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Vol. V, No. 21 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 15 July 1950


MARINES "FROZEN" TO
PRESENT DUTY

According to a recent AlMarCor
received on 'this 'Base, all Marine personnel will "stay put". The directive states that orders that are now in process will be carried out but further transfers of Marines both ashore and afloat will not be
entertained in the near future.
SALT WATER SWIMMERS
IRRITATED BY ALGAE

A mild seige of skin infections
hit the Base last week-end when eleven cases .of dermatitis were reported' by the Naval Hospital as a result of exposure to toxic algae in the water at the Base salt
water beaches.
Potential sea-bathers were
warned that the presence of an unidentified algae, which appears on the local scene anually at about this time, makes it unsafe for persons to bathe in the ocean due to the possibility of generalized and v e r y discomforting dermatitis which occurs in many cases, particularly in the cases of persons Known to have sensitive skins.
It is expected that this condition
will prevail for a month or so.
Further notices will be published when inspections by the Base Medical Officer reveal the water
to be safe again.
SENATE CONFEREES
OK DRAFT EXTENSION
Washington (AFRS) - House
and Senate conferees recently agreed on a one-year extension of the present Draft law to July 9,
1951.
The compromise removes all
restrictions on all* the President's authority to call men into uniform as he sees necessary to keep the
armed forces at .desired 'strength.
The conferees also wrote in a
new provision to give the. President complete authority to call National Guard and reserve ,membrs into active service whenever
he thinks necessary.
The compromise now goes to the
House and then to the Senate. for
approval.


THREE CHANGE OF COMMANDS ARE DUE-TWO COMPLETED


When the Hodges docked last Tuesday morning four officers who were slated to become Commanding Officers, stepped ashore. In the routine way of the Navy and Marine Corps these changes of command were normal and part of the plan of carrying out the Navy Department's rotation of duty policy.
This week saw slated changes in CO's of three commands and change of command ceremonies in two. The Marine Barracks, Naval Station and Naval Air Station were the three commands to. be relieved, while the new CO's had taken up their duties at the Hospital and VU-10.
COL J. F. Hough, the new CO of Marine Site was born 1 August 1902 in Washington, D. C. where he attended the local schools before attending the University of Maryland from which he graduated in 1925. After graduation from Maryland he received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Corps and has served continuously from that time.
During his early years in the Marine Corps he played and coached football at Quantico, Parris Island and Philadelphia. During the period 1928 through 1932, the Colonel served aboard the battleships Florida and Arkansas.
After attending the Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, N. J., he was assigned duty with the Second Battalion of the Fleet Marine Force. In 1934, the Colonel was ordered to the Radio Material School at Anacostia for a course of instruction upon the completion of which he took up duties as regimental communications officer with the Fourth Marines in China. In 1937, he was in charge of the radio Station at the American Embassy in Peiping when the Japanese began the prelude. to World W~r II.
On the Colonel's return from overseas, he took up duties at Quantico until 1941. From 1941 until 1944. Colonel Hough was then assigned to the Second Marine Division and with the Defeuse Forces in American Samoa. Upon the com-


pletion of these duties in 1944 he was assigned to duty as the Chief of Staff of the San Diego Area.
Since the end of the war, the Colonel has served with the Fifth Amphibious Corps, Second Marine Division, Navy Department Board of Awards at Headquarters, Marine Corps, and in 1948, assumed duty as Commanding Officer of the Second Combat Service Group, Service Command, Camp Lejeune, N. C., from whence he comes to Gtmo.
His wife, the former Margaret Pitcher of Washington, D. C.; son, John Francis Hough, Jr.; and daughter, Harriet Elaine are presently residing at Marine Site 1A.
The new Commanding Officer for the Naval Station, CAPT W. K. Romoser, USN, is also an "oldtimer" in the service, having graduated from the Naval Academy with the Class of '26,
Captain Romoser's first duties were aboard the battleship Maryland, and then he saw duty on the Asiatic Station in destroyers from 1930 to 1933. After that came duty on the New York one of the first oil burners and a ship that saw service in World War I as well as World War II.
Destroyers then again for the Captain, this time on the Destroyer Squadron Staff and then to the Naval War College in 1938.
After the emergency was declared Captain Romoser again went to destroyers, this time as CO. of the Greer and Upshur. Still as CO of a "tin can" Captain Romoser put one of the first 2100-ton ships in commission in early '42 -the USS Radford.
The Radford under the command of Captain Romoser earned, the Presidential Unit Citation in helping rescue 444 survivors of the Helena after having gone through the Guadacanal campaign and the island hopping phase of the war.In 1944 Captain Romoser put in commission the Tactical Radar School and assumed additional duties-as CO of Naval Training Schools, Holly.wood, Florida. Back to Destroyers again in 1945 (Continued. on Page, Two) , ,


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Pare Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 15 July 1950


CHANGE OF COMMAND

9& V(Continued from Page One)
-this time ComDesRon Nine, taking the Squadron to the Western
Pacific. Then to duty on the Staff
Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., of Commander, 7th Fleet and later
Room 205- Phone 254 Naval Forces, Western Pacific.
A course of instruction at the
Saturday, 15 July 1950 National War College, a tour of
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE duty with BuPers and thence to
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Guantanamo.
Rear Admiral A. M. Bledsoe, USN Captain Romoser who is married
Commander
Allen Collier, JOS ----------------- Editor has one son, Bill, age 16 and one
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor daughter, Babs who is just old
THE INDIAN is published weekly, fin- enough to be included with the anced by appropriated funds, printed on teen-agers, the Captain likes to government equipment, for free distri- hunt and fish as well as play golf. bution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base,
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Captain L. E. French, USN, also Base Commander. arrived Tuesday in the Hodges but THE INDIAN is published in compliance at press time The Indian had not with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 been able to obtain further informa(Rev) 1945. tion beyond the fact that he was a THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press classmate of CAPT Romoser and Service material which may be reprinted
with the credit line: AFPS. that his last duty station was in BuPers at Washington, D. C.
The new Commanding Officer of
MARINE MUSINGS the Hospital, as well as Base Medical Officer is Captain D. 0. ZearThings at Marine Site have been baugh, MC, USN who reported to rather quiet during the past few ComNOB 11 July 1950. CAPT Zearweeks. baugh relieved CAPT L. L. Wilson,
Last Tuesday saw the arrival of MC, USN, who had been the Hosour new Commanding Officer, COL pital's CO since 3 June 1950 until Hough. The Colonel comes to us last Thursday, 13 July. from Camp Lejeune, where he was CAPT Zearbaugh entered the in command of the Second Combat service in 1925 and after having Service Group. Welcome aboard, served alternate cruises at sea and Colonel; may you have a pleasant Naval Hospitals started his war tour of duty here in Guantanamo service in Transport duty which Bay. Also on board the Hodges was was followed by duty as Division MAJ Arsenault who will assume Surgeon of the 3rd Marines, executhe duties of the Base Provost tive officer of Nola Hospital and Marshal. I suggest that all hands then the Command and Staff School, become acquainted with him - it Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va. might prove beneficial. The Hospital's new CO and Mrs.
CAPT Sullivan recently was de- Zearbaugh, and daughter Nancy tached from duty here and will at- are now. in Quarters "B" at the tend the Amphibious Warfare Naval Hospital. School in Quantico, Virginia. His LCDR R. J. Sutherlin took up duties as Guard Platoon Coin- his duties as CO of VU-10 last mander have been assumed by Cap- Saturday after an inspection of tain Pesely. personnel by Rear Admiral Bledsoe.
COL Lanigan was guest of honor LCDR Sutherlin comes to us at a recent party at the Marine from the NROTC Unit at Illinois Corps Exchange Restaurant. The Institute of Technology at Chiparty, given by members of the cago. He is a native of Coatesville, Staff NCO Club, proved to be a Indiana, and was graduated from great success, judging by the looks Purdue University in 1937 with a of everyone the next morning. Bachelor of Science degree in chemIn the world of sports - the ical engineering. He entered the Marine team has 'had a little hard Navy in November 1938 as an luck in one or two of their games aviation cadet, receiving his flight recently; but presently, they are training at Pensacola during 1938 back in their old form. Our team and 1939. His date of rank as LCDR might be in second place, but we is 15 March 1944. Commander Suthall know that it isn't second rate erlin was married in Pensacola in so standby Navy. March 1943 and has three chidlren.
PFC Chenette and SGT Dales, Mrs. Sutherlin and the children are who are at present "the lovers" of here with the skipper and are at 'Marine Site 2, 'are having a hard home at Paola Point. time staying away from Guantana*mo City. If it isn't liberty; it's There were three polar bears shore patrol. Who are the little sitting on an iceberg. women, fellows? "Now", said the father polar ;Swimmers -on the Site should bear, "I've got a tale to tell." b happy to know that there -has "I, too", said the mother polar :been a sun shade built at the swim- 'bear, "have a tale to tell." ming pool. All you *dark, hand- The little pola rbear looked up some men won't 'have to worry at 'his parents' and said: "My about becoming too tan now. tail's told."


-~ S


Sunday, 16 July 1950 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse
1 100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LT P. J. MARRON, USNR
(Catholic)
MARRIAGE IS BETTER
THAN COURTSHIP

Continuing the discussion under the general topic "Love and Marriage", Chaplain Faulk will speak Sunday at 1100 on the subject "Marriage Is Better Than Courtship". These subjects are of interest to not only the married persons but also those who may be contemplating marriage. The Chapel choir will provide special music for the service.
HOSPITAL NOTES
Heirport News: Theresa Denise Reynolds born 7 July to RMC and Mrs. L. W. Reynolds; Baby girl Roush born 13 July to ALC and Mrs. W. E. Roush.
CAPT D. 0. Zearbaugh, MC, USN arrived via the Hodges on Tuesday of this week and assumed command in ceremonies which were held in front of the Hospital Administration Buirding Thursday afternoon. CAPT Zearbaugh and family are heartily welcomed to Gtmo and we all hope they will enjoy their tour of duty in our midst.
Flimsies of transfer orders have been received transferring C. J. Paresi, HMC and R. L. Catts, HMC to ComSix and J_ H. Littlejohn, HMC to ComTwelve.
A. E. Hickerson, CS1 has departed for Stateside leave, and T. W. Little, HM2 has gone to Havana with his wife for a few days of sightseeing.
Two new nurses reported this week: ENS Mary F. Williams from Newport, R. I. and LT G. L. Mrofka from Long Beach, California. Welcome aboard, gals; we feel sure you will find this a mighty fine spot for duty.
TRICKY QUICKY
flonny is twice as old as 'Cedric. Donny's age, multiplied by itself and the result added 'to Cedric's age multipled by itself gives the result "245". How old is Donny?
Last Week's Solution:. The trains were the same distance from New York.


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 15 July 1950







Saturdav. 15 .Tl 90THE INDIAN Page Three


TRAGRP TRIVIALS
As The Indian goes to press it sees a few more new faces around the old Training Group Building. The head of the list is CAPT C. G. Christie, who arrived Tuesday on the Hodges as relief of CAPT K. S. Masterson. Welcome aboard Captain Christie and we hope that you enjoy your tour here. Returning from leave in the good old United States, we have M. W. Kypers, J. A. Smith, J. I. Davenport and H. Kirkpatrick. It's good to have you all back but it must have been hard to leave the States.
The shipriders have been having a field day again but it looks like darker days ahead. We know that the Training Group will carry on and continue to uphold it's reputation.
In the sports department things look bad, the boys just can't seem to get that winning streak that they have all been striving for, but then they have not given up hope.
This week, we are saying goodbye to four of our old and trusted shipmates. LT Higgins is leaving for TAD in S. .n Diego and then to his new duty station at Point Loma, San Diego, California. Also leaving us is Groves, RD1, Whetzel, RMSN. YNC S. F. Dodge left us last Monday for some wellearned leave and then to duty in San Diego, California. It sure looks like a lot of people want that West Coast duty, I wonder why.
TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
By Barbara Thomas
Last week I made my first trip to Santiago and enjoyed it very much with the exception of the roughness coining back. It wasn't quite as' pleasant as I would have liked.
I understand Al Havard is having a wonderful vacation at camp in Benson, Md. Glad he is having fun but it will be nice to welcome
him back to the Base.
Nancy Zearbaugh and Henry French have arrived but I haven't had the pleasure of meeting them yet. Welcome to you both.
Babs and Billy Romoser spent Tuesday in Gtmo and will be here again when the Hodges comes through on her return to New York. Hope to see you both then.
Ramona Sparks, Elsie Heimer, and I had the pleasure of attending a party given by CDR and Mrs. Marshall on Sunday afternoon for some of the midshipmen. All of us had a very nice time. Elsie attends school in Santiago but is spending the Summer with her parents here on the Base.
Skiddy Masterson writes that he is exercising stren'uously to grow the inch he* needs for entrance to 'the academy." Best of luck to him. ,Skiddyis 'greatly miIsed by all who ,'k n wi i i and he is sure to be we l liked 'Wh erever" '* is located.


O'ER THE TEA CUPS
By Betty Radcliffe
When the Gen. Hodges arrived this week there were quite a few passengers for Gtmo: There was CAPT and Mrs. L. E. French and CAPT D. 0. Zearbaugh. LT F. Young welcomed his wife and baby. Another arrival was Mrs. Mildred E. Grimmer from Groton, Conn. Mrs. Grimmer is the mother of CHPCLK L: W. Grimmer. Returning from leave were CDR and Mrs. S. H. Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Tausch and' Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Adair. Welcome to Gtmno. all you newcomers and welcome back you oldtimers. :'
Mrs. G. D. MacMichael and son, George left this week for about a month's vacation in New York. We will be looking forward to your return, Peg,
Out in Bargo Point there are seven couples who call themselves "The Screaming Meemies"; they have organized a bowling league and will bowl one night a week for nine nights at the end of which time the winning couple will get a trophy and the losing couple will have earned a booby prize. Sounds like fun doesn't it? Last week the teachers and interested mothers of the Kindergarten and Primary classes of Sunday School gave a Hanky shower in honor of Mrs. W. L. Foster and Mrs. W. G. Esders. The shower was held at the home of Mrs. S. R. Preston.
Mrs. J. H. Skinner has two very welcome guests in her home; her mother Mrs. Ray Kempler from Columbus, Ohio and Mrs. Skinner's sister, Mrs.;Elizabeth Denning from Portsmouth, Ohio. Mrs. Kemper and Mrs. Denning have been here about three weeks and will return to their homes next week. Send me a piece of the good old Buckeye soil, ladies ... that's my home State too.
Mr, and Mrs. Nat Robbins left this week after spending a delightful two weeks, with LT and Mrs. R. S. Burns. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins traveled to Havana where they will spend a few days before returning to their home in Miami.
So many comings and goings this week that I feel like the information booth at Grand Central Station.,,
See ya later.,

LIBRARY NOTES

Mike Shayne is back from a much needed vacation to face a wnew murder 'in Miami. Naturally, :hefinds himselff involved with a woman, :Saka' Morton -feature Writer'only she is the corpse. After r niing through skid-row, a few conflicts with-homicide, he ,discovers'f:who done it". This book is :BreVI Hotl.days latest--"This -Is


Girl

Scout

Notes
By Adeline Irwin
Well, our scouts are back in the news. Miss us? Sure hope so.
Seems as tho' many things have occured lately, one of which was the "Surprise Birthday Party" yours truly gave for her teenagers. This affair took place Wednesday 5, in Newtown, at the residence of Mrs. L. R. Smith, our Brownie Leader. All the girl scouts were invited and since no mother has called asking what her scout ate or how much, we guess there were no after affects, such as tummy-aches. Anyway, seems as tho' everybody had a bang-up time, leaving my girl a year older, and me, well we, won't go into that!
Our two patrols, seem to be really moving on their badge work. Patrol 1, made two puppets, Romeo and Juliet, and put on the balcony scene for Patrol 2 last Thursday, complete with one of the girls reading the beginning and ending of the story. Shakespeare, has nothing on the girl scouts!
The Brownies are as popular as ever. Recently they made plastic napkin holders with their names inscribed and this week they made holders for pot holders. Their next project will be to paint designs on hankies witih textile paints. The Brownie leaders keep the little scouts out of mischief and happy through summer, and I believe they deserve a round of applause from all of us.
Our complaints to all of you Brownie leades for a job well done.

WANTED. ! ! AMATEUR ACTS

Let's hear: from you Guys and Gals, single fellows included, who sing, play instruments, give imitations, or what: have you. You can win a valuable prize in the Amateur Contest at the Dance the Ladies Auxiliary of the F. R. A. is sponsoring July 2.1st,, 8:00 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. at the YRAee Track. For more details call Mrs. DeYoung at 773.
Tickets calt be purchased starting Monday at both Navy Exchanges and the Post Exchange, admission price, $2.00 per couple, no Stags. Don't wait too. long before getting yours, they might be all sold out. Beer and mixed drinks will be sold at popular 'prices. Also a flee Buffet Lunch. will be served. Plan now on beior, there for a full evening of iertainment. .
For those' who have no means of transportation, :a special bus is being. proyidedL It will leave New,town at 7:30 an l stop at all regular Bus:Stops,


THE INDIAN


Pa e Three


Sa�urdav. 15 July 195.0








Saturday. 15 Juy 1950THE INDIAN m.Ba13uy5-20


RED SOX COME FROM BEHIND TO TAKE
AN 8 TO 7 VERDICT OVER NAS

Three Run Ninth Inning On Four Consecutive Singles Enable Sox To Take League Lead
By Jack Perry
Sunday afternoon the Naval losses. He got fifteen via strikeStation Red Sox came through with outs. Rosario hurled for the losers some neat clutch hitting in the and struck out thirteen. He also ninth inning to pull an 8 to 7 belted a two run homer in the victory out of the fire. It marked fifth inning. the second straight win for the Sox Saturday afternoon the Marines over the Air Station and allowed chalked up victory number eight them to take the league lead. by dumping the Training Group
The Sox pushed a lone run across 17 to 9. The Marines scored in all in their half of the first inning on but the first two innings. Dukes, an error by the first baseman and the winning pitcher, went the a long double by Tye. NAS dup- distance for the Leathernecks and licated the feat with a walk, two struck out eleven. Inman hurled stolen bases and a passed ball. The for the Training Group and fanSox bounced back in the second ned nine. inning with two more: tallies. Web- Monday night the Hospital kept ster struck out but went all the on the win trail by tripping the way to second on a passed ball. Supply Depot 11 to 4. Both teams He then stole third and scored on scored a pair of runs in the first Perry's infield hit. Perry reached inning. NSD took the lead with a second on a fielder's choice and two run burst in the third. The later scored on an error by the Hospital then came back with three first baseman. In the bottom of the runs in each of the last three fourth NAS scored two runs on innings to wind up the game. Clesingles by Berg and Waechter, an- ments went the distance for Hoserror and a fielder's choice. Single pital striking out eleven and getruns were scored by the Sox in the ting credit for the victory. Hickey fourth and seventh and by NAS hurled for Supply and fanned in the second and seventh, seven. He pitched one hit ball up
At the end of the seventh, the 'til the fateful seventh when the score stood in a five to five deadlock, Hospital scored the deciding runs. In the botton of the eighth NAS Both pitchers were touched for scored two runs. Faile and White seven hits. hit successive singles and both Tuesday night the Marines took crossed the plate on a double by an 8 to 4 win from a hard fighting Gallagher. Things were pretty VU-10 club. Farnum started on the quiet in the Red Sox dugout as it hill for the Marines and went one looked as though NAS had added and a third innings. Dukes came them to their list of victims. In the on and finished up getting credit last inning Eggebrecht struck out for the win and fanning ten. Ratte the first man to face him. Then went the first six innings for VU-10 the Sox came to life and teed off and struck out three. He was reon him. Menear singled to left. lieved by Waters who hurled the Miller hit one in the same spot, last two innings and fanned two. Menear holding third. Tye then Hamden led off in the first inning collected his third hit of the day, with a round tripper for VU-10 a single to center scoring Menear and Brown did the same in the and an overthrow by the center second. For the Marines, McGillbra fielder allowed Miller to score, Tye hit a two run homer in the first going to third. Stocklosa then came and Jacobik a two run smash in through with the fourth consecu- the third. VU-10 collected twelve tive hit of the inning to wind up hits to the Marines' eight. the game. Jim Webster went all Wednesday night the Seabees the way for the Sox, fanning twelve won their second game of the week and notching his fifth victory of the with a 16 to 5 victory over the year. Eggebrecht was on the hill Training Group. The pair of wins for the Air Station. He struck out moved them up to fifth in the five and was touched for the loss. league standings. Maloy went the
Thursday night the Seabees distance for the winner, striking chalked up victory number three out nine and getting credit for the with a 13 to 9 win over the Supply victory. Wine started for the TrainDepot. It was a big five iun third ing Group and lasted only two ininning that just about wound up nings as he was clipped for ten the game for the Seabees. With runs. Smith took over in the third the help of some bad: fielding on and went five innings, fanning the part of the Supply, the Seabees seven. He was lifted -in favor of managed to load the bases and with Inman who hurled the last two two out Maloy singled to center, frames and struck out two. The ball scooted through the center
fielder's legs f6r a costly error and A true musician is the man who four runs crossed the plate. Rosario puts his ear to the keyhole, when getting his third win against five he hears a lady singing in the-bath.


WANTED: WINTER WEAR
By Evelyn Perdue
Mittens, mufflers, macintoshes, gloves, galoshes-any old thing that'd be most unlikely in these parts-are wanted by the costume committee (in the person of Miss Pally Parish) of "Cuckoos on the Hearth". Seems kind of improbable that these things could be located in such a warm climate, doesn't it? But from past experience we can say even queerer things have turned up on the Base when called for. So if you are one of the few who may have tucked away a- nice warm overcoat in hopes of seeing colder weather one day, how about dragging it out of mothballs for a week or so, in order that our cast may be suitably clothed for that Maine blizzard they'll be facing onstage in a couple of weeks? Miss Parish will be delighted to have you contact her so that she may pick up such items, and, incidentally, any dark men's suits. That old problem of civilian clothes for our sailors is haunting us again. Let your outfit make its debut-on the Little Theatre stage!

Next Week's Baseball Schedule At Fleet Recreation
Monday
Seabees vs VU-10
Tuesday
NAS vs Marines
Wednesday
TraGrp vs NSD
Thursday
Seabees vs NavSta
At Marine Site
Saturday
VU-10 vs Hospital
Sunday
TraGrp vs NAS

The Standings
(As of Thursday Morning)
Team W. L. NavSta ---------------10 1
Marines ---------------9 2
NAS ------------------8 2
Hospital ---------------6 4
Seabees ----------------4 7
VU-10 --------------3 7
NSD -----------------. 9
TraGrp ------------ 0 10





N. A. S. MOVIE LYCEUM
Sunday, 16 July
WHEN WILLIE COMES
MARCHING HOME
Dan Dailey. Corine Calvet
Monday. 17 July
CINDERELLA
Ilene Woods .Eleanor Audley
Tuesday, 18 July
THE STORY OF SEA BUISCUIT Shirley Temple Barry Fitzger~id


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THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-13. July 50-2500




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PAGE 1

Vol. V, No. 21 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 15 July 1950 MARINES "FROZEN" TO PRESENT DUTY According to a recent A1MarCor received on this Base, all Marine personnel will "stay put". The directive states that orders that are now in process will be carried out but further transfers of Marines both ashore and afloat will not be entertained in the near future. SALT WATER SWIMMERS IRRITATED BY ALGAE A mild seige of skin infections hit the Base last week-end when eleven cases of dermatitis were reported by the Naval Hospital as a result of exposure to toxic algae in the water at the Base salt water beaches. Po tentia 1 sea-bathers were warned that the presence of an unidentified algae, which appears on the local scene anually at about this time, makes it unsafe for persons to bathe in the ocean due to the possibility of generalized and v e r y discomforting dermatitis which occurs in many cases, particularly in the cases of persons Known to have sensitive skins. It is expected that this condition will prevail for a month or so. Further notices will be published when inspections by the Base Medical Officer reveal the water to be safe again. SENATE CONFEREES OK DRAFT EXTENSION Washington (AFRS) -House and Senate conferees recently agreed on a one-year extension of the present Draft law to July 9, 1951. The compromise removes all restrictions on all. the President's authority to call men into uniform as he sees necessary to keep the armed forces at desired strength. The conferees also wrote in a new provision to give the President complete authority to call National Guard and reserve members into active service whenever ne thinks necessary. The compromise now goes to the House and then to the Senate. for approval. THREE CHANGE OF COMMANDS ARE DUE-TWO COMPLETED When the Hodges docked last Tuesday morning four officers who were slated to become Commanding Officers, stepped ashore. In the routine way of the Navy and Marine Corps these changes of command were normal and part of the plan of carrying out the Navy Department's rotation of duty policy. This week saw slated changes in CO's of three commands and change of command ceremonies in two. The Marine Barracks, Naval Station and Naval Air Station were the three commands to be relieved, while the new CO's had taken up their duties at the Hospital and VU-10. COL J. F. Hough, the new CO of Marine Site was born 1 August 1902 in Washington, D. C. where he attended the local schools before attending the University of Maryland from which he graduated in 1925. After graduation from Maryland he received a commission as Second Lieutenant in the Corps and has served continuously from that time. During his early years in the Marine Corps he played and coached football at Quantico, Parris Island and Philadelphia. During the period 1928 through 1932, the Colonel served aboard the battleships Florida and Arkansas. After attending the Army Signal School at Fort Monmouth, N. J., he was assigned duty with the Second Battalion of the Fleet Marine Force. In 1934, the Colonel was ordered to the Radio Material School at Anacostia for a course of instruction upon the completion of which he took up duties as regimental communications officer with the Fourth Marines in China. In 1937, he was in charge of the radio Station at the American Embassy in Peiping when the Japanese began the prelude to World War II. On the Colonel's return from overseas, he took up duties at Quantico until 1941. From 1941 until 1944. Colonel Hough was then assigned to the Second Marine Division and with the Defense Forces in American Samoa. Upon the completion of these duties in 1944 he was assigned to duty as the Chief of Staff of the San Diego Area. Since the end of the war,. the Colonel has served with the Fifth Amphibious Corps, Second Marine Division, Navy Department Board of Awards at Headquarters, Marine Corps, and in 1948, assumed duty as Commanding Officer of the Second Combat Service Group, Service Command, Camp Lejeune, N. C., from whence he comes to Gtmo. His wife, the former Margaret Pitcher of Washington, D. C.; son, John Francis Hough, Jr.; and daughter, Harriet Elaine are presently residing at Marine Site 1A. The new Commanding Officer for the Naval Station, CAPT W. K. Romoser, USN, is also an "oldtimer" in the service,.having graduated from the Naval Academy with the Class of '26. Captain Romoser's first duties were aboard, the battleship Maryland, and then he saw duty on the Asiatic Station in destroyers from 1930 to 1933. After that came duty on the New York one of the first oil burners and a ship that saw service in World War I as well as World War II. Destroyers then again for the Captain, this time on the Destroyer Squadron Staff and then to the Naval War College in 1938. After the emergency was declared Captain Romoser again went to destroyers, this time as CO of the Greer and Upshur. Still as CO of a "tin can" Captain Romoser put one of the first 2100-ton ships in commission in early '42 -the USS Radford. The Radford under the command of Captain Romoser earned the Presidential Unit Citation in helping rescue 444 survivors of the Helena after having gone through the Guadacanal campaign and the island hopping phase of the war. In 1944 Captain Romoser put in commission the Tactical Radar School and assumed additional duties as CO of Naval Training Schools, Hollywood, Florida. Back to Destroyers again in 1945 (Continued on Page Two)

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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 15 July 1950 CHANGE OF COMMAND (Continued from Page One) -this time ComDesRon Nine, tak_____________________ ing the Squadron to the Western Pacific. Then to duty on the Staff Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., of Commander, 7th Fleet and later Room 205 -Phone 254 Naval Forces, Western Pacific. A course of instruction at tihe Saturday, 15 July 1950 National War College, a tour of U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE duty with BuPers and thence to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Guantanamo. Rear Admiral A. M. Bledsoe, USN CommanderCpanO]Oe'woi la''e Allen Collier, J0OL-mandr Editor has one son, Bill, age 16 and one P. H. Teeter, LCDR---------Staff Advisor daughter, Babs who is just old THE INDIAN is published weekly, finenough to he included with the anced by appropriated funds, printed on teen-agers, the Captain likes to government equipment, for free distrihunt and fish as well as play golf. bution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. arrived Tuesday in the Hodges hut THE INDIAN is published in compliance at press time The Indian had not with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 been able to obtain further informa(Rev) 1945. tion beyond the fact that he was a THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press classmate of CAPT Romoser and Service material which may he reprin ted ta i atdt tto a i with the credit line: AFPS. _________________________ BuPers at Washington, D. C. MARINEThe new Commanding Officer of MARIE MUINGS the Hospital, as well as Base Medical Officer is Captain D. 0. ZearThings at Marine Site have been baugh, MC, USN who reported to rather quiet during the past few ComNOB 11 July 1950. CAPT Zearweeks. baugh relieved CAPT L. L. Wilson, Last Tuesday saw the arrival of MC, USN, who had been the Hosour new Commanding Officer, COL pital's CO since 3 June 1950 until Hough. The Colonel cones to us last Thursday, 13 July. from Camp Lejeune, where he was CAPT Zearbaugh entered the in command of the Second Combat service in 1925 and after having Service Group. Welcome aboard, served alternate cruises at sea and Colonel; may you have a pleasant Naval Hospitals started his war tour of duty here in Guantanamo service in Transport duty which Bay. Also on board the Hodges was was followed by duty as Division MAJ Arsenault who will assume Surgeon of the 3rd Marines, executhe duties of the Base Provost tive officer of Nola Hospital and Marshal. I suggest that all hands then the Command and Staff School, become acquainted with him -it Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va. might prove beneficial. The Hospital's new CO and Mrs. CAPT Sullivan recently was deZearbaugh, and daughter Nancy tached from duty here and will atare now in Quarters "B" at the tend the Amphibious Warfare Naval Hospital. School in Quantico, Virginia. His LCDR R. J. Sutherlin took up duties as Guard Platoon Coinhis duties as CO of VU-10 last wander have been assumed by CapSaturday after an inspection of tain Pesely. personnel by Rear Admiral Bledsoe. COL Lanigan was guest of honor LCDR Sutherlin comes to us at a recent party at the Marine from the NROTC Unit at Illinois Corps Exchange Restaurant. The Institute of Technology at Chiparty, given by members of the cago. He is a native of Coatesville, Staff NCO Club, proved to be a Indiana, and was graduated from great success, judging by the looks Purdue University in 1937 with a of everyone the next morning. Bachelor of Science degree in chemIn the world of sports -the ical engineering. He entered the Marine team has had a little hard Navy in November 1938 as an luck in one or two of their games aviation cadet, receiving his flight recently; but presently, they are training at Pensacola during 1938 back in their old form. Our team and 1939. His date of rank as LCDR might be in second place, but we is 15 March 1944. Commander Suthall know that it isn't second rate berlin was married in Pensacola in so standby Navy. March 1943 and has three children. PFC Chenette and SGT Dales, Mrs. Sutherlin and the children are who are at present "the lovers" of here with the skipper and are at Marine Site 2, are having a hard home at Paola Point. time staying away from Guantanamo City. If it isn't liberty; it's There were three polar bears shore patrol. Who are the little sitting on an iceberg. women, fellows? "Now", said the father polar Swimmers on the Site should bear, "I've got a tale to tell." be happy to know that there has "I, too", said the mother polar been a sun shade built at the swimbear, "have a tale to tell." ming pool. All you dark, handThe little polar bear looked up some men won't have to worry at his parents and said: "My about becoming too tan now, tail's toldW Sunday, 16 July 1950 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LT P. J. MARRON, USNR (Catholic) MARRIAGE IS BETTER THAN COURTSHIP Continuing the discussion under the general topic "Love and Marriage", Chaplain Faulk will speak Sunday at 1100 on the subject "Marriage Is Better Than Courtship". These subjects are of interest to not only the married persons but also those who may be contemplating marriage e. The Chapel choir will provide special music for the service. HOSPITAL NOTES Heirport News: Theresa Denise Reynolds born 7 July to RMC and Mrs. L. W. Reynolds; Baby girl Roush born 13 July to ALC and Mrs. W. E. Roush. CAPT D. 0. Zearbaugh, MC, USN arrived via the Hodges on Tuesday of this week and assumed command in ceremonies which were held in front of the Hospital Administration Building Thursday afternoon. CAPT Zearbaugh and family are heartily welcomed to Gtmo and we all hope they will enjoy their tour of duty in our midst. Flimsies of transfer orders have been received transferring C. J. Paresi, HMC and R. L. Catts, HMC to ComSix and J. H. Littlejohn, HMC to ComTwelve. A. E. Hickerson, CS1 has departed for Stateside leave, and T. W. Little, HM2 has gone to Havana with his wife for a few (lays of sightseeing. Two new nurses reported this week: ENS Mary F. Williams from Newport, R. I. and LT G. L. Mrofka from Long Beach, California. Welcome aboard, gals; we feel sure you will find this a mighty fine spot for duty. TRICKY QUICKY Donny is twice as old as Cedric. Donny's age, multiplied by itself and the result added to Cedric's age multipled by itself gives the result "245". How old is Donny? Last Week's Solution:. The trains were the same distance from New York. I Pare Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 15 July 1950

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Saturday 15 Jul 1950 TNPage Three TRAGRP TRIVIALS As The Indian goes to press it sees a few more new faces around the old Training Group Building. The head of the list is CAPT C. G. Christie, who arrived Tuesday on the Hodges as relief of CAPT K. S. Masterson. Welcome aboard Captain Christie and we hope that you enjoy your tour here. Returning from leave in the good old United States, we have M. W. Kypers, J. A. Smith, J. I. Davenport and H. Kirkpatrick. It's good to have you all back but it must have been hard to leave the States. The shipriders have been having a field day again but it looks like darker days ahead. We know that the Training Group will carry on and continue to uphold it's reputation. In the sports department things look bad, the boys just can't seem to get that winning streak that they have all been striving for, but then they have not given up hope. This week, we are saying goodbye to four of our old and trusted shipmates. LT Higgins is leaving for TAD in S:n Diego and then to his new duty station at Point Loma, San Diego, California. Also leaving us is Groves, RD1, Whetzel, RMSN. YNC S. F. Dodge left us last Monday for some wellearned leave and then to duty in San Diego, California. It sure looks like a lot of people want that West Coast duty, I wonder why. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Barbara Thomas Last week I made my first trip to Santiago and enjoyed it very much with the exception of the roughness coming back. It wasn't quite as pleasant as I would have liked. I understand Al Havard is having a wonderful vacation at camp in Benson, Md. Glad he is having fun but it will be nice to welcome him back to the Base. Nancy Zearbaugh and Henry French have arrived but I haven't had the pleasure of meeting them yet. Welcome to you both. Babs and Billy Romoser spent Tuesday in Gtmo and will be here again when the Hodges comes through on her return to New York. Hope to see you both then. Ramona Sparks, Elsie Heimer, and I had the pleasure of attending a party given by CDR and Mrs. Marshall on Sunday afternoon for some of the midshipmen. All of us had a very nice time. Elsie attends school in Santiago but is spending the Summer with her parents here on the. Base. Skiddy Masterson writes that he is exercising strenuously to grow the inch he. needs for entrance to the academy. Best of luck to him. Skiddy is greatly missed by all who knew him, and he is sure to be well liked wherever he is located. O'ER THE TEA CUPS By Betty Radcliffe When the Gen. Hodges arrived this week there were quite a few passengers for Gtmo: There was CAPT and Mrs. L. E. French and CAPT D. 0. Zearbaugh. LT F. Young welcomed his wife and baby. Another arrival was Mrs. Mildred E. Grimmer from Groton, Conn. Mrs. Grimmer is the mother of CHPCLK L. W. Grimmer. Returning from leave were CDR and Mrs. S. H. Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Tauseh and Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Adair. Welcome to Gtino. all you newcomers and welcome back you oldtimers. Mrs. G. D. MacMichael and son, George left this week for about a month's vacation in New York. We will be looking forward to your return, Peg. Out in Bargo Point there are seven couples who call themselves "The Screaming Meemies"; they have organized a bowling league and will bowl one night a week for nine nights at the end of which time the winning couple will get a trophy and the losing couple will have earned a booby prize. Sounds like fun doesn't it? Last week the teachers and interested mothers of the Kindergarten and Primary classes of Sunday School gave a Hanky shower in honor of Mrs. W. L. Foster and Mrs. W. G. Esders. The shower was held at the home of Mrs. S. R. Preston. Mrs. J. H. Skinner has two very welcome guests in her home; her mother Mrs. Ray Kempler from Columbus, Ohio and Mrs. Skinner's sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Denning from Portsmouth, Ohio. Mrs. Kemper and Mrs. Denning have been here about three weeks and will return to their homes next week. Send me a piece of the good old Buckeye soil, ladies .that's my home State too. Mr. and Mrs. Nat Robbins left this week after spending a delightful two weeks with LT and Mrs. R. S. Burns. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins traveled to Havana where they will spend a few days before returning to their home in Miami. So many comings and goings this week that I feel like the information booth at Grand Central Station. See ya later. LIBRARY NOTES Mike Shayne is back from a much needed vacation to face a new murder in Miami. Naturally, he finds .himself involved with a woman, Sai'a Morton -feature writer--only she is the corpse. After roaming through skid-row, a few conflicts with -homicide, he discovers "wtho done it". This book is Bret Holliday's latest-"This Is I, Miehael:S-hayne." Girl Scout Notes By Adeline Irwin Well, our scouts are back in the news. Miss us? Sure hope so. Seems as tho' many things have occured lately, one of which was the "Surprise Birthday Party" yours truly gave for her teenagers. This affair took place Wednesday 5, in Newtown, at the residence of Mrs. L. R. Smith, our Brownie Leader. All the girl scouts were invited and since no mother has called asking what her scout ate or how much, we guess there were no after affects, such as tummy-aches. Anyway, seems as tho' everybody had a bang-up time, leaving my girl a year older, and me, well we, won't go into that! Our two patrols, seem to be really moving on their badge work. Patrol 1, made two puppets, Romeo and Juliet, and put on the balcony scene for Patrol 2 last Thursday, complete with one of the girls reading the beginning and ending of the story. Shakespeare, has nothing on the girl scouts! The Brownies are as popular as ever. Recently they made plastic napkin holders with their names inscribed and this week they made holders for pot holders. Their next project will be to paint designs on hankies with textile paints. The Brownie leaders keep the little scouts out of mischief and happy through summer, and I believe they deserve a round of applause from all of us. Our compliments to all of you Brownie leaders for a job well done. WANTED! ! AMATEUR ACTS Let's hear from you Guys and Gals, single fellows included, who sing, play instruments, give imitations, or what have you. You can win a valuable prize in the Amateur Contest at the Dance the Ladies Auxiliary of the F. R. A. is sponsoring July 21st,. 8:00 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. at the -Race Track. For more details call Mrs.,DeYoung at 773. Tickets can be purchased starting Monday at both Navy Exchanges and the Post Exchange, admission price, $2.00 per couple, no Stags. Don't wait too.long before getting yours, they might be all sold out. Beer and mixed drinks will be sold at popular prices. Also a free Buffet Lunch will be served. Plan now on bqi g there for a full evening of entertainment. For those who have no means of transportation, a special bus is being provided. It will leave Newtown at 7:30 and stop at all regular Bus Stops, THE INDIAN Page Three Saturday 15 July 1 0

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Saturday. 15 July1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-IS. July 50-2500 RED SOX COME FROM BEHIND TO TAKE AN 8 TO 7 VERDICT OVER NAS Three Run Ninth Inning On Four Consecutive Singles Enable Sox To Take League Lead By Jack Sunday afternoon the Naval Station Red Sox came through with some neat clutch hitting in the ninth inning to pull an 8 to 7 victory out of the fire. It marked the second straight win for the Sox over the Air Station and allowed them to take the league lead. The Sox pushed a lone run across in their half of the first inning on an error by the first baseman and a long double by Tye. NAS duplicated the feat with a walk, two stolen bases and a passed ball. The Sox bounced back in the second inning with two more tallies. Webster struck out but went all the way to second on a passed ball. He then stole third and scored on Perry's infield hit. Perry reached second on a fielder's choice and later scored on an error by the first baseman. In the bottom of the fourth NAS scored two runs on singles by Berg and Waechter, an error and a fielder's choice. Single runs were scored by the Sox in the fourth and seventh and by NAS in the second and seventh. At the end of the seventh, the score stood in a five to five deadlock, In the botton of the eighth NAS scored two runs. Faile and White hit successive singles and both crossed the plate on a double by Gallagher. Things were pretty quiet in the Red Sox dugout as it looked as though NAS had added them to their list of victims. In the last inning Eggebrecht struck out the first man to face him. Then the Sox came to life and teed off on him. Menear singled to left. Miller hit one in the same spot, Menear holding third. Tye then collected his third hit of the day, a single to center scoring Menear and an overthrow by the center fielder allowed Miller to score, Tye going to third. Stocklosa then came through with the fourth consecutive hit of the inning to wind up the game. Jim Webster went all the way for the Sox, fanning twelve and notching his fifth victory of the year. Eggebrecht was on the hill for the Air Station. He struck out five and was touched for the loss. Thursday night the Seabees chalked up victory number three with a 13 to 9 win over the Supply Depot. It was a big five run third inning that just about wound up the game for the Seabees. With the help of some bad fielding on the part of the Supply, the Seabees managed to load the bases and with two out Maloy singled to center. The ball scooted through the center fielder's legs for a costly error and four runs crossed the plate. Rosario getting his third win against five Perry losses. He got fifteen via strikeouts. Rosario hurled for the losers and struck out thirteen. He also belted a two run homer in the fifth inning. Saturday afternoon the Marines chalked up victory number eight by dumping the Training Group 17 to 9. The Marines scored in all but the first two innings. Dukes, the winning pitcher, went the distance for the Leathernecks and struck out eleven. Inman hurled for the Training Group and fanned nine. Monday night the Hospital kept on the win trail by tripping the Supply Depot 11 to 4. Both teams scored a pair of runs in the first inning. NSD took the lead with a two run burst in the third. The Hospital then came back with three runs in each of the last three innings to wind up the game. Clements went the distance for Hospital striking out eleven and getting credit for the victory. Hickey hurled for Supply and fanned seven. He pitched one hit ball up 'til the fateful seventh when the Hospital scored the deciding runs. Both pitchers were touched for seven hits. Tuesday night the Marines took an 8 to 4 win from a hard fighting VU-10 club. Farnum started on the hill for the Marines and went one and a third innings. Dukes came on and finished up getting credit for the win and fanning ten. Ratte went the first six innings for VU-10 and struck out three. He was relieved by Waters who hurled the last two innings and fanned two. Hamden led off in the first inning with a round tripper for VU-10 and Brown did the same in the second. For the Marines, McGillbra hit a two run homer in the first and Jacobik a two run smash in the third. VU-10 collected twelve hits to the Marines' eight. Wednesday night the Seabees won their second game of the week with a 16 to 5 victory over the Training Group. The pair of wins moved them up to fifth in the league standings. Maloy went the distance for the winner, striking out nine and getting credit for the victory. Wine started for the Training Group and lasted only two innings as he was clipped for ten runs. Smith took over in the third and went five innings, fanning seven. He was lifted in favor. of Inman who hurled the last two frames and struck out two. A true musician is the man who puts his ear to the keyhole, when he hears a lady singing in the bath. WANTED: WINTER WEAR By Evelyn Perdue Mittens, mufflers, macintoshes, gloves, galoshes-any old thing that'd be most unlikely in these parts-are wanted by the costume committee (in the person of Miss Pally Parish) of "Cuckoos on the Hearth". Seems kind of improbable that these things could be located in such a warm climate, doesn't it? But from past experience we can say even queerer things have turned up on the Base when called for. So if you are one of the few who may have tucked away a nice warm overcoat in hopes of seeing colder weather one day, how about dragging it out of mothballs for a week or so, in order that our cast may be suitably clothed for that Maine blizzard they'll be facing onstage in a couple of weeks? Miss Parish will be delighted to have you contact her so that she may pick up such items, and, incidentally, any dark men's suits. That old problem of civilian clothes for our sailors is haunting us again. Let your outfit make its debut on the Little Theatre stage! Next Week's Baseball Schedule At Fleet Recreation Monday Seabees vs VU-10 Tuesday NAS vs Marines Wednesday TraGrp vs NSD Thursday Seabees vs NavSta At Marine Site Saturday VU-10 vs Hospital Sunday TraGrp vs NAS The Standings (As of Thursday Morning) Team W. L. NavSta ---------------10 1 Marines-9 2 NAS -----------------8 2 Hospital Seabees -----VU-10 --------------NSD TraGrp ---------------6 4 3 0 4 7 7 9 10 N. A. S. MOVIE LYCEUM Sunday, 16 July WHEN WILLIE COMES MARCHING HOME Dan Dailey Corine Calvet Monday, 17 July CINDERELLA Ilene Woods Eleanor Audley Tuesday, 18 July THE STORY OF SEA BUISCUIT Shirley Temple Barry Fitzgerald I S S Saturday. 15 Julv_1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-13 July 50-2500


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