Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text










9ke/


Vol. V, No. 20 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 8 July 1950


HURRICANE-DRILL
SCHEDULED

A Base-wide hurricane drill was announced this week at a command conference. The ficticious hurricane is scheduled to be discovered on Thursday, 13 July and the Base, including all military and civilian personnel and dependents, will progress through a series of simulated and real preparations for defense against *the elements.
The drill Will come to a climax about 0830 Saturday, 15 July, when all personnel will actually leave their quarters and places of employment for the hurricane shelters. After a brief inspection of conditions, it is anticipated that the "secure" will be sounded and normal conditions resumed about 1000.
During the next week instructions to residents will be published and distributed to all quarters occupants. Following the drill a critique will be baeld to incorporate suggested changes to make the Base Bill for Hurricane Protection more effective.

TWO REPLACEMENT
BUSES ARRIVE
The USNS Kingsport Victory (AK 239) off-loaded two buses for the Base Transportation System last Wednesday. These are almost new, 29-passenger capacity, KS-5 Internationals, and were shipped from San Juan whence they were diverted to transport Portrex personnel during Spring maneuvers. 'After a. few shipping scratches and broken light lenses are corrected, they will be put in regular service, replacing two. of' the wellworn veterans..
Riders! Treat them well. They are the last new buses we will see for a long, long time!
" he tilt 7ol he -leaning tower of Pisa, Italy, hase increased. by-a ]$tt - more Pian . quarter-inch in the -pas12 years..
,"The average pre e' exerted. at the ,edge.-ofa aazor blade when it cuts a :hi lr -j:said.to '-be


IF YOU USE WATER,
READ THIS!

In fact and fable, appeals for saving water are frequently brought to our attention. Drought conditions in this area of Cuba were emphasized last month when it was necessary for the Base to ship water to nearby Santiago to prevent misery from being brought about by actual water famine. New York City has just ended a serious emergency. However, water consumption on the Base has been on the increase throughout the past several months.
This is not intended to raise the alarm that we too are -confronted with a water shortage. Possibly, however, the abundance of water available to the Base is a "curse" which lulls us into the belief that water can be spent and wasted with abandon.
There is plenty of water in the Yateras River whence the Base derives its supply. However, the cost of this water, including the contractor's charges, treatment costs, and distribution costs make each gallon of water cost about ten times the cost- of a gallon in a city like Miami or 30 times the cost of water in a city located in the Pacific Northwest where water abounds.
The greatest- water wasters are the public quarters occupants who do not personally pay water bills for water consumed on the premises at present. Note that proviso "at present" It is used advisedly, since unofficial warnings have been issued that the Government cannot long continue to pay for water wasted at the rate it is. being wasted by quarters on this Base. For the month of May 'many quarters used more than $20 worth of water!. This is-more than the value of -one Savings- Bond, and it is wondered how many of the occupants would-be willing:, to personally foot: such -a water bill month after month -oreven once L.For the most .part these excesses ha ve- been-, the- resultT of 44inure to report leaks promptly.; over., ambitious .attempts.--at gard-. emu.ng 6 horiculture where plants
itned for Page soil must
(Continued on.PageTvm.)',


FOOTBALL'S "FAIR,CATCH" RULE DISCARDED
By Armed Forces 'Press Service
Football's "fair catch" rule has been discarded.
The football rules committee gave very little publicity to-this change in the playing code after its January, meeting at Pinehurs+, N.C., and many coaches as well as fans are as yet unaware of the details.
Now the safety man, on a punt has two options instead of three, as formerly. He may elect to (1) catch the punt, or (2) let it hit and roll free.
Previously, if tacklers covering the kick were bearing down uncomfortably close, the safety man could raise a hand-the "fair catch" signal-and protect himself. In this case the ball was put ir play at the spot where he caught it.
The receiver's only protection now is, that he cannot be hit by the opposition until the ball reaches him. Once the ball touches him, however, he is at the mercy of the opposing ends and tackles rushing downfield to cover the punt.
Wallace Wade, of Duke, a committee member who confirmed the rule change, suggested that it will encourage more punt returns, which happens to be one of the most colorful maneuvers in college football.
SHIP ARRIVALS

-Ships scheduled to arrive here within the coming week are practically nil. The lone arrival 'is the USNS General-H. F.-Hodges, AP144, which is-scheduled to arrive Tuesday morning from New York enroute to the Canal Zone via San Juan; P. R.
Departures during the coming week include Task Force 86, comprised -of eight destroyers and the battleship Missouri which will leave Monday morning.
Oklahoma and Colorado are the p r i n c i pra-I-broomcorn-growing states, - .

in t he production of hops.








Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 8 July 1950


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 8 July 1950
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral A. M. Bledsoe, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOB ----------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay. Cuba by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rey) 1945.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service material which may be reprinted with the credit line: AFPS.

HEP CATS AND THE MORE MELLOW RUG CUTTERS

Got your tickets yet to the "Jam Session?" They're going fast so don't be left out, you'll be missing a wonderful time. The Ladies' Auxiliary of the F. R. A. are going all out to make this Dance a huge success. Don't forget the date, July 21st, 8:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Race Track. Tickets $2.00 per couple. No stags admitted. Drinks and refreshments will be available-but natch!
And we do want you amateurs who sing, play instruments or have any special talent to start brushing up and compete in our Amateur Contest. You won't be sorry-three cash merchandise orders will be presented to the lucky winners. Interested? ? ? Call Mrs. De Young at 773 for details.
Jitterbugs and all others, you can strut your stuff too. Three dance contests to take care of all of you, with a prize for each winning couple in each contest.
Those of you who haven't secured your tickets yet can do so at both Navy Exchanges and the PX. So hurry, hurry,.hurry.

NEXT WEEK'S BASEBALL
SCHEDULE
At Fleet Recreation

Monday- NSD vs. Hospital Tuesday-Marines vs. VU-10 Wednesday-TraGrp vs. Seabees Thursday-NSD vs. NAS Saturday-Marines vs. NavSta
At Marine Site
Saturday-Marihs 'vs. NavSta Sunday-TraGrp vs. :Hospital

WAF: "How are you doing: in your race to matrimony?"
aC .' .thin- k m o. my,..ast lap."3


HOSPITAL NOTES

Heirport News: This has been a busy week in the nursery. Six new citizens having made their appearance: James Allan Smith born 1 July to HM2 and Mrs. C. W. Smith; Keith Holland Robertson born 1 July to ENS and Mrs. K. H, Robertson; Donna Marie Dlugi born 2 July to CSC and Mrs. F. M. Dlugi Melanie Jayne Dickey born 2 July to CAPT and Mrs. M. N. Dickey, USAF; Marsha Jean Thorn born 3 July to LTJG J. I. Thorn, and Baby Girl Mills born 6 July to BM2 and Mrs. W. 0. Mills.
0. L. Frakes, HM3 departed this week for duty at Naval Hospital Portsmouth, Virginia. G. A. Templeton,. HMC and C. H. Gerhold, HM1 have received flimsies of orders to ComSIX.
LTJG Spicer, MC has received orders for residency training in X-ray at Naval Hospital, Bethesda. LTJG Moschella has received notice of acceptance of resignation, effective on or about 15 November.
We haven't heard anything about our sailboat enthusiast b e i n g dunked recently. Has he finally learned to sail a boat, or did he just give up?
We are really wondering about Mrs. Quielisch - did she really fall in or was that just her way of cooling off.

IF YOU USE WATER,
READ THIS!

(Continued from Page One)
be continously watered, and overzealous attempts to keep grass green beyond the extent intended by Nature and beyond the need for sustaining plant life; or lack of supervision of domestic servants, many of whom never plug the sink when. washing dishes or rinsing clothes. Most of the grass on this Base will live through severe drought conditions and a Kellygreen lawn was never intended by Nature for grass in this locale at this season of the year.
During the month of July, occupants' of quarters where excessive amounts of water have been expended for June will receive written notice of such fact, and it is expected that voluntary steps will be taken to insure that more drastic action is not required.
Remember that:the water bill for the Base must be paid out of funds which also pay for maintenance and improvements. With reduced funds now available for these purposes due to recent cuts in allotments, the saving of water-is "a must".
Hamburg, Funkstown and F6ggt Bottom, were 'nam6s 'Applied lon ago 'to." the Potomac-shore section of the District of Columbia, about' where the stately Lindbln 'memorial now stand ,,. , ,.'..


Sunday, 9 July 1950' Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Mabses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LT P. J. MARRON, USNR
(Catholic)

LOVE AND MARRIAGE

For the next four Sundays, Chaplain Faulk will speak on the general subject: "Love and Marriage" at the 1100 Protestant Church Service. It is believed that these discussions will be of particular interest to young men who are contemplating marriage and are interested in a discussion on the purpose of marriage. These discussions, however, will not be limtied to the unmarried but will be of interest to all. The subject for Sunday, 9 July, is "Marriage Is For Adults!"

LIBRARY NOTES

Our Library needs books. Every effort is made to provide a wide variety of reading material in the Base Library, but our sources of supply are limited. In the past the Library has received many donations of valuable books which have added greatly to our collection. Any one having books that they desire to donate to the Library are invited to call the number 672 and the books will be picked up. Donations of Westerns and "whodunits" would be especially useful.
Interesting books for the interested: "Handbook of Basic Motion Picture Technique" for the camera fan; "Great Mistakes of The War" for the serious; "The Art of Real Happiness" for the concerned; "Rough 'Justice" for the drugstore cowboy; "Homicide House" for the thrill seekers; "The Art of Plain Talk" for the convincing; "Boatbuilding" for the handyman; and "The Flame Tree" for the bored.

Jane: "You're making a mistake marrying Ed, -=�e'Il6 t .a, ea ouble life" .. ..ouble" =" . ...
.Joan:' , 1 but unle's I � d6 nfariry hinl,'Itl y lea.! as ingle life."
Sailor: (sitting with his" girl in the, monqoight )"I'd like .tq .Iask you a question.
Girl (breathlessly): "'Xes?1'
Sailor: "Will you ple.se'-Zmnv over? I'm sifttmg on a nail.


S


I


0


















S


Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 8 July 1950








Saturday. 8 July 1950TH IDANPeThe


SBoy
Scout
~Affairs.


By Henry Crommelin, Jr.
The Boy Scout camp at Nicaro
proved to be a very successful one, due to the efforts of CAPT and Mrs. Lloyd, the manager of the nickel mines and plant in Nicaro.
Others who deserve credit are: LT K. L. Jones, camp director, L. Price, assisant scoutmaster, C. W. Abbott, scoutmaster, the Troop Committee and Chaplain Faulk, the local scout commissioner. Those people and many others were responsible for .the success of the camp.
A typical day began with reveille
at 6:00 a.m., at 6:10 all hands fell in for calisthenics and drill practice which lasted until 6:40. Between 6:40 and 7:00 chow. Everybody took showers and washed up.
After 8:00 colors, there was a room and personnel inspection. Until 10:30 the boys passed and studied for Boy Scout tests for their next advancements. From 10:30 to 12:00 chow, a soft ball game was usually underway. At 1:00 p.m. the scouts prepared for a short three mile hike to a fresh water river for swimming. On the way to and from, many new kinds of plants and trees and occasionally signs of a bird or animal were found. The scouts would return to the barracks by 4:30 and would wash up for 5:00 chow. After chow- the scouts relaxed, studied or played catch with a soft ball until 6:43 colors. Following colors there was either an indoor or outdoor camp fire, or movies brought from the Base. Usually by 9:15 the movies or the campfire would be over. At 9:30 the day would come to a close with
taps.
As a result of this trip, seven
boys plan to go up for Second Class Scout from one to three plan to go up for First Class and another hopes to get three merit badges at the Board of Review which will be held in the near future. From eight to ten boys going up for a new advancement out of fourteen shows
that the camp was successful.
As a gesture of goodwill, the Boy
Scouts played the Cuban boys in two softball games and had the Cuban fellows in for chow. In turn, the Cuban school children put on a very impressive ceremony in which the Cuban and American flags
were exchanged.

The insurance salesman was talking to a friend. He said:
"You know I served in the Navy During World War II."
"You did?" Did you get a commission?".
"Naw. I just got a. straight
sala :ry.


O'ER THE TEA CUPS
By Betty Radcliffe
Well the 4th of July has gone again for another year. It was quite a day too.
The fourth was the birthday of Mrs. E. H. Mooneyham and she celebrated with a buffet supper at her home.
Also on the fourth, Mrs. L. Bonatta returned from leave in the States. Welcome back, Anne.
A couple of weeks ago, NSD gave a grand supper party at the Race Track. The party served a dual purpose . . . a farewell party for CDR and Mrs. L. P. Kimball and a welcome to CDR and Mrs. L. Metzger. A five-piece Cuban orchestra furnished the music for dancing. CDR Kimball was presented with a "mobile caddy" a sort of caddy on wheels.
Speaking of the Race Track ... from what I have been told, Recreation has really done a fine job in fixing the old Race Track into a marvelous recreation park . . . with dance pavillion, bar, picnic tables, barbecue pit, horseshoe pitching area, volley ball court, etc.
Last Monday, the Camera Club held a meeting at which time Mrs. Thelma Foster was presented with a Photograph Album as a farewall gift. Mrs. Foster was one of the original members and she will be missed by the entire club. Good luck, Thelma.
As you must know by now, the L. A. F. R. A. will hold a big dance at the Race Track on the 21st of this month. The big event of the dance will be the amateur talent contest . . . can you sing, or do imitations, dance, stand on your head, or something like that? Come on, limber up the talent and be prepared to participate in the contest.
I have been told that the "Shipwreck" dance at the CPO Club was a huge success. There were many original and clever costumes worn. Mrs. L. G. Gomez won the ladies prize for costume . . . she was bedecked in vines, leaves and flowers. There was hope and a promise of more "Shipwreck" dances at the Club because of the popularity of this one.
Either I nag enough or my husband reads this column... anyway, I finally got my barbecue pit.
See ya' later.

TRICKY QUICKY

An express train left New York for Washington, D. C., at the same time that a local left Washington for New York. The express averaged 60 miles an hour and the local 30 miles per hour. When they passed each -other, which train was nearer New York? Last Week's Solution: There were four boxes of apples and two boxes of peache. .


TEEN AGE ROUNDUP
By Barbara Thomas
Have received some interesting news from Cecil Pederson such as the smothered feeling one has when attending a movie in a closed building and the way people are crowded and pushed in the shopping districts. We certainly aren't bothered that way here in Gtmo, are we? I suppose after we leave here, we realize more and more how wonderful life here really is. How 'bout it boys and girls?
Susie Maulsby is learning to sail and I am sure she will do well at it for Susie does well at everything she tries.
I am going to have to apologize for not having more news this week but I haven't been able to find out what everyone is doing. I do promise to write longer articles after school opens again, but in the meantime, be sure to call me at 601 and give me any bit of news you might have.

SPORTS QUIZ
By Armed Forces Press Service
QUESTIONS
1. Trainers Willie Molter and Bill Bishop saddled the most winners in 1949. Was it 103, 129, or 81?
2. Iowa, Holy Cross, and University of Pittsburgh have new football coaches this year. Can you name them?
3. Who was younger when he won the heavyweight boxing title, Jack Dempsey or Gene Tunney?
4. Name the winner of the first Masters golf tournament in Augusta. Ga., in 1934 who repeated in 1936.
5. What star gridder at Yale in 1909, coached the Blue in football the following year?
ANSWERS
"o3 PaL *9
�t%.mlS uoIoJH 1
suA& Souunj, 'pg sv, Sasduio( *8
�T41 'VAOUBSu9
ug'I 'ssoJD fAlOH 'uosJOpuv o1PPa :xamoI ' aa dsuogvaI pauuoaI *g "69T 'T


THE :INDIANX


Paee Three








Saudy uy150TEIDA to BySJl5-50


EXTRA INNING GAMES FEATURE WEEK'S BASEBALL PLAY

Jim Webster Fans 20 as Sox Nip VU-10 2 to 1 In 11 Innings;
Hospital Takes 14 Inning 3 to 2 Win From Seabees


The Marine Site Diamond was full of action Saturday afternoon as the Hospital kept on the win trail by edging the Seabees 3 to 2 in a fourteen inning thriller. The Hospital drew first blood by pushing across one run in the bottom of the first. Call reached first on an error, stole second and scored on successive passed balls. The Seabees tied the score in the top of the fifth. Phillips singled to center, stole second, reached third on an error and crossed the plate on a passed ball. The pitchers took control of the game up to the fourteenth inning when the Seabees pushed across what looked to be the winning marker. Clugh singled, stole second and scored on successive single by Outlaw and Irvin. In the bottom of the fourteenth Maloy retired the first two batters. With two out and none on, Zimmerman drew a base on balls. Clements then reached first on a miscue by the shortstop, Zimmerman going to third. Havelka then singled across the tying run with Clements holdmg third and later scored the winning marker on another passed ball. Clements hurled the first four and one-third innings for the Hospital, fanning five. Havelka came on in the fifth with three on and one out, retired the side with only one run crossing the plate and went the remaing innings getting credit for twelve strikeouts. It was a real heartbreaker for Maloy to lose as his mates could push across only two runs on their fourteen hits while he pitched four-hit ball through the fourteen innings and set down thirteen swinging.
In the second extra inning contest of the week, the Naval Station Red Sox took a hard earned 2 to 1, eleven inning victory from VU-10., It was a battle of pitchers all the way. Jim Webster, Red Sox southpaw, fanned twenty batters in eight and two-thirds innings and gave. up. but one hit, a first inning single.
The Sox scored' the game's first run in- the bottom of 'the seventh. With-one out, O'Niel singled, stole second, went to third on a fielder's choice and scored on a wild pitch. In the top of the ninth, VU-10 pushed- across the tying run without a hit. Johnson drew a base on balls, reached second on a sacrifice, went to third on an error and a fielder's choice: and' scored on a sacrifice bunt.1In the last of the eleventh, Stocklosa reached first on a'costly error by, the VU.,10 third baseman, went, to :second on a fielder's choice. aid stole thr l, VU-10 then lifted PPatton, in favor


ck Perry
of Brown who quickly poured two fast strikes past Johnson, but then with a two and two count, Johnson drove the next pitch to center for a -clean single which proved
to be the game winning blow.
Jim Webster pitched brilliant ball
for eight and two-thirds innings.
O'Niel took over with two out in the eighth and held the opposition hitless, struck out four and got credit for the win. The Naval Station pitchers tossed ten consecutive no-hit innings. For VU-10, Ratte started and went seven innings, giving up three hits and fanning six. He was relieved by Patton who was touched for the loss although he gave up only one hit and struck out two. Brown pitched to one batter in the eleventh and that was Johnson who came through in the
clutch for the Sox.
Thursday night, last week, the
Naval Air Station kept in the running by knocking off VU-10 16 to 8. Jones started on the hill for, the Flyers and went three and a third innings, striking out four. Eggebrecht took over in the fourth and finished the remaining inning, fanning eight while notching his third win. Smith homered for the winners with one on in the bottom of the sixth. Ratte started for VU-10, went five innings and was clipped for the loss. Jones came on in the bottom of the sixth but needed help from Patton who went the final three innings. This trio of hurlers got seven strikeouts and was
touched for twelve hits.
Sunday afternoon the Training
Group just missed pulling an upset that would have rocked Guantanamo Bay. A four run seventh inning set the stage for another Red Sox victory. "Ace'" Adams started on the mound for the Sox and went five innings, giving up two runs and striking out three. Anders came on in the sixth, struck out four and got credit for his first win of the season. O'Niel, Red Sox fireballer, was called in to pitch the last two innings as the Training Group threatened to turn the tide with a rally that was cut off at three runs in the eighth. Groves hurled for the Training Group and fanned six.
He was relieved-by Inman in the top of the eighth who finished up and got one man swinging. Groves was the loser.
. Monday night the Marines topped the Supply'3Depot by a score of 10 to, two. Larum handled the mound duties for the winners for six innings, got'dredit for fouir strikeouts and was: clipped for. five hits. Dukes finished up giving up three hits and


fanning three. Larum received credit for the win. "Knuckles" Lazzaroni started on the hill for the Supply Depot and pitched two-hit ball for six innings but then the Marines found the range and clipped him for nine hits in two innings. Rosario took the mound in the ninth and struck out two. Lazzaroni fanned seven and was touched for the loss. Rosraio hit a round tripper in the bottom of the sixth with'none on.
The NAS-Hospital game which was to'be played on the 4th of July was postponed to a later date.
The following is the up to date record of pitchers who have won games this season: Name Team W L Jones NAS ------- 4 0 O'Niel NavSta ____ 3 0 Farnum Marines ---- 2 0 Adams NavSta 1 0 Anders NavSta ---- 1 0 Brown VU-10 -------1 '
Critz Marines ---- 1 0 Neeley NAS -------1 0 Webster NavSta ---- 4 1 Eggebrecht NAS ------- 3 1 Dukes Marines ---- 4 2 Jones VU-10 ----- 2 1 Clements Hospital --- 3 2 Havelka Hospital 2 2 Maloy Seabees 2 5 Rosario NSD ------- 2 5
THE STANDINGS
(As of Thursday morning)

Team W L NavSta ----------------9 1
NAS ------------------8 1
Marines ----------------7 2
Hospital ---------------5 4
VU-10 -----------------4 6
NSD -------------------2 7
Seabees -----------------2 7
TraGrp ----------------0 8


NAS MOVIE LYCEUM
Sunday, 9 July
CHICAGO DEADLINE
Alan Ladd Dona Reed
Monday, 10 July
THE WOMAN ON PIER 13 Robert Ryan Loriane Day
Tuesday, 11 July
ON THE TOWN
Gene Kelly Ann Miller


Wednesday, 12 July
WITHOUT HONOR
Loraine Day Franchot Tone
Thursday, 13 July
THE DEVIL'S HENCHMAN Warner ,Baxter Mike Muzarki
'Friday, 14 luly
CHALLENGE TO. LASSIE
Edmund Gweti -Donald Crisp
Saturday, 15 July
TRAPPEDLloyd Bridges . James. Tod


S


S


Saturday, 8 July 1950


Gtmno. Bay-6Jul 50-2500.


THE INDIAN




Full Text

PAGE 1

Vol. V, No. 20 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 8 July 1950 HURRICANE DRILL SCHEDULED Base-wide hurricane drill was announced this week at a command conference. The fictitious hurricane is scheduled to be discovered on Thursday, 13 July and the Base, including all military and civilian personnel and dependents, will progress through a series of simulated and real preparations for defense against the elements. The drill will come to a climax about 0830 Saturday, 15 July, when all personnel will actually leave their quarters and places of employment for the hurricane shelters. After a brief inspection of conditions, it is anticipated that the "secure" will be sounded and normal conditions resumed about 1000. During the next week instructions to residents will be published and distributed to all quarters occupants. Following the drill a critique will be held to incorporate suggested changes to make the Base Bill for Hurricane Protection more effective. TWO REPLACEMENT BUSES ARRIVE The USNS Kingsport Victory (AK 239) off-loaded two buses for the Base Transportation System last Wednesday. These are almost new, 29-passenger capacity, KS-5 Internationals, and were shipped from San Juan whence they were diverted to transport Portrex personnel during Spring maneuvers. After a few shipping scratches and broken light lenses are corrected, they will be put in regular service, replacing two of the wellworn veterans. Riders! Treat them well. They are the last new buses we will see for a long, long time! The tilt of the leaning tower of Pisa, Italy, has increased by a little more than a quarter-inch in the past 12 years. 'The average pressure exerted at the edge of .a, razor blade when it cuts a wxyhisker is. -said to be ffv''tons pel', sciuar&. inch. IF YOU USE WATER, READ THIS! In fact and fable, appeals for saving water are frequently brought to our attention. Drought conditions in this area of Cuba were emphasized last month when it was necessary for the Base to ship water to nearby Santiago to prevent misery from being brought about by actual water famine. New York City has just ended a serious emergency. However, water consumption on the Base has been on the increase throughout the past several months. This is not intended to raise the alarm that we too are confronted with a water shortage. Possibly, however, the abundance of water available to the Base is a "curse" which lulls us into the belief that water can be spent and wasted with abandon. There is plenty of water in the Yateras River whence the Base derives its supply. However, the cost of this water, including the contractor's charges, treatment costs, and distribution costs make each gallon of water cost about ten times the cost of a gallon in a city like Miami or 30 times the cost of water in a city located in the Pacific Northwest where water abounds. The greatest water wasters are the public quarters occupants who do not personally pay water bills for water consumed on the premises at present. Note that proviso "at present" It is used advisedly, since unofficial warnings have been issued that the Government cannot long continue to pay for water wasted at the rate it is being wasted by quarters on this Base. For the month of May many quarters used more than $20 worth of water! This is more than the value of one Savings Bond and it is wondered how many of the occupants would be willing to personally foot such a water bill month after month -or even once! For the most part these excesses have been the result of failure -to report leaks promptly; over-ambitious attempts at gardening or horticulture where plants never intended for arid soil must (Continued on Page Tivq) FOOTBALL'S "FAIR CATCH" RULE DISCARDED By Armed Forces Press Service Football's "fair catch" rule has been discarded. The football rules committee gave very little publicity to this change in the playing code after its January, meeting at Pinehurst, N.C., and many coaches as well as fans are as yet unaware of the details. Now the safety man, on a punt has two options instead of three, as formerly. He may elect to (1) catch the punt, or (2) let it hit and roll free. Previously, if tacklers covering the kick were bearing down uncomfortably close, the safety man could raise a hand-the "fair catch" signal-and protect himself. In this case the ball was put ir play at the spot where he caught it. The receiver's only protection now is that he cannot be hit by the opposition until the ball reaches him. Once the ball touches him, however, he is at the mercy of the opposing ends and tackles rushing downfield to cover the punt. Wallace Wade, of Duke, a committee member who confirmed the rule change, suggested that it will encourage more punt returns, which happens to be one of the most colorful maneuvers in collegE football. SHIP ARRIVALS Ships scheduled to arrive here within the coming week are practically nil. The lone arrival is the USNS General H. F. Hodges, AP144, which is scheduled to arrive Tuesday morning from New York enroute to the Canal Zone via San Juan; P. R. Departures during the coming week include, Task Force 86, comprised of eight destroyers and the battleship Missouri which will leave Monday morning. Oklahoma and Colorado are the p r i n c i p-a-I -broomcorn-growing states. The state of Washington lads in the production of hops.

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 8 July 1950 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 8 July 1950 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral A. M. Bledsoe, USN Commander Allen Collier, J03----------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service material which may be reprinted with the credit line: AFPS. HEP CATS AND THE MORE MELLOW RUG CUTTERS Got your tickets yet to the "Jam Session?" They're going fast so don't be left out, you'll be missing a wonderful time. The Ladies' Auxiliary of the F. R. A. are going all out to make this Dance a huge success. Don't forget the date, July 21st, 8:00 p.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Race Track. Tickets $2.00 per couple. No stags admitted. Drinks and refreshments will be available-but natch! And we do want you amateurs who sing, play instruments or have any special talent to start brushing up and compete in our Amateur Contest. You won't be sorry-three cash merchandise orders will be presented to the lucky winners. Interested??? Call Mrs. De Young at 773 for details. Jitterbugs and all others, you can strut your stuff too. Three dance contests to take care of all of you, with a prize for each winning couple in each contest. Those of you who haven't secured your tickets yet can do so at both Navy Exchanges and the PX. So hurry, hurry, hurry. NEXT WEEK'S BASEBALL SCHEDULE At Fleet Recreation Monday-NSD vs. Hospital Tuesday-Marines vs. VU-10 Wednesday-TraGrp vs. Seabees Thursday-NSD vs. NAS Saturday-Marines vs. NavSta At Marine Site Saturday-Marines vs. NavSta Sunday-TraGrp vs. Hospital WAF: "How are you doing in your race to matrimony?" WAC: "I think I'm on my last lap." HOSPITAL NOTES Heirport News: This has been a busy week in the nursery. Six new citizens having made their appearance: James Allan Smith born 1 July to HM2 and Mrs. C. W. Smith; Keith Holland Robertson born 1 July to ENS and Mrs. K. H. Robertson; Donna Marie Dlugi born 2 July to CSC and Mrs. F. M. Dlugi Melanie Jayne Dickey born 2 July to CAPT and Mrs. M. N. Dickey, USAF; Marsha Jean Thorn born 3 July to LTJG J. I. Thorn, and Baby Girl Mills born 6 July to BM2 and Mrs. W. O. Mills. O. L. Frakes, HM3 departed this week for duty at Naval Hospital Portsmouth, Virginia. G. A. Templeton,. HMC and C. H. Gerhold, HM1 have received flimsies of orders to ComSIX. LTJG Spicer, MC has received orders for residency training in X-ray at Naval Hospital, Bethesda. LTJG Moschella has received notice of acceptance of resignation, effective on or about 15 November. We haven't heard anything about our sailboat enthusiast b e i n g dunked recently. Has he finally learned to sail a boat, or did he just give up? We are really wondering about Mrs. Quielisch -did she really fall in or was that just her way of cooling off. IF YOU USE WATER, READ THIS! (Continued from Page One) be continously watered, and overzealous attempts to keep grass green beyond the extent intended by Nature and beyond the need for sustaining plant life; or lack of supervision of domestic servants, many of whom never plug the sink when, washing dishes or rinsing clothes. Most of the grass on this Base will live through severe drought conditions and a Kellygreen lawn was never intended by Nature for grass in this locale at this season of the year. During the month of July, occupants of quarters where excessive. amounts of water have been expended for June will receive written notice of such fact, and it is expected that voluntary steps will be taken to insure that more drastic action is not required. Remember that the water bill for the Base must be paid out of funds which also pay for maintenance and improvements. With reduced funds now available for these purposes due to recent cuts in allotments, the saving of water is "a must". Hamburg, Funkstown and Foggy Bottom were names applied long ago 'to the Potomac-shore section of the District of Columbia about where the stately Lincoln memorial now stands. ' Sunday, 9 July 1950 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Mabses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LT P. J. MARRON, USNR (Catholic) LOVE AND MARRIAGE For the next four Sundays, Chaplain Faulk will speak on the general subject: "Love and Marriage" at the 1100 Protestant Church Service. It is believed that these discussions will be of particular interest to young men who are contemplating marriage and are interested in a discussion on the purpose of marriage. These discussions, however, will not be limtied to the unmarried but will be of interest to all. The subject for Sunday, 9 July, is "Marriage Is For Adults!" LIBRARY NOTES Our Library needs books. Every effort is made to provide a wide variety of reading material in the Base Library, but our sources of supply are limited. In the past the Library has received many donations of valuable books which have added greatly to our collection. Any one having books that they desire to donate to the Library are invited to call the number 672 and the books will be picked up. Donations of Westerns and "whodunits" would be especially useful. Interesting books for the interested: "Handbook of Basic Motion Picture Technique" for the camera fan; "Great Mistakes of The War" for the serious; "The Art of Real Happiness" for the concerned; "Rough Justice" for the drugstore cowboy; "Homicide House" for the thrill seekers; "The Art of Plain Talk" for the convincing; "Boatbuilding" for the handyman; and "The Flame Tree" for the bored. Jane: "You're making a mistake marrying Ed. He'll lead :a double life." .Joan: "Yeah, but unless I do marry him, I'll lead a single life." Sailor: (sitting with his girl in the moonlight): "I'd like to ask you a question. Girl (breathlessly): "Yes?" Sailor: "Will you please move over? I'm sitting on a nail. I 0 Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 8 July 1950

PAGE 3

Saturday. July 1950 Scout Affairs By Henry Crommelin, Jr. The Boy Scout camp at Nicaro proved to be a very successful one, due to the efforts of CAPT and Mrs. Lloyd, the manager of the nickel mines and plant in Nicaro. Others who deserve credit are: LT K. L. Jones, camp director, L. Price, assisant scoutmaster, C. W. Abbott, scoutmaster, the Troop Committee and Chaplain Faulk, the local scout commissioner. Those people and many others were responsible for the success of the camp. A typical day began with reveille at 6:00 a.m., at 6:10 all hands fell in for calisthenics and drill practice which lasted until 6:40. Between 6:40 and 7:00 chow. Everybody took showers and washed up. After 8:00 colors, there was a room and personnel inspection. Until 10:30 the boys passed and studied for Boy Scout tests for their next advancements. From 10:30 to 12:00 chow, a soft ball game was usually underway. At 1:00 p.m. the scouts prepared for a short three mile hike to a fresh water river for swimming. On the way to and from, many new kinds of plants and trees and occasionally signs of a bird or animal were found. The scouts would return to the barracks by 4:30 and would wash up for 5:00 chow. After chowthe scouts relaxed, studied or played catch with a soft ball until 6:43 colors. Following colors there was either an indoor or outdoor camp fire, or movies brought from the Base. Usually by. 9:15 the movies or the campfire would be over. At 9:30 the day would come to a close with taps. As a result of this trip, seven boys plan to go up for Second Class Scout from one to three plan to go up for First Class and another hopes to get three merit badges at the Board of Review which will be held in the near future. From eight to ten boys going up for a new advancement out of fourteen shows that the camp was successful. As a gesture of goodwill, the Boy Scouts played the Cuban boys in two softball games and had the Cuban fellows in for chow. In turn, the Cuban school children put on a very impressive ceremony in which the Cuban and American flags were exchanged. The insurance salesman was talking to a friend. He said: "You know I served in the Navy S during World War II." "You did?" Did you get a commission?" "Naw. I just got a. straight salary." O'ER THE TEA CUPS By Betty Radcliffe Well the 4th of July has gone again for another year. It was quite a day too. The fourth was the birthday of Mrs. E. H. Mooneyham and she celebrated with a buffet supper at her home. Also on the fourth, Mrs. L. Bonatta returned from leave in the States. Welcome back, Anne. A couple of weeks ago, NSD gave a grand supper party at the Race Track. The party served a dual purpose ...a farewell party for CDR and Mrs. L. P. Kimball and a welcome to CDR and Mrs. L. Metzger. A five-piece Cuban orchestra furnished the music for dancing. CDR Kimball was presented with a "mobile caddy" .. a sort of caddy on wheels. Speaking of the Race Track from what I have been told, Recreation has really done a fine job in fixing the old Race Track into a marvelous recreation park with dance pavillion, bar, picnic tables, barbecue pit, horseshoe pitching area, volley ball court, etc. Last Monday, the Camera Club held a meeting at which time Mrs. Thelma Foster was presented with a Photograph Album as a farewall gift. Mrs. Foster was one of the original members and she will be missed by the entire club. Good luck, Thelma. As you must know by now, the L. A. F. R. A. will hold a big dance at the Race Track on the 21st of this month. The big event of the dance will be the amateur talent contest ...can you sing, or do imitations, dance, stand on your head, or something like that? Come on, limber up the talent and be prepared to participate in the contest. I have been told that the "Shipwreck" dance at the CPO Club was a huge success. There were many original and clever costumes worn. Mrs. L. G. Gomez won the ladies prize for costume ...she was bedecked in vines, leaves and flowers. There was hope and a promise of more "Shipwreck" dances at the Club because of the popularity of this one. Either I nag enough or my husband reads this column ..anyway, I finally got my barbecue pit. See ya' later. TRICKY QUICKY An express train left New York for Washington, D. C., at the same time that a local left Washington for New York. The express averaged 60 miles an hour and the local 30 miles per hour. When they passed each other, which train was nearer New York? Last Week's Solution: There were four boxes of apples and two boxes of peaches. TEEN AGE ROUNDUP By Barbara Thomas Have received some interesting news from Cecil Pederson such as the smothered feeling one has when attending a movie in a closed building and the way people are crowded and pushed in the shopping districts. We certainly aren't bothered that way here in Gtmo, are we? I suppose after we leave here, we realize more and more how wonderful life here really is. How 'bout it boys and girls? Susie Maulsby is learning to sail and I am sure she will do well at it for Susie does well at everything she tries. I am going to have to apologize for not having more news this week but I haven't been able to find out what everyone is doing. I do promise to write longer articles after school opens again, but in the meantime, be sure to call me at 601 and give me any bit of news you might have. SPORTS QUIZ By Armed Forces Press Service QUESTIONS 1. Trainers Willie Molter and Bill Bishop saddled the most winners in 1949. Was it 103, 129, or 81? 2. Iowa, Holy Cross, and University of Pittsburgh have new football coaches this year. Can you name them? 3. Who was younger when he won the heavyweight boxing title, Jack Dempsey or Gene Tunney? 4. Name the winner of the first Masters golf tournament in Augusta. Ga., in 1934 who repeated in 1936. 5. What star gridder at Yale in 1909, coached the Blue in football the following year? ANSWERS ASon Pas t' ,q~4jui uo41011 sumx Seuunj, 'Tzg sum Aasclua( "g "111d '13AOUzSSV uerl :SSOai AloH 'uosrepuv etppa I "~Any of you birds ever pulled a tooth ?" Saturday 8 July 1950 THE INDIAN Paste Three

PAGE 4

Saturday, 8 July 1950 THE INDIAN Otmo. Bay-6 Jul 50-2500. EXTRA INNING GAMES FEATURE WEEK'S BASEBALL PLAY Jim Webster Fans 20 as Sox Nip VU-10 2 to 1 In 11 Innings; Hospital Takes 14 Inning 3 to 2 Win From Seabees The Marine Site Diamond was full of action Saturday afternoon as the Hospital kept on the win trail by edging the Seabees 3 to 2 in a fourteen inning thriller. The Hospital drew first blood by pushing across one run in the bottom of the first. Call reached first on an error, stole second and scored on successive passed balls. The Seabees tied the score in the top of the fifth. Phillips singled to center, stole second, reached third on an error and crossed the plate on a passed ball. The pitchers took control of the game up to the fourteenth inning when the Seabees pushed across what looked to be the winning marker. Clugh singled, stole second and scored on successive single by Outlaw and Irvin. In the bottom of the fourteenth Maloy retired the first two batters. With two out and none on, Zimmerman drew a base on balls. Clements then reached first on a miscue by the shortstop, Zimmerman going to third. Havelka then singled across the tying run with Clements holding third and later scored the winning marker on another passed ball. Clements hurled the first four and one-third innings for the Hospital, fanning five. Havelka came on in the fifth with three on and one out, retired the side with only one run crossing the plate and went the renaing innings getting credit for twelve strikeouts. It was a real heartbreaker for Maloy to lose as his mates could push across only two runs on their fourteen hits while he pitched four-hit ball through the fourteen innings and set down thirteen swinging. In the second extra inning contest of the week, the Naval Station Red Sox took a hard earned 2 to 1, eleven inning victory from VU-10. It was a battle of pitchers all the way. Jim Webster, Red Sox southpaw, fanned twenty batters in eight and two-thirds innings and gave up but one hit, a first inning single. The Sox scored the game's first run in the bottom of the seventh. With-one out, O'Niel singled, stole second, went to third on a fielder's choice and scored on a wild pitch; In the top of the ninth, VU-10 pushed across the tying run without a hit. Johnson drew a base on balls, reached second on a sacrifice, went to third on an error and a fielder's choice and scored on a sacrifice bunt. In the last of the eleventh, Stocklosa reached first on a costly error by the VU,-10 third baseman, went to second on a fielder's choice, and stole third, VU-10 then lifted Patton in favor ek Perry of Brown who quickly poured two fast strikes past Johnson, but then with a two and two count, Johnson drove the next pitch to center for a clean single which proved to be the game winning blow. Jim Webster pitched brilliant ball for eight and two-thirds innings. O'Niel took over with two out in the eighth and held the opposition hitless, struck out four and got credit for the win. The Naval Station pitchers tossed ten consecutive no-hit innings. For VU-10, Ratte started and went seven innings, giving up three hits and fanning six. He was relieved by Patton who was touched for the loss although he gave up only one hit and struck out two. Brown pitched to one batter in the eleventh and that was Johnson who came through in the clutch for the Sox. Thursday night, last week, the Naval Air Station kept in the running by knocking off VU-10 16 to 8. Jones started on the hill for the Flyers and went three and a third innings, striking out four. Eggebrecht took over in the fourth and finished the remaining inning, fanning eight while notching his third win. Smith homered for the winners with one on in the bottom of the sixth. Ratte started for VU-10, went five innings and was clipped for the loss. Jones came on in the bottom of the sixth but needed help from Patton who went the final three innings. This trio of hurlers got seven strikeouts and was touched for twelve hits. Sunday afternoon the Training Group just missed pulling an upset that would have rocked Guantanamo Bay. A four run seventh inning set the stage for another Red Sox victory. "Ace" Adams started on the mound for the Sox and went five innings, giving up two runs and striking out three. Anders came on in the sixth, struck out four and got credit for his first win of the season. O'Niel, Red Sox fireballer, was called in to pitch the last two innings as the Training Group threatened to turn the tide with a rally that was cut off at three runs in the eighth. Groves hurled for the Training Group and fanned six. He was relieved by Inman in the top of the eighth who finished up and got one man swinging. Groves was the loser. Monday night the Marines topped the Supply Depot by a score of 10 to two. Larum handled the mound duties for the winners for six innings, got credit for four strikeouts and was clipped for five hits. Dukes finished up giving up three hits and fanning three. Larum received credit for the win. "Knuckles" Lazzaroni started on the hill for the Supply Depot and pitched two-hit ball for six innings but then the Marines found the range and clipped him for nine hits in two innings. Rosario took the mound in the ninth and struck out two. Lazzaroni fanned seven and was touched for the loss. Rosraio hit a round tripper in the bottom of the sixth with none on. The NAS-Hospital game which was to be played on the 4th of July was postponed to a later date. The following is the up to date record of pitchers who have won games this season: Name Team W L Jones NAS -------4 0 O'Niel NavSta 3 0 Farnum Marines 2 0 Adams NavSta 1 0 Anders NavSta 1 0 Brown VU-10 ------1 0 Critz Marines 1 0 Neeley NAS -------1 0 Webster NavSta 4 1 Eggebrecht NAS -------3 1 Dukes Marines 4 2 Jones VU-10 ------2 1 Clements Hospital 3 2 Havelka Hospital 2 2 Maloy Seabees 2 5 Rosario NSD ------2 5 THE STANDINGS (As of Thursday morning) Team NavSta NAS -------------Marines Hospital --VU-10 -.NSD Seabees -----TraGrp ------W 9 8 7 5 4 2 2 0 L 1 1 2 4 6 7 7 8 NAS MOVIE LYCEUM Sunday, 9 July CHICAGO DEADLINE Alan Ladd Dona Reed Monday, 10 July THE WOMAN ON PIER 13 Robert Ryan Loriane Day Tuesday, 11 July ON THE TOWN Gene Kelly Ann Miller Wednesday, 12 July WITHOUT HONOR Loraine Day Franchot Tone Thursday, 13 July THE DEVIL'S HENCHMAN Warner Baxter Mike Muzarki Friday, 14 July CHALLENGE TO LASSIE Edmund Gwetui Donald Crisp Saturday. 15 July .TRAPPED Lloyd Bridges James Todd S d' S Saturday, 8 July 1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-6 Jul 50-2500.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EUOUMGBG6_6S9YOW INGEST_TIME 2015-10-20T20:56:08Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00114
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EA0DAI5HN_3NU9LT INGEST_TIME 2015-05-20T21:36:43Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00114
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES