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Indian
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9$&


Vol. IV No. 48 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 January 1950


EMERGENCY REPAIR JOB PERFORMED ON RODMAN
Last Friday the local Ship's
Repair department and officers and men of the AFDL-47 teamed together to complete an emergency repair job on the USS Rodman
(DMS-21).
The Rodman began drydocking
operations about 6:00 p.m. Friday and by 8:00 was "high and dry".
Then civilian repair crews from the Ships Repair Department moved in and by 4:00 a.m. Saturday morning had completed emergency repairs, on the Rodman. By 6:00 a.m.
she was back in the water and shortly thereafter rejoined her
squadron.
The repairs made were as follows: the overboard discharge at frames 187 and 188 was repaired with a new section. Also two cracks in the sound room of the ship were welded and repaired by welding a plate inside the ship together with stiffners. The cracks were caused by fatigue of the metal. In addition, eight zincs were put on the rudders. The repair work was done entirely by Cuba civilian crews while the military personnel of the AFDL-47 handled the docking
operations.
At the present another emergency job is being performed, this time on the USS Gillis AGSC-13. Approximately 16 square feet of planking was stove in on the starboard side between frames 55 and 58. The damage was done when the rope guard of the Tanner AGS-15 caught the Gillis after she had slipped and got caught under the stern of the Tanner.
The incident occured outside the Bay area where the two ships were participating in daily maneuvers. The Gillis, an ex-YMS is a wooden hull ship. Three of the frames and the longitudinal were broken. Work is expected to be
completed by Monday night.
The AFDL-47 is scheduled to
leave Guantanamo Bay for Norfolk bn or about April 15 where O she will go into drydock for a
period of about one month. During that time underwater work (painting, etc) will be done, upon completion of which she will
return here.


LOCAL SHIP MOVEMENTS

As The Indian went to press there was no word as to whether the USS Missouri had been moved from the sandbar at Hampton Roads, Va., where she ran aground Tuesday as she left her berth in Norfolk and headed South to Guantanamo.
Meanwhile arriving today is the USS Chuckawan (AO-100) which is due in port this afternoon from Norfolk. Also slated to arrive here sometime today is the LST-533. The latter will stay in local waters until about February 6.
Arriving Monday will be the Trumpetfish (SS-425). She will be here until approximately 3, February. The Trumpetfish comes here from Key West, Fla.
Next Thursday the USS Chipola (AO-63) will arrive in Guantanamo and will depart on Friday January 27. She comes here from San Pedro, Calif.
REGULAR OFFICERS TO GET RESERVE DUTY
Washington (AFPS)-All regular officers of the U. S. Armed Forces must serve at least two years with the National Guard or reserve units during their Service careers.
Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson recently announced the new policy adopted on the recommendation of the Civilian Components Policy Board.
The Defense Secretary stressed that in time of emergency officers and men of the civilian components would make up the bulk of the country's fighting forces.
"For the professional military man in such a time to weld these components and our regular establishment together into the most effective fighting force," Secretary Johnson said, "he must be familiar with and understand the problems, state of training and psychological outlook of the members of our civilian components."'
By the same token, our Reservists urgently need the skilled guidance and supervision that only the professional military man can give", the Defense Secretary concluded.


BASE LEGAL OFFICER
ADDS THIRD STRIPE
CDR Hugh B. Miller, Jr., Base Legal Officer recently added a third full stripe to his shoulder bars after being advanced to the rank of full Commander, effective 1 November 1949. The appointment dated back to Nov. 5, 1945.
CDR Miller reported aboard the Naval Operating Base on June 21, 1948, coming to Guantanamo from the office of the Judge Advocate General in Washington, D. C. He relieved LCDR Raymond V. Von Wolkenton.

TWO AIR SQUADRONS
ARRIVE MONDAY
On Monday, January 23, two more air squadrons visit Guantanamo to undergo a period of training.
VP-7, based in Quonset Point, R. I. will arrive to spend ten days training here. They will be based at Leeward Point. Nine P2V-2 aircraft and approximately 30 officers and 130 men comprise VP-7.
VP-34, a seaplane squadron arrives here for eleven days training and will be tender based during their entire stay here. VP-34 is comprised of nine PBM aircraft. The Greenwich Bay (AVP-41) will render tender services. This tender is the white ship in the harbor which has caused comment from numerous residents of the Base. The reason back of her being white is that she is one of three rotating ships of her class in the Persian Gulf, and since she has the summer "duty" it is necessary because of the intense heat of that area to have her painted white. The Greenwich Bay will return to the Persian Gulf via Norfolk after her work with various seaplane squadrons here is completed.
UP BOQ MESS RATES
The Bureau of the Budget has suggested to the Defense Department that bachelor officers quartered at military installations be charged $1.80 per day or $54.00 per month for meals. Present charges range from $30.00 to $40.00 per month.








PaeToTHE INDIAN Saturday. 21 January 1950


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 -Phone 284
Saturday, 21 January 1950
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN --------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR ------ Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-36 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

HOSPITAL NOTES

Nursery News: Betty Mae Brown born 11 January to EMi and Mrs. A. M. Brown; Martha Carole Beatty born 14 January to OMC and Mrs. H.P. Beatty; Linda Carol Zapasnik born 16 January to MLC and Mrs. E.M. Zapasnik.
RADM C. J. Brown, MC, USN and CDR A. F. Bigelow, MSC, USN arrived on Tuesday of this week for inspection of medical facilities. They depart today for Washington via commerical airlines from Guantanamo.
CDR R. R. Sullivan, MSC, USN is here from Washington in connection with a new program of eye protection. G. 0. Talley, HM3 of our staff, recently completed a course at Naval Hospital, Jacksonville in connection with the same program. When the program gets underway, it should be of great benefit to civilian employees.
LT L. E. Ceaglske, NC, USN has received advance notice of transfer to U. S. Naval Hospital, Oakland, California.
The hospital basketball team started the official season off by winning from the NOB School by a score of 74 to 31. On Wednesday night they played VU-10, but too late for the score to be published.

ComScutBut will award two free copies of the next issue of the "Indian" to the first Gtmo School Student who turns in the correct answer to the following: a square field has a fence around it; the fence is four boards high and the boards are each eleven feet long (boards are parallel to the ground). The number of acres in the field and boards in the fence is the same
-what is that number? We worked it and it's easy if you know the answer.


SPORTSMANSHIP
By ComScutButLant
Every now and then some selfstyled expert compiles a list of his favorite words and a list of those words that displease him most. Usually his favorites are those with the euphonic quality he likes most; conversely his least liked words are those without these qualities. Rarely does such a list include words solely because of the lexicology involved.
So, we establish a precedent and publish herewith our favoritethe single word "sportsmanship". The word has euphonic qualities that are most agreeable and the beauty of its meaning is beyond the meager descriptive ability of your writer.
As we stand now, on the threshhold of the basketball season, we may confidently look forward to many practical applications of this word. And, unfortunately, there will probably be rare occasions when we will note with regret the lack of such application. Let us hope that the latter case will be rare.
A good loser, as distinguished from an indifferent competitor, is a fellow who can carry the qualities of gentility with him and display them prominently at all times a fellow in whom these qualities are more than a veneer which is erased by adversity; who gives his everything to the thought of winning but does not for a moment in trying, forget his responsibilities to his fellow man. He plays hard but fair. If he wins he is modest in winning and if he should lose he does so gracefully.
Basketball is a hard, fast game. The speed of the action almost completely precludes the possibility of avoiding occasional violent bodily contact. However, the rules prescribe proper penalties for these unintentional infractions and the officials are charged with the responsibility of enforcing the rules and inflicting the prescribed penalties. But there are other rules that are required by the established concepts of good sportsmanship; rules that are just as important to the success of the contest from a spectator standpoint as those printed in the rule book. These rules require that every contestant try his very best at all times; that he respect his opponent, the officials and the spectators; that he vigorously avoid taking unfair advantage of his opponent and that he just as vigorously prosecute every legal advantage to his team. These additional rules are not those of a small group met in a smoke-filled room but the rules set down by man in his advance through the ages-the rules of civilized man and polite society.
The cagey cager who can block, trip, charge or hack his opponent and yet avoid the wary eye of the


-m
CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900 Vespers
Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

NATIONAL SERVICE
LIFE INSURANCE

How many people on this Base who have NSLI, whether it is a term policy or a converted policy have their correct beneficiary and option listed? The insured may select any of the four opticns available for payment of insurance benefits upon his death, or he may elect that a part of the proceed he paid under one option and the balance under another option. The four options are as follows:
Option 1-One Sum-Under this option the insurance proceeds will be payable in one sum at the maturity of the policy by death. Selection may be made only by the insured.
Option 2-Limited Monthly Installments-Under this option the insurance proceeds will be payable to the designated first beneficiary in a specified number of equal monthly installments, ranging in number from 36 to 240 in multiples of 12. If this option has been elected for 72 monthly installments, the beneficiary would receive $151.40 for a period of seven years.
Option 3-Monthly Installments for Life-With 120 monthiy installments guranteed . Under this option, the monthly installments listed in the table for age 35, the beneficiary would receive $42.00
(Continued on Page Four)

official has gained but little because what advantage he may have won is overcompensated by the loss of dignity which is inevitably a part of such tactics. The cheering section that noisily tries to rattle a player making a foul shot may escape the prescribed penalty but they cannot escape the loss of face-they may even win the game but suffer a loss of dignity far greater in value-so, have they won?
Was it Knute Rocke who said: "For when the one Great Scorer
Comes to write against
your name,
He writes not what you won or lost
But how you played the game."?


Paize Two


THE INDIAN








Satuday,21 anuay 190 TE INIANPaL~e Three


U SALES CATALOG NOW
AVAILABLE AT NSD

Sales Catalog No. B-11-50 offering passenger and non-passenger carrying vehicles for sale, is now available for distribution. Personnel interested in any of these vehicles may secure catalogs by appearing in person at the Main ,Office, Building 752 (second deck),
Naval Supply Depot.
Details as to the rules for, conducting the sale may be found in the Daily Bulletin section of the
"'Papoose".

GIRL SCOUT NEWS
By Adeline Irwin
The Girl Scout Troop Committee got together for their monthly meeting, Tuesday, January 10, and after all the business of the troop was attended to Mrs. Wray suggested the committee learn to do some art or craft. This can be passed on to the girls and will be useful in other cities and bases.
Mrs. MacDonald will teach the
ladies textile painting.
Friday 13 January, was the day
for the regular Scout meeting. The girls were excited over the Sunrise Hike to take place on the following day, consequently this meeting was full of plans, songs and games. One game I would like to mention is the "Scout Law Game". This game is to aid the girls to learn their laws. Mrs. Skinner and Mrs. Wray, taught the girls a little about
"Flag Etiquette".
Saturday morning, the Scouts
gathered for their hike, and although the hike was a short one, the girls enjoyed themselves and were famished when they arrived O at Mrs. Wray's. While hiking along,
the girls sang the "Hiking Song"
and many others. Breakfast consisted of orange juice, pancakes,
eggs, and hot chocolate.
We are all looking forward to
another hike in the not too distant
future.

, LIBRARY NOTES

New books ready for circulation
include Bill Mauldin's "A Sort Of A Saga". This book, omitting all the arguments of war, peace, and politics, has nothing to sell except the idea that people are pretty wonderful and funny if you look ,at them closely and lovingly. "The Lonely Warrior" - the life of Kamehameha the Great of Hawaii -by Kathleen Dickenson Mellem is an enthralling story written within the framework of recorded facts and polished with material from stories told her by the old Hawaiians whose grandparents had pers6nal acquaintance with the great king himself in the
,days of his glory.


By PFC Earle Rice USMC
The USS Montague dropped anchor in Gtmo. Bay, January 6, 1950. On board were 26 new men who will make their residence on Marine Site No. 2 for the next 24 months. The majority will soon be found standing regular watches in the "boonies". Good luck in your new assignments men.
With so many new men buzzing around Marine Site, our shorttimers are becoming wary of straying too far from the barracks. What's the matter fella's afraid you'll miss the ship? ? ?
Congratulations, this week are extended to TSgt Ousbon Bateman and the former Miss Neri Fajordo. The "gunny" who was scratched from the list of eligible bachelors, accepted the bonds of matrimony December 29, 1949, at the Base Chapel. Best wishes and loads of luck to you and your bride.
Your reporter has been asked by our Mail Clerk, SSgt Chester Wilson to express his sincere appreciation and thanks to all who attended the funeral services for his baby daughter.
Riddle . . . What is the reason for the long face Pfc Doss has been wearing around lately? Answer . . . Doss's dog, and constant companion, Blackie, recently, had "office hours" for a canine misdemeanor, and was sentenced to be confined for a period of 14 days in the dog pound.
Now, let's take a quick look at the basketball highlights. The Marines began the Base league by dropping it's opening game to NAS by a score of 49-30 They say weak start, strong finish.., let's hope so.
In the Intra-Post league, the 2nd Sect Gd Plat met its first defeat at the hands of the 1st Sect Gd Plat in a fast moving exhibition. The 1st Sect followed up this important win by taking their remaining two games easily. So ... with the regular league schedule completed, we find the 1st and 2nd Sections in a first place dead lock. A play-off game has been arranged and next week the "Champ" will be named.
Here are the up-to-date scores of the final games played:
2nd Sect ----- 13 1st Sect ------- 31
Hq Plat ------- 11 2nd Sect ----- 43
Hq Plat ------- 18 Off's-S/NCO's - 42 Hq Plat ------- 20 1st Sect ----- 40
Off's-S/NCO's - 29 lst Sect ----- 35
Father-in-law: "I suppose you know that when I die my daughter will inherit $50,000 . . . well, .. Why don't you say something?"
Husband: "Drop dead!"
* * *
Said the ' tooth brush to the tooth paste in a moment of delight: "I'm going to give you a great big squeze when we meet on the bridge tonight."


TRAINING GROUP
TRIVIALS
With the arrival of more ships daily, FTG personal are dusting off the cobwebs that may have gathered during the holidays and knuckling down to serious work. If a stranger were to walk through the building he probably would think we are still on holiday routine as it is comparatively quiet, but most of our personnel (officer and enlisted) are riding ships daily from 0700 to 1700, which may explain the "ghost town" affect here at FTG.
With the arrival of the USS Tanner our holiday leave party returned after a well earned rest, ready to tackle the work ahead.
We wish to say "so-long" to Ford, EN2; Nilsen, ET3; Boak, SN; and Hench, YNSA, who have gone to Gunfire Support Training Unit, Culebra, Puerto Rico, for three months TAD. Hurry up and get back gang.
What's this about Bowman, BTC, beating the Atlantic Fleet champ at acey-ducey, in his own lair aboard the USS Purvis?... Say Chief, any witnesses?
I hear that Kirkpatrick, EMC, is burning the midnight oil in preparation for LDO exams. In putting in your course for a "Mr" we say, "good luck".
A hearty "welcome" is extended to LTJG V. L. D'Amboise on his arrival from U. S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory, White Oak, Md., where he was security officer, for duty in the gunnery department.
Under the able coaching of LCDR Gutting, the FTG's fighting hoopsters downed NSD to win their first league game of the season. It was a team bent on winning and after overcoming a NSD lead of 2-0 in the opening minutes, remained out in front by a safe margin throughout the game. Our hats off to LTJG "Doe" Jones and Crain, SN, both scoring 13 points and to Heffner, SN, who added 11 points, then there was Pauquette, ET3, who threw in 10 points, but most of all to the entire team, for a job well done.
Basketball isn't the only sport in which FTG personnel participate, commencing 1 February our Enlisted Men's bowling teams will take to the alleys to tackle all comers. It is noted that each activity may have an unlimited number of teams . . . Sooo Training Group keglers who are interested, are urged to sign up pronto with LCDR Hayward.
Just before submitting copy, I heard that the Officer's softball team is jumping the gun by starting practice before the league is organized.

DID YOU KNOW
A surgeon is the only man who can get rich operating in the red.


Saturday, 21 Jdnuarv 1950


THE INDIAN


Paee Three








Saturday, 21 January 1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-19 Jan 50-2500


VU-10 DRUBS HOSPITAL WITH 64-31 COUNT

Guantanamo's 1949 cage champions were in Jacksonville, Florida today to participate in the AirLant basketball tournament after winning their first two games here in beginning defense of their 1949 crown. The maroon clad hoopsters put on a spectacular show Wednesday night as they drubbed a highly regarded Hospital quintet, 64-31.
After a sluggish win over the Naval Station Tuesday night, the local railbirds had established the Hospital quint as a slight favorite to take the defending champions in their battle Wednesday night. The contest was played on almost even terms the first half but in the second half VU-10 turned on the heat to win going away. Three of the Hospital's best players, guards George Call and Donald Zimmerman and Gene Reardon fouled out in the last quarter. For the victors the play of Dick Koehler, and "Stubby" Berriochoa, forwards and A. E. Hoppe, guard was outstanding. Koehler was high man for the winners, dropping in 19 points while Waters was second with 13 points to his credit. For the Hospital, Wilson hit for 14 to lead his team's effort.
NSD Wins
In the first game Wednesday night, NSD had defeated the High School by a 51-29 margin. The Supply Depot quint leaped into an early lead and were never seriously challenged. Martell hit the bucket for 14 points for NSD while Ed Ondrasik was high for the High School with eight points. Russell Boughnou dropped in six for the High School.
Tuesday night, the Naval Station made VU-10 extend themselves before finally bowing to the lads from the Utility Squadron by a 36-33 count. Bradfield was high man for the Naval Station with 25 points fKoehler sparked VU-10's attack with 11 points, with Waters scoring 10.
The second game Tuesday saw the Marines bow to a superior NAS quintet by a 49-30 score, in one of the wildest, roughest games that ever has been or ever will be played in the league. The game, almost completely out of hand from the start threatened to become a roughhouse time and again. Officiating wasn't up to par however, in such a game it is well nigh impossible for it to be. Dick Fleming, Frank Leighton and Bennie Loperfido each bagged 10 points for NAS. Dukes topped the Marines with 13 points.
The league opened on Monday night when the highly touted Hos-


pital quintet smashed the High School, 74-31, with a 34 point fourth quarter splurge to show they are rated as the team to beat in this year's league. Holding a 19-7 lead at the end of the first quarter the second team went into action in the second quarter. The High School staged a brilliant rally that fell just short of tying the game up as the halftime caught them on the short end of a 23-21 score. After the intermission the Hospital quickly increased their lead and were never again seriously challenged. They led 40-10 going into the final quarter. Ed Ondrasik, player-coach for the High School was high for his team With 19 points while Jack Wilson led the Hospital scorers with 25 points.
The Hospital squad took the court in new uniforms of scarlet and grey and some real classy warm-up jackets. The High School maintained their Green and White uniforms they had last season.
High School Cheerleaders
The cheerleaders for the High School turned out in grand style to lead their rooting section. New uniforms featuring white blouses with a fancy green "G" on the front and green skirts made them extra attractive as they gave fine support to their team.
In the second game, LCDR Gutting's Fleet Training Group quint grabbed an early lead and was never in any danger as they whizzed past the NSD five by a 52-22 count. Fleet Training was also decked out in new colors. Purple and white replace the Orange worn by the FTG cagers last season.
Standings
(As of Thursday Morning, 19 Jan.) Team W. L. Pct. VU-10 ----------2 0 1.000
NAS------------1 0 1.000
FTG 1----------1 0 1.000
Hospital -------- 1 1 .500
NSD ------------1 1 .500
NavSta ---------0 1 .000
Marines ---------0 1 .000
High School ----- 0 2 .000

THIS WEEK'S SCHEDULE
Monday 1st Game
NOB School vs. VU-10
2nd Game
NSD vs. Naval Station
Tuesday 1st Game USNH vs. Marines
2nd Game
NAS vs. Training Group
Wednesday 1st Game NAS vs. NOB School
2nd Game
USNH vs. Naval Station
Thursday 1st Game Marines vs. NSD
2nd Game
Training Group vs. VU-10


By Allen Collier, Sports Editor


LIFE INSURANCE

(Continued from Page Two)
monthly installments will be payable throughout the remaining lifetime of the designated first beneficiary, no matter how long he or she may live. However, should the first beneficiary die before 120 such installments have been paid, the remaining unpaid installments guaranteed will be payable until the face value of the policy has been paid.
Option 4-Monthly Installments for Life-With total installments equal to face amount of the Policy Guaranteed.-Under this option the monthly installments listed in a table which depends on the age of the beneficiary on the last birthday at death of the insured (If beneficiary is 35 years of age, he or she will receive $39.90) will be payable throughout the remaining life time of the designated first beneficiary, no matter how long, he or she may live. However should the first beneficiary die before receiving the number of monthly installments guaranteed, the sum of which shall equal the face amount of the policy, the remaining unpaid installments will be payable to any living contingent beneficiary, or, if no contingent beneficiary is living the present value of such unpaid installments will be paid in one sum to the insured's estate.
Since the Base Insurance Office was established in Room 205 of the NOB Administration building, five weeks ago, the following transactions have been completed: New Applications ---------- $ 79,500.
Conversion To Permanent Plans $265,500. Total -----------------------$365,000.
Change of Beneficiaries ------- 17. Change of Option Settlements- 11. Rendered technical advice ---- 35. The Base Insurance officer is available ONLY on Monday and Friday in Room 205 of the NOB Administration building.



Mj~o

NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Saturday 21 January
ARSON, INC.
Robert Lowery Ann Gwynne
Sunday 22 January
BLACK MAGIC
Orson Wells Nancy Guild
Monday 23 January
MIRANDA
Georgie Withers Glynis Johns
Tuesday 24 January
THE DARING CABALLERO Duncan Renaldo Leo Carrillo
Wednesday 25 January
MR. PERRIN & MR. TRAIL
David Farrar Greta Gynt
Thursday 26 January
BRIMSTONE
Rod Cameron Adrian Booth
Friday 27 January
ESTHER WATERS
Kathleen Ryan Dirl Bogarde


S


















I


S


Saturday, 21 January 1950


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-19 Jan 50-2500)




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PAGE 1

Vol. IV No. 48 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 January 1950 EMERGENCY REPAIR JOB PERFORMED ON RODMAN Last Friday the local Ship's Repair department and officers and men of the AFDL-47 teamed together to complete an emergency repair job on the USS Rodman (DMS-21). The Rodman began drydocking operations about 6:00 p.m. Friday and by 8:00 was "high and dry". Then civilian repair crews from the Ships Repair Department moved in and by 4:00 a.m. Saturday morning had completed emergency repairs, on the Rodman. By 6:00 a.m. she was back in the water and shortly thereafter rejoined her squadron. The repairs made were as follows: the overboard discharge at frames 187 and 188 was repaired with a new section. Also two cracks in the sound room of the ship were welded and repaired by welding a plate inside the ship together with stiffners. The cracks were caused by fatigue of the metal. In addition, eight zincs were put on the rudders. The repair work was done entirely by Cuba civilian crews while the military personnel of the AFDL-47 handled the docking operations. At the present another emergency job is being performed, this time on the USS Gillis AGSC-13. Approximately 16 square feet of planking was stove in on the starboard side between frames 55 and 58. The damage was done when the rope guard of the Tanner AGS-15 caught the Gillis after she had slipped and got caught under the stern of the Tanner. The incident occured outside the Bay area where the two ships were participating in daily maneuvers. The Gillis, an ex-YMS is a wooden hull ship. Three of the frames and the longitudinal were broken. Work is expected to be completed by Monday night. The AFDL-47 is scheduled to leave Guantanamo Bay for Norfolk bn or about April 15 where she will go into drydock for a period of about one month. During that time underwater work (painting, etc) will be done, upon completion of which she will return here. LOCAL SHIP MOVEMENTS As The Indian went to press there was no word as to whether the USS Missouri had been moved from the sandbar at Hampton Roads, Va., where she ran aground Tuesday as she left her berth in Norfolk and headed South to Guantanamo. Meanwhile arriving today is the USS Chuckawan (AO-100) which is due in port this afternoon from Norfolk. Also slated to arrive here sometime today is the LST-533. The latter will stay in local waters until about February 6. Arriving Monday will be the Trumpetfish (SS-425). She will be here until approximately 3, February. The Trumpetfish comes here from Key West, Fla. Next Thursday the USS Chipola (AO-63) will arrive in Guantanamo and will depart on Friday January 27. She comes here from San Pedro, Calif. REGULAR OFFICERS TO GET RESERVE DUTY Washington (AFPS)-All regular officers of the U. S. Armed Forces must serve at least two years with the National Guard or reserve units during their Service careers. Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson recently announced the new policy adopted on the recommendation of the Civilian Components Policy Board. The Defense Secretary stressed that in time of emergency officers and men of the civilian components would make up the bulk of the country's fighting forces. "For the professional military man in such a time to weld these components and our regular establishment together into the most effective fighting force," Secretary Johnson said, "he must be familiar with and understand the problems, state of training and psychological outlook of the members of our civilian components."' By the same token, our Reservists urgently need the skilled guidance and supervision that only the professional military man can give", the Defense Secretary concluded. BASE LEGAL OFFICER ADDS THIRD STRIPE CDR Hugh B. Miller, Jr., Base Legal Officer recently added a third full stripe to his shoulder bars after being advanced to the rank of full Commander, effective 1 November 1949. The appointment dated back to Nov. 5, 1945. CDR Miller reported aboard the Naval Operating Base on June 21, 1948, coming to Guantanamo from the office of the Judge Advocate General in Washington, D. C. He relieved LCDR Raymond V. Von Wolkenton. TWO AIR SQUADRONS ARRIVE MONDAY On Monday, January 23, two more air squadrons visit Guantanamo to undergo a period of training. VP-7, based in Quonset Point, R. I. will arrive to spend ten days training here. They will be based at Leeward Point. Nine P2V-2 aircraft and approximately 30 officers and 130 men comprise VP-7. VP-34, a seaplane squadron arrives here for eleven days training and will be tender based during their entire stay here. VP-34 is comprised of nine PBM aircraft. The Greenwich Bay (AVP-41) will render tender services. This tender is the white ship in the harbor which has caused comment from numerous residents of the Base. The reason back of her being white is that she is one of three rotating ships of her class in the Persian Gulf, and since she has the summer "duty" it is necessary because of the intense heat of that area to have her painted white. The Greenwich Bay will return to the Persian Gulf via Norfolk after her work with various seaplane squadrons here is completed. UP BOQ MESS RATES The Bureau of the Budget has suggested to the Defense Department that bachelor officers quartered at military installations be charged $1.80 per day or $54.00 per month for meals. Present charges range from $30.00 to $40.00 per month.

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Saturday, 21 January 1950 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205Phone 254 Saturday, 21 January 1950 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, JOSN---------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR___Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. HOSPITAL NOTES Nursery News: Betty Mae Brown born 11 January to EM1 and Mrs. A. M. Brown; Martha Carole Beatty born 14 January to OMC and Mrs. H. P. Beatty; Linda Carol Zapasnik born 16 January to MLC and Mrs. E. M. Zapasnik. RADM C. J. Brown, MC, USN and CDR A. F. Bigelow, MSC, USN arrived on Tuesday of this week for inspection of medical facilities. They depart today for Washington via commerical airlines from Guantanamo. CDR R. R. Sullivan, MSC, USN is here from Washington in connection with a new program of eye protection. G. 0. Talley, HM3 of our staff, recently completed a course at Naval Hospital, Jacksonville in connection with the same program. When the program gets underway, it should be of great benefit to civilian employees. LT L. E. Ceaglske, NC, USN has received advance notice of transfer to U. S. Naval Hospital, Oakland, California. The hospital basketball team started the official season off by winning from the NOB School by a score of 74 to 31. On Wednesday night they played VU-10, but too late for the score to be published. ComScutBut will award two free copies of the next issue of the "Indian" to the first Gtmo School Student who turns in the correct answer to the following: a square field has a fence around it; the fence is four boards high and the boards are each eleven feet long (boards are parallel to the ground). The number of acres in the field and boards in the fence is the same -what is that number? We worked it and it's easy if you know the answer. SPORTSMANSHIP By ComScutButLant Every now and then some selfstyled expert compiles a list of his favorite words and a list of those words that displease him most. Usually his favorites are those with the euphoric quality he likes most; conversely his least liked words are those without these qualities. Rarely does such a list include words solely because of the lexicology involved. So, we establish a precedent and publish herewith our favoritethe single word "sportsmanship". The word has euphonic qualities that are most agreeable and the beauty of its meaning is beyond the meager descriptive ability of your writer. As we stand now, on the threshhold of the basketball season, we may confidently look forward to many practical applications of this word. And, unfortunately, there will probably be rare occasions when we will note with regret the lack of such application. Let us hope that the latter case will be rare. A good loser, as distinguished from an indifferent competitor, is a fellow who can carry the qualities of gentility with him and display them prominently at all times -a fellow in whom these qualities are more than a veneer which is erased by adversity; who gives his everything to the thought of winning but does not for a moment in trying, forget his responsibilities to his fellow man. He plays hard but fair. If he wins he is modest in winning and if he should lose he does so gracefully. Basketball is a hard, fast game. The speed of the action almost completely precludes the possibility of avoiding occasional violent bodily contact. However, the rules prescribe proper penalties for these unintentional infractions and the officials are charged with the responsibility of enforcing the rules and inflicting the prescribed penalties. But there are other rules that are required by the established concepts of good sportsmanship; rules that are just as important to the success of the contest from a spectator standpoint as those printed in the rule book. These rules require that every contestant try his very best at all times; that he respect his opponent, the officials and the spectators; that he vigorously avoid taking unfair advantage of his opponent and that he just as vigorously prosecute every legal advantage to his team. These additional rules are not those of a small group met in a smoke-filled room but the rules set down by man in his advance through the ages-the rules of civilized man and polite society. The cagey cager who can block, trip, charge or hack his opponent and yet avoid the wary eye of the CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Vespers Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE How many people on this Base who have NSLI, whether it is a term policy or a converted policy have their correct beneficiary and option listed? The insured may select any of the four options available for payment of insurance benefits upon his death, or he may elect that a part of the proceed he paid under one option and the balance under another option. The four options are as follows: Option 1-One Sum-Under this option the insurance proceeds will be payable in one sum at the maturity of the policy by death. Selection may be made only by the insured. Option 2-Limited Monthly Installments-Under this option the insurance proceeds will be payable to the designated first beneficiary in a specified number of equal monthly installments, ranging in number from 36 to 240 in multiples of 12. If this option has been elected for 72 monthly installments, the beneficiary would receive $151.40 for a period of seven $years. Option 3-Monthly Installments for Life-With 120 monthly installments guranteed-. Under this option, the monthly installments listed in the table for age 35, the beneficiary would receive $42.00 (Continued on Page Four) official has gained but little because what advantage he may have won is overcompensated by the loss of dignity which is inevitably a part of such tactics. The cheering section that noisily tries to rattle a player making a foul shot may escape the prescribed penalty but they cannot escape the loss of face-they may even win the game but suffer a loss of dignity far greater in value-so, have they won? Was it Knute Rocke who said: "For when the one Great Scorer Comes to write against your name, He writes not what you won or lost But how you played the game."? Pag-e Two Saturday 21 January 0 THE INDIAN

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Satuday,21 anuay 190 TE INIANPa ge Three W SALES CATALOG NOW AVAILABLE AT NSD Sales Catalog No. B-11-50 offering passenger and non-passenger carrying vehicles for sale, is now available for distribution. Personnel interested in any of these vehicles may secure catalogs by appearing in person at the Main Office, Building 752 (second deck), Naval Supply Depot. Details as to the rules for conducting the sale may be found in the Daily Bulletin section of the "Papoose". GIRL SCOUT NEWS By Adeline Irwin The Girl Scout Troop Commiittee got together for their monthly meeting, Tuesday, January 10, and after all the business of the troop was attended to Mrs. Wray suggested the committee learn to do some art or craft. This can be passed on to the girls and will be useful in other cities and bases. Mrs. MacDonald will teach the ladies textile painting. Friday 13 January, was the day for the regular Scout meeting. The girls were excited over the Sunrise Hike to take place on the following day, consequently this meeting was full of plans, songs and games. One game I would like to mention is the "Scout Law Game". This game is to aid the girls to learn their laws. Mrs. Skinner and Mrs. Wray, taught the girls a little about "Flag Etiquette". Saturday morning, the Scouts gathered for their hike, and although the hike was a short one, the girls enjoyed themselves and were famished when they arrived Oat Mrs. Wray's. While hiking along, the girls sang the "Hiking Song" and many others. Breakfast consisted of orange juice, pancakes, eggs, and hot chocolate. We are all looking forward to another hike in the not too distant future. LIBRARY NOTES New books ready for circulation include Bill Mauldin's "A Sort Of A Saga". This book, omitting all the arguments of war, peace, and politics, has nothing to sell except the idea that people are pretty wonderful and funny if you look at them closely and lovingly. "The Lonely Warrior" -the life of Kamehameha the Great of Hawaii -by Kathleen Dickenson Mellem is an enthralling story written within the framework of recorded facts and polished with material from stories told her by the old Hawaiians whose grandparents had personal acquaintance with the great king himself in the days of his glory. By PFC Earle Rice USMC The USS Montague dropped anchor in Gtmo. Bay, January 6, 1950. On board were 26 new men who will make their residence on Marine Site No. 2 for the next 24 months. The majority will soon be found standing regular watches in the "boonies". Good luck in your new assignments men. With so many new men buzzing around Marine Site, our shorttimers are becoming wary of straying too far from the barracks. What's the matter fella's afraid you'll miss the ship ? ? ? Congratulations, this week are extended to TSgt Ousbon Bateman and the former Miss Neri Fajordo. The "gunny" who was scratched from the list of eligible bachelors, accepted the bonds of matrimony December 29, 1949, at the Base Chapel. Best wishes and loads of luck to you and your bride. Your reporter has been asked by our Mail Clerk, SSgt Chester Wilson to express his sincere appreciation and thanks to all who attended the funeral services for his baby daughter. Riddle ...What is the reason for the long face Pfe Doss has been wearing around lately? Answer ...Doss's dog, and constant companion, Blackie, recently, had "office hours" for a canine misdemeanor, and was sentenced to be confined for a period of 14 days in the dog pound. Now, let's take a quick look at the basketball highlights. The Marines began the Base league by dropping it's opening game to NAS by a score of 49-30 They say weak start, strong finish .let's hope so. In the Intra-Post league, the 2nd Sect Gd Plat met its first defeat at the hands of the 1st Sect Gd Plat in a fast moving exhibition. The 1st Sect followed up this important win by taking their remaining two games easily. So with the regular league schedule completed, we find the 1st and 2nd Sections in a first place dead lock. A play-off game has been arranged and next week the "Champ" will be named. Here are the up-to-date scores of the final games played: 2nd Sect -13 1st Sect31 Hq Plat -11 2nd Sect43 Hq Plat18 Of's-S/NCO's -42 Hq Plat -20 1st Sect -40 Off's-S/NCO's -29 1st Sect -35 Father-in-law: "I suppose you know that when I die my daughter will inherit $50,000 ...well, .Why don't you say something?" Husband: "Drop dead!" Said the tooth brush to the tooth paste in a moment of delight: "I'm going to give you a great big squeze when we meet on the bridge tonight." TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS With the arrival of more ships daily, FTG personal are dusting off the cobwebs that may have gathered during the holidays and knuckling down to serious work. If a stranger were to walk through the building he probably would think we are still on holiday routine as it is comparatively quiet, but most of our personnel (officer and enlisted) are riding ships daily from 0700 to 1700, which may explain the "ghost town" affect here at FTG. With the arrival of the USS Tanner our holiday leave party returned after a well earned rest, ready to tackle the work ahead. We wish to say "so-long" to Ford, EN2; Nilsen, ET3; Boak, SN; and Hench, YNSA, who have gone to Gunfire Support Training Unit, Culebra, Puerto Rico, for three months TAD. Hurry up and get back gang. What's this about Bowman, BTC, beating the Atlantic Fleet champ at acay-ducey, in his own lair aboard the USS Purvis? .Say Chief, any witnesses? I hear that Kirkpatrick, EMC, is burning the midnight oil in preparation for LDO exams. In putting in your course for a "Mr" we say, "good luck". A hearty "welcome" is extended to LTJG V. L. D'Amboise on his arrival from U. S. Naval Ordnance Laboratory, White Oak, Md., where he was security officer, for duty in the gunnery department. Under the able coaching of LCDR Gutting, the FTG's fighting hoopsters downed NSD to win their first league game of the season. It was a team bent on winning and after overcoming a NSD lead of 2-0 in the opening minutes, remained out in front by a safe margin throughout the game. Our hats off to LTJG "Doe" Jones and Crain, SN, both scoring 13 points and to Heffner, SN, who added 11 points, then there was Pauquette, ET3, who threw in 10 points, but most of all to the entire team, for a job well done. Basketball isn't the only sport in which FTG personnel participate, commencing 1 February our Enlisted Men's bowling teams will take to the alleys to tackle all comers. It is noted that each activity may have an unlimited number of teams ...Sooo Training Group keglers who are interested, are urged to sign up pronto with LCDR Hayward. Just before submitting copy, I heard that the Officer's softball team is jumping the gun by starting practice before the league is organized. DID YOU KNOW A surgeon is the only man who can get rich operating in the red. Saturday, 21 January 1950 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Saturday, 21 January 1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-lI Jan 10-2600 VU-10 DRUBS HOSPITAL WITH 64-31 COUNT Guantanamo's 1949 cage champions were in Jacksonville, Florida today to participate in the AirLant basketball tournament after winning their first two games here in beginning defense of their 1949 crown. The maroon clad hoopsters put on a spectacular show Wednesday night as they drubbed a highly regarded Hospital quintet, 64-31. After a sluggish win over the Naval Station Tuesday night, the local railbirds had established the Hospital quint as a slight favorite to take the defending champions in their battle Wednesday night. The contest was played on almost even terms the first half but in the second half VU-10 turned on the heat to win going away. Three of the Hospital's best players, guards George Call and Donald Zimmerman and Gene Reardon fouled out in the last quarter. For the victors the play of Dick Koehler, and "Stubby" Berriochoa, forwards and A. E. Hoppe, guard was outstanding. Koehler was high man for the winners, dropping in 19 points while Waters was second with 13 points to his credit. For the Hospital, Wilson hit for 14 to lead his team's effort. NSD Wins In the first game Wednesday night, NSD had defeated the High School by a 51-29 margin. The Supply Depot quint leaped into an early lead and were never seriously challenged. Martell hit the bucket for 14 points for NSD while Ed Ondrasik was high for the High School with eight points. Russell Boughnou dropped in six for the High School. Tuesday night, the Naval Station made VU-10 extend themselves before finally bowing to the lads from the Utility Squadron by a 36-33 count. Bradfield was high man for the Naval Station with 25 points Koehler sparked VU-10's attack with 11 points, with Waters scoring 10. The second game Tuesday saw the Marines bow to a superior NAS quintet by a 49-30 score, in one of the wildest, roughest games that ever has been or ever will be played in the league. The game, almost completely out of hand from the start threatened to become a roughhouse time and again. Officiating wasn't up to par however, in such a game it is well nigh impossible for it to be. Dick Fleming, Frank Leighton and Bennie Loperfido each bagged 10 points for NAS. Dukes topped the Marines with 13 points. The league opened on Monday night when the highly touted Hospital quintet smashed the High School, 74-31, with a 34 point fourth quarter splurge to show they are rated as the team to beat in this year's league. Holding a 19-7 lead at the end of the first quarter the second team went into action in the second quarter. The High School staged a brilliant rally that fell just short of tying the game up as the halftime caught them on the short end of a 23-21 score. After the intermission the Hospital quickly increased their lead and were never again seriously challenged. They led 40-10 going into the final quarter. Ed Ondrasik, player-coach for the High School was high for his team with 19 points while Jack Wilson led the Hospital scorers with 25 points. The Hospital squad took the court in new uniforms of scarlet and grey and some real classy warm-up jackets. The High School maintained their Green and White uniforms they had last season. High School Cheerleaders The cheerleaders for the High School turned out in grand style to lead their rooting section. New uniforms featuring white blouses with a fancy green "G" on the front and green skirts made them extra attractive as they gave fine support to their team. In the second game, LCDR Gutting's Fleet Training Group quint grabbed an early lead and was never in any danger as they whizzed past the NSD five by a 52-22 count. Fleet Training was also decked out in new colors. Purple and white replace the Orange worn by the FTG cagers last season. Standings (As of Thursday Morning, 19 Jan.) Team W. L. Pct. VU-10 ----------2 0 1.000 NAS -----------1 0 1.000 FTG ------------1 0 1.000 Hospital --------1 1 .500 NSD -----------1 1 .500 NavSta ---------0 1 .000 Marines ---------0 1 .000 High School---0 2 .000 THIS WEEK'S SCHEDULE Monday 1st Game NOB School vs. VU-10 2nd Game NSD vs. Naval Station Tuesday 1st Game USNH vs. Marines 2nd Game NAS vs. Training Group Wednesday 1st Game NAS vs. NOB School 2nd Game USNH vs. Naval Station Thursday 1st Game Marines vs. NSD 2nd Game Training Group vs. VU-10 By Allen Collier, Sports Editor LIFE INSURANCE (Continued from Page Two) monthly installments will be payable throughout the remaining lifetime of the designated first beneficiary, no matter how long he or she may live. However, should the first beneficiary die before 120 such installments have been paid, the remaining unpaid installments guaranteed will be payable until the face value of the policy has been paid. Option 4-Monthly Installments for Life-With total installments equal to face amount of the Policy Guaranteed.-Under this option the monthly installments listed in a table which depends on the age of the beneficiary on the last birthday at death of the insured (If beneficiary is 35 years of age, he or she will receive $39.90) will be payable throughout the remaining life time of the designated first beneficiary, no matter how long, he or she may live. However should the first beneficiary die before receiving the number of monthly installments guaranteed, the sum of which shall equal the face amount of the policy, the remaining unpaid installments will be payable to any living contingent beneficiary, or, if no contingent beneficiary is living the present value of such unpaid installments will be paid in one sum to the insured's estate. Since the Base Insurance Office was established in Room 205 of the NOB Administration building, five weeks ago, the following transactions have been completed: New Applications ---------$ 79,500. Conversion To Permanent Plans $265.500. Total ----------------------$365,000. Change of Beneficiaries ------17. Change of Option Settlements11. Rendered technical advice 35. The Base Insurance officer is available ONLY on Monday and Friday in Room 205 of the NOB Administration building. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Saturday 21 January ARSON, INC. Robert Lowery Ann Gwynne Sunday 22 January BLACK MAGIC Orson Wells Nancy Guild Monday 23 January MIRANDA Georgie Withers Glynis Johns Tuesday 24 January THE DARING CABALLERO Duncan Renaldo Leo Carrillo Wednesday 25 January MR. PERRIN & MR. TRAIL David Farrar Greta Gynt Thursday 26 January BRIMSTONE Rod Cameron Adrian Booth Friday 27 January ESTHER WATERS Kathleen Ryan Dirl Bogarde S I S Saturday, 21 Januarv 1950 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-19 Jan 50-2500