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Indian

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Title:
Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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Vol. V, No. 8 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 15 April 1950


BASE BEAUTIFICATION .PROGRAM SHOWS RESULTS
Over a period of almost a year
an organized Base beautification Program has been underway. The
results are daily becoming more evident to even the casual onlooker as surplus materials and equipment are hauled off for disposal, and trees and shrubs are set out
to take their place.
Probably most noteworthy has
been the successful planting of hundreds of young palm trees along all the main thoroughfares and in many of the quarters areas where barrenness is yielding to beauty. Most of the young palms are sprouts which are being cultivated from the bulk of a purchase of several hundred coconuts
from sturdy stock in Cuba.
The arid climate of Guantanamo . Bay has discouraged the natural
growth of hardy palm trees, and it was found most desirable to
(Continued on Page Two)
UNUSUAL CABLE REPAIR JOB ACCOMPLISHED HERE
The combined efforts of personnel
and equipment of several Base and other naval activities recently resulted in the successful raising and repairing of the submarine telephone cable between the Naval Operating Base proper, and Leeward Point Field. The telephone cable had been damaged and partly "shorted" on 12 January when it became fouled with the anchor of the USS PC-579 and was lifted to
the surface.
Funds for emergency repairs
were obtained by the Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station from the Bureau of Aeronautics. The Bureau of Yards and Docks furnished technical assistance and arranged for the temporary transfer of three qualified cable splicers from the 15th Naval District, Balboa, Canal
Zone.
When the extent of damage was Explored, resistance readings indicated that the "short" was close to the eastern shore. Accordingly, it was decided to approach the location starting from Windward
(Continued on Page Six)


LOCAL UNITS, VU-10 PILOT LOCATE
SURVIVORS OF KINGSTON AIR CRASH

An alert rescue crew from Utility Squadron TEN assisted by the destroyer C. H. Roan (DD 853) of Destroyer Division One Hundred One took the honors in a gigantic Caribbean Navy-Air Force-Coast, Guard
Search for survivors Monday. The
CARNIVAL OPENS NEXT search was initiated late Sunday
FRIDAY AFTERNOON when Captain Russel Banting in a Caribbean International Airways
The 1950 Spanish Main Carnival PBY5A was forced to make an opens next Friday afternoon to emergency landing at sea while commence two fun-packed days of enroute from Nassau to Kingston. color and enjoyment for all resi- After radioing his position and dents of the Base and Fleet per- the fact his plane was flooding at sonnel present at that time. The about 1700 Sunday, Captain Bantmidway will operate until 2300 Fri- ing, was not heard from again until day night, and will reopen Saturday the rescue was effected about 1100 upon completion of the giant float Monday. When Kingston Oceanic parade which will pass the review- Air Traffic Control alerted various ing stand commencing at 1300. Caribbean commands, Naval Air
It is presently planned that the Station Guantanamo Search and parade will circle slowly about the Rescue plans were initiated. recreation and Carnival area, so Daylight Search Organized that all may see the floats in LCDR John Graves, operations action, and then halt and be parked officer took off in a Martin Mariner at the Carnival site, for closer to conduct a night search which inspection, proved fruitless, but he was able
The Kiddies costume parade will to lay out the search sectors for be held at the same place on Friday, local planes Monday morning. The at which time prizes will be pre- reported scene of the crash was sented to the kids judged best it 40 miles southeast of Kingston. each of six age classes. Meantime the destroyers BrownChevrolet To Be Awarded son (DD 868), C. H. Roan (DD 853),
The big attraction of the evening S. B. Roberts (DD 823), and R. H. will be the awarding of the door McCard (DD 822) were dispatched prize announced in these columns to the scene under the command of last week and at about 2200, the Captain Fritz Gleim, USN, Comgrand raffle award of a 1950 mander Destroyer Squadron TEN Chevrolet convertible, a Cushman with the objective of organizing scooter, and a brand-new deep- a surface search. freeze unit. From Puerto Rico, Commander
The drawings will be held right Antilles Area had dispatched Air on the Midway, and all ticket Force Search and Rescue planes, holders on the raffle are urged to one B-17 and'one SA10 with rescue be present, efforts to be coordinated by Major
Actual construction of the Mid- Thomas M. Miller, USAF. Meanway will commence on Wednesday while Commander Coast Guard, of this week when the Fleet Re- Seventh District in Miami made creation Area will be turned over plans to dispatch two search airto the carpenters and electricians craft, one from Miami and one for conversion and everything is from St. Petersburg to join the expected to be fully ready by Fri- daylight search. day afternoon, so break out the VU-10 Locates Survivors piggy bank, check over your sched- At daybreak Monday the Guanule of bridge and canasta dates, tanamo Search group dispatched, and arrange things so that you included two JD aircraft and one too, will be able to enjoy all the Martin Mariner. After a short fun and excitement of the 1950 search in the assigned sector, MidSpanish Main Carnival. (Continued on Page Two)







THE INDIAN


Saturday. 15 April 1950


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 15 April 1950
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, J03 ------------------ Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR ---------- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service material which may be reprinted with the credit line: AFPS.

QUICK THINKING-QUICK
ACTION SAVES TWO
I'The lives of two men attached
to the floating dry dock, AFDL-47, afnchored in the-bay' were undoubtedly saved by the quick'thinking and quick action on the part of the other members of the crew on Wedn6sday morning, April 5.
A. Violante, SN, USN, lowered himself through the manhole into one of the chain lockers of AFDL47, a compartment approximately seven feet square and ten feet deep, for the purpose of attaching a sling to the end of the chain. A moment after entering the compartment, he collapsed. E. J. Kwiatkowski, SN, USN, standing on the deck near the manhole, saw Violante's predicament, called for help, and then lowered himself into the compartment in an attempt to rescue Violante. He had no sooner passed through the manhole when he collapsed.
By this time most of the remaining crew had rushed to the manhole bringing Oxygen Rescue Breathing Apparatus and hand lines, which were used in bringing the two unconscious men out of the hole and onto deck where artificial respiration was immediately applied. Apparently both men had ceased breathing before reaching the deck.
In the meantime a doctor had arrived, and immediately fed oxygen to the two victims before transporting them to the hospital, where both men are now responding satisfactorily to treatment.
The chain locker in question, which is lined with creosoted timbers, had been closed for a month or longer, and was entered immediately upon opening. Toxic ftmes ' had formed in combination with an oxygen deficiency.
An ounce -f prevention is still worth a poiud of cure.


HOSPITAL NOTES
Nursery News: Patricia Karen Todd born 5 April to ALl and Mrs: G. E. Todd; Ann Arleen O'Bryan born 7 April to ENC and Mrs. R. I. O'Bryan; Judith Margaret Warner born 10 April to PM1 and Mrs. T.R. Warndr; and Sheila Ann Littlejohn born 10 April to HMC and Mrs. J.H. Littlejohn.
LCDR and Mrs. Vonfraenkel are spending a few days in Panama, having departed Tuesday on the HODGES.
Collins, HM3 has gone to the States for separation, and Mintzmyer, CS1 leaves Monday on the HODGES for duty at Naval Training Center, San Diego. Call, CS3 has gone to the States on emergency leave due to the illness of his mother; Bell, HM3 is on annual leave in the States.

BASE BEAUTIFICATION
(Continued from Page One)
import coconuts rather than use the local Base crop for propagation purposes. This procedure was recommended by Mr. Everett Noel, Asst. Foreman, Public Works, who has been in general charge of the cultivation and planting operations. With a small crew of gardeners and laborers constantly engaged in the worthy project, the day-today work has not been noticed as much by Base residents as by persons paying periodic visits. The latter have expressed delight at noting the improvements; and particularly the "old timers" appreciate the great strides which are being made, since Guantanamo has always heretofore presented a rather parched, barren appearance.
In addition to the palms, oleanders, citrus trees, and other fruit and vegetable bearing plants have been carefully selected and planted where appropriate. Selection of suitable plant life has been governed by regulations which require that appropriate landscaping be accomplished considering the high cost of water, the necessity for minimizing extensive manual cultivation, and elimination of plants which invite insect infestation.
This beautification program will, of course, be an increasing joy to those who follow us in residence here. However, it is a privilege to watch the Base develop and a trust to see that proper care is given to trees, plants, and shrubs to prolong their life and enhance Guantanamo's natural charm.

CARNIVAL PRIZES
Cut the coupon out of this paper for your novelty prize. If you forget your coupons, a right arm or left ear as sliced off by any nearby pirate will suffice for security. Even your sworn .oath signed' in blood (yours) 'will get *ne prize.


Catholic Masses
0700 Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100 Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LT P. J. MARRON, USNR
(Catholic)

GUEST PREACHER AT 0
CHAPEL

On Sunday, 16 April, Chaplain James A. Whitman of the USS Columbus will be a guest preacher at Protestant Chapel Services at 1100. Chaplain Whitman is a minister of the Northern Baptist Church and during his Naval career has served on the USS Portland and the USS: Bunker Hill. He entered the service in the Naval Reserve in 1942 and became a Regular Navy Chaplain in 1946.

LOCAL UNITS, VU-IO PILOT FIND SURVIVORS


(Continued from Page One)
shipman J. L. Rieker, Navigator of the Mariner piloted by LCDR W. R. Kreitzer, spotted a Very's shell flare fired from a life raft with survivors at 0919. Aboard Were Captain and Mrs. Banting and Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Brannan, all of Kingston. They were by this time about sixty miles west of the reported crash scene, and about fifteen miles off-shore off Portland Bight.
Roan Picks Up Survivors
While LCDR Kreitzer circled his aircraft over the raft, LT C. B. McKinney, pilot of one of the VU-10 JD guided the destroyers to the scene. At about 1100 the USS C. H. Roan, Commanded by CDR D. L. Martineau picked up all survivors and then transferred them to the destroyer Brownson. The Medical Officer of the Brownson pronounced the survivors in good physical condition, and they were delivered to civil authorities in Kingston about three p.m. Monday.
Tuesday His Excellency, the Governor of Jamaica cabled the following message of appreciation: "I wish to convey to you and to the officers and men under your command sincere thanks for the splendid cooperation received and service rendered in connection with the search for and rescue of the crew of. Caribbean International Airways aircraft VPBAO on Sundiay 9th-.April. without which coopesation their lives.- might well have been lost." : .....


Page Two


0









Saturday, 15 April 1950


THE INDIAN


BROOKLYN HAS
RENEWED LEASE OF N. L. THRONE

By Bob Broeg
(Ed. Note: This article is excerpted from
anational sports magazine by The Indian as -part of their coverage of the opening of the 1950 baseball season. Mr. Broeg is a baseball expert on the staff of the St.
Louis Post-Dispatch.)
. No National league pennant-winner has repeated since the three year St. Louis reign ended in 1945, but the brash young men of Brooklyn figure to end the title trading this -season. The Dodgers just seem certain to get better rather
than worse.
Traditionally, however, the race . in the senior circuit is closer than one second to another, for there hasn't been a runaway since the Cardinals twice spreadeagled a war-time field, and the championship cakewalks mentioned-in 1943 and '44-were exceptions bot h by pre-war and after-the-shooting
standards.
So, regardless of Brooklyn's undeniable right to the role of a solid favorite, the customary pnotofinish must be expected. The Dodgers chief challenge probably will come again from the Redbirds, the perennial contenders who have run one-two for nine consecutive seasons. Only a last-week slump cost the Cards the flag by a game
last year.
The pennant dark horses will
be Boston and Philadelphia, by all odds the most interesting clubs in the league-the youthful Phillies because they made the biggest jump last year, jumping three notches into third place, and the Braves because the dissension-riddled 1948 champions underwent the most spectacular off-season
face lifting.
Every club needs something.
Defending Brooklyn could use pitching depth of a quality to get away from a maddening, medley relay of the mound. St. Louis would profit best by a day-in and day-out lineup, improved right hand punch and more versatile reserves. Boston, with its outfield repaired, needs harmony more than even another proven starting pitcher or a comeback by Johnny Sain. Philadelphia's requirements include a second baseman, outfield offensive power and a fervent hope that the pitching brillance of Ken Hientzleman and and Russ Meyer wasn't flash in
the pan brillance.
In the second division we're picking Pittsburgh, moved up a peg from 1949 because Bill Meyer began to put together a pitching staff even while his attack, despite Ralph Kiner's raging bat, proved inadequate and his infield sagged Horribly. A drop forecast for the
New York Giants, sixth and possibly lower is prompted by the pieceby-piece dismantling of the powerladen line-up that was tailor-made
(Continued on Page Six)


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RED SOX WILL NOT BE DENIED 1950 PENNANT
By Dan Daniel
(Ed. Note: The following story is excerpted from a national baseball magazine.
In making complete it's coverage of the opening of the 1950 season in the majors The Indian reproduces these excerpts by this well known New York baseball writer.)
Uneasy lies the head that has
tried to predict the order of finish in a major league pennant race.
You watch the field in Spring training, mass your impressions, talk things over with the managers and what happens? The Yankees, whom you designated no higher than third, not only win the pennant but the world championship
as well.
0 However, looking into the basen ball crystal is a lot of fun. And, I the fact remains that the experts
do present a good-over-all average t for any decade. So here goes for > the American League pennant race
of 1950, the Golden Jubilee year of
that circuit.
The Yankees were standouts in 1949, and it is an ancient axiom in
sports, "Play safe and stick with
the champion."
M The tendency to go along with M the title holder is especially strong
in this case because the 1949 1 Bombers proved themselves so
game and so determined in the Z face of crowding handicaps.
I know the Yankees well. I lived
with them throughout the 1949 m season. I know what they can do as units and as an ensemble. I
would like to see them repeat.
S However it is my impression that the Boston Red Sox will win the M 1950 championship.
Why? Well, pitching for one. C Power for another. Tremendous
effectiveness at Fenway Park and vastly improved work on the road.
Why Boston? Joe McCarthy. A M fine manager. He missed winning the pennant by one game in 1949.
He missed by one game, that play- off with Cleveland, in 1948. But I M just don't believe he will miss again
in 1950.
You picked the Red Sox in 1949
and they -failed you. Pick them V1 again? Yes, pitching and power and Marse Joe. And let's not forget
that ever ready checkbook of Tom Yawkey. If the Boston club should find itself in need of another player and he is available for money, Yawkey will get him. Tom is not in the baseball business for profit.
And Tom is mighty sore over his
1948 and '49 disappointments
Yes, it looks like Boston then
New York, with Cleveland third, Detroit fourth, Philadelphia fifth, Chicago sixth, St. Louis seventh, and poor down trodden Washington last.
Philadelphia again fifth? Philadelphia with Alex Kellner, Lou Brissie, Dick Fowler and Carl
Scheib fifth?
Yes, fifth. Somehow I have the
(Continued on Page Six)


S













0





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I


THE INDIAN


Saturday. 15 Aipril 1950


a e Four








Saturday, 15 April 1950 THE INDIAN Page Five


Girl

Scout

Notes
The Intermediate Girl Scout
Troop has been practicing for the Big Event. Last Thursday the girls met at Mrs. Skinner's home and her neighbors gave our girls
a lovely compliment.
Monday, 10 April, found the
scouts practicing again for the coming ceremony. The girls are working very hard and learning all the different things necessary to make
you, parents, proud of them.
The ceremony will be held at
Victory Hill School, April 25, at 1800. We hope all the parents of our scouts will plan to be there Sand give the girls lots of moral
support. We are sure you'll be rewarded by their performance and will go home very, very, proud of
your Girl Scout.
BROWNIES, BROWNIES, everywhere I My, but, there are a lot of little Elves. Last Tuesday, April 4, the little scouts had an Easter Egg Hunt followed by Spatter Painting Bunnies. The games were full of excitement and if the little Pixies stopped chattering, after they got home, before dinner, I'll miss
my guess.
There will be a Brownie Mother
"Get Together" at the lyceum in Newtown Monday, 17 April, at 0900. Mrs. L. R. Smith is hopeful . that you will all come. If transportation is desired call Mrs. T. E.
Craig, at 5-179.
TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
By Ramona Moses
The Monogram banquet was a
huge success. It was held Wednesday night at Marine Site Restaurant. Admiral Phillips, the school board members and Dr. Permenter were among the guests. Commander Kimball awarded letters and miniature basket balls to the players and cheer leaders. Barbara Gould was awarded a plain letter and a miniature basket ball for being
the best girl athlete.
The student council is very busy
these days enlisting help among the students to sell tickets and work in the novelty booth at the Carnival. The novelty booth will
feature regular Carnival things.
We bid a sad farewell to Eunice
and Pat Besse also Jack MacDonald.
They left Teusday with their parents for duty in Los Estados Unidos.
Shirley Morris has a new dress
that looks like a Paris Model that she made in Home Economics with
her own two hands.
Gee! Every one looked 'scrumptious" in their new Easter outfits.
The Easter bunny was a good fellow, even yburs truly is sporting a new watdh.


By CPL Allen Brown
Another week, another deadline and another article goes to press. Deadline time just around the corner, so here we go-at the present time softball is in the spotlight here at Marine Site. A few games have already been played to date with favorable results. While on the subject of softball and of games already played, one should not fail to mention one recently played game in particular. In the VU-10 versus Marine exhibition, PFC Dukes made a brilliant showing for the Marine Squad by pitching a one hit game. It should be noted, however, that behind Duke's outstanding pitching was a welldeveloped and a well-organized group of individuals playing excellent defensive ball. It certainly could be seen that many hours of hard and sincere work had gone into the practice sessions that the team had undergone. CPL Dales had a perfect night at bat getting two hits and a successful sacrifice. For you that might be interested, the final score was: Marines, 4; VU-10, 2.
News has reached your reporter that Privates Roell and Terrell have been presented with Private First Class warrants. Congratulations men on your recent promotion.
During the past week, a member of the Guard Platoon "shipped over". The lucky man was PFC Archer! Another recent reenlisment that went unmentioned in this column was TSGT Bateman's. Apologies to the "Gunny" and we extend to them both our best wishes (and, perhaps, sympathies) for another cruise.
Rumor has it that a certain CPL is marking the days off the calendar as his time in the Corps goes whizzing by! ! ! Wonder if his initials might be W.I. S. ? "Scuttlebutt" says that he isn't alone in his unusual occupation.
'Til next week then-


I This Coupon ( I "NOVEl


I At the
SPANISH


3ood for One .TY PRIZE"


MAIN

CARNIVAL
April 21 and 22
Fleet. ReCreation. Center


O'ER THE TEA CUPS
By Betty Radcliffe
Well, Easter has done been went and gone. I saw a lot of purrty bonnets and gowns, didn't you?
The Egg Hunt at Victory Park was certainly a colorful event; the little boys and girls, (the big ones too) looked very pretty in their new outfits. I hope all those people that were there taking pictures got some good ones.
The Camera Club has been trying out a new field-about once a week they arm themselves with cotton, toothpicks, snapshots and photographic oil paints; endeavoring to make like professional photograph painters.
The Clubs made a trip to Guantanamo Monday to take some pictures around the river and an old water wheel. Of course there was a little shopping crowded in on the side.
Monday evening the Gussies and the Bloomers had another practice game. It was a three inning game with the Bloomers wiwning by a score of 7 to 6. The girls are having a good time playing softball and would like to see more players come out; actually they would like enough players for another team so there could be a ,eague with: trophies for the winning team. Come on girls, be a softball player.
Mrs. J. Herman and Mrs. Slack were hostesses at a delightful luncheon given for 'the Hospital Wives Thurs. Apr. 6 at the Officer's Club.
I don't suppose there was anyone on the Base that didn't see "Room Service". It was certainly worth seeing. Again the Little Theatre went all out to produce another "Hit". I don't know whether you realize it or not, but, an awful lot of hard work goes into producing a play. On the other hand; the time and energy expended prove worthwhile when the audience reaction is as favorable as it was with this production. All the comments I heard and overheard were complimentary. I want to extend congratulations to the entire cast and crew for the splendid performance of "Room Service".
One afternoon last week I took a ride through Bargo Point and I was pleasantly surprised to see the progress that is being made with individual landscaping. Some of those yards; although postage stamp in size, were like picture book gardens - flower bordered brick walks and colorful flower beds set on a carpet of rich green grass. It certainly is inspiring to see families take such obvious pride in their yards. Why don't you take your husband for a ride through Bargo . . . maybe he would take the hint and fix your yard with flowers, etc.
'Till. nextweek, bye now.


Saturday, 15 April 1950


THE INDIAN


Page Five








SatiirAav 15 A nril 195~0TH IN INtm.a-lAp O2e


UNUSUAL CABLE REPAIR JOB ACCOMPLISHED HERE
(Continued from Page One)
Point. On Wednesday, 29 March, divers from the Naval Station Ships Repair Department placed slings on the cable in the shallow water close to the beach at Windward Point and raised the cable to the surface. The cable was then carefully lifted and placed on specially constructed guides and rollers across the deck of the Naval Air Station "Mary Ann" crane, following which Naval Station steamer and yard tugs pushed the Mary Ann toward Leeward Piont, underrunning the cable or causing it to rise to the surface and pass the deck of the Mary Ann. When the Mary Ann had approached to within 500 feet of the "short", the cable was found to be fouled on the bottom. Following failure of repeated attempts to free the cable, it was decided to leave the Mary Ann in position to the east of the "short" and to repeat the entire process of underrunning the cable starting from Leeward Point. Divers could not be sent down at this location due to the extreme depth.
Underrunning f r o m Leeward Point was started Friday, 31 March using a 30 ton lighter, rollers borrowed from the All American Cable Company and a steamer tug for propulsion. By nightfall the 30 ton lighter had moved to within 600 feet of the "Mary Ann".
When tests located the short between the barge and the "Mary Ann", it was decided to remove this section replacing it with new cable to be spliced into both ends. After new cable had been run between the "Mary Ann" and the lighter, the old cable was cut and the two end splices completed. By working around the clock, the splices were finished Sunday morning, 2 April and after successful tests the cable was slowly lowered to the bottom of the bay.
Throughout the job "calm seas" generally prevailed, but in the exposed location at the Harbor entrance the heavy swells made the work both difficult and dangerous.
Although the job involved long hours and hard work it had its pleasanter aspects. Meals were good, and from all reports the shark fishing excellent. Mostly, however, all hands enjoyed using the temporary phones rigged on the "Mary Ann", particularly because of the disbelief encountered in trying to convince the person on the other end of the line that they were really talking to someone out in the middle of the Bay.
The Base is grateful for the cooperation of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Bureau of Yards and Docks, Headquarters 15th Naval District and All-American Cable Company, who all contributed so materially to the efforts of the local commands and activities.


KUDOS TO COMNOB FROM
SECNAV MATTHEWS

The following is excerpted from a letter written by Secretary of Navy Matthews to the Base Commander: "The pleasant memory of my visit with you and your officers and their wives is still fresh, and it would please me very much if you would be so good as to extend to them my regards and good wishes for the Easter season."

TRAINING GROUP
TRIVIALS

It was with regret that we said goodbye to LT H. J. MacDonald who was detached from this command last Saturday. He, Mrs. MacDonald, their son and daughter sailed in the General Hodges for Panama and transfer to the General Butner for transportation to San Diego where he will be transferred to the Fleet Reserve after more than 23 years service.
Another familiar face is missing from the FTG passageways. LT H. R. Besse, after 33 months duty in the Training Group, was transferred to Naval School (Fleet Gunnery and Torpedo), Naval Station, San Diego, California. Taking over at the desk once occupied by LT Besse we see LT F. E. Young who comes to us from Norfolk Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Welcome aboard.
Monday night saw the Officers' Soft Ball team bow to mighty VU-10 by a score of 11 to'4. Tuesday night saw a determined FTG team crush the mighty VU-10 with a score of 15 to 9; that's showing them boys, you can't keep a good team down.

RED SOX WILL NOT BE DENIED 1950 PENNANT
(Continued from Page Three)
impression that this is not going to be a big year for Connie Mack. The fact is I'm pulling for Connie to be right up there in the pennant fight but I have a hunch he won't be.
The American League is a tougher organization than it was in 1949. Even Washington should do better under Bucky Harris, who came back to the capitol for his third shot as pilot of the Senators after guiding San Diego in 1949. Only St. Louis appears likely to suffer retrogression.
Gal: Is it true that sailors are only interested in wine, women and song?
Gob: No. It's seldom our outfit ever does any singing.
* * *
People are always looking for the needle in the haystack because that's where the farmer's daughter does all her fancy work.


BROOKLYN HAS
RENEWED LEASE OF
N. L. THRONE
(Continued from Page Four)
for the Polo Grounds, the slugging pull-hitter's paradise park. The worst headaches will probably be felt by the league's two new managers, Luke Sewell at Cincinnati and Frankie Frisch at Chicago, where the Old Flash will begin his first full season as skipper.
A year ago, the way the clubs stacked up as they went to the post, we looked for an apparent distribution of strength-no standout team and no weak sister, either-to be reflected in close standings up and down the line. Instead it was strictly a two-horse race and, in fact, only three clubs finished above .500.
This time we're anticipating a more definite cleavage between the first and second division clubs with the top four clubs winning more than they lose. Brooklyn's allaround strength and better balance seems to off-set St. Louis piching, the best in the league, and the individual brilliance of Stan Musial.
MORE NAS BOUQUETS

The Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, this week received correspondence initiated by CTU 102.3.2 (Portrex) and forwarded enthusiastically by C. 0. Fasron 101, ComFAirWing THREE and ComFAirWingsLant, which commended VU-10 and NAS for their cooperation in making facilities available during Portrex. Rear Admiral Hickey in his endorsement stated: "The excellence of services rendered and the cooperative spirit displayed by All Hands left nothing to be desired."
Visitors Too, Must Take Shots
All persons - including those ONLY VISITING Panama-taking passage to the Canal Zone must have yellow fever innoculation and must carry medical immunization cards. All innoculations may be obtained at the Naval Hospital Dependents Clinic.




NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Saturday, 15 April
NOOSE
Carole Landis Derek Farr
Sunday, 16 April
FURY AT FURNACE CREEK
Victor Mature Coleen Gray
Monday, 17 April
ALIAS THE CHAMP
G. George Robert Rockwell
Tuesday, 18 April
WYOMING BANDIT
Alan Lane Eddie Waller
Wednesday, 19 April
MISS TATLOCK'S MILLIONS Wanda Hendrix Barry Fitzgeraldt


S


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-13 Apr 50-2500


. :turAav. 15 Anti1 1 gso




Full Text

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V1W5 Vol. V, No. 8 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 15 April 1950 BASE BEAUTIFICATION PROGRAM SHOWS RESULTS Over a period of almost a year an organized Base beautification Program has been underway. The results are daily becoming more evident to even the casual onlooker as surplus materials and equipment are hauled off for disposal, and trees and shrubs are set out to take their place. Probably most noteworthy has been the successful planting of hundreds of young palm trees along all the main thoroughfares and in many of the quarters areas where barrenness is yielding to beauty. Most of the young palms are sprouts which are being cultivated from the bulk of a purchase of several hundred coconuts from sturdy stock in Cuba. The arid climate of Guantanamo .Bay has discouraged the natural growth of hardy palm trees, and it was found most desirable to (Continued on Page Two) UNUSUAL CABLE REPAIR JOB ACCOMPLISHED HERE The combined efforts of personnel and equipment of several Base and other naval activities recently resulted in the successful raising and repairing of the submarine telephone cable between the Naval Operating Base proper, and Leeward Point Field. The telephone cable had been damaged and partly "shorted" on 12 January when it became fouled with the anchor of the USS PC-579 and was lifted to the surface. Funds for emergency repairs were obtained by the Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station from the Bureau of Aeronautics. The Bureau of Yards and Docks furnished technical assistance and arranged for the temporary transfer of three qualified cable splicers from the 15th Naval District, Balboa, Canal Zone. When the extent of damage was S explored, resistance readings indicated that the "short" was close to the eastern shore. Accordingly, it was decided to approach the location starting from Windward (Continued on Page Six) LOCAL UNITS, VU-IO PILOT LOCATE SURVIVORS OF KINGSTON AIR CRASH An alert rescue crew from Utility Squadron TEN assisted by the destroyer C. H. Roan (DD 853) of Destroyer Division One Hundred One took the honors in a gigantic Caribbean _____________________ Navy-Air Force-Coast Guard CARNIVAL OPENS NEXT Search for survivors Monday. The search was initiated late Sunday FRIDAY AFTERNOON when Captain Russel Banting in a Caribbean International Airways The 1950 Spanish Main Carnival PBY5A was forced to make an opens next Friday afternoon to emergency landing at sea while commence two fun-packed days of enroute from Nassau to Kingston. color and enjoyment for all resiAfter radioing his position and dents of the Base and Fleet perthe fact his plane was flooding at sonnel present at that time. The about 1700 Sunday, Captain Bantmidway will operate until 2300 Friing, was not heard from again until day night, and will reopen Saturday the rescue was effected about 1100 upon completion of the giant float Monday. When Kingston Oceanic parade which will pass the reviewAir Traffic Control alerted various ing stand commencing at 1300. Caribbean commands, Naval Air It is presently planned that the Station Guantanamo Search and parade will circle slowly about the Rescue plans were initiated. recreation and Carnival area, so Daylight Search Organized that all may see the floats in LCDR John Graves, operations action, and then halt and be parked officer took off in a Martin Mariner at the Carnival site, for closer to conduct a night search which inspection. proved fruitless, but he was able The Kiddies costume parade will to lay out the search sectors for be held at the same place on Friday. local planes Monday morning. The at which time prizes will be prereported scene of the crash was seated to the kids judged best in 40 miles southeast of Kingston. each of six age classes. Meantime the destroyers BrownChevrolet To Be Awarded son (DD 868), C. H. Roan (DD 853), The big attraction of the evening S. B. Roberts (DD 823), and R. H. will be the awarding of the door McCard (DD 822) were dispatched prize announced in these columns to the scene under the command of last week and at about 2200, the Captain Fritz Gleim, USN, Coigrand raffle award of a 1950 manner Destroyer Squadron TEN Chevrolet convertible, a Cushman with the objective of organizing scooter, and a brand-new deepa surface search. freeze unit. From Puerto Rico, Commander The drawings will be held right Antilles Area had dispatched Air on the Midway, and all ticket Force Search and Rescue planes, holders on the raffle are urged to one B-17 and one SAlO with rescue be present. efforts to be coordinated by Major Actual construction of the MidThomas M. Miller, USAF. Meanway will commence on Wednesday while Commander Coast Guard, of this week when the Fleet ReSeventh District in Miami made creation Area will be turned over plans to dispatch two search airto the carpenters and electricians craft, one from Miami and one for conversion and everything is from St. Petersburg to join the expected to be fully ready by Fridaylight search. day afternoon, so break out the VU-io Locates Survivors piggy bank, check over your schedAt daybreak Monday the Guanule of bridge and canasta dates, tanamo Search group dispatched, and arrange things so that you included two JD aircraft and one too, will be able to enjoy all the Martin Mariner. After a short fun and excitement of the 1950 search in the assigned sector, MidSpanish Main Carnival. (Continued on Page Two)

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Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday. 15 April 1950 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 15 April 1950 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, JO3_--------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR----------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service material which may be reprinted with the credit line: AFPS. QUICK THINKING-QUICK ACTION SAVES TWO The lives of two men attached to the floating dry dock, AFDL-47, anchored in the bay, were undoubtedlr saved by the quick thinking and quick action on the part of the other members of the crew on Wedlesday morning, April 5. A. Violante, SN, USN, lowered himself through the manhole into one of the chain lockers of AFDL47, a compartment approximately seven feet square and ten feet deep, for the purpose of attaching a sling to the end of the chain. A moment after entering the compartment, he collapsed. E. J. Kwiatkowski, SN, USN, standing on the deck near the manhole, saw Violante's predicament, called for help, and then lowered himself into the compartment in an attempt to rescue Violante. He had no sooner passed through the manhole when he collapsed. By this time most of the remaining crew had rushed to the manhole bringing Oxygen Rescue Breathing Apparatus and hand lines, which were used in bringing the two unconscious men out of the hole and onto deck where artificial respiration was immediately applied. Apparently both men had ceased breathing before reaching the deck. In the meantime a doctor had arrived, and immediately fed oxygen to the two victims before transporting them to the hospital, where both men are now responding satisfactorily to treatment. The chain locker in question, which is lined with creosoted timbers, had been closed for a month or longer, and was entered immediately upon. opening. Toxic fumes had. formed in combination with an oxygen deficiency. An ounce Hof prevention is still worth a pound of cure. HOSPITAL NOTES Nursery News: Patricia Karen Todd born 5 April to AL1 and Mrs. G. E. Todd; Ann Arleen O'Bryan born 7 April to ENC and Mrs. R. I. O'Bryan; Judith Margaret Warner born 10 April to PM1 and Mrs. T. R. Warner; and Sheila Ann Littlejohn born 10 April to HMC and Mrs. J. H. Littlejohn. LCDR and Mrs. Vonfraenkel are spending a few days in Panama, having departed Tuesday on the HODGES. Collins, HM3 has gone to the States for separation, and Mintzmyer, CS1 leaves Monday on the HODGES for duty at Naval Training Center, San Diego. Call, CS3 has gone to the States on emergency leave due to the illness of his mother; Bell, HM3 is on annual leave in the States. BASE BEAUTIFICATION (Continued from Page One) import coconuts rather than use the local Base crop for propagation purposes. This procedure was recommended by Mr. Everett Noel, Asst. Foreman, Public Works, who has been in general charge of the cultivation and planting operations. With a small crew of gardeners and laborers constantly engaged in the worthy project, the day-today work has not been noticed as much by Base residents as by persons paying periodic visits. The latter have expressed delight at noting the improvements; and particularly the "old timers" appreciate the great strides which are being made, since Guantanamo has always heretofore presented a rather parched, barren appearance. In addition to the palms, oleanders, citrus trees, and other fruit and vegetable bearing plants have been carefully selected and planted where appropriate. Selection of suitable plant life has been governed by regulations which require that appropriate landscaping be accomplished considering the high cost of water, the necessity for minimizing extensive manual cultivation, and elimination of plants which invite insect infestation. This beautification program will, of course, be an increasing joy to those who follow us in residence here. However, it is a privilege to watch the Base develop and a trust to see that proper care is given to trees, plants, and shrubs to prolong their life and enhance Guantanamo's natural charm. CARNIVAL PRIZES Cut the coupon out of this paper for your novelty prize. If you forget your coupons, a right arm or left ear as sliced off by any nearby pirate will suffice for security. Even your sworn oath signed in blood (yours) will get 'oe prize. Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LT P. J. MARRON, USNR (Catholic) GUEST PREACHER AT CHAPEL On Sunday, 16 April, Chaplain James A. Whitman of the USS Columbus will be a guest preacher at Protestant Chapel Services at 1100. Chaplain Whitman is a minister of the Northern Baptist Church and during his Naval career has served on the USS Portland and the USS. Bunker Hill. He entered the service in the Naval Reserve in 1942 and became a Regular Navy Chaplain in 1946. LOCAL UNITS, VU-10 PILOT FIND SURVIVORS (Continued from Page One) shipman J. L. Rieker, Navigator of the Mariner piloted by LCDR W. R. Kreitzer, spotted a Very's shell flare fired from a life raft with survivors at 0919. Aboard were Captain and Mrs. Banting and Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Brannan, all of Kingston. They were by this time about sixty miles west of the reported crash scene, and about fifteen miles off-shore off Portland Bight. Roan Picks Up Survivors While LCDR Kreitzer circled his aircraft over the raft, LT C. B. McKinney, pilot of one of the VU-10 JD guided the destroyers to the scene. At about 1100 the USS C. H. Roan, Commanded by CDR D. L. Martineau picked up all survivors and then transferred them to the destroyer Brownson. The Medical Officer of the Brownson pronounced the survivors in good physical condition, and they were delivered to civil authorities in Kingston about three p.m. Monday. Tuesday His Excellency, the Governor of Jamaica cabled the following message of appreciation: "I wish to convey to you and to the officers and men under your command sincere thanks for the splendid cooperation received and service rendered in connection with the search for and rescue of the crew of. Caribbean International Airways aircraft VPBAO on Sunday 9th, April without which cooperation their lives might well have been-lost." 0 0 Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 15 April 1950

PAGE 3

Saturday, 15 April 1950 THE .INDIAN BROOKLYN HAS RENEWED LEASE OF N. L. THRONE By Bob Broeg (Ed. Note: This article is excerpted from a national sports magazine by The Indian as part of their coverage of the opening of the 1950 baseball season. Mr. Broeg is a baseball expert on the staff of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.) No National league pennant winner has repeated since the three year St. Louis reign ended in 1945, but the brash young men of Brooklyn figure to end the title trading this .season. The Dodgers just seem certain to get better rather than worse. Traditionally, however, the race in the senior circuit is closer than one second to another, for there hasn't been a runaway since the Cardinals twice spreadeagled a war-time field, and the championship cakewalks mentioned-in 1943 and '44-were exceptions bo~h by pre-war and after-the-shooting an '44-wereoexcetiole bofh by standards. So, regardless of Brooklyn's undeniable right to the role of a solid favorite, the customary pnotofinish must be expected. The Dodgers chief challenge probably will come again from the Redbirds, the perenmal contenders who have run one-two for nine consecutive seasons. Only a last-week slump cost the Cards the flag by a game last year. The pennant dark horses will be Boston and Philadelphia, by all odds the most interesting clubs in the league-the youthful Phillies because they made the biggest jump last year, jumping three notches into third place, and the Braves because the dissension-riddled 1948 champions underwent the most spectacular off-season face lifting. Every club needs something. Defending Brooklyn could use pitching depth of a quality to get away from a maddening, medley relay of the mound. St. Louis would profit best by a day-in and day-out lineup, improved right hand punch and more versatile reserves. Boston, with its outfield repaired, needs harmony more than even another proven starting pitcher or a comeback by Johnny Sain. Philadelphia's requirements include a second baseman, outfield offensive power and a fervent hope that the pitching brillance of Ken Hientzleman and and Russ Meyer wasn't flash in the pan brillance. In the second division we're picking Pittsburgh, moved up a peg from 1949 because Bill Meyer began to put together a pitching staff even while his attack, despite Ralph Kiner's raging bat, proved inadequate and his infield sagged Horribly. A drop forecast for the New York Giants, sixth and possibly lower is prompted by the pieceby-piece dismantling of the powerladen line-up that was tailor-made (Continued on Page Six) 0 0 w .1 O n -J No! X LU LU 0 x ^N ti *** -r 4*to0 : G~ p a-G ~ .c0 Co aa 10 a,' ,4dac anad 0 c4-4 U< C. Z Pi Pi z 0 91 p v 0 ~a 0O 54* a~a 00 **N ti"-00 N -1 O tihd ^ 0 00 0 0 .0 og N acTa ac M 0 N 0 n 0 -0 c: d* u 0* -0,. 0 0-00C O o 0 0 0. a a '.~ 0*4 0 0n d ,Co d0 -00 0 -C 00 0 -00 aa oom -00N.0 a M I 0 ap -0 A * ^ N .00 a aOOG wa 0 *'ti tti m H *-44 0 r00 .0o 00= N4
PAGE 4

THE INDIAN Saturday. 15 April 1950 M C a toO' r to'too 4,4 -n 4., 45 to 0 z r a 1" z C M i -'. 0!" 'C _;0 1 cC'G -.+. C. tN .,*. N to to t *to tto to toox to .012 'Itoa4 W -n -Ctoo C V to~. Oto 7to F+N.to toca to -' 0 0 0 TA 4 .4444 -tox totot toto To-v to Ct C' ,. t ototo -N to to t o To "#.Ct* xC. to C-"7 -t to to NHg tooot -o 00 0 W9N CC-A totot toN ar to o :4 tot ]_' 't'tr C toto'. 44.* toto C-t C a H -0 C-to no C2 C C cc ccW 4 sea-W c to r No Hto caN to. to to'O r .a T O C-t *4 MI (n9C ;a n ? -c. o '-C 0 C>*0 to -Lt NH N~ tot to to coS *2 W # n 0 W >a. w. C 44 tot t t to -4 too -n> too C y':5 tot to -i( 5* a to a k~C4t -y-. 0 Uoa ,-. #.'C -O totox o .5 0 No' NI-po 45i t O --N x Ot" to N C to o o 4 0: L # .,t NoO* toN o Q. .+ F # a~ to y o t Qi~"C Cto S' C* -a CMEv b K : vi GNo O f+ mt' o 0 t o -t> to*.t toto' t tO totoN to" o ,to' t to -N 0 C Cto CCto NT .2'a' t O a 'C 4' tto G 0 S '-to toSZ t'O too -o toto to '-1 00t C-to C "P tototot N .# C' too O>to' C 4Cy tooCA toto. C~ .* tt W to., z k H 0 x O W0 Hy z a 4< C a a Pag~e Four WYn to z-t WTo* H *t r O i C z A cc H O 3 C Cn a 0' off a n z C U'2 c ZH G> 00 -* to CO. N to T to t jtO Way a 0 OO t Oo+,t C-Z 25On. o ,eto O ;0' .t Page Four RED SOX WILL NOT BE DENIED 1950 PENNANT By Dan Daniel (Ed. Note: The following story is excerpted from a national baseball magazine. In making complete it's coverage of the opening of the 1950 season in the majors The Indian reproduces these excerpts by this well known New York baseball writer.) Uneasy lies the head that has tried to predict the order of finish in a major league pennant race. You watch the field in Spring training, mass your impressions, talk things over with the managers and what happens? The Yankees, whom you designated no higher than third, not only win the pennant but the world championship as well. However, looking into the baseball crystal is a lot of fun. And, the fact remains that the experts do present a good-over-all average for any decade. So here goes for the American League pennant race of 1950, the Golden Jubilee year of that circuit. The Yankees were standouts in 1949, and it is an ancient axiom in sports, "Play safe and stick with the champion." The tendency to go along with the title holder is especially strong in this case because the 1949 Bombers proved themselves so game and so determined in the face of crowding handicaps. I know the Yankees well. I lived with them throughout the 1949 season. I know what they can do as units and as an ensemble. I would like to see them repeat. However it is my impression that the Boston Red Sox will win the 1950 championship. Why? Well, pitching for one. Power for another. Tremendous effectiveness at Fenway Park and vastly improved work on the road. Why Boston? Joe McCarthy. A fine manager. He missed winning the pennant by one game in 1949. He missed by one game, that playoff with Cleveland, in 1948. But I just don't believe he will miss again in 1950. You picked the Red Sox in 1949 and they failed you. Pick them again? Yes, pitching and power and Marse Joe. And let's not forget that ever ready checkbook of Tom Yawkey. If the Boston club should find itself in need of another player and he is available for money, Yawkey will get him. Tom is not in the baseball business for profit. And Tom is mighty sore over his 1948 and '49 disappointments Yes, it looks like Boston then New York, with Cleveland third, Detroit fourth, Philadelphia fifth, Chicago sixth, St. Louis seventh, and poor down trodden Washington last. Philadelphia again fifth? Philadelphia with Alex Kellner, Lou Brissie, Dick Fowler and Carl Scheib fifth? Yes, fifth. Somehow I have the (Continued on Page Six) S 0 S

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Saturday, 15 April 1950 THE INDIAN Page Five 3 Girl 'Scout Notes The Intermediate Girl Scout Troop has been practicing for the Big Event. Last Thursday the girls met at Mrs. Skinner's home and her neighbors gave our girls a lovely compliment. Monday, 10 April, found the scouts practicing again for the coming ceremony. The girls are working very hard and learning all the different things necessary to make you, parents, proud of them. The ceremony will be held at Victory Hill School, April 25, at 1800. We hope all the parents of our scouts will plan to be there and give the girls lots of moral support. We are sure you'll be rewarded by their performance and will go home very, very, proud of your Girl Scout. BROWNIES, BROWNIES, everywhere! My, but, there are a lot of little Elves. Last Tuesday, April 4, the little scouts had an Easter Egg Hunt followed by Spatter Painting Bunnies. The games were full of excitement and if the little Pixies stopped chattering, after they got home, before dinner, I'll miss my guess. There will be a Brownie Mother "Get Together" at the lyceum in Newtown Monday, 17 April, at 0900. Mrs. L. R. Smith is hopeful *Othat you will all come. If transportation is desired call Mrs. T. E. Craig, at 5-179. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Ramona Moses The Monogram banquet was a huge success. It was held Wednesday night at Marine Site Restaurant. Admiral Phillips, the school board members and Dr. Permenter were among the guests. Commander Kimball awarded letters and miniature basket balls to the players and cheer leaders. Barbara Gould was awarded a plain letter and a miniature basket ball for being the best girl athlete. The student council is very busy these days enlisting help among the students to sell tickets and work in the novelty booth at the Carnival. The novelty booth will feature regular Carnival things. We bid a sad farewell to Eunice and Pat Besse also Jack MacDonald. They left Teusday with their parents for duty in Los Estados Unidos. Shirley Morris has a new dress that looks like a Paris Model that she made in Home Economics with her own two hands. Gee! Every one looked 'scrumptious" in their new Easter outfits. The Easter bunny was_ a good fellow; even yours truly is sporting a new watch. By CPL Allen Brown Another week, another deadline and another article goes to press. Deadline time just around the corner, so here we go-at the present time softball is in the spotlight here at Marine Site. A few games have already been played to date with favorable results. While on the subject of softball and of games already played, one should not fail to mention one recently played game in particular. In the VU-10 versus Marine exhibition, PFC Dukes made a brilliant showing for the Marine Squad by pitching a one hit game. It should be noted, however, that behind Duke's outstanding pitching was a welldeveloped and a well-organized group of individuals playing excellent defensive ball. It certainly could be seen that many hours of hard and sincere work had gone into the practice sessions that the team had undergone. CPL Dales had a perfect night at bat getting two hits and a successful sacrifice. For you that might be interested, the final score was: Marines, 4; VU-10, 2. News has reached your reporter that Privates Roell and Terrell have been presented with Private First Class warrants. Congratulations men on your recent promotion. During the past week, a member of the Guard Platoon "shipped over". The lucky man was PFC Archer! Another recent reenlisment that went unmentioned in this column was TSGT Bateman's. Apologies to the "Gunny" and we extend to them both our best wishes (and, perhaps, sympathies) for another cruise. Rumor has it that a certain CPL is marking the days off the calendar as his time in the Corps goes whizzing by! ! Wonder if his initials might be W. I. S.? "Scuttlebutt" says that he isn't alone in his unusual occupation. 'Til next week thenI This Coupon NOVELE At the SPANISH Good for One LTY PRIZE" 1 MAIN CARNIVAL April 21 and 22 Fleet Recreation Center O'ER THE TEA CUPS By Betty Radcliffe Well, Easter has done been went and gone. I saw a lot of purrty bonnets and gowns, didn't you? The Egg Hunt at Victory Park was certainly a colorful event; the little boys and girls, (the big ones too) looked very pretty in their new outfits. I hope all those people that were there taking pictures got some good ones. The Camera Club has been trying out a new field-about once a week they arm themselves with cotton, toothpicks, snapshots and photographic oil paints; endeavoring to make like professional photograph painters. The Clubs made a trip to Guantanamo Monday to take some pictures around the river and an old water wheel. Of course there was a little shopping crowded in on the side. Monday evening the Gussies and the Bloomers had another practice game. It was a three inning game with the Bloomers winning by a score of 7 to 6. The girls are having a good time playing softball and would like to see more players come out; actually they would like enough players for another team so there could be a league with trophies for the winning team. Come on girls, be a softball player. Mrs. J. Herman and Mrs. Slack were hostesses at a delightful luncheon given for the Hospital Wives Thurs. Apr. 6 at the Officer's Club. I don't suppose there was anyone on the Base that didn't see "Room Service". It was certainly worth seeing. Again the Little Theatre went all out to produce another "Hit". I don't know whether you realize it or not, but, an awful lot of hard work goes into producing a play. On the other hand; the time and energy expended prove worthwhile when the audience reaction is as favorable as it was with this production. All the comments I heard and overheard were complimentary. I want to extend congratulations to the entire cast and crew for the splendid performance of "Room Service". One afternoon last week I took a ride through Bargo Point and I was pleasantly surprised to see the progress that is being made with individual landscaping. Some of those yards; although postage stamp in size, were like picture book gardens -flower bordered brick walks and colorful flower beds set on a carpet of rich green grass. It certainly is inspiring to see families take such obvious pride in their yards. Why don't you take your husband for a ride through Bargo ...maybe he would take the hint and fix your yard with flowers, elc. 'Till. next. week, bye. now. Saturday, 15 April 1950 THE INDIAN Page Five I

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Saturdy 15 Ani190 THE INDIANtmo. UNUSUAL CABLE REPAIR JOB ACCOMPLISHED HERE (Continued from Page One) Point. On Wednesday, 29 March, divers from the Naval Station Ships Repair Department placed slings on the cable in the shallow water close to the beach at Windward Point and raised the cable to the surface. The cable was then carefully lifted and placed on specially constructed guides and rollers across the deck of the Naval Air Station "Mary Ann" crane, following which Naval Station steamer and yard tugs pushed the Mary Ann toward Leeward Piont, underrunning the cable or causing it to rise to the surface and pass the deck of the Mary Ann. When the Mary Ann had approached to within 500 feet of the "short", the cable was found to be fouled on the bottom. Following failure of repeated attempts to free the cable, it was decided to leave the Mary Ann in position to the east of the "short" and to repeat the entire process of underrunning the cable starting from Leeward Point. Divers could not be sent down at this location due to the extreme depth. Underrunning f r o m Leeward Point was started Friday, 31 March using a 30 ton lighter, rollers borrowed from the All American Cable Company and a steamer tug for propulsion. By nightfall the 30 ton lighter had moved to within 600 feet of the "Mary Ann". When tests located the short between the barge and the "Mary Ann", it was decided to remove this section replacing it with new cable to be spliced into both ends. After new cable had been run between the "Mary Ann" and the lighter, the old cable was cut and the two end splices completed. By working around the clock, the splices were finished Sunday morning, 2 April and after successful tests the cable was slowly lowered to the bottom of the bay. Throughout the job "calm seas" generally prevailed, but in the exposed location at the Harbor entrance the heavy swells made the work both difficult and dangerous. Although the job involved long hours and hard work it had its pleasanter aspects. Meals were good, and from all reports the shark fishing excellent. Mostly, however, all hands enjoyed using the temporary phones rigged on the "Mary Ann", particularly because of the disbelief encountered in trying to convince the person on the other end of the line that they were really talking to someone out in the middle of the Bay. The Base is grateful for the cooperation of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Bureau of Yards and Docks, Headquarters 15th Naval District and All-American Cable Company, who all contributed so materially to the efforts of the local commands and activities. KUDOS TO COMNOB FROM SECNAV MATTHEWS The following is excerpted from a letter written by Secretary of Navy Matthews to the Base Commander: "The pleasant memory of my visit with you and your officers and their wives is still fresh, and it would please me very much if you would be so good as to extend to them my regards and good wishes for the Easter season." TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS It was with regret that we said goodbye to LT H. J. MacDonald who was detached from this command last Saturday. He, Mrs. MacDonald, their son and daughter sailed in the General Hodges for Panama and transfer to the General Butner for transportation to San Diego where he will be transferred to the Fleet Reserve after more than 23 years service. Another familiar face is missing from the FTG passageways. LT H. R. Besse, after 33 months duty in the Training Group, was transferred to Naval School (Fleet Gunnery and Torpedo), Naval Station, San Diego, California. Taking over at the desk once occupied by LT Besse we see LT F. E. Young who comes to us from Norfolk Group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Welcome aboard. Monday night saw the Officers' Soft Ball team bow to mighty VU-10 by a score of 11 to 4. Tuesday night saw a determined FTG team crush the mighty VU-10 with a score of 15 to 9; that's showing them boys, you can't keep a good team down. RED SOX WILL NOT BE DENIED 1950 PENNANT (Continued from Page Three) impression that this is not going to be a big year for Connie Mack. The fact is I'm pulling for Connie to be right up there in the pennant fight but I have a hunch he won't be. The American League is a tougher organization than it was in 1949. Even Washington should do better under Bucky Harris, who came back to the capitol for his third shot as pilot of the Senators after guiding San Diego in 1949. Only St. Louis appears likely to suffer retrogression. Gal: Is it true that sailors are only interested in wine, women and song? Gob: No. It's seldom our outfit ever does any singing. People are always looking for the needle in the haystack because that's where the farmer's daughter does all her fancy work. BROOKLYN HAS RENEWED LEASE OF N. L. THRONE (Continued from Page Four) for the Polo Grounds, the slugging pull-hitter's paradise park. The worst headaches will probably be felt by the league's two new managers, Luke Sewell at Cincinnati and Frankie Frisch at Chicago, where the Old Flash will begin his first full season as skipper. A year ago, the way the clubs stacked up as they went to the post, we looked for an apparent distribution of strength-no standout team and no weak sister, either-to be reflected in close standings up and down the line. Instead it was strictly a two-horse race and, in fact, only three clubs finished above .500. This time we're anticipating a more definite cleavage between the first and second division clubs with the top four clubs winning more than they lose. Brooklyn's allaround strength and better balance seems to off-set St. Louis pitching, the best in the league, and the individual brilliance of Stan Musial. MORE NAS BOUQUETS The Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station, this week received correspondence initiated by CTU 102.3.2 (Portrex) and forwarded enthusiastically by C. 0. Fasron 101, ComFAirWing THREE and ComFAirWingsLant, which commended VU-10 and NAS for their cooperation in making facilities available during Portrex. Rear Admiral Hickey in his endorsement stated: "The excellence of services rendered and the cooperative spirit displayed by All Hands left nothing to be desired." Visitors Too, Must Take Shots All persons -including those ONLY VISITING Panama-taking passage to the Canal Zone must have yellow fever innoculation and must carry medical immunization cards. All innoculations may be obtained at the Naval Hospital Dependents Clinic. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Saturday, 15 April NOOSE Carole Landis Derek Farr Sunday, 16 April FURY AT FURNACE CREEK Victor Mature Coleen Gray Monday, 17 April ALIAS THE CHAMP G. George Robert Rockwell Tuesday, 18 April WYOMING BANDIT Alan Lane Eddie Waller Wednesday, 19 April MISS TATLOCK'S MILLIONS Wanda Hendrix Barry Fitzgerald S S THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-13 Apr 50-2500 Saturday 15 April 0


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