout the world. Through these auxiliaries and branches prompt relief is provided to personnel and their families when needed. Layettes for new babies are furnished as need develops and thrift shops are operated at the larger activities, such as Guantanamo Bay, where articles of clothing and other essentials may be purchased at rock-bottom prices. The society employs 32 Navy Relief visiting nurses who work among the families at the principal Navy and Marine Corps centers. It also employs 21 professional social workers in the main auxiliaries who are qualified to assist with personal as well as financial problems. Overhead, however, is kept at a minimum through utilization of some 2,000 volunteer wives of naval personnel. Continued hostilities in Korea and related incidents of service impose ever-increasing demands upon the society for aid. In 1952, financial assistance exceeded any year since the peak year of World War II. HOT AIR TV starlet Rosemary Colligan takes time out from rehearsal to soak up a little sun outside the NBC studio in Hollywood. Lucky break for us, working clothes and all. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES By Jerry Lewis After a week of sitting on the sidelines during rehearsals, watching the jolly progress which is taking place, I can assure you it's going to be all they say it is! Naturally, I'm speaking of that new production by the group, entitled, "Strange Bedfellows." There have been inumerable laughs during rehearsals alone, a preview of what's to come on opening night. This little gem is guaranteed to keep 'em rolling, with not a single dull moment. You'll be getting much more than your money's worth when you see this next play at Marina Point. Set aside one night during the second or third week of May and make it a point to get up to the "Point" for two hours of hilarious entertainment! Over-rating it? Not by a long shot! But there's only one way to tell. ..see it yourself! The plot evolves around the trials and tribulations of a stubborn, (and might I add, very attractive) girl named Clarissa fighting tooth and nail for Women Suffrage. Her subsequent campaign becomes a complicated mess of human comedy. Joe Knepper building a magnificent stage set. Bob Koppit and Anita Yates, co-directors, doing a great job of readying it for you! A beautifully fitted cast living their parts like they meant it! Much time and work going into it. ...the rest of it is entirely up to you! Progress is nearing its peak and holds the promise of a big opener. It's the legitimate stage brought to all hands of Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, don't turn it away. From all appearances, it's going to be a typical SRO (standing room only) audience week, so listen for the word as to when and where the ducats can be purchased! WGBY and The Indian will pass the word very shortly. How about two right down front? All hands are cordially invited. Bring friends, relatives and guests but be sure to be there yourself to see "Strange Bedfellows," a presentation by the Little Theatre organization atop Marina Point. Instructor: "Fifty percent of the people down there thought we were going to be killed during that tailspin." Aviation student: Yes, sir. And 50 per cent of the people up here thought so, too. Wife (to husband reading) "I want to do some shopping today if the weather permits. What does the paper forecast say?" Husband: "Rain, hail, sleet, snow, thunder, lightning, and fierce winds."


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INGEST IEID EXOOT8Y6Q_XNO1Y9 INGEST_TIME 2015-10-27T21:44:19Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00239
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES