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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Vol. V, No. 11 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 May 1950


HARDENING BEACH SAND FOR TEMPORARY ROADS

Some months ago the Base received a peculiar request from the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Samples of beach sand from selected locations were requested for use in a "program concerned with the stabilization of beach sand". At the time this request was made, the importance of the program was not fully realized. However, published accounts in technical journals as well as the popular press, now
reveal the value of this program.
A Princeton University scientist, working under contract for the Bureau of Yards and Docks has developed a technique of beach stabilization which will permit the passage of heavy trucks over
sandy areas within a few hours after the process has been completed. The process is a mixing densification operation performed in one trip by ordinary road building equipment and can be done at a rate of about 12 feet per second.
Within a matter of a couple of
hours, the resulting "paving" supports the weight of a slow moving
jeep without visibly deforming the pavement. Some hours later a truck with a gross load of 131/2 tons can pass over the same "pavement"
repeatedly without affecting the
surface.
Veterans of the Marines and
"SeaBees" who participated in the Iwo Jima operations need no introduction to the horrors of bogging down when trying to establish
a beach-head on unstable sand.
Tests are continuing with various
types of sand so that the process may be applied on all kinds of beaches, and it is presumed that the Guantanamo samples will be
used for these experiments.
It is interesting to observe that
the development of the techniques described in this article comprises another peace-time bond between the famed war-time buddies, the
Marines and the "SeaBees".
To assure yourself that your boy
or girl will have the education you desire for them- Buy Savings
Bonds now.


CHRISTOPHER L. ZIZ
RETIRES 15 MAY

More than thirty years of Federal service-28 of it on this Base
-is the enviable record of Christopher L. Ziz, clerk in the Naval Supply Depot. With a comfortable annuity in prospect, Mr. Ziz will return to the United States on 15 May for voluntary retirement from the Federal service.
In putting in more service on the Base than any other continen-


Christopher L. Ziz
tal American citizen (or so available records indicate), Mr. Ziz has seen the Base grow from the small station it was in 1922 to the important operating base it has become today.
Born in De Lisle, Mississippi of French-Austrian parentage, Mr. Ziz lived the life of a typical smalltown boy until service in World War I gave him a yen for travel. After his return from France, where he served with the 101st Engineers of the 26th Division, he studied bookkeeping in Jackson, Mississippi.
Soon after completing the course, he took a Civil Service examination, and when offered appointment as a bookkeeper at Guantanamo Bay, he took the job. He had heard of the Naval station from a cousin who had visited here while in the Navy, and thought he'd like it. The entrance rate of pay was $4.64 per day, considered an excellent salary in 1922.
(Continued on Page Two)


PICNIC AND FIELD DAY TO BE HELD TUESDAY
The fourth annual NOB School' picnic and field day will be held at the Fleet Recreation Center on Tuesday, May 9, beginning at 10:00 a.m., according to a school announcement made last week. Coach Edward J. Ondrasik, of the school staff, is again general chairman of the program. He is being assisted by Mrs. Barbara Broughton, the students, faculty, and patrons of the school, and by the Naval Station Recreation Department.
All parents of school age children are again cordially invited to join with children and teachers in a day of sports and organized field events, play and good food-a program planned for the enjoyment of every member of the family. If you are a patron or friend of the school come out and enjoy yourself. There will be games, field contests, and prizes for the children in grades kindergarten through twelve, and free food and soft drinks for all.
Free Food in Family Restaurant
All food will be served in the Family Restaurant. The kindergarten children, with their parents, will begin eating about 11:30 a.m. It is requested that parents with more than one child accompany their youngest child or children into the Family Restaurant for lunch. After the kindergarten children and parents have eaten, the first group of primary children and parents will be served. No one will enter the restaurant until the group to which he or she belongs has been called over the loud speaker and is requested to do so. It has been pointed out that this is very important, as the seating capacity of the restaurant is limited. Buses for Children and Parents The regular school buses that transport children in grades kindergarten through six will leave the Transportation Office on the morning of the field day at 9:15 a.m., and will make their regular school route run to pick up kindergarten and elementary children, and those parents who wish to ride. These buses are expected to arrive at.
(Continued on Page Three)








Pag Tw HEI ..Sauda,6. a.15


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg..
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 6 May 1950
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JO3 ---------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service material which may be reprinted with the credit line: AFPS.

CHRISTOPHER L. ZIZ
RETIRES 15 MAY
(Continued from Page One)
Travel in the early 1920's was rugged. When Mr. Ziz finished his first two-year contract at the Base, he went by slow train from Boqueron to Havana, and thence by United Fruit Co. steamer to New Orleans.
While on leave, he married a girl he had known for more than ten years, and brought his bride back to the Base. He recalls that they lived at first in an apartment located near the present site of the Naval Hospital. In December of 1924, he and Mrs. Ziz moved to Quarters K, one of the civilian houses located near the NOB administration building, and there they have lived for the past 26 years.
Their only child, Dolores, was born in Quarters K on 11 November 1925. Now Mrs. Earl Eichenlaub, she lives in St. Louis, where her husband is studying electronics.
Mr. Ziz thinks of his years on the Base as very happy ones, and has been well satisfied with life at Guantanamo Bay. Conveniences have been added to make life more pleasant as the years went by. The early predecessor of the present .supermarket S h ip s Store Ashoi'e was a small commissary store where one could purchase canned goods once a month, and fresh meats twice a week. "Not that anyone was ever allowed to go hungry," Mr. Ziz hastily explains. "If anyone ran out of food, he could get some more, but those were the regular selling days."
Mr. Ziz has regularly engaged in active sports during his entire service on the Base, and though now 56 years old, plays, at least two sets of tennis each week. In 1947 he bowled a perfect score, with only one embarrassing fact to mar the occasion. He was bowling against the NSD officers' team
(Continued on Page Four)


HOSPITAL NOTES

Heirport News: Maria Teresa Mendoza born 28 April to SD3 and Mrs. B. Mendoza; baby girl VanHorn born 30 April to HMC and Mrs. T. J. VanHorn (the VanHorn's were so sure they would get a boy this time they had already chosen a name for him and are now at a loss to decide on a name for a girl), but the stork fouled things up and left the boy with AD1 and Mrs. W.M. Schmauder on 1 May-he's named William R. Schmauder.
Another birth which we are happy to report is that of Joyce Ann Hunter on 27 April in San Diego; the proud parents are LTJG and Mrs. R. E. Hunter. Mr. Hunter expects to make the acquaintance of this newest addition to his family in about two of three weeks.
LTJG Carrie J. Wright NC, USN upon acceptance of her resignation from the Navy, was separated last Monday. Mrs. Wright is living at the Air Station and we expect to see her around here frequently.
Riddle, MMC and Hulst HM1 departed for duty at Corpus Christi and San Diego respectively.
Departing on leave: Gallant, HMC, Doyle, HM2, Farro, SN and Major, SN. Returned from leave Spronberger, SN.

MARINE MUSINGS
By CPL Allen Brown
The Marine Detachment from the USS Columbus has returned to its duties aboard ship after having completed annual range firing with a very high percentage of qualification.
How many of you have noticed the new grandstand at the Post ball field? This past week a coat of paint was added and our diamond now looks like a small Yankee Stadium.
This week in our sports review, our catcher takes the spotlight. MSGT McLellan, presently First Sergeant of Guard Platoon, was born in Bay City, Michigan and graduated from high school in that city. After graduation, he enrolled in the Bay City Business School and completed his course there in 1937. Upon completion of this schooling, McLellan was employed by the General Motors Plant at Saginaw, Michigan. Came the war
-he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served in both the Asiatic and the European Theaters. After his discharge, he reenlisted and has been in the Corps ever since. "Mac" has played "semi-pro" baseball. and while at high school, he played both softball and football. Loads of luck to MSGT McLellan in all future games yet to be played. May -he do as well in them as he has'done in the past!
All for 'now, with more next week.


4wa~fii S


Sunday, 7 May 1950 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK USN
(Protestant)
LT P.J. MARRON, USNR
(Catholic)

O'ER THE TEA CUPS
By Betty Radcliffe
Last week-end yours truly and better half were among the lucky ones to make the trip to Jamaica. Everyone I have talked to enjoyed the trip very much.
I could go into a lot of detail about Jamaica; about how beautiful and colorful the country is, how lovely Hope Garden is-the Garden is 92 years old and covers 350 acres, I could comment on the hospitality of the Jamaicans and the delicious food-as I said. I could say all these things, but those of you that have not been there would be envious and those who have been there would be bored reading about it; so I will merely say; If you haven't been Jamaica, you should try to go in the near future.
Mrs. A.L. Ernest has returned after spending several weeks in the States. Part of the time was spent in the Hospital and the rest of the time she spent with her family. Glad to know you are feeling better Marge.
LT and Mrs. E. R. Shapard have also returned to Gtmo. after spending several weeks on leave. Welcome back, Dr. and Mrs. Shapard.
On Apr. 25th Drs. Vonfraenkel, Freitas, Cronemiller, and Childs gave themselves a "Wetting Down" party. Dr. Freitas is now a CDR and Drs. Vonfraenkel, Cronemiller and Childs are LCDRs; Mrs. Freitas is in the States and, missed the party, but the other wives helped with the celebration.
Mrs. McIntosh deserves a lot credit for the good 'she is doing in the Dry Cleaning plant. Since she has been in there a lot of changes have been made. There was a time when hangers and service was at a premium. Today, decent hangers, dress and suit bags, and alterations have been added; plus faster and better service. Now it is very much like a Stateside dry cleaning plant.
She swears no man's lips have ever touched hers. That's enough to make any girl swear.


I


8


















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Page Two


THE INDIAN


Saturday. 6 May 1950








Saturday, 6 May 1950 THE INDIAN Pare Three


*-Girl Scout


Notes
By Adeline Irwin
The Girl Scout Troop Flag arrived in Sunday's mail, just one week late for the Presentation, but "Better late than Never!" The flag is really beautiful. It is divided horizontially, by blue and white. In the center is a gold Trefoil. On the blue field in white lettering is "Troop 2" and on the white field in blue lettering is "Guantanamo Bay, Cuba". We are very proud of this flag and hope to have an opportunity to show it off, to all of
you, good people.
The Brownies made themselves
-name pins", Tuesday 25 April to enable the leaders to call each little ,elf by name. There are 36 Brownies and the helpers are ever changing, so it is very difficult to know each child without some kind of
identification.
Last Tuesday, the Brownies had
a May Day party, complete with May pole, May day songs, and refreshments supplied by the girls' mothers. Yours truly, was sorry to have to hurry away, but the Girl Scout Organization is looking for a permanent meeting place and Tuesday was just a busy day.

PICNIC AND FIELD DAY
TO BE HELD TUESDAY
(Continued from Page One)
the Recreation Center just before 10:00 a.m. The two buses used for high school transportation will then make their regular run to pick up high. school students and
parents. Parents and children Wishing to come in private cars are urged to do so and should plan to arrive not later than 10:00 a.m.
promptly, at which time the competitive field events will get under way. Children* in the third grade and below should not come to the picnic at hl uiless accompanied
by. a parent or another adult.
Full Program Planned
There will be softball and other
equipment for play before and after the various groups have competed in the field'.,ev~nts. There will be softball and other scheduled games after lunch. It is expected that the day's progrkm'..will be completed early in" the afternoon, at which time the buses will be available to return children and parents to
their homes.
It is hoped that as many parents
as possible will co.me out and enjoy a day of fun with their children; and that parents, teachers, and children will get to know and. understand each other better as a result .of.this year's .field day and picnic.


TRAINING GROUP
TRIVIALS

By S. F. Dodge YNC
CAPT "Mac" Rides Gen. Hodges
The Fleet Training Group has reluctantly contributed a passenger to the Hodges, New York bound this weekend, and it's with the utmost regret and sincerity of heart our final farewells are addressed to our departing Group Commander, Captain H.D. McIntosh. He has reigned over this command since November 23, 1947 and from that time until now we have grown to know him as an officer big in principal though small in stature.
There is an ageless and energetic glint to the blue eyes of this water warrior who was commissioned Ensign at the Naval Academy upon graduation in June 1922. He is a tried and proven sailor, schooled by his assignments to destroyers, battleships, transports, cruisers, and shore assignments.
Following his arrival in New York, Captain McIntosh will enjoy a well learned vacation in that city and Washington, D. C. before heading for the West Coast to assume his duties as Commanding Officer, Naval Ammunition Depot, Mare Island, California.
As with all billets as Commanding Officer, there is assigned the the collateral responsibility of morale; we shall go a step beyond that here at the Training Group and say that Captain McIntosh has held this at such a high level that we prefer to say he has established among us an enviable brotherhood of man and it would be a pleasure to serve with him again.
Kirtland Lauds McIntosh
Our personal esteem for Captain McIntosh is echoed in a message received by him from the Commander, Training Command, Atlantic Fleet, which we quote:
"Msg Capt McIntosh. Under your capable and energetic leadership the FTG Gtmo has developed an enviable reputation among Atlantic Fleet Unit'. In the performance of duty there is always so. much that cannot be commanded, it can only be 'given'. This has been the predominantt characteristic of vourself and your FTG. Best of luck and may we soon be shipmates again". RADM Kirtland.
Command Relinquished
In a ,ceremony which was impressive because of its brevity and substance, Captain McIntosh read the orders, at 0900, 5 May 1950 which detached him as Commander, Fleet Training Group, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He was temporarily relieved by Captain V. Havard, Jr., who will serve in an "Acting" capacity .until the newly assigned Group Commander arrives.


& Boy Scout
SAffairs


To start the ball rolling in this week's Scout. news, I want to give the dope on when the next overnight hike to Escondido Bay will be held.
The grapevine tells me that the Scouts will leave early in the morning on the 29th of May, and return on the 30th, in the afternoon-in plenty of time to tell Mom and Dad all about the hike and get ready to go to the movies!
Our meeting last night was a real success. There wasn't a boy there who didn't think it was the best so far., We had a special interest talk, which was given by LT K. L. .("Whitey") Jones, a member of the Troop Committee. Mr. Jones spoke to us on the "Bikini Atoll" atom bomb test. It was very interesting, the majority of the Scouts were perched attentatively on the edge of their seats from beginning to end! We, as members of Scout Troop No. 35, wish to express our deepest appreciation 'to Mr. Jones for so willingly consenting to give up his free time for the express purpose of being with us last night and contributing so well to the evening's entertainment.
Our special interest speaker for next meeting will be LT J. E. Herman, who is also a member of the Committee. "We are all looking forward to his talk with much enthusiasm.
We had mbre than a special interest' speaker last night. When I said a c6uple of weeks ago that the Scouts were on the move, that is exactly what I meant! We had some instruction in First Aid for the boys who are working on their Second Class Badge, and instruction in astronomy for the ones who are soon going to be eligible for First Class 'Scouts.
Asst. Scoutmaster Leonard Price was working with the group who are studying First Aid, and Asst. Scoutmaster Jerry J. Dickson was working 'with: the other group. After the meeting, just to show that the instructions paid off, several of the boys stayed and passed some ,of their' First Aid requirements. The future astronomers also had a :session with the Big Dipper, Little Dipper, Cassiopia and the Milky Way.
Starting ,next week there will be regular classes for the Scouts who wish to qualify for the radio and astronomy Merit Badges. That's thirty for now folks; see you next week!
"What's a buccaneer?"
"Too much. to pay for corn."


Saturday, 6 Ma~y 1950


THE: INDIAN


' Paee Three








Saturday. 6 May 1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-4 May 50-2500


TELEGRAPHIC MONEY
ORDER SERVICE
Effective 1 May 1950, the All American Cable Company has established a telegraphic money order service both to and from the continental United States for the use of personnel based here. It is hoped that this service will' be of benefit to the residents of the Base.
The charge in conection with telegraphing money to the States will be the cost of the message plus the money order charge. Money may be forwarded at* either the full rate, deferred rate, or night letter rate message charge as the sender desires. The charge for the transmittal of money will be 2% of the amount sent up to $200 with a minimum fee of 75�. For transmittal of a money order in excess of $200, the charge Will be 2% of the first $200 and one half of 1% for all in excess of $200.
This service is available from 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m. daily.
ANNUAL NAVY RELIEF DRIVE UNDERWAY

The "Annual Call for Contributions" for the Navy Relief Society was announced this week. The drive, to be conducted throughout the Navy during the period 4 May, to 6 June, commemorates the NavyAir-Marine battles at Coral Sea and Midway.
Although a large portion of the recent "Spanish Main" charity Carnival proceeds, which has now grown to $18,085.41 will be directed to Navy Relief, the Commander has been directed to solicit voluntary contributions from Base Personnel. Chaplain Faulk has been designated as funds chairman for the campaign to accept any voluntary contributions offered.

CHRISTOPHER L. ZIZ
RETIRES 15 MAY
(Continued from Page Two) at the time.
"You could buy a lot more for a dollar in those days," say Mr. Ziz. at the time.
The most exciting period on the Base was probably the sudden growth which began with the advent of hostilities in Europe in 1939, Mr. Ziz believes. After years of placid routine (including a period in 1932 when the Supply Department had less than 30 employees), all suddenly became hurry and confusion, as thousands of men went to work to complete the many projects which brought the Base to its present size. When Mr. and Mrs. Ziz leave the Base on 15 May, flying to Jacksonville for further transportation to New Orleans, they will take with them the good wishes of the many friends they have made during their years at Guantanamo Bay.


YOUR MOVIE GUIDE

Dates listed are those for NAS Movie Lyceum
Sunday-"Thieves Highway"-A story of a son who goes out to avenge his father who has lost both his legs and has been robbed through the action of a crooked fruit dealer. The son joins with a trucker and brings a load of apples to San Francisco where the crooked dealer has his business. He learns the man's identity, hires a girl to lure him to her room where he awaits him. A terrific fight ensues and the crooked dealer is finally arrested. Cast also includes Lee J. Cobb and Jack Oakie.
Monday-"Red Light". A priest is killed by a man his brother had sent to prison for embezzlement.
The brother thought it contained the name of the murderer. Eventually he finds out what his brother was referring to and the murderer is killed while in flight. Cast includes Gene Lockhart, Ray Burr. Short Subject is "Movietone News", a sports review.
Tuesday-"Roseanna McCoy"to featured players Joan Evans and Farley Granger goes much of the credit for the success of this Hatfield-McCoy romance. Based upon a novel by Alberta Hannum, the story is concerned with the famous feud which flourished among the hills of the Blue Ridge Mountains during the 1880's. Excellent performances are also given by Raymond Massey, Charles Bickford and Richard Basehart.
Wednesday-"The Big Wheel"Mickey Rooney stars in a film about auto racing which has some highly exciting moments. If you like action filled pictures you'll enjoy this. Part of the action centers around the Indianapolis Speedway. Cast includes Thomas Mitchell.
Thursday-"Abandoned"-A story about the expose of a baby profiteering racket disclosed by a girl whose sister is killed under suspicious circumstances after giving her fatherless baby out for adoption. With the help of a newspaperman and the district attorney, the leaders of the baby-selling racket are caught and the baby located. Two shorts. Friday-"Miss Grant Takes Richmond"-Picked for her dumbness a young girl is hired as a secretary for a realty firm, which unknown to her is a front for a bookie service. In trying to make good the new secretary becomes very annoying to her employer and involves him in many complications, but love eventually solves everything. Cast includes James Gleason and Janis Carter. Musical Short.

Joe: "Do you know how to make anti-freeze ?"
Shmoe: "Sure. Hide her woolen underwear."


NAVAL AIR STATION
DUMPS NAVAL STATION,,.
The Naval Air Station Flyers, irked by their collapse in the final games of the first round of the Base Softball League avenged an. earlier 8-3 loss to the Naval Station by cubbing that team, 9-1 on Wednesday night. The Flyers were in complete command of the game all the way.
Wednesday night's win for the Flyers gave them a four won and none lost record for the second round which ends next week. If they maintain their record they will meet the Naval Station in a playoff for the Base softball title.
Monday night saw three teams emerge victorious by wide margins. The Hospital nine was engaged in the closest game when they whipped VU-10 by a 10-6 score. The Marine diamond squad clipped the NSD crew by a 12-6 score while the Naval Station walloped the Training Group by 14-4 count.

KUDOS TO COMNOB

The following letter of thanks was received this week by the Base Commander from Mr. Owen Roberts, President of the Caribbean International Airways, Ltd., whose plane recently crashed into the Caribbean, the survivors of which were sighted first VU-10. The letter:
" . . . I must take this opportunity of thanking you, the officers, NCOs and enlisted men under your command for the very able and efficient air-sea rescue arrangement which led to the safe recovery of the four survivors of our air craft VPBAO.
"I am glad to say that the survivors were entirely unharmed and I would like to express this company's gratitude for the scale of effort which you organized and for the efficiency with which it was carried out.

MOVIE LOG
N.A.S. MOVIE LYCEUM
Saturday 6 May
FRONTIER INVESTIGATION
Alan Lane Eddie Waller
Sunday, 7 May
THIEVES HIGHWAY
Richard Conte Valentia Cortesa
Monday, 8 May RED LIGHT
George Raft Virginia Mayo
Tuesday, 9 May
ROSEANNA McCOY
Farley Granger Joan Evans.
Wednesday, 10 May
THE BIG WHEEL
Mickey Rooney Mary Hatcher
Thursday, 11 May ABANDONED
Dennis O'Keefe Gale Storm
Friday, 12 May
MISS GRANT TAKES
RICHMOND
Lucille Ball William Holden


S






























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S


Saturday, 6 May 1950


THE INDIAN


Gtyro. ,Bay- -4 May 50-2500,




Full Text

PAGE 1

Vol. V, No. 11 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 May 1950 HARDENING BEACH SAND FOR TEMPORARY ROADS Some months ago the Base received a peculiar request from the Bureau of Yards and Docks. Samples *of beach sand from selected locations were requested for use in a "program concerned with the stabilization of beach sand". At the time this request was made, the importance of the program was not fully realized. However, published accounts in technical journals as well as the popular press, now reveal the value of this program. A Princeton University scientist, working under contract for the Bureau of Yards and Docks has developed a technique of beach stabilization which will permit the passage of heavy trucks over sandy areas within a few hours after the process has been completed. The process is a mixing densification operation performed in one trip by ordinary road building equipment and can be done at a rate of about 12 feet per second. Within a matter of a couple of hours, the resulting "paving" supports the weight of a slow moving jeep without visibly deforming the pavement. Some hours later a truck with a gross load of 13/ tons can pass over the same "pavement" repeatedly without affecting the surface. Veterans of the Marines and "SeaBees" who participated in the Iwo Jima operations need no introduction to the horrors of bogging down when trying to establish a beach-head on unstable sand. Tests are continuing with various types of sand so that the process may be applied on all kinds of beaches, and it is presumed that the Guantanamo samples will be used for these experiments. It is interesting to observe that the development of the techniques described in this article comprises another peace-time bond between the famed war-time buddies, the Marines and the "SeaBees". To assure yourself that your boy or girl will have the education you desire for them -Buy Savings Bonds now. CHRISTOPHER L. ZIZ RETIRES 15 MAY More than thirty years of Federal service-28 of it on this Base -is the enviable record of Christopher L. Ziz, clerk in the Naval Supply Depot. With a comfortable annuity in prospect, Mr. Ziz will return to the United States on 15 May for voluntary retirement from the Federal service. In putting in more service on the Base than any other continenChristopher L. Ziz tal American citizen (or so available records indicate), Mr. Ziz has seen the Base grow from the small station it was in 1922 to the important operating base it has become today. Born in De Lisle, Mississippi of French-Austrian parentage, Mr. Ziz lived the life of a typical smalltown boy until service in World War I gave him a yen for travel. After his return from France, where he served with the 101st Engineers of the 26th Division, he studied bookkeeping in Jackson, Mississippi. Soon after completing the course, he took a Civil Service examination, and when offered appointment as a bookkeeper at Guantanamo Bay, he took the job. He had heard of the Naval station from a cousin who had visited here while in the Navy, and thought he'd like it. The entrance rate of pay was $4.64 per day, considered an excellent salary in 1922. (Continued on Page Two) PICNIC AND FIELD DAY TO BE HELD TUESDAY The fourth annual NOB School picnic and field day will be held at the Fleet Recreation Center on Tuesday, May 9, beginning at 10:00 a.m., according to a school announcement made last week. Coach Edward J. Ondrasik, of the school staff, is again general chairman of the program. He is being assisted by Mrs. Barbara Broughton, the students, faculty, and patrons of the school, and by the Naval Station Recreation Department. All parents of school age children are again cordially invited to join with children and teachers in a day of sports and organized field events, play and good food-a program planned for the enjoyment of every member of the family. If you are a patron or friend of the school come out and enjoy yourself. There will be games, field contests, and prizes for the children in grades kindergarten through twelve, and free food and soft drinks for all. Free Food in Family Restaurant All food will be served in the Family Restaurant. The kindergarten children, with their parents, will begin eating about 11:30 a.m. It is requested that parents with more than one child accompany their youngest child or children into the Family Restaurant for lunch. After the kindergarten children and parents have eaten, the first group of primary children and parents will be served. No one will enter the restaurant until the group to which he or she belongs has been called over the loud speaker and is requested to do so. It has been pointed out that this is very important, as the seating capacity of the restaurant is limited. Buses for Children and Parents The regular school buses that transport children in grades kindergarten through six will leave the Transportation Office on the morning of the field day at 9:15 a.m., and will make their regular school route run to pick up kindergarten and elementary children, and those parents who wish to ride. These buses are expected to arrive at (Continued on Page Three)

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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 May 1950 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 6 May 1950 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, J03------------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR---------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press ,Service material which may be reprinted with the credit line: AFPS. CHRISTOPHER L. ZIZ RETIRES 15 MAY (Continued from Page One) Travel in the early 1920's was rugged. When Mr. Ziz finished his first two-year contract at the Base, he went by slow train from Boqueron to Havana, and thence by United Fruit Co. steamer to New Orleans. While on leave, he married a girl he had known for more than ten years, and brought his bride back to the Base. He recalls that they lived at first in an apartment located near the present site of the Naval Hospital. In December of 1924, he and Mrs. Ziz moved to Quarters K, one of the civilian houses located near the NOB administration building, and there they have lived for the past 26 years. Their only child, Dolores, was born in Quarters K on 11 November 1925. Now Mrs. Earl Eichenlaub, she lives in St. Louis, where her husband is studying electronics. Mr. Ziz thinks of his years on the Base as very happy ones, and has been well satisfied with life at Guantanamo Bay. Conveniences have been added to iake life more pleasant as the years went by. The early predecessor of the present supermarket S h i p s Store Ashoie was a small commissary store where one could purchase canned goods once a month, and fresh meats twice a week. "Not that anyone was ever allowed to go hungry," Mr. Ziz hastily explains. "If anyone ran out of food, he could get some more, but those were the regular selling days." Mr. Ziz has regularly engaged in active sports during his entire service on the Base, and though now 56 years old, plays, at least two sets of tennis each week. In 1947 he bowled a perfect score, with only one embarrassing fact to mar the occasion. He was bowling against the NSD officers' team (Continued on Page Four) HOSPITAL NOTES Heirport News: Maria Teresa Mendoza born 28 April to SD3 and Mrs. B. Mendoza; baby girl VanHorn born 30 April to HMC and Mrs. T. J. VanHorn (the VanHorn's were so sure they would get a boy this time they had already chosen a name for him and are now at a loss to decide on a name for a girl), but the stork fouled things up and left the boy with AD1 and Mrs. W. M. Schmauder on 1 May-he's nailed William R. Schmauder. Another birth which we are happy to report is that of Joyce Ann Hunter on 27 April in San Diego; the proud parents are LTJG and Mrs. R. E. Hunter. Mr. Hunter expects to make the acquaintance of this newest addition to his family in about two of three weeks. LTJG Carrie J. Wright NC, USN upon acceptance of her resignation from the Navy, was separated last Monday. Mrs. Wright is living at the Air Station and we expect to see her around here frequently. Riddle, MMC and Hulst HM1 departed for duty at Corpus Christi and San Diego respectively. Departing on leave: Gallant, HMC, Doyle, HM2, Farro, SN and Major, SN. Returned from leave Spronberger, SN. MARINE MUSINGS By CPL Allen Brown The Marine Detachment from the USS Columbus has returned to its duties aboard ship after having completed annual range firing with a very high percentage of qualification. How many of you have noticed the new grandstand at the Post ball field? This past week a coat of paint was added and our diamond now looks like a small Yankee Stadium. This week in our sports review, our catcher takes the spotlight. MSGT McLellan, presently First Sergeant of Guard Platoon, was born in Bay City, Michigan and graduated from high school in that city. After graduation, he enrolled in the Bay City Business School and completed his course there in 1937. Upon completion of this schooling, McLellan was employed by the General Motors Plant at Saginaw, Michigan. Came the war -he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served in both the Asiatic and the European Theaters. After his discharge, he reenlisted and has been in the Corps ever since. "Mac" has played "semi-pro" baseball. and while at high school, he played both softball and football. Loads of luck to MSGT McLellan in all future games yet to be played. May he do as well in them as he has done in the past! All for now, with more next week. Sunday, 7 May 1950 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LT P. J. MARRON, USNR (Catholic) O'ER THE TEA CUPS By Betty Radcliffe Last week-end yours truly and better half were among the lucky ones to make the trip to Jamaica. Everyone I have talked to enjoyed the trip very much. I could go into a lot of detail about Jamaica; about how beautiful and colorful the country is, how lovely Hope Garden is-the Garden is 92 years old and covers 350 acres, I could comment on the hospitality of the Jamaicans and the delicious food-as I said. I could say all these things, but those of you that have not been there would be envious and those who have been there would be bored reading about it; so I will merely say; If you haven't been Jamaica, you should try to go in the near future. Mrs. A. L. Ernest has returned after spending several weeks in the States. Part of the time was spent in the Hospital and the rest of the time she spent with her family. Glad to know you are feeling better Marge. LT and Mrs. E. R. Shapard have also returned to Gtmo. after spending several weeks on leave. Welcome back, Dr. and Mrs. Shapard. On Apr. 25th Drs. Vonfraenkel, Freitas, Cronemiller, and Childs gave themselves a "Wetting Down" party. Dr. Freitas is now a CDR and Drs. Vonfraenkel, Cronemiller and Childs are LCDRs; Mrs. Freitas is in the States and missed the party, but the other wives helped with the celebration. Mrs. McIntosh deserves a lot credit for the good she is doing in the Dry Cleaning plant. Since she has been in there a lot of changes have been made. There was a time when hangers and service was at a premium. Today, decent hangers, dress and suit bags, and alterations have been added; plus faster and better service. Now it is very much like a Stateside dry cleaning plant. She swears no man's lips have ever touched hers. That's enough to make any girl swear. S 0 I Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 May 1950

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Saturday, 6 May 1950 THE INDIAN Pare Three Girl Scout Notes By Adeline Irwin The Girl Scout Troop Flag arrived in Sunday's mail, just one week late for the Presentation, but "Better late than Never!" The flag is really beautiful. It is divided horizontially, by blue and white. In the center is a gold Trefoil. On the blue field in white lettering is "Troop 2" and on the white field in blue lettering is "Guantanamo Bay, Cuba". We are very proud of this flag and hope to have an opportunity to show it off, to all of you, good people. The Brownies made themselves "name pins", Tuesday 25 April to enable the leaders to call each little elf by name. There are 36 Brownies and the helpers are ever changing, so it is very difficult to know each child without some kind of identification. Last Tuesday, the Brownies had a May Day party, complete with May pole, May day songs, and refreshments supplied by the girls' mothers. Yours truly, was sorry to have to hurry away, but the Girl Scout Organization is looking for a permanent meeting place and Tuesday was just a busy day. PICNIC AND FIELD DAY TO BE HELD TUESDAY (Continued from Page One) the Recreation Center just before 10:00 a.m. The two buses used for high school transportation will then make their regular run to pick up high school students and parents. Parents and children wishing to come in private cars are urged to do so and should plan to arrive not later than 10:00 a.m. promptly, at which time the competitive field events will get under way. Children in the third grade and below should not come to the picnic at all unless accompanied by a parent or another adult. Full Program Planned There will be softball and other equipment for play before and after the various groups have competed in the field events. There will be softball and other scheduled games after lunch. It is expected that the day's program', will be completed early in' the afternoon, at which time the buses will be available to return children and parents to their hoimes. It is hoped that as many parents as possible will come out and enjoy a day of fun with their children; and that parents, teachers, and children will get to know and-understand each other better as a result of this year's .field day and picnic. TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS By S. F. Dodge YNC CAPT "Mac" Rides Gen. Hodges The Fleet Training Group has reluctantly contributed a passenger to the Hodges, New York bound this weekend, and it's with the utmost regret and sincerity of heart our final farewells are addressed to our departing Group Commander, Captain H. D. McIntosh. He has reigned over this command since November 23, 1947 and from that time until now we have grown to know him as an officer big in principal though small in stature. There is an ageless and energetic glint to the blue eyes of this water warrior who was commissioned Ensign at the Naval Academy upon graduation in June 1922. He is a tried and proven sailor, schooled by his assignments to destroyers, battleships, transports, cruisers, and shore assignments. Following his arrival in New York, Captain McIntosh will enjoy a well learned vacation in that city and Washington, D. C. before heading for the West Coast to assume his duties as Commanding Officer, Naval Ammunition Depot, Mare Island, California. As with all billets as Commanding Officer, there is assigned the the collateral responsibility of morale; we shall go a step beyond that here at the Training Group and say that Captain McIntosh has held this at such a high level that we prefer to say he has established among us an enviable brotherhood of man and it would be a pleasure to serve with him again. Kirtland Lauds McIntosh Our personal esteem for Captain McIntosh is echoed in a message received by him from the Commander, Training Command, Atlantic Fleet, which we quote: "Msg Capt McIntosh. Under your capable and energetic leadership the FTG Gtmo has developed an enviable reputation among Atlantic Fleet Units. In the performance of duty there is always so. much that cannot be commanded, it can only be 'given'. This has been the predominant characteristic of yourself and your FTG. Best of luck and may we soon be shipmates again". RADM Kirtland. Command Relinquished In a ceremony which was impressive because of its brevity and substance,. ,Captain McIntosh read the orders,. at 0900, 5 May 1950 which detached him as Commander, Fleet Training Group, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He was temporarily relieved by.Captain V. Havard, Jr., who will serve in an "Acting" capacity.until the newly assigned Group Commander arrives. Boy Scout 'Affairs To start the ball rolling in this week's Scout news, I want to give the dope on when the next overnight hike to Escondido Bay will be held. The grapevine tells me that the Scouts will leave early in the morning on the 29th of May, and return on the 30th, in the afternoon-in plenty of time to tell Mom and Dad all about the hike and get ready to go to the movies! Our meeting last night was a real success. There wasn't a boy there who didn't think it was the best so far. We had a special interest talk, which was given by LT K. L. ("Whitey") Jones, a member of the Troop Committee. Mr. Jones spoke to us on the "Bikini Atoll" atom bomb test. It was very interesting, the majority of the Scouts were perched attentatively on the edge of their seats from beginning to end! We, as members of Scout Troop No. 35, wish to express our deepest appreciation to Mr. Jones for so willingly consenting to give up his free time for the express purpose of being with us last night and contributing so well to the evening's entertainment. Our special interest speaker for next meeting will be LT J. E. Herman, who is also a member of the Committee. We are all looking forward to his talk with much enthusiasm. We had more than a special interest speaker last night. When I said a couple of weeks ago that the Scouts were on the move, that is exactly what I meant! We had some instruction in First Aid for the boys who are working on their Second Class Badge, and instruction in astronomy for the ones who are soon going to be eligible for First Class Scouts. Asst. Scoutmaster Leonard Price was working with the group who are studying First Aid, and Asst. Scoutmaster Jerry J. Dickson was working with the other group. After the meeting, just to show that the instructions paid off, several of the boys stayed and passed some of their First Aid requirements. The future astronomers also had a session with the Big Dipper, Little Dipper, Cassiopia and the Milky Way. Starting' next week there will be regular classes for the Scouts who wish to qualify for the radio and astronomy Merit Badges. That's thirty for now folks; see you next week! "What's a buccaneer?" "Too much to pay for corn." Saturday, 6 May 1950 THE INDIAN 'Par-e Three

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Saturday, 6 May 1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-4 May 50-2500 TELEGRAPHIC MONEY ORDER SERVICE Effective 1 May 1950, the All American Cable Company has established a telegraphic money order service both to and from the continental United States for the use of personnel based here. It is hoped that this service will be of benefit to the residents of the Base. The charge in conection with telegraphing money to the States will be the cost of the message plus the money order charge. Money may be forwarded at either the full rate, deferred rate, or night letter rate message charge as the sender desires. The charge for the transmittal of money will be 2% of the amount sent up to $200 with a minimum fee of 75

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