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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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Sunday Supplement
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Gitmo Review
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Gitmo Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Y91. IV No. 40


U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 26 November 1949


LATEST DOPE ON CHRISTMAS MAIL
YFR 1152 to Make Special Trips to
Miami to Pick Up Mail
On 20 November the USS YFR1152 brought 300 sacks of United States mail from Miami to Guantanamo Bay. This marked the first of three mail trips with the second to be on 5 December and the last on 19 December when it is anticipated that around 1,000 sacks of mail will be picked up. All parcel post mail is being diverted to Miami for pickup until 23 December
After discontinuation of trips by USS YFR-1152 mail will be picked up by local planes on special flights to Miami. First class mail will continue to be forwarded from New York to Patuxent River, Maryland to be placed aboard FLSW flights to Guantanamo Bay each Monday and Friday.
Outgoing Mail
It is expected that Christmas parcels for the United States will be dispatched on the following dates: 23 November to Norfolk via USS Mattabasset; 28 November to Miami via the USS YFR-1152; 2 December to Norfolk via USS General Anderson; 5 December to Norfolk via USS Alcona; 9 December to Norfolk via USS Adams; 10 December to Norfolk via USS Corduba; and 12 December to Miami via USS YFR-1152.
Parcels intended for delivery by Christmas must be posted not later than 1 December. Gift Certificates must be signed before submission of parcel to the post office for mailing. Special delivery speeds up delivery of Christmas parcels.
Greeting Cards
All greeting cards to and from overseas bases must be sealed and posted at the rate of three cents per ounce, in accordance with the Postal Bulletin, Post Office Department, Washington, D. C. #19,268 dated 20 September 1949. This allows patrons to enclose a written message with greeting cards.
All personnel on the Base wishing to exchange Christmas greeting cards may mail same through the Fleet Post Office sealed at the drop postage rate of one cent, but must use proper box number of the addressee.


FLOWER SERVICE
INAUGURATED HERE
Beginning Monday a new service is being effected by the local Ship's Service. The service, "Flowers-bywire" will afford Base personnel al opportunity to send flowers to their families or sweethearts.
LT K. W. Strebel, Ship's Service officer, announced the innovation of this service late this week. In making the announcement he stated that orders for flowers must be placed with the local store at least two weeks prior to the delivery date. International Flower Service in New York City is the firm handling the Guantanamo orders and they must be given the orders one week in advance of the delivery date. Due to the fact that only bi-weekly mail service is in effect to the States from here the orders will be able to go out only on Mondays and Fridays. Persons utilizing this service will pay for the flowers here and may have a ten word message included free of charge if they wish. Order blanks may be obtained at the Naval Station Ship's Service.
Burlington, Vt. (AFPS)--"Better late than never" is a cliche Albert G. Prill doesn't mind using. When he was 21 he was forced to quit the University of Vermont because of failing health. Recently, 59 years later, he was awarded a degree.


ORCHIDS FROM
USS WILLIAMSBURG

The following note of
thanks was received by dispatch from the USS Williamsburg on 19 November following her departure from g Guantanamo Bay: "In behalf
of the officers and crew of
_ the Williamsburg I wish to $ express our sincere thanks
and appreciation to you and your command for the many courtesies and kindnesses shown and in making our visit so pleasant." The mess age was addressed to NOB Guantanamo Bay.


BASE SUPPLY ACTIVITIES
TO BE INSPECTED

On Monday, 28 November the following members of the Staff of the Inspector General of the Supply Corps will arrive at this Base to conduct a routine inspection of supply activities: CAPT R.R. Thompson, SC, Assistant Inspector General; CDR A. A. Pabst, SC, Material and Supply, Bureau of Supply and Accounts; CDR S. C. St. John, SC, Ship's Store Office; CDR G. F.' Brewton, SC, Accounting and Finance, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts; LCDR J. T. Hughes, SC, Office of Naval Material, EXOS; LCDR A. McCrone, SC, Officer Personnel, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts; LCDR E. M. Brown, SC, Office of General Inspector of SC; LTJG J. H. Miller, SC, Office of General Inspector of SC (Air). Also arriving to join this party on 29 November are: CAPT L. W. Cease, Tenth Naval District Supply Officer, and LCDR K. Strickler, Tenth Naval District Ship's Service Officer.

CABIN TRANSPORTATION
CLARIFIED
Last week the Indian ran a front page story concerning the assignment of certain enlisted personnel to cabin accomodations when traveling aboard military transports of the CMSTS. At the request of the Port Director this story is being clarified.
Men of the first three pay grades are assigned cabin accomodations when sufficient cabin space is available. However when cabin transportation is assigned, it does not mean that personnel so assigned can be certain of occupying a cabin with their families.
Cabins aboard transports are equipped with four berths each, and to utilize cabin space to accomodate the greatest number of persons the assignments must be made to four female or four male passengers for each cabin. The only exception to this rule being when a family group is large enough to occupy an entire cabin or when the transport is carrying only a fraction of the cabin capacity.


9* /








PaL-e Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 26 November 1949


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205- Phone 254
Saturday, 26 November 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
F. R. Pledger, ALC ---------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR ------ Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions, of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFFS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.


Nursery News:
Dimitri Thomas Burroughs born 19 November to SOC and Mrs. Otto L. Burroughs; C a r I o s Alfredo Cabol born 21 November to Mr. & Mrs. C.A. Cabol.
At 1300 24 November the Hospital Family enjoyed their annual Thanksgiving dinner in the Recreation Hall at the Hospital. Among the many guests present were RADM and Mrs. W. K. Phillips.
After one previous game with the Guantanamo City Business College had been cancelled due to inclement weather, the Hospital Basketball Team came through with a 39-31 score to win Tuesday night's game.
Dr. W. T. Annon departed on ten days leave in the States via VR-1
-mission matrimony. We all join in wishing Dr. and Mrs. Annon the best of luck and happiness.
CSC A. 0. Mullins reenlisted on board for a period of four years.

BASE ACCIDENTS

By C. E. Britt
Recently two more vehicular accidents occurred on curved roads.
Two private automobiles collided head-on while rounding a curve on one of the beach roads. Fortunately, no one was injured but damage to both cars was considerable.
A weapons carrier operated by a navy driver completely overturned while rounding another curve on the same road. It was necessary to use a jack in order to extricate the driver from under the vehicle.


PATIENCE

By ComScutButLant
A couple of years back a song writer made himself quite a pot of dough and a name in the musical world with a song written around the title words "Patience and Fortitude". If this beginning sounds like a sermon we suggest that you stop here. Preaching is not our intent. As Commander, ScuttleButt, Atlantic, we pass on to you what the boys are saying in the back room-and elsewhere.
However, even at the risk of being accused of preaching, we do want to bring to the attention of our readers (?) the twin panaceas which must be well remembered and frequently employed in the pursuit of success and happiness in any endeavor-Tincture of Time and Essence of Patience. Time cures all the ills of mankind and patience is required to let time do the work. All things come to those who wait-true. Admittedly its pretty tough on the patience when you have to sweat out the CPO list for two or three years in a row-but what can you do except wait. The element of patience makes the waiting all the more endurable. Also it is pretty hard on the patience to listen to the yakking of some crackpot (possibly us) but then we are reminded of the words of that great philosopher Voltaire, who said "I do not agree with what you have to say but I will defend unto death your right to say it". An excellenL illustration of patience-the patience to hear the other guy's side of the question although it may be in complete disagreement with our own views.
Here we go again to the "old Navy". Your old Man-o'-Warsman had to be patient because it was a long time between liberties and rates. For instance the guy who printed this paper was a Bluejacket so long that when he finally got his hack-driver hat it took him several weeks to get to the point where he could look up and see the peak of his cap without thinking something was falling on him. (We had the same experience). Of course it may seem now that some of the nice things came pretty fast to the guys who were in during the late war but other things, some of which weren't very nice, also came pretty fast during those days.
So just stay in there patiently pitching instead of (rhyming word deleted) and time will treat you well; maybe not always but the odds are pretty good.

Epaulets first were used as shoulder pads to ease the weight of a hod, later being taken over by soldiers to soften the weight of a musket and finally by Naval officers to signify rank.


CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Sunday, November 27, 1949 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

NEW BOOKS RECEIVED AT
BASE LIBRARY

Mrs. H. R. Besse, NOB Librarian, reports that the following books are now in the Base library and are available to people stationed here: "The Egyptian" by Waltari; "Mary" by Asch; "Let Love Come At Last" by Caldwell; "Father Of The Bride" by Streeter; "Twilight On The Floods" by Steen; "The Way West" by Gutherie; "Point Of No Return" by Marquand; "Call It Treason" by Howe; "The Lonely" by Gallico.
These books are all new and have been on the best seller list of the New York Times Book Review. Besides these, there are many others which are good reading.

TRAINING GROUP
TRIVIALS

By L. C. Coleman YN2
Since we last went to press, the Training Group has received three new enlisted men fresh from the states, namely Turner, J. D., GMCA, Burns, R. E., YN1 and Little, D. W., ET1. Welcome aboard men, here's wishing you a most enjoyable tour of duty in Gtmo.
In the romance, or should I say travel department, I see that our three roving Romeos have made another trip to Santiago de Cuba, and from their appearances when they returned they must have staged a modern day version of the battle of San Juan Hill.
Cigars are being passed out this week, congratulations go to Coleman, L. C., YN2, Kulpers, M. W., ET3, Petty, C. W., RM3 Phillips, N. F., YN3, Volner, H. A., RD2 and Webb, E. A., RM3. Keep up the good work fellows.
On the sporting scene the officers' bowling team suffered a slight setback when they dropped three out of four games to the Hospital Dental Corps team, however the team is showing improvement and should do much better in the future.


S


Pa e Two


THE IND1AN








Saturday, 26 November 1949TH NINaeThe


NEW CIVIL SERVICE POLICY SANCTIONED

Washington (AFPS)-an overall personnel policy for civilian employees throughout the Department of Defense was recently approved by Secretary of Defense
Louis Johnson.
The new policy statement was
drawn up by the Personnel policy Board, under the chairmanship of Hubert E. Howard, and lists a sound basis for management-employee relations.
Under the ten points of the bill,
employees will be protected from discrimination against race, sex, color, religion, national origin, physical handicap; they will be offered opportunity for advancement in jobs for which they are best fitted; and shall be given the proper training to insure improved
job .performance.
Also provided under the new
policy are safe and healthful working conditions, frank and open expression for improvement of working conditions and methods, the right to become members oi lawful employee organizations, equal pay for difficult and responsible jobs, and the assurance of being well informed on plans and policies affecting them and their
jobs.

BOY SCOUT NOTES

'On Friday the 4th of November
1949 the Boy Scouts of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba had their second meeting at the quonset hut by the NOB sailboat locker. The troop was divided into 4 patrols with about 6 boys to each patrol. During this meeting work was begun on the Tenderfoot requirements. B. S. Inscoe, BM1, showed the boys about five knots including the bowline
and the square knot.
On Saturday, 12th of November,
the third meeting was held at the same place. On this night the boys learned a few patrol formation and drills. The boys decided to have long pants for their uniforms. They were informed that the best behaved patrol will go on a fishing
trip on the 19th of November.
The fourth meeting was held on
Friday, November 17, 1949. This meeting Ramon E. Alonso and Thomas Groome qualified for their Tenderfoot badges. On the 16th of December of the boys who have qualified will receive their Tenderfoot badges.
Stag patrol went fishing last
Sunday. Only three small fish were caught. Everyone had a good time.

Not So Famous Sayings.
If you want a stable friend,
you'd better buy a horse."
"This 'pen' leaks," said the convict, as the rain came through the
roof.


YOUR SIDEWALK SUPERINTENDENT

Lives there a man who works so hard or a woman so involved with home economics that does not still have time to stop a while and watch a steam shovel at work? We all know the answer to that one, and as a result there will be weekly column (we hope) devoted to this delightful pastime. Naturally, each individual cannot cover every project undertaken on the Base, so we will do it for you. At least we will try to cover all of them.
For instance, the other day the road grader was at work on Corinaso Point. Probably an every day occurrence somewhere on the Base, but on this particular day, it was at Corinaso Point. Your Superintendent wanted to stay longer but had to keep on the move. At the Naval Air Station your Superintendent observed a group of carpenters apparently tearing a quonset hut apart. Upon investigation it developed that they were not wrecking the building but converting the old NAS Chapel into living quarters. That's fine, because it means two more families will have a home in the not too distant future.
A little out of our line, the next project was one of the most interesting it has ever been our pleasure to take part in. Chief Mackay, leading chief of the helicopters at VU-10 invited your superintendent on a flight with the security patrol. As a matter of policy we brought our good friend Chief Bacon from the Print Shop merely to get the G. S. P. (General Service Personnel's) slant on things. To this day we still haven't received an opinion from the Chief but your superintendent can say with gusto that even though he has four years submarine duty and over twelve years aviation duty behind him, that helicopter ride around the boundaries of our Base was one of the most unique and thrilling experiences yet. LT Haines, the pilot, proved to be a diplomat at large without saying a word. We were riding quite low over the fence and passed over a Cuban on a horse. Apparently the horse was as fouled up as we were the first time we saw a helicopter because he started bucking and rearing. Your superintendent feared for the safety of its rider. Our pilot, however, displayed excellent courtesy and made a wide circle around the beast and rider. Looking back, we could see that the man had his horse back under control and was lazily continuing on his way down the road.

The new arrivals are just getting settled in the crowded theatre.
She: "Does it make any difference on which side of you I sit?"
He: "No. I'm ambidextrous."


PAY BILL GUARANTEES A MORE SECURE FUTURE
By Armed Forces Press Service
While a few persons may lose money under the new pay law, it is important to understand that over a period of years virtually every Serviceman will come out substantially ahead.
That, according to Armed Forces Talk 297, is the key to the new law, officially known as the "Career Compensation Act of 1949".
"Through the boost in basic pay, even if at the expense of other pays." the Talk declares "every Serviceman's future is made more secure."
This is because the new system of basic pay is "based on the degree of military responsibility, replacing the old longevity system, which unduly rewarded lower rankers of long service over high rankers of lesser service.
There is also a new retirement system.
Noting that "you will have to wait for official interpretations of some of the more complicated provisions," the Talk summarizes these principal changes:
1. The shift from the principle of longevity to that of reponsibility.
2. Abolition of special pay for foreign and sea duty and various special pays including infantry and medical badge compensation and enlistment leave allowances.
3. A change in the basis of flight and submarine pay from, percentage to fixed sum.
4. "Staging out" of the family allowance and its replacement by increased quarters allowance.
5. A change in the basis of enlistment allowances to length of future enlistment agreed upon instead of past service length.
6. Extension of the physical retirement system to enlisted personnel of less than 20 years' service.
These changes, the Talk declares, are designed "to establish for the uniformed Services a pay pattern which will tend to be more attractive to first-class personnel.
"Even though special payments generally are reduced, the over-all increase in basic pay, the new retirement provision and other compensations offer substantial new rewards to those who make the Armed Forces their career.

WHITE HOUSE REPAIRS' ARE NEAR COMPLETION

Washington (AFPS)-President Truman should be able to move back into the White House by Christmas, 1951, so says Building Administrator W. E. Reynolds.
The President and the First Family now occupy Blair House, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House.


THE INDIAN


Page .Three








...Fo.NSaturday 26 November 1949


URUGUAYAN NAVAL PERSONNEL TO VISIT

About 30 November a detachment of Uruguayan Naval personnel will depart from NAS Dallas. Texas flying ten surplus TBM (Avenger) aircraft to Uruguay. The proposed itinerary includes overnight stops at Pensacola, Miami, Guantanamo Bay, and San Juan. They are expected to arrive at McCalla Field on or about 2 December. The detachment consists of eleven officers and fifteen enlisted personnel.

LITTLE THEATER NOTES

There has been "Much Ado" at the theatre and various ports of call of the newly assembled radio rogues. Under the watchful eye of Shirley Childs, the charming miss who wrung the laughs from "My Sister Eileen" and crammed them into an hour long radio adaptation, more sore "hunt and peck" fingers have turned up than ever before in the history of this Base. And rumors to the contrary, she is not drumming up trade for Dr. Childs.
No, indeed! The callouses are being accumulated through the efforts of all embryo typists and their betters, the yeomen, to cut the stencils that will be run off that will be stapled, that will be read (phew!) by those seeking a part in the play. From one who knowsthere's work in them thar scripts!
Naturally, we cannot announce the results of last night's casting session, since last night has not yet arrived as this written. But there is a great chance that those with whom the decision rests are still on the lookout for your voice. If such is the case, keep your eyes and ears open for an announcement calling for another night of casting ,this coming Tuesday, November 29.
Seven days later, remember to turn your dial to 1450 and hear the initial performance of the "Little Theatre of the Air". It is estimated that no more than a week will be necessary to put the finishing touches on this little opus.
That's the beauty of these radio plays, you know. No set, no costumes, no makeup, no memory work, and that great bogeyman, the audience, isn't there to watch your every move. If you have been bothered by this thought and hesitated to join us on its account, now's your chance to work behind the "footlights" without being scared to death.
You know, this is another cold, icy plunge for us, this radio venture, and it's birth pangs are comparing favorably with The Little Theatre's during it's origin. Our hope is that you'll accept it as well ns you have the productions of the past. So keep an ear turned in our direction-how's about it?


A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA CAN BE EARNED BY YOU

In the lives of many Navy men
the acquisition of a high school B diploma is an extremely important Let', matter. High school graduation is things a requirement for assignment to "Powel certain Navy schools, such as Pho- team. tographer's Mate School. In the year t] case of other schools, for example Post Aviation Electrician's Mate School With v and Control Tower Operator's LTCO] School, the diploma, while not a couldn' requirement is an important con- occasic sideration in the eyes of those Colone charged with making selections. In there civilian life, high school graduation Beck, I has become the prerequisite for tain, consideration for a very large Cass, proportion of jobs. On I
In view, then, of the part played skin t by the high school diploma both an Int in civilian and military life, any the fir plan which helps Navy men who over H left school before completing the 2nd 12th grade to acquire that docu- in the ment or its equivalent while in the ping service should be welcomed. Wedne
There are fundamentally three left tl ways in which Navy men may work defeat( toward high school graduation. The The simplest method, provided the high team s school or state department of edu- agains cation looks favorably upon the last T method, is by way of the USAFI In General Educational Development Monda tests. These tests, five in number contest and requiring approximately 10 Officer, hours in all for their administra- compet tion, :are designed to determine the enterin educational level of the examinee thrillin without regard to his formal the CIo educational background. If that was in level proves to be sufficiently high, Officer. most high schools are willing to accept satisfactory scores on the Team GED tests as qualifying for a 2nd Gd diploma, but are faced with course 1st Gd requirements that have to be met Officer, according to state law. Sometimes Headqi it is a requirement in U. S. history; often there is a double requirement of American history and civics. In some cases where the high' school itself is unwilling to award a diploma, the state department of education may grant a high school equivalency certificate, a document which, as its name indicates, is generally accepted as the equivalent of a diploma.
The other two methods will be discussed in a subsequent issue of the Indian. The GED Tests, high school and college level, are administered by the Naval Station Educational Services Officer, Bay Hill Barracks #4.

COPS BAG DOGNAPPER
Atlantic City (AFPS) - Dog
Catcher James Evans was recently arrested on a charge of stealing 15 dogs.
Evans was charged with taking dogs from the city, pound and selling them to an unidentified lab. oratory.


y CPL E. J. Kazmierski s see-this week we'll start off by congratulating that rful" Officers' volley ball For the second consecutive ris squad claimed the IntraVolley Ball Championship fords of encouragement from L Johnston, that ball club just 't be downed. On frequent ins our Commanding Officer, 1 J. R. Lanigan, was seen out assisting CAPT Sullivan, LT LT Neef, and the team Capour Post Adjutant, CAPT spikin' 'em over. Monday 14 Nov. 49 the pigook to the air to start off r-Post Football League. In st clash the 2nd Sect romped qs to score a 13 to 0 triumph. Sect scored two touchdowns first half to defeat a scrapOfficers-Staff NCO's team sday 16 Nov. 1949. This he 2nd Guard Section uned, final score 12 to 0. 1st Gd Sect touch football lipped over an 18 to 2 win t a hard pressed Hqs outfit hursday.
an action-packed game on y 21 Nov. 1949 the first 0 - 0 took place when the fightin s-Staff NCO's team held it's itor, the 1st Gd Sect, from
-g the end zone to score. This .g contest was called when ck ran out, and the Gd Sect
* a scoring position on the s-Staff NCO's 1-yard line.
Standings
Won Lost Tied Sect ------- 2 0 0
Sect --------1 0 1
s-Staff NCO's 0 1 1 quarters Plt__ 0 2 0


"Say, mister ...


0


s


Paee Four


THE INDIAN








Saturday. 26 November 1949 THE INDIAN Pare Five


TENTH DIVISION
*NEWS NOTES

By B.W. Richards, YNC.
Among Tenth Division guests
attending the Marine Birthday Party last week were BMC and Mrs. E. H. Tye, ENC and Mrs.
L. P. Greenawalt, CSC and Mrs. R.
Culipher, the writer and his wife.
We were shown a grand time, the food was something to write home about, and we hope the Marines will never cease giving birthday parties to which we can be invited.
My wife and I were guests of
Chief and Mrs. Garcia on Hospital Cay Sunday; we spent a most enjoyable day, and had some fine fishing off one of the docks. While fishing, we sighted what appeared to be a sea snake or extra large eel, about ten feet long, near the dock, which, in company with two smaller snakes, or eels, has been seen before in that area. While sea snakes, which are deadly poisonous, are not normally found in the Caribbean, it would not be unlikely that they should have been introduced by way of the Panama Canal, since they do inhabit the eastern Pacific. However, they have never been known to attack man unless
caught in fishing nets.
COL Souder paid the office a
short visit Monday; we're glad to see him back on his feet, and hope
he'll be back in harness real soon. 'The Presidential Yacht, which
silently and without fanfare tied up in front of this office one night last week, as silently left over the week-end. It presents a beautiful sight, with it's white sides and gleaming bright work, sitting gracefully on the water. No man could ride it often and remain a
landlubber by choice.
ENC L. P. Greenawalt (Hawkshaw), was in Guantanamo on Police business Monday; he liked it so well that he took his wife and mother over on a shopping tour Friday. There's a lot to see there,
if you can be there in daylight.

BASE HOUSING OFFICE MOVED
The Base Housing Office was
moved Tuesday, 22 November from Room 206 to Room 205 which is . across the passageway from the Legal Officer's Office in the Base Administration Building. The telephone number, 305, is retained by the Housing Office. Office hours are from 0800 to 1630 Mondays
through Fridays.

ANOTHER LITTLE
MORON STORY
. There was a little Moron who
cut a hole in the rug to see the floor show; then covered it back up because he didn't want to see the
hole show.


GUANTANAMO'S
RANDOLPH RANCH
(Continued from last week)
"Boqueron" is the only cow at Randolph, and it is she that furnishes milk for ranch personnel. Her stablemate is an old horse named "Prince" who is twentysix years old, and looks every bit of it. His back is so swayed that his belly almost touches the ground. But old Prince has been a good saddle horse in his day and has earned his retirement. Thomas loves animals too much to shoot Prince now that he has outlived his usefulness. When asked what he would do if he saw someone mistreating one of his animals. Thomas replied, "The same thing you would do." This we considered a compliment.
"Lady" and "Cry Baby"
In addition to Prince there are five brood horses kept at the ranch proper, however, Recreation Department maintains two saddle horse corrals. One located at the Naval Air Station, and the other at the Base. The Marines have another for their own use. At present there are forty horses and three colts on the station, but the queen of them all is "Cry Baby". Thomas' pride and joy. She is a five months old colt and is the daughter of a mixed PalaminoArabian named "Lady". Whenever you see Thomas walking around the ranch you can be sure that "Lady" and "Cry Baby" are not very far away.
Large Chicken Ranch
There are a few chickens at Randolph for the use of ranch personnel but most of the local eggs are produced at a chicken ranch located nearer the Base. It is also under the supervision of the Randolph Ranch manager. At this chicken ranch there are 1101 hens and roosters of Leghorn, New Hampshire Red, and mixed breed stock. The peak output in eggs per day is fifty dozen, however, at the present time the hens are molting and ten to twelve dozen eggs per day is the top production figure. These eggs are sold to the Commissary by the Recreation Department.
Two incubators are in operation at the chicken ranch with a capacity of 400 eggs each. An additional incubator is on hand but unassembled at the present time. Helping Thomas with the chicken ranch are Morris Williams, a Jamaican, and Chuey Fong.
Limberneck Treatment
While on the subject of chickens it is fitting to mention the treatment that Thomas discovered for limberneck, a disease not uncommon to domestic fowl. Limberneck means just what the name implies. It leaves a chicken with its neck bent so that the head often lays on the back, chest or side. Formerly chicken ranchers immediately killed


Muster around the Joe Pot, Shipmates, for our first session and we will call the meeting to order and proceed with a story about Opera-tor #48 on the Base Police. Secret Operator #48,, that is! He has just received orders to "Follow That Man."
We are not supposed to let this out, but Secret Operator #48 is Shanghai Dietch, and "That Man" is the B. T. 0. that just landed a job firing the boiler to raise steam used to blow the whistle on a peanut vendor's machine. He is the same dude just transferred here from the Asiatic Fleet due to the fact that he saw too many jellyfish walking up the Yangtse River on stilts.
But, he's not going to get awav with it, because if Operator #48 falls down on the job, there's always Operator #35 (Rhodes) to take over the job.
There's a guy down here that gets a big charge out of sleeping on pool tables. Favorite position. feet and hands in each of the corner pockets. It's getting to be a tough situation when you have to play Pill Pool around a frame like that.
At a dance held at the Marine Site Pavillion last week some character let the air out of the tires, (and we mean literally), of a shipmate's car. Hitch-hiking home in the ayem has always been a pain in the neck to yours truly so we can sympathize with the victim. Guess he's lucky he's still got wheels on the buggy, tho'.
Caught a feller asleep in a chair in the barracks the other day. Figured out an excellent punch line for a fouled up photograph. Just tip the chair backwards, place a Royal Flush on his chest and write underneath, "Dont Let This Happen To You". The only difficulty encountered was that no one available knew what a Royal Flush is.

off all chickens victimized by limberneck.
Thomas mixed kerosene with nose drops which proved quite effective in the treatment of limberneck. His findings he turned over to the Government. He says that there is a better treatment on the market, but he doesn't know where to procure it.
In addition to chickens, the ranch has approximately one hundred pigeons and squabs. It's quite an experience to be sitting inside the ranch house and hear a hundred pigeons walking and flying around outside. It sounds just like a medium rainfall, and it's hard not be convinced that it isn't rain.


Saturday. 26 November 1949


THE INDIAN


Patze Five








Satuirdav. 26 November 1949 THE INDIANGt. a-4Nv920


By Allen Collier, Sports Editor


OFFICERS' BOWLING
LEAGUE

At the end of three weeks of competition in the Officers' Bowling league, the Naval Air Station team is leading the National league while the Civilians of NSD are still on top in the American. The NAS team replaced the Naval Station after trailing earlier in the season. The leading bowlers during the first three weeks were:
American League
Team W L Pins Pts. NSD -------- 7 2 2 9
FTG -------- 5 4 1 6
Marines ----- 4 5 2 6 VU-10 -------3 3 1 4
NOB -------- 3 3 1 4
Hosp-Dental - 2 7 1 3 NOB-VU-10 game postponed.
National League
NAS --------8 1 3 11
NavSta ------ 7 1 3 10 Hosp-Dental - 4 5 2 6 FTG -------- 3 6 1 4
VU-10 ------ 2 7 0 2
NSD -------- 2 6 0 2
Individual Average (150 or over) Name Games Ave. Badger --------------9 169
Ziz -----------------9 164
Wesson -------------6 164
Ondrasik ------------5 154
Serig ---------------8 153
Wray ---------------5 153
Berkley -------------6 153
Wilson --------------9 150
Jones (Hosp) -------- 8 150 Team high single game, NSD (A), 825; Individual high single game, Badger, 232; Individual high three games, Badger, 532.

ONCE AGAIN BASEBALL
SERIES IS RAINED OUT

By H. L. Broughton
Due to the fact that Jupiter Pluvius went on a tear the last three nights of scheduled games between the All-Stars and Cuban Civilians, the baseball series has slowed down to a halt. The next scheduled game is for Tuesday 29 November, weather permitting. The two teams haven't really had a chance to feel each other out yet, but once they get going, the fur should fly between these two crack teams.
HANDICAP GOLF
TOURNEY UNDERWAY

The Men's Annual Handicap Golf Tournament got underway Thursday morning with some 60 golfers participating. Final round play is slated for tomorrow, weather conditions permitting. Club officials stated that if weather in -


terferes the tourney will be extended until next weekend. At press time Wednesday the Fleet Boat Pool's Rogalski was the low medalist with a net of 66. He was shooting with a 20 handicap. LTJG Hansen was in runner-up position at that time with a 67. He was playing with a handicap of 11.
Final. results and trophy winners will be announced in next week's Indian.

WARMIN' THE BENCH
By Armed Forces Press Service
"It's absolutely ridiculous to even hope that we'll have as good a team this season as we have had for the past four years," the "Baron of Basketball." University of Kentucky's Adolph Rupp, declared in a special interview with this writer.
The chief mentor of Wildcat squads, which for many years have earned national acclaim, sat in an old swivel chair with his feet resting on the somewhat cluttered desk in one corner of the small Kentucky gym.
"We can't be expected to have as good a team this year, when we've just graduated such stars as Alex Groza, Ralph Beard, 'Wah Wah' Jones, and Cliff Barker," he continued. "Sure, we're the defending national champions, but remember those boys who were the national champions, are playing this year under the name of the Indianapolis Olympians.
The coach pulled out one of the national publications and began flipping the pages, "Look at this," he complained. "They know we graduated the 'Fabulous Four' and still, even before the season starts, they pick Kentucky to finish in the top three teams."
Leaning back in his chair he mumbled, "Why, I'll be surprised if we don't loose seven or eight games out of our 25-game schedule. Every team is laying for us."
"You can tell them though," the basketball, mentor said with a slight smile, "any team that wants to get even with us had better do it this year, because we're going to be ready next season.
Rupp thought for a brief moment before continuing, then with a frown crowding his eyes, said
slowly, "I look for Bradley and Villanova to have outstanding teams this year. Also Tulane, San Francisco and Oklahoma will put good squads on the floor. Kansas out in the Big Seven will be a dark horse, with that big boy from Indiana named LoVelette tossing in a lot of baskets."
"And of course De Paul and


NEW YORKER TO SPEAK
OVER WGBY
Vr. Nick Appopolous, wealthy New York apartment owner is expected to arrive at the Base the first week in December. An hour of radio time has been allocated to Mr. Appopolous and his party tenatively scheduled by WGBY for Tuesday, 6 December. Mr. Appopolous' program will carry a message of vital interest to all Base personnel.

VU-10 NOTES

Our Squadron Commander, CDR Egbert recently returned from a trip back to the States, but unfortunately arrived on the Base to late to attend the Squadron Dance at the Marine Pavilion. We all missed the Skipper at the dance and all we can say is he sure missed a good one.
LT Sousa and his committee did a swell job of arranging and everyone had a swell time. Music was furnished by Jay Jay and the Naval Base Band. Prizes were presented to couples winning the various dance contests.
About 2200 all hands took time out to sample the excellent buffet lunch while "Tall Boy" Greenway and his "Gitmo Gitters" furnished some good old hoe down music.
Only mishap of the evening was the discovery of a sudden flat tire on the Exec's car after the dance. .
LT E.D. Brock arrived aboard W FLSW in time to be present at th, last half of the dance. His last duty station was at Annapolis, Maryland and we are happy to welcome him aboard as we were stationed with him at the Air Facility up there several years ago.
New York (AFPS)--"Absolutely not!" is Joe DiMaggio's answer when asked if he's ready to hang up his spikes. "I don't know why I would be quitting," he said, getting ready for a San Francisco vacation. "All I need is rest and lots of it."

New Orleans (AFPS)-Tulane University will break off football relations with Notre Dame after the 1950 game. The announcement was made shortly after the Irish had knocked the Green Wave from the undefeated ranks, 46-7. W

Notre Dame always have topflight teams. We meet them with just one day between, and on their home floors, too."
"Then there's Purdue and Michigan State in the Big Ten which look mighty good from our advance reports.
"Yes," concluded the Man in the Brown Suit, "I feel certain that fans of the cage game can look forward to another top season of play on the college hardwoods."


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-24 Nov 49-2500


Sat.nrdsv: 26 Nnvamb r 1949




Full Text

PAGE 1

ian Vol. IV No. 40 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 26 November 1949 LATEST DOPE ON CHRISTMAS MAIL YFR 1152 to Make Special Trips to Miami to Pick Up Mail On 20 November the USS YFR1152 brought 300 sacks of United States mail from Miami to Guantanamo Bay. This marked the first of three mail trips with the second to be on 5 December and the last on 19 December when it is anticipated that around 1,000 sacks of mail will be picked up. All parcel post mail is being diverted to Miami for pickup until 23 December After discontinuation of trips by USS YFR-1152 mail will be picked up by local planes on special flights to Miami. First class mail will continue to be forwarded from New York to Patuxent River, Maryland to be placed aboard FLSW flights to Guantanamo Bay each Monday and Friday. Outgoing Mail It is expected that Christmas parcels for the United States will be dispatched on the following dates: 23 November to Norfolk via USS Mattabasset; 28 November to Miami via the USS YFR-1152; 2 December to Norfolk via USS General Anderson; 5 December to Norfolk via USS Alcona; 9 December to Norfolk via USS Adams; 10 December to Norfolk via USS Corduba; and 12 December to Miami via USS YFR-1152. Parcels intended for delivery by Christmas must be posted not later than 1 December. Gift Certificates must be signed before submission of parcel to the post office for mailing. Special delivery speeds up delivery of Christmas parcels. Greeting Cards All greeting cards to and from overseas bases must be sealed and posted at the rate of three cents per ounce, in accordance with the Postal Bulletin, Post Office Department, Washington, D. C. #19,268 dated 20 September 1949. This allows patrons to enclose a written message with greeting cards. All personnel on the Base wishing to exchange Christmas greeting cards may mail same through the Fleet Post Office sealed at the drop postage rate of one cent, but must use proper box number of the addressee. FLOWER SERVICE INAUGURATED HERE Beginning Monday a new service is being effected by the local Ship': Service. The service, "Flowers-bywire" will afford Base personnel an opportunity to send flowers to their families or sweethearts. LT K. W. Strebel, Ship's Service officer, announced the innovation of this service late this week. In making the announcement he stated that orders for flowers must be placed with the local store at least two weeks prior to the delivery date. International Flower Service in New York City is the firm handling the Guantanamo orders and they must be given the orders one week in advance of the delivery date. Due to the fact that only bi-weekly mail service is in effect to the States from here the orders will be able to go out only on Mondays and Fridays. Persons utilizing this service will pay for the flowers here and may have a ten word message included free of charge if they wish. Order blanks may be obtained at the Naval Station Ship's Service. Burlington, Vt. (AFPS)-"Better late than never" is a cliche Albert G. Prill doesn't mind using. When he was 21 he was forced to quit the University of Vermont because of failing health. Recently, 59 year later, he was awarded a degree. i ORCHIDS FROM USS WILLIAMSBURG -The following note of thanks was received by dispatch from the USS Williamsburg on 19 November following her departure from Guantanamo Bay: "In behalf of the officers and crew of the Williamsburg I wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to you and I your command for the many courtesies and kindnesses -shown and in making our I visit so pleasant." The mes; sage was addressed to NOB 2 Guantanamo Bay. 5 Ii BASE SUPPLY ACTIVITIES TO BE INSPECTED On Monday, 28 November the following members of the Staff of the Inspector General of the Supply Corps will arrive at this Base to conduct a routine inspection of supply activities: CAPT R. R. Thompson, SC, Assistant Inspector General; CDR A. A. Pabst, SC, Material and Supply, Bureau of Supply and Accounts; CDR S. C. St. John, SC, Ship's Store Office; CDR G. F. Brewton, SC, Accounting and Finance, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts; LCDR J. T. Hughes, SC, Office of Naval Material, EXOS; LCDR A. McCrone, SC, Officer Personnel, Bureau of Supplies and Accounts; LCDR E. M. Brown, SC, Office of General Inspector of SC; LTJG J. H. Miller, SC, Office of General Inspector of SC (Air). Also arriving to join this party on 29 November are: CAPT L. W. Cease, Tenth Naval District Supply Officer, and LCDR K. Strickler, Tenth Naval District Ship's Service Officer. CABIN TRANSPORTATION CLARIFIED Last week the Indian ran a front page story concerning the assignment of certain enlisted personnel to cabin accomodations when traveling aboard military transports of the CMSTS. At the request of the Port Director this story is being clarified. Men of the first three pay grades are assigned cabin accomodations when sufficient cabin space is available. However when cabin transportation is assigned, it does not mean that personnel so assigned can be certain of occupying a cabin with their families. Cabins aboard transports are equipped with four berths each, and to utilize cabin space to accomodate the greatest number of persons the assignments must be made to four female or four male passengers for each cabin. The only exception to this rule being when a family group is large enough to occupy an entire cabin or when the transport is carrying only a fraction of the cabin capacity.

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Pare Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 26 November 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 26 November 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander F. R. Pledger, ALC--------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR.Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions. of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. Iu Nursery News: P1 j Dimitri Thomas Burroughs born 19 November to SOC and Mrs. Otto L. Burroughs; Car l os Alfredo Cabol born 21 November to Mr. & NOTE Mrs. C.A. Cabol. At 1300 24 November the Hospital Family enjoyed their annual Thanksgiving dinner in the Recreation Hall at the Hospital. Among the many guests present were RADM and Mrs. W. K. Phillips. After one previous game with the Guantanamo City Business College had been cancelled due to inclement weather, the Hospital Basketball Team came through with a 39-31 score to win Tuesday night's game. Dr. W. T. Annon departed on ten days leave in the States via VR-1 -mission matrimony. We all join in wishing Dr. and Mrs. Annon the best of luck and happiness. CSC A. 0. Mullins reenlisted on board for a period of four years. BASE ACCIDENTS By C. E. Britt Recently two more vehicular accidents occurred on curved roads. Two private automobiles collided head-on while rounding a curve on one of the beach roads. Fortunately, no one was injured but damage to both cars was considerable. A weapons carrier operated by a navy driver completely overturned while rounding another curve on the same road. It was necessary to use a jack in order to extricate the driver from under the vehicle. PATIENCE By ComScutButLant A couple of years back a song writer made himself quite a pot of dough and a name in the musical world with a song written around the title words "Patience and Fortitude". If this beginning sounds like a sermon we suggest that you stop here. Preaching is not our intent. As Commander, ScuttleButt, Atlantic, we pass on to you what the boys are saying in the back room-and elsewhere. However, even at the risk of being accused of preaching, we do want to bring to the attention of our readers ( ?) the twin panaceas which must be well remembered and frequently employed in the pursuit of success and happiness in any endeavor-Tincture of Time and Essence of Patience. Time cures all the ills of mankind and patience is required to let time do the work. All things come to those who wait-true. Admittedly its pretty tough on the patience when you have to sweat out the CPO list for two or three years in a row-but what can you do except wait. The element of patience makes the waiting all the more endurable. Also it is pretty hard on the patience to listen to the yakking of some crackpot (possibly us) but then we are reminded of the words of that great philosopher Voltaire, who said "I do not agree with what you have to say but I will defend unto death your right to say it". An excellent illustration of patience-the patience to hear the other guy's side of the question although it may be in complete disagreement with our own views. Here we go again to the "old Navy". Your old Man-o'-Warsman had to be patient because it was a long time between liberties and rates. For instance the guy who printed this paper was a Bluejacket so long that when he finally got his hack-driver hat it took him several weeks to get to the point where he could look up and see the peak of his cap without thinking something was falling on him. (We had the same experience). Of course it may seem now that some of the nice things came pretty fast to the guys who were in during the late war but other things, some of which weren't very nice, also came pretty fast during those days. So just stay in there patiently pitching instead of (rhyming word deleted) and time will treat you well; maybe not always but the odds are pretty good. Epaulets first were used as shoulder pads to ease the weight of a hod, later being taken over by soldiers to soften the weight of a musket and finally by Naval officers to signify rank. CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Sunday, November 27, 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1749-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) NEW BOOKS RECEIVED AT BASE LIBRARY Mrs. H. R. Besse, NOB Librarian, reports that the following books are now in the Base library and are available to people stationed here: "The Egyptian" by Waltari; "Mary" by Asch; "Let Love Come At Last" by Caldwell; "Father Of The Bride" by Streeter; "Twilight On The Floods" by Steen; "The Way West" by Gutherie; "Point Of No Return" by Marquand; "Call It Treason" by Howe; "The Lonely" by Gallico. These books are all new and have been on the best seller list of the New York Times Book Review. Besides these, there are many others which are good reading. TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS By L. C. Coleman YN2 Since we last went to press, the Training Group has received three new enlisted men fresh from the states, namely Turner, J. D., GMCA, Burns, R. E., YN1 and Little, D. W., ET1. Welcome aboard men, here's wishing you a most enjoyable tour of duty in Gtmo. In the romance, or should I say travel department, I see that our three roving Romeos have made another trip to Santiago de Cuba, and from their appearances when they returned they must have staged a modern day version of the battle of San Juan Hill. Cigars are being passed out this week, congratulations go to Coleman, L. C., YN2, Kulpers, M. W., ET3, Petty, C. W., RM3 Phillips, N. F., YN3, Volner, H. A., RD2 and Webb, E. A., RM3. Keep up the good work fellows. On the sporting scene the officers' bowling team suffered a slight setback when they dropped three out of four games to the Hospital Dental Corps team, however the team is showing improvement and should do much better in the future. S Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 26 November 1949

PAGE 3

Saturday. ~ November 1949 THE INDIAN Page Thret~ .NEW CIVIL SERVICE POLICY SANCTIONED Washington (AFPS)-an overall personnel policy for civilian employees throughout the Department of Defense was recently approved by Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson. The new policy statement was drawn up by the Personnel policy Board, under the chairmanship of Hubert E. Howard, and lists a sound basis for management-employee relations. Under the ten points of the bill, employees will be protected from discrimination against race, sex, color, religion, national origin, physical handicap; they will be offered opportunity for advancement in jobs for which they are best fitted; and shall be given the proper training to insure improved job performance. Also provided under the new policy are safe and healthful working conditions, frank and open expression for improvement of working conditions and methods, the right to become members of lawful employee organizations, equal pay for difficult and responsible jobs, and the assurance of being well informed on plans and policies affecting them and their jobs. BOY SCOUT NOTES On Friday the 4th of November 1949 the Boy Scouts of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba had their second meeting at the quonset hut by the NOB sailboat locker. The troop was divided into 4 patrols with about 6 boys to each patrol. During this meeting work was begun on the Tenderfoot requirements. B. S. Inscoe, BM1, showed the boys about five knots including the bowline and the square knot. On Saturday, 12th of November, the third meeting was held at the same place. On this night the boys learned a few patrol formation' and drills. The boys decided to have long pants for their uniforms. They were informed that the best behaved patrol will go on a fishing trip on the 19th of November. The fourth meeting was held on Friday, November 17, 1949. This meeting Ramon E. Alonso and Thomas Groome qualified for their Tenderfoot badges. On the 16th of December of the boys who have qualified will receive their Tenderfoot badges. Stag patrol went fishing last Sunday. Only three small fish were caught. Everyone had a good time. Not So Famous Sayings. If you want a stable friend, you'd better buy a horse." "This 'pen' leaks," said the convict, as the rain came through the roof. YOUR SIDEWALK SUPERINTENDENT Lives there a man who works so hard or a woman so involved with home economics that does not still have time to stop a while and watch a steam shovel at work? We all know the answer to that one, and as a result there will be weekly column (we hope) devoted to this delightful pastime. Naturally, each individual cannot cover every project undertaken on the Base, so we will do it for you. At least we will try to cover all of them. For instance, the other day the road grader was at work on Corinaso Point. Probably an every day occurrence somewhere on the Base, but on this particular day, it was at Corinaso Point. Your Superintendent wanted to stay longer but had to keep on the move. At the Naval Air Station your Superintendent observed a group of carpenters apparently tearing a quonset hut apart. Upon investigation it developed that they were not wrecking the building but converting the old NAS Chapel into living quarters. That's fine, because it means two more families will have a home in the not too distant future. A little out of our line, the next project was one of the most interesting it has ever been our pleasure to take part in. Chief Mackay, leading chief of the helicopters at VU-10 invited your superintendent on a flight with the security patrol. As a matter of policy we brought our good friend Chief Bacon from the Print Shop merely to get the G. S. P. (General Service Personnel's) slant on things. To this day we still haven't received an opinion from the Chief but your superintendent can say with gusto that even though he has four years submarine duty and over twelve years aviation duty behind him, that helicopter ride around the boundaries of our Base was one of the most unique and thrilling experiences yet. LT Haines, the pilot, proved to be a diplomat at large without saying a word. We were riding quite low over the fence and passed over a Cuban on a horse. Apparently the horse was as fouled up as we were the first time we saw a helicopter because he started bucking and rearing. Your superintendent feared for the safety of its rider. Our pilot, however, displayed excellent courtesy and made a wide circle around the beast and rider. Looking back, we could see that the man had his horse back under control and was lazily continuing on his way down the road. The new arrivals are just getting settled in the crowded theatre. She: "Does it make any difference on which side of you I sit?" He: "No. I'm ambidextrous." PAY BILL GUARANTEES A MORE SECURE FUTURE By Armed Forces Press Service While a few persons may lose money under the new pay law, it is important to understand that over a period of years virtually every Serviceman will come out substantially ahead. That, according to Armed Forces Talk 297, is the key to the new law, officially known as the "Career Compensation Act of 1949". "Through the boost in basic pay, even if at the expense of other pays." the Talk declares "every Serviceman's future is made more secure." This is because the new system of basic pay is "based on the degree of military responsibility, replacing the old longevity system, which unduly rewarded lower rankers of long service over high rankers of lesser service. There is also a new retirement system. Noting that "you will have to wait for official interpretations of some of the more complicated provisions," the Talk summarizes these principal changes: 1. The shift from the principle of longevity to that of responsibility. 2. Abolition of special pay for foreign and sea duty and various special pays including infantry and medical badge compensation and enlistment leave allowances. 3. A change in the basis of flight and submarine pay from, percentage to fixed sum. 4. "Staging out" of the family allowance and its replacement by increased quarters allowance. 5. A change in the basis of enlistment allowances to length of future enlistment agreed upon instead of past service length. 6. Extension of the physical retirement system to enlisted personnel of less than 20 years' service. These changes, the Talk declares, are designed "to establish for the uniformed Services a pay pattern which will tend to be more attractive to first-class personnel. "Even though special payments generally are reduced, the over-all increase in basic pay, the new retirement provision and other compensations offer substantial new rewards to those who make the Armed Forces their career. WHITE HOUSE REPAIRS ARE NEAR COMPLETION Washington (AFPS)-President Truman should be able to move back into the White House by Christmas, 1951, so says Building Administrator W. E. Reynolds. The President and the First Family now occupy Blair House, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House. Saturday, 26 November 1949 THE INDIAN Page -Threc

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THE INDIAN Saturday 26 November 1949 URUGUAYAN NAVAL PERSONNEL TO VISIT About 30 November a detachment of Uruguayan Naval personnel will depart from NAS Dallas. Texas flying ten surplus TBM (Avenger) aircraft to Uruguay. The proposed itinerary includes overnight stops at Pensacola, Miami, Guantanamo Bay, and San Juan. They are expected to arrive at McCalla Field on or about 2 December. The detachment consists of eleven officers and fifteen enlisted personnel. LITTLE THEATER NOTES There has been "Much Ado" at the theatre and various ports of call of the newly assembled radio rogues. Under the watchful eye of Shirley Childs, the charming miss who wrung the laughs from "My Sister Eileen" and crammed them into an hour long radio adaptation, more sore "hunt and peck" fingers have turned up than ever before in the history of this Base. And rumors to the contrary, she is not drumming up trade for Dr. Childs. No, indeed! The callouses are being accumulated through the efforts of all embryo typists and their betters, the yeomen, to cut the stencils that will be run off that will be stapled, that will be read (phew!) by those seeking a part in the play. From one who knowsthere's work in them thar scripts! Naturally, we cannot announce the results of last night's casting session, since last night has not yet arrived as this written. But there is a great chance that those with whom the decision rests are still on the lookout for your voice. If such is the case, keep your eyes and ears open for an announcement calling for another night of casting this coming Tuesday, November 29. Seven days later, remember to turn your dial to 1450 and hear the initial performance of the "Little Theatre of the Air". It is estimated that no more than a week will be necessary to put the finishing touches on this little opus. That's the beauty of these radio plays, you know. No set, no costumes, no makeup, no memory work, and that great bogeyman, the audience, isn't there to watch your every move. If you have been bothered by this thought and hesitated to join us on its account, now's your chance to work behind the "footlights" without being scared to death. You know, this is another cold, icy plunge for us, this radio venture, and it's birth pangs are comparing favorably with The Little Theatre's during it's origin. Our hope is that you'll accept it as well as you have the productions of the past. So keep an ear turned in our direction-how's about it? A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA CAN BE EARNED BY YOU In the lives of many Navy men the acquisition of a high school diploma is an extremely important matter. High school graduation is a requirement for assignment to certain Navy schools, such as Photographer's Mate School. In the case of other schools, for example Aviation Electrician's Mate School and Control Tower Operator's School, the diploma, while not a requirement is an important consideration in the eyes of those charged with making selections. In civilian life, high school graduation has become the prerequisite for consideration for a very large proportion of jobs. In view, then, of the part played by the high school diploma both in civilian and military life, any plan which helps Navy men who left school before completing the 12th grade to acquire that document or its equivalent while in the service should be welcomed. There are fundamentally three ways in which Navy men may work toward high school graduation. The simplest method, provided the high school or state department of education looks favorably upon the method, is by way of the USAFI General Educational Development tests. These tests, five in number and requiring approximately 10 hours in all for their administration, are designed to determine the educational level of the examinee without regard to his formal educational background. If that level proves to be sufficiently high, most high schools are willing to accept satisfactory scores on the GED tests as qualifying for a diploma, but are faced with course requirements that have to be met according to state law. Sometimes it is a requirement in U. S. history; often there is a double requirement of American history and civics. In some cases where the high school itself is unwilling to award a diploma, the state department of education may grant a high school equivalency certificate, a document which, as its name indicates, is generally accepted as the equivalent of a diploma. The other two methods will be discussed in a subsequent issue of the Indian. The GED Tests, high school and college level, are administered by the Naval Station Educational Services Officer, Bay Hill Barracks #4. COPS BAG DOGNAPPER Atlantic City (AFPS) -Dog Catcher James Evans was recently arrested on a charge of stealing 15 dogs. Evans was charged with taking dogs from the city pound and selling them to an unidentified laboratory. By CPL E. J. Kazmierski Let's see-this week we'll start things off by congratulating that "Powerful" Officers' volley ball team. For the second consecutive year this squad claimed the IntraPost Volley Ball Championship With words of encouragement from LTCOL Johnston, that ball club just couldn't be downed. On frequent occasions our Commanding Officer, Colonel J. R. Lanigan, was seen out there assisting CAPT Sullivan, LT Beck, LT Neef, and the team Captain, our Post Adjutant, CAPT Cass, spikin' 'em over. On Monday 14 Nov. 49 the pig skin took to the air to start off an Intra-Post Football League. In the first clash the 2nd Sect romped over Hqs to score a 13 to 0 triumph. 2nd Sect scored two touchdowns in the first half to defeat a scrapping Officers-Staff NCO's team Wednesday 16 Nov. 1949. This left the 2nd Guard Section undefeated, final score 12 to 0. The 1st Gd Sect touch football team slipped over an 18 to 2 win against a hard pressed Hqs outfit last Thursday. In an action-packed game on Monday 21 Nov. 1949 the first 0 -0 contest took place when the fightin Officers-Staff NCO's team held it's competitor, the 1st Gd Sect, front entering the end zone to score. This thrilling contest was called when the clock ran out, and the Gd Sect was in a scoring position on the Officers-Staff NCO's 1-yard line. Standings Team Won Lost Tied 2nd GdSect -------2 0 0 1st GdSect -----1 0 1 Officers-Staff NCO's 0 1 1 Headquarters Plt 0 2 0 0 "Say, mister 0 S Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday 26 Novem 9 a

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Saturday. 26 November 1949 THE INDIAN Pare Five TENTH DIVISION NEWS NOTES By B. W. Richards, YNC Among Tenth Division guests attending the Marine Birthday Party last week were BMC and Mrs. E. H. Tye, ENC and Mrs. L. P. Greenawalt, CSC and Mrs. R. Culipher, the writer and his wife. We were shown a grand time, the food was something to write home about, and we hope the Marines will never cease giving birthday parties to which we can be invited. My wife and I were guests of Chief and Mrs. Garcia on Hospital Cay Sunday; we spent a most enjoyable day, and had some fine fishing off one of the docks. While fishing, we sighted what appeared to be a sea snake or extra large eel, about ten feet long, near the dock, which, in company with two smaller snakes, or eels, has been seen before in that area. While sea snakes, which are deadly poisonous, are not normally found in the Caribbean, it would not be unlikely that they should have been introduced by way of the Panama Canal, since they do inhabit the eastern Pacific. However, they have never been known to attack man unless caught in fishing nets. COL Souder paid the office a short visit Monday; we're glad to see him back on his feet, and hope he'll be back in harness real soon. The Presidential Yacht, which silently and without fanfare tied up in front of this office one night last week, as silently left over the week-end. It presents a beautiful sight, with it's white sides and gleaming bright work, sitting gracefully on the water. No man could ride it often and remain a landlubber by choice. ENC L. P. Greenawalt (Hawkshaw), was in Guantanamo on Police business Monday; he liked it so well that he took his wife and mother over on a shopping tour Friday. There's a lot to see there, if you can be there in daylight. BASE HOUSING OFFICE MOVED The Base Housing Office was moved Tuesday, 22 November from Room 206 to Room 205 which is .across the passageway from the Legal Officer's Office in the Base Administration Building. The telephone number, 305, is retained by the Housing Office. Office hours are from 0800 to 1630 Mondays through Fridays. ANOTHER LITTLE MORON STORY There was a little Moron who cut a hole in the rug to see the floor show; then covered it back up because he didn't want to see the hole show. GUANTANAMO'S RANDOLPH RANCH (Continued from last week) "Boqueron" is the only cow at Randolph, and it is she that furnishes milk for ranch personnel. Her stablemate is an old horse named "Prince" who is twentysix years old, and looks every bit of it. His back is so swayed that his belly almost touches the ground. But old Prince has been a good saddle horse in his day and has earned his retirement. Thomas loves animals too much to shoot Prince now that he has outlived his usefulness. When asked what he would do if he saw someone mistreating one of his animals. Thomas replied, "The same thing you would do." This we considered a compliment. "Lady" and "Cry Baby" In addition to Prince there are five brood horses kept at the ranch proper, however, Recreation Department maintains two saddle horse corrals. One located at the Naval Air Station, and the other at the Base. The Marines have another for their own use. At present there are forty horses and three colts on the station, but the queen of them all is "Cry Baby". Thomas' pride and joy. She is a five months old colt and is the daughter of a mixed PalaminoArabian named "Lady". Whenever you see Thomas walking around the ranch you can be sure that "Lady" and "Cry Baby" are not very far away. Large Chicken Ranch There are a few chickens at Randolph for the use of ranch personnel but most of the local eggs are produced at a chicken ranch located nearer the Base. It is also under the supervision of the Randolph Ranch manager. At this chicken ranch there are 1101 hens and roosters of Leghorn, New Hampshire Red, and mixed breed stock. The peak output in eggs per day is fifty dozen, however, at the present time the hens are molting and ten to twelve dozen eggs per day is the top production figure. These eggs are sold to the Commissary by the Recreation Department. Two incubators are in operation at the chicken ranch with a capacity of 400 eggs each. An additional incubator is on hand but unassembled at the present time. Helping Thomas with the chicken ranch are Morris Williams, a Jamaican, and Chuey Fong. Limberneck Treatment While on the subject of chickens it is fitting to mention the treatment that Thomas discovered for limberneck, a disease not uncommon to domestic fowl. Limberneck means just what the name implies. It leaves a chicken with its neck bent so that the head often lays on the back, chest or side. Formerly chicken ranchers immediately killed THE 7 Muster around the Joe Pot, Shipmates, for our first session and we will call the meeting to order and proceed with a story about Operator #48 on the Base Police. Secret Operator #48,, that is! He has just received orders to "Follow That Man." We are not supposed to let this out, but Secret Operator #48 is Shanghai Dietch, and "That Man" is the B. T. 0. that just landed a job firing the boiler to raise steam used to blow the whistle on a peanut vendor's machine. He is the same dude just transferred here from the Asiatic Fleet due to the fact that he saw too many jellyfish walking up the Yangtse River on stilts. But, he's not going to get away with it, because if Operator #48 falls down on the job, there's always Operator #35 (Rhodes) to take over the job. There's a guy down here that gets a big charge out of sleeping on pool tables. Favorite position. feet and hands in each of the corner pockets. It's getting to be a tough situation when you have to play Pill Pool around a frame like that. At a dance held at the Marine Site Pavillion last week some character let the air out of the tires, (and we mean literally), of a shipmate's car. Hitch-hiking home in the ayem has always been a pain in the neck to yours truly so we can sympathize with the victim. Guess he's lucky he's still got wheels on the buggy, tho'. Caught a feller asleep in a chair in the barracks the other day. Figured out an excellent punch line for a fouled up photograph. Just tip the chair backwards, place a Royal Flush on his chest and write underneath, "Dont Let This Happen To You". The only difficulty encountered was that no one available knew what a Royal Flush is. off all chickens victimized by limberneck. Thomas mixed kerosene with nose drops which proved quite effective in the treatment of limberneck. His findings he turned over to the Government. He says that there is a better treatment on the market, but he doesn't know where to procure it. In addition to chickens, the ranch has approximately one hundred pigeons and squabs. It's quite an experience to be sitting inside the ranch house and hear a hundred pigeons walking and flying around outside. It sounds just like a medium rainfall, and it's hard not be convinced that it isn't rain. Saturday, 26 November 1949 THE INDIAN PaLre Five

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Satur'day 26 Novembe 19 THE INDIAN t Gtmou. Bay-24 Nov 49-2600 OFFICERS' BOWLING LEAGUE At the end of three weeks of competition in the Officers' Bowling league, the Naval Air Station team is leading the National league while the Civilians of NSD are still on top in the American. The NAS team replaced the Naval Station after trailing earlier in the season. The leading bowlers during the first three weeks were: American League Team W L Pins Pts. NSD---------7 2 2 9 FTG ---------5 4 1 6 Marines ------4 5 2 6 VU-10 3 3 1 4 NOB --------3 3 1 4 Hosp-Dental 2 7 1 3 NOB-VU-10 game postponed. National League NAS --------8 1 3 11 NavSta ------7 1 3 10 Hosp-Dental 4 5 2 6 FTG -------3 6 1 4 VU-10 -------2 7 0 2 NSD --------2 6 0 2 Individual Average (150 or over) Name Games Ave. Badger _--------9 169 Zi -----------9 164 Wesson -------------6 164 Ondrasik ------------5 154 Serig --------------8 153 Wray ---------------5 153 Berkley ------------6 153 Wilson ____-----_ 9 150 Jones (Hosp) -------8 150 Team high single game, NSD (A), 825; Individual high single game, Badger, 232; Individual high three games, Badger, 532. ONCE AGAIN BASEBALL SERIES IS RAINED OUT By H. L. Broughton Due to the fact that Jupiter Pluvius went on a tear the last three nights of scheduled games between the All-Stars and Cuban Civilians, the baseball series has slowed down to a halt. The next scheduled game is for Tuesday 29 November, weather permitting. The two teams haven't really had a chance to feel each other out yet, but once they get going, the fur should fly between these two crack teams. HANDICAP GOLF TOURNEY UNDERWAY The Men's Annual Handicap Golf Tournament got underway Thursday morning with some 60 golfers participating. Final round play is slated for tomorrow, weather conditions permitting. Club officials stated that if weather interferes the tourney will be extended until next weekend. At press time Wednesday the Fleet Boat Pool's Rogalski was the low medalist with a net of 66. He was shooting with a 20 handicap. LTJG Hansen was in runner-up position at that time with a 67. He was playing with a handicap of 11. Final. results and trophy winners will be announced in next week's Indian. WARMIN' THE BENCH By Armed Forces Press Service "It's absolutely ridiculous to even hope that we'll have as good a team this season as we have had for the past four years," the "Baron of Basketball." University of Kentucky's Adolph Rupp, declared in a special interview with this writer. The chief mentor of Wildcat squads, which for many years have earned national acclaim, sat in an old swivel chair with his feet resting on the somewhat cluttered desk in one corner of the small Kentucky gym. "We can't be expected to have as good a team this year, when we've just graduated such stars as Alex Groza, Ralph Beard, 'Wah Wah' Jones, and Cliff Barker," he continued. "Sure, we're the defending national champions, but remember those boys who were the national champions, are playing this year under the name of the Indianapolis Olympians. The coach pulled out one of the national publications and began flipping the pages, "Look at this," he complained. "They know we graduated the 'Fabulous Four' and still, even before the season starts, they pick Kentucky to finish in the top three teams." Leaning back in his chair he mumbled, "Why, I'll be surprised if we don't loose seven or eight games out of our 25-game schedule. Every team is laying for us." "You can tell them though," the basketball, mentor said with a slight smile, "any team that wants to get even with us had better do it this year, because we're going to be ready next season. Rupp thought for a brief moment before continuing, then with a frown crowding his eyes, said slowly, "I look for Bradley and Villanova to have outstanding teams this year. Also Tulane, San Francisco and Oklahoma will put good squads on the floor. Kansas out in the Big Seven will be a dark horse, with that big boy from Indiana named LoVelette tossing in a lot of baskets." "And of course De Paul and NEW YORKER TO SPEAK OVER WGBY Mr. Nick Appopolous, wealthy New York apartment owner is expected to arrive at the Base the first week in December. An hour of radio time has been allocated to Mr. Appopolous and his party tenatively scheduled by WGBY for Tuesday, 6 December. Mr. Appopolous' program will carry a message of vital interest to all Base personnel. 0 VU-10 NOTES Our Squadron Commander, CDR Egbert recently returned from a trip back to the States, but unfortunately arrived on the Base to late to attend the Squadron Dance at the Marine Pavilion. We all missed the Skipper at the dance and all we can say is he sure missed a good one. LT Sousa and his committee did a swell job of arranging and everyone had a swell time. Music was furnished by Jay Jay and the Naval Base Band. Prizes were presented to couples winning the various dance contests. About 2200 all hands took time out to sample the excellent buffet lunch while "Tall Boy" Greenway and his "Gitmo Gitters" furnished some good old hoe down music. Only mishap of the evening was the discovery of a sudden flat tire on the Exec's car after the dance. LT E. D. Brock arrived aboard FLSW in time to be present at thr last half of the dance. His last duty station was at Annapolis, Maryland and we are happy to welcome him aboard as we were stationed with him at the Air Facility up there several years ago. New York (AFPS)-"Absolutely not!" is Joe DiMaggio's answer when asked if he's ready to hang up his spikes. "I don't know why I would be quitting," he said, getting ready for a San Francisco vacation. "All I need is rest and lots of it." New Orleans (AFPS)-Tulane University will break off football relations with Notre Dame after the 1950 game. The announcement was made shortly after the Irish had knocked the Green Wave from the undefeated ranks, 46-7. Notre Dame always have topflight teams. We meet them with just one day between, and on their home floors, too." "Then there's Purdue and Michigan State in the Big Ten which look mighty good from our advance reports. "Yes," concluded the Man in the Brown Suit, "I feel certain that fans of the cage game can look forward to another top season of play on the college hardwoods." By Allen Collier, Sports Editor 7' ,aura 26Nvme99TEIDA


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