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Vol. IV No. 39 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 19 November 1949


ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEES
GET POST ALLOWANCE

Increase Will Be Retroactive For All Employees

A fat boost in salaries is in the
offing this week for a number of Base employees in positions subject to the Classification Act. Most
* of them are dependents of military or civilian personnel who previously.were ineligible to receive the post allowance authorized for this
area.
Under a recent policy revision,
all American citizens occupying Classification Act positions at this Base will receive the post allowance, amounting in most cases to some 25% of basic salary. Until the revision of policy, payment of
* the post allowance was restricted
to American citizens whose presence at this Base was attributable
to their employment.
The new policy is the result of
a decision by the Secretary of Defense personnel policy committee, and will be placed into effect
as of 1 October, 1949.

CANADIAN AIRCRAFT
CARRIER TO VISIT GTMO.

On Thursday 24 November HMCS
Magnificent with HMCS Haida and Swansea as plane guards, will
arrive for a one day stay.
The -Magnificent, with the 18th
Carrier Air Group aboard is on a three week cruise to afford the Air Group an opportunity to carry out flying exercises at sea under good
weather conditions.
The Magnificent, commanded by
COMO K. F. Adams, RCN is a light fleet aircraft carrier, and she displaces 18,000 tons. She is 695 feet long with a beam of 80 feet and
a draft of 24 feet 3 inches.
The plane guards Haida and
Swansea are commanded by LCDR E. T. G. Madwick, RCN, and LCDR J. P. P. Dawson, RCN, respectively, are destroyers with a displacement of 2,745 tons. They are 377 feet long with a draft of 11 feet 8 inches.
The complement of the Magnificent is 100 officers and 750 men while the Haida and Swansea carry
10 officers and 150 men each.


MARINE BORERS SUBJECT
OF INVESTIGATION
An inspection team consisting of CDR Frank Tyrell, CEC, USN, Mr. George Knox, Mr. R. C. Stokes, and Mr. K. E. Wright from the Bureau of Yards and Docks and Dr. Herbert McKennis of the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, arrived by FLSW Tuesday, 14 November to make a study of damage to underwater woodwork by virtue of attack by marine borers.
According to CDR L.M. Davis, Base Public Works Officer, and his staff, the two predominant species of marine borers in this area are the Teredo Navalis or ship worm, and the Limnoria. The Teredo Navalis, which breathes through it's tail, is classified as a Molluscan marine borer and has the appearance of a worm with teeth while the Limnoria is of the Crustacea variety and resembles a short shrimp with pincers.
A sample of the NAS sea plane ramp was brought to the editorial office for a closer look. The marine borers had virtually honeycombed the wood. A year and a half ago the sample had been a substantial piece of timber of six by six inch dimensions that had been thoroughly creosoted before installation. Today that piece of wood weighs about one third of its original weight.
This borer activity is seriously reducing structural strength of timber piers, and extensive repair work is contemplated as a result of the findings of the experts.

PASSENGER STAT S IS
TO BE CHANGED

Effective 1 December, 1949 enlisted men of the first three pay grades will be assigned cabin accommodations when traveling with dependents. This means that aboard military ship transports of the CMSTS, these men may share cabins with their dependents. Formerly they were assigned troop quarters while their dependents were assigned to cabins. The new arrangement should be a Godsend to mothers traveling with children, as it enables the fathers to give them a hand.


CONFIRMATION BY
ARCHBISHOP
Archbishop Serantes of Oriente
Administers Sacraments
Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes of Oriente Province administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to Roman Catholics of the Naval Operating Base for the first known time in Base history Wednesday, November 16 in the Base Chapel.
Archbishop Serantes came to the Base accompanied by his secretary, Father A. Hernandez, and by Fathers A. Borjas, Gregorio Garcia, and Alfonso Alonzo, all of Guantanamo City. The Archbishop was in Guantanamo City for the observance of St. Christopher's Day at the invitation of the Chauffeurs' Union there and came to the Naval Operating Base to confirm forty new members of the church at the invitation of Chaplain Herold. At a 6:30 a.m. street mass in Guantanamo City the the Archbishop conferred a blessing upon all the assembled vehicles of the members of the drivers' union.
The street mass in Guantanamo City was attended by twenty-one Base personnel in company with Chaplain Herold. Members of this party including COL J. R. Lanigan CDR and Mrs. Jos. Scanlon, LCDR and Mrs. W.N. Gallagher, LCDR and Mrs. E. L. Freitas and Mrs. J. H. Graves, Capt. and Mrs. Piel, Sgt. Major Carcelli, Chief and Mrs. C. J. Paresi, Chief and Mrs. J. MacDonald, Chief and Mrs. J. Phillips and James Schwantner, AG2, accompanied Archbishop Serantes to the Naval Operating Base where he was rendered honors on arrival by the Naval Operating Base band and was met by the Base Commander, Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips at the Officers' landing.
At 1100 the Sacrament of Confirmation was administered by the Archbishop in the Naval Operating Base Chapel to the following seven adults and thirty-three children: Hugh George Koerner, Mrs. Bonnie Elizabeth McGowan, Mrs. Audrey Mary Birch, Leon James Bowman, Mrs. Eileen Marguerite Forte, Mrs. Jacqueline Catherine Little, and Jack Patrick Clarke.
(Continued on Page Eight)








Pare Two THE N A Saturday. 19 November 1949


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 19 November 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo nay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
F. R. Pledger, ALC ---------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR ------ Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS.
All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

CHRISTMAS PARTY WORKERS LAUDED

The fact that Friday, 11 November was a holiday on the Base did not halt the work of -Santa's helpers at the Naval Air Station. Mrs. Walter (Red) Shallis, Mrs. J. S. Poteet, Mrs. R. L. Reed, and Mrs. J. L. Johnson wrapped over three hundred Christmas packages for the NAS-VU-10 Children's Christmas Party in five hours. I The staff of the Indian joins the Christmas party committee in a word of thanks to these energetic ladies for their commendable help towards a successful Christmas Party.
NAS SHIP'S SERVICE
NEWS

By ENS W. K. Lampman, USN The NAS Ship's Service soda fountain is back in commission after undergoing more than two weeks of face lifting. Defective equipment formerly occupying three-fourths of the fountain space has been replaced. The majority of the new equipment consists of ice cream freezers with a total capacity. of sixty gallons.
New tables and chairs are on order and should arrive to be placed in use in the very near future. The chairs will be constructed of modernistic tubular chrome and will have leather upholstering.
-vThe NAS Ship's Service sewing room is to be enlarged to accomodate a large quantity of new material recently received which includes material for dresses, curtains, drapes, and upholstering formerly not carried in stock.
(SEA)-Between decks ('tween decks) is the space between any two decks, but especially that in a cargo vessel below the main deck.


BLUEJACKET
Vs
WHITEHAT

By ComScutButLant
Back in the days before sailors had zippers in their jumpers, hip pockets in their blues and belt loops on their white trousers, an enlisted man in the Navy who pulled his jumper on over his head was called a "Bluejacket". This was-and is-a title of dignity and respect whose beginning is lost in antiquity. It was a name which left no question in the mind as to whom it referred. A Bluejacket was a Man-O'-Warsman of the United States. The name was never applied to merchant sailors or to Sunday yachtsmen. The Bluejacket was a stalwart and sturdy part of that "first line of defense, the Navy". He was proud of this name and the heritage handed down by his predecessors, the "Iron men in wooden ships" who bore the name before him.
Bluejacket's Manual His Guide
His guide, mentor and companion shared his proud title "The Bluejacket's Manual". Thus did that great unknown, the Navy Department, lend further dignity to his title by. this official recognition of its propriety.
Now we do not necessarily contend that age and usage make things better. We readily admit the superiority of radar over guesswork; of modern fire control apparatus over the sweating ensign with a slide rule; of the modern miracle drugs over epsom saltsbut not without qualifications. Guesswork leads radar in picking a winner in the third at Tanforan; that sweating ensign could sign a special liberty chit that would be Greek to your modern fire control machines and we know of one job that epsom salts will still do betten than penicillin.
So it goes with the name "White Hat" as applied to our modern ManO'-Warsman. This term is flat, colorless and completely devoid of the glamour of its predecessor. It could be applied to a cotton picker, polo player, big game hunter or street sweeper just as appropriately as to an enlisted member of the greatest navy in the world.
Your old sailor was a proud old codger and an able one. His counterpart of today is equally ablelet's give him back his pride by returning his name "Bluejacket".

Patient: "This is my first operation-I'm quite nervous you know."
Surgeon: "I know just how you feel. It's my first too."
* * *
Old Maid: "He's the sixth man I've fallen in love with without avail."
Friend: "Wear one on your next date and maybe you'll have better luck."


CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Sunday, November 20, 1949 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

THANKSGIVING DAY
SERVICE

Thanksgiving Day comes this year on 24 November. A Protestant Thanksgiving Day Service will be held at the Station Chapel at 1000. All hands are asked to remember this date and plan to make it a real Thanksgiving.

ARE YOU A PASSERBY?

By F. R. Pledger, ALC, USN
All of us have our dark moments, if we didn't have we wouldn't be human beings. From the time that Adam and Eve disobeyed the Lord to sample the fruit from the tree of knowledge, we have had troubles, sorrows, and unhappiness. The fact that we have them is not, in itself, paramount, but what we DO to overcome them or what we do to HELP those about us, conquer theirs, is.
Practically every one has heard the story of the suicide, paused on the' railing of a high bridge, whose hardships, imagined or otherwise had finally reached a climax and to his way of thinking, offered only one solution. Just before the leap into eternity, a sympathetic passerby stepped into the picture in time to halt the tragedy with a kind word and a little everyday common sense reasoning.
We are all suicides or passersby. Yes, whether you realize it or not, we are! You don't have to jump from a bridge or under a subway to be a suicide, but you can kill your own spirit, and be just as guilty.
Upon arrival at this Base, no one was any lonelier than I. My loved ones were thousands of miles away, and probably wouldn't be with me again for months. There is no deeper feeling of despondency than that of loneliness. You can .,even be in a crowd and still seem alone. But loneliness can be licked by yourself or with the help of a passerby; and there are
(Continued on Page Seven)


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THE INDIAN


Pa e Two








Saturday, 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Pas~e Three


O LITTLE THEATER NOTES
Off with the Old, On with the
new ... The Tuesday, 8 November business meeting at The Little Theatre proved to be a memorable affair. Election of officers, new plans for the future-the theme song could've been "Auld Lang
Syne".
Mrs. Dorothy Pederson and Nell
Abernathy, past president and secretary, repectively, stepped down from their posts to welcome their suceessors, but not without receiving the appreciation of all for having given, during the past six months, such a big boost to The Little Theatre. With gratification we listened as a letter from Admiral Phillips, commending the executive committee of the past on
their work.
And now to the new executives, .who hope to carry on, and perhaps
improve The Little Theatre with their many new plans. To initiate these, who would be better suited than Ken Allen, the one person who has seen every phase of our work as actor, director, and allround stage-hand, recruiter, and "cumshaw" king? His election
comes as no surprise.
The post of vice-president was
vacant for some time after Ruth Kibler returned to the States. To serve in that capacity the group elected Evelyn Perdue. Nell Abernathy, perhaps with a sigh of relief, handed over her books and many papers to Nan Burton, the new secretary. However we still have Bill Lampman with us to handle the treasury. What infinite
trust we have in that man!
The new group shall meet to
appoint committees to help formulate their ideas for the future.
Though the Holiday season has been. recognized as "slack season", plenty of meaty problems have ~arisen for the new brains to gnaw on.
The Constitution will be examined for feasible and necessary changes. The Theatre building itself will be treated to a face-lifting, brushes and hammers this time not to be used on a stage set. Of course the play reading committee is on the* look out for a new play, so all will be in readiness after the
Holidays.
But the biggest job of all lies in
organizing "The Little Theatre of the Air". Surprised? Very few people realize that way back in the latter part of 1947 it was the original idea of a few ambitious people to put on radio sketches.
But up popped "Arsenic and Old Lace", the first Little Theatre production in Gtmo. Finally the idea has come back to life, and with the cooperation of WGBY it is expected The Theatre will have its radio
ddbut in about a month's time.
Keep this in mind, won't you?
Shirley Childs has edited the play,


GUANTANAMO'S
RANDOLPH RANCH
By virtue of an original treaty between the American and Cuban governments in 1903, approximately forty-seven square miles of territory was leased to the United States for the establishment of a Naval Base for the mutual protection of America and Cuba. Within the confines of this area, however, there exists a ranch that is unknown to the majority of Navy people and particularly the personnel stationed at Guantanamo Bay.
The NOB Recreation Department maintains and operates a ranch covering thousands of acres that was utilized as grazing land for livestock prior to the treaty. Cuban Cattleman First Rancher From 1915 until 1932 the ranch was operated under contract with the United States by Senor Albelado Marques, a Cuban cattleman. Under this contract Senor Marques raised and slaughtered beef cattle and supplied meat for the fleet, Base, and the Cuban fondas. In 1932 the contract was not renewed, however Senor Marques still resides in Guantanamo City, Cuba. Some of the original feeding pens built under his management are still standing at the ranch.
Texas Cattleman Takes Over
For nine years the ranch operation was negligible. In 1941, John Randolph, a wealthy Texan, moved his cattle from Cuba to Guantanamo Bay under a new contract to operate the ranch on a corporation basis. It was Randolph who gave the ranch it's name. Formerly it had been called the Marques Ranch. The ranch continued to operate under the management of Randolph until 1943, when he died. A quantity of his stock had been transferred back to Cuba before his death.
From 1941 until 1948 the ranch became run down from haphazard management. There was no manager assigned for any great length of time. First, under one manager and then another, the ranch was more of a burden to the Base than it was an asset.
Now Managed By Ex BMC
In February, 1948, William Thomas, BMC, USFR was employed by the Recreation Department to manage the ranch. Thomas was transferred from active Naval duty after twenty-one years service, the last two of which were spent at Guantanamo Bay. He knows the natives and the country, but most
(Continued on Page Six)

"My Sister Eileen", to an one hour radio presentation. The scripts will be ready soon for casting and oh! are we on the lookout for "new blood"! Watch for our announcements in the "Papoose". If you're looking for a new form of recreation, this is it!


CIVILIAN CHATTER
By C.V. Linn
Did you know that L. D. Irving, the investigator, is the author of numerous outdoor articles in national magazines? He recently mailed out another on wild pigeon hunting in Cuba which is sure to hit somewhere.
C.V. Agdamag, chief clerk in the Public Works Department, is currently in the States in connection with his application for citizenship. Born in the Philippines, he has been employed on the Base for more than 25 years, and is now taking action to become a full-fledged U. S. citizen.
Could that wide grin on Ralph Sierra's face 3e due to the move he made last week to Quarters "N"? More space for the four children, and just across the street from work-who could wonder.
Welcome to Frederick W. Oesterle, who just reported aboard as Engineering Aide, GS-6, in the Public Works Department. Mrs. Oesterle will be along on first available surface transportation. He finds Gtmo. an agreeable change after completing a contract at NOB, Kodiak.
A hearty "welcome back" to Fred Spence, Civil Engineer, who just got back from a month's leave and three weeks schooling at the Naval Unit, Army Chemical Center, Edgewood, Md., and to George Murray, Leadingman Automotive Mechanic, who just got back from leave to begin a new employment
-agreement.
Those sad people who lost the post allowance a few months ago can now be glad again. They get it back, effective 1 October, under a new policy governing the granting of allowances.
LT J. F. Pringle, USNR, is the latest to join the ranks of civilian employees. Released to inactive duty in the Reserve last week at Jacksonville, he returned to the Base as Electronics Engineer, GS-11, in the Electronics Facility, Naval Station.
WHAT IS A DEFENSIVE DRIVER?
By C. E. Britt
A Defensive Driver is one who makes allowances for the lack of skill and the lack of knowledge on the part of the other feliow-who recognizes that he has no control over the unpredictable actions of other drivers and pedestrians, nor over conditions of weather and roads, and who, therefore, develops a defense against all these hazards. He concedes his right-of-way and makes other concessions to avoid collision. He is careful to commit no driving errors himself, and is defensively alert to avoid the accident traps and hazards created by weather, roads, pedestrians, and other drivers.


Saturday, 19 November 1949


THE INDIAN


Patre Three







Pao e FourTH NDA Saturday. 19 November 1949


MARINE CELEBRATION HUGE SUCCESS
By CPL Ed Kazmierski
The Marine Barracks' observance of the 174th birthday of the United States Marine Corps on 10 November 1949, will long be remembered by members of this command as a truly gala occasion. The day's festivities got under way at 8:30 a.m. The competition during the morning consisted of track and field events and a softball game featuring the Hq Platoon. The final results totalled up to a rather top heavy score in Gd Platoon's favor.
After a picnic lunch with Chief Hatuey's nectar, all hands assembled on the baseball diamond to see the Staff NCO's down the officers in a run-away contest, this game being played all for the laughs.
At 5:00 p.m. all hands again assembled on the parade ground to participate in the Sunset Parade. During this ceremony, our Commanding Officer, Colonel J. R. Lanigan presented the Birthday Athletic Events Plaque to Captain F. E. Sullivan, Platoon Commander of the victorious Guard Platoon.
Immediately following the march off of the colors, the Marines and their guests sat down to a birthday dinner which made everyone present wish that the Marine Corps might have been twins!!
A more delicious repast could not have been prepared and the quantity of delicacies did justice to even the most voracious appetites. Chaplain Faulk gave the invocation, which was followed by COL Lanigan's reading the Marine Corps' Birthday message, and an appropriate speech by our Base. Commander, RADM Phillips. The dinner was climaxed by cutting the birthday cake by COL Lanigan, assisted by Sergeant Major Carcelli and Master Sergeant Pitts.
The dinner finished, all guests and troops drifted to the Rustic Pavilion for an evening of dancing, topping off a fine day of celebration.
Now with the Birthday duly celebrated and past, we will settle down to the business of doing our small part in making the 175th year of the Marine Corps as honorable and useful in our country's service as the past 174 years.


"MY SISTER EILEEN"
BEING CAST

- Tuesday night, 22 Novem- I !ber there will be casting for
a radio production of "My Sister Eileen" at the Little Theatre, Marine Site Three.
A variety of new voices are needed, so come out for an
audition.
(i O O iOO f ~ e*


I Nursery News:
Cheryl Anne Ma,lone born 10 November to BM2 and Mrs. C. Malone; Franklin Howard Chase born 10 November to ET2 and
Mrs. K. H. Chase; and Gilbert Deveriaus Milburn,
Jr. born 14 Noevmber to GM1 and Mrs. G. D. Milburn.
Mrs. Helen Miller, wife of the American Vice-Consul at Santiago was admitted to the Dependents Ward this week. The Vice-Consul, Mr. E. H. Miller and their infant son accompanied Mrs. Miller to the Base. Mrs. Miller enjoyed a speedy recovery, and all have returned to Santiago.
LT Mary Hogan, NC, has returned from 30 days stateside leave; Dr. and Mrs. D. W. Spicer have also returned from emergency stateside leave; R. L. Buchina, HN and J. J. Pippo, HA have departed on 30 days leave.

TENTH DIVISION NOTES
By B. W. Richards, YNC, USN BOS'N Christiansen is back on the job, although favoring a sore toe with an abbreviated shoe.
LTCOL Souder, Base Provost Marshal, turned in to the hospital last week and has not yet returned to duty. We are hoping for his early recovery.
Yeoman striker Bromm and I have been assigned to the Admiral's staff, but will continue to do business at the same old stand; we appreciate the honor.
Recent additions to this activity are ENC Cushing from NSD, AOC Deitch (Shanghai), from VU-10, ADC Feketey and AMC Kent from NAS; returned to their commands were ALC Hale and AOC Brindley, VU-10, and ADC Ermis, NAS.
BM2 Rawls departed on emergency leave on November 8. We extend our sympathy in the death of his grandfather.
IM3 Carden turned in to the hospital Wednesday. It looks as though he might get the rest he's been looking for.
Shanghai's wife returned from the hospital last week with another boy, which is a chip off the old block.
BMC W. L. Beeson, who has been cheerfully handing out (or refusing to hand out) driver's licenses on this Base for the past two years, has left today for duty in Green Cove Springs, Florida.
GM3 Bobby Bridges leaves today for discharge; it is our understanding that he expects to go college. Good luck, Bobby.
ADC S. T. Rhodes, III, of the NAS, has been assigned to TAD with this division, to replace AD1 Case, who is returning to duty with NAS.


THANKSGIVING DAY
TEA DANCE
Melvin Crissy, ADC, USN, president of the CPO Mess, announces that there will be a Tea Dance at the CPO Club on Thanksgiving Day, 24 November between the hours 1400 and 1700. Cocktails will be served. Music for dancing will be furnished by the Naval Base Band.

USS WILLIAMSBURG
VISITS GTMO.

The USS Williamsburg, presidential yacht, tied up at Pier Baker on Wednesday, 16 November. She is expected to leave today. President Truman was not aboard.

VU-10 NOTES
By F. R. Pledger, ALC USN
Even though it was a payday weekend and liberty has recommenced in Guantanamo City, the liberty list for Friday took a beating to give way to a Squadron Dance held Friday night. The big question now is, when is the next one going to come off'?
We point out that no matter where you are or how busy you happen to be you can always find time to improve yourself. An excellent example is J. P. Mello, AK1, who has just completed the USAFI course "Military Law" with a final mark of 3.86. Mello can rightfully be proud of his accomplishment. Congratulations for the fine work, "Stores".
We welcome aboard B. J. Norton, ADAA from Cabannis Field, Corpus Christi, Texas and bid adios to J. L. Johnson, ADC.
"Foulball" Faulkner has promised us an article, in fact, he turned one in, but when it came to deciphering the copy great difficulty was encountered. When asked to, help, Faulkner evaded the job by stating that the copy was one day old, and who did we think he was Einstein?
Chief -Medica is whipping together a CPO softball team that should be a good one when they get going. The brown-baggers with the big Navy chests did some history making huffing and puffing after a couple of turns around the diamond last Sunday at Newtown.
A friendly discussion between a General Service chief and an Aviation chief came to a screeching halt when the Aviation chief came out with, "Well, I see that you guys in general service have things fixed up your way with this new rating structure. You finally swung it so BuPers now calls us ADC's which any dimwit knows means Air Dale Chiefs."
He: "Honey chile, will you all marry me ?"
She: "Oh, this is so southern."


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THE INDIAN








Saturday, 19 November 1949 TEIDA aeFv


OTEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
By Skiddy Masterson and Cecil Pederson
As we had no Teen-Age column
last week, our news is a bit behind times but for those who haven't heard and to refresh the memory of those who have we shall continue.
The Student Council has started
having night meetings at different members' houses for the comfort and convenience of all concerned.
Wednesday before last, the first night meeting took place at Skiddy's at 7:00. It was supposed to be a short meeting, but lasted til 9:15 due to controversy over forthcoming parties. All is well now and
straightened out.
The Dramatic Club, advised by
Mr. Fife, is certainly well underway with a brief but complete constitution and its governing committee elected. The officers consist of: President, Kay Hollis; VicePresident, J e a n e en; SecretaryO Treasurer, Betty Parks; Technical
Manager, Jack; Property Manager, Norman Huddy; Costume mistress, Cecil. Rumors have been heard concerning a Christmas play but
nothing definite has been decided.
Last Saturday night found Mr.
McNeal and his Sunday School class at Skiddy's house. Fun was had by all and a small portion of our appreciation was shown to Mr.
McNeal for all the wonderful . things he has done for us when the
class gave him another sport shirt
to add to his wardrobe.
Under the supervision of Mrs.
Broughton, their teacher, the 11th and 12th grade homeroom is going to Kittery Beach this afternoon on a hayride. Following this will be a square dance to which the entire high school is invited. We're all anticipating a grand timc and will give you further details next week.

CONSTITUTION TO LAND
AT McCALLA FIELD

The Navy's largest plane, the
four-motored R60 transport Constitution will make a return visit to McCalla Field next Monday, 21 November. The ship is scheduled to arrive from Puerto Rico at 1000 local time with 71 passengers and will pick up a small load of leave . passengers here and depart at 1130 carrying them to Patuxent River, Md. From there the plane is scheduled to go to Olathe, Kansas.
Base residents who were among
the five hundred or more persons who were allowed to go through the plane on its first visit here on September 27th were amazed at the size and carrying capacity of the plane and at the ease with which it
was landed at this Base.
General visiting aboard the Constitution may be prohibited this time due to the number of passengers embarked and the very short
stop over scheduled.


TRAINING GROUP
TRIVIALS

By J. L. Richard YNSN
No doubt the most talked about event of this week has been the recreational trip via crashboat to Santiago de Cuba. Among Training Group personnel who made this most interesting and enjoyable trip was Chief Staff Officer CAPT V. Havard. Although Captain Havard stayed only a day, he was very much impressed by the scenic beauty of this tropical city. A few of the Training Group enlisted lads took advantage of this pleasure cruise to Santiago, and seemed, from all reports, to have made quite a hit with the ladies there. We won't mention any names. However, the trip to Santiago was not all "milk and honey", according to Bellor, Fike and Prunty. Ask these "sailors" when they are going to submit a request for bedroom suites aboard the crashboat.
Leach, FTC, who is an active member of our group is enjoying stateside life, involving temporary additional duty. Volner, RD3 from our Radar department has just flown to the states and is practically back in the hills of Tennessee. Guess the hills of Cuba made him a little homesick. As the Christmas holidays near, all hands are really patronizing the dry cleaning establishment on the Base, anticipating annual Christmas leave, and flooding the place with "blues". Best wishes for a speedy recovery go from all hands to LT Utegaard of the Training Group who is in the Hospital. We hope to have him back with us soon.
Viewed through the Training Group Sportscope, we see that the Training Group Bowling Team scored a surprising victory over VU-10 by taking the game by three points. The Training Group Officers' Bowling Team ably led by CDR Peterson and LT C. Chavis are gradually getting into shape and should show favorably in the near future.

LET'S START A
GOSSIP COLUMN
The Indian does not lay claim to being as newsy a paper as the Press Scimitar or Commercial Appeal in Memphis, but . . . we do feel that we can compete with their social items. We, too, have personnel aboard who go on, trips, have guests, marry," have babies, etc. Let's start a social column in the Indian. Be your own Society Reporter. Send in items of interest and we will have a regular weekly gossip session. Instead of gossiping over the back fence about the strange man visiting Mrs. Jones, send that juicy bit into the Indian office and let us all read about it . ..


PROTESTANT VESPERS

The Protestant Vesper Service for Bluejackets and Teen-Agers which meets at 1900, Station Chapel, is still maintaining its high interest. The musical program under the direction of Ted McKenney is a popular part of the service. In order to provide some fun and competition, beginning next Sunday there will be an attendance competition, the congregation having been divided into two sides, port and starboard. The Co-chairmen of the port side are PFC Nelson H. Dukes, Jr. and Joan McNeal. The Co-chairmen of the starboard side are John Dettinger, CSSN, USN, and Jeaneen Hummell. A record will be kept of the attendance of the two sides and it is planned to have a gala party after a few weeks, at which time the losers will have to entertain the winners. All Bluejackets and Teen-Agers are cordially invited to come and join a side.
The subject for the Chaplain's talk on Sunday will be "What was Christ's Attitude Towards Sex?"

CROWS EARNED BY
GTMO. MEN
By authority of a dispatch received from the Administrative Office, ComTEN the following men have been advanced to the next higher rating: V. A. Mertz from CS3 to CS2; G. H. Weisenberger from CS3 to CS2; M. J. Di Ferio from SN to CS3; J. R. Dettinger from SN to CS3; G. H. Babcock, Jr., from DC2 to DC1; C. R. Tisdale from DC2 to DC1; J. A. Brand 'from FN to DC3; R. Sagert FN to EM3; A. E. Machtolff FP2 to FP1; T. A. Brooks from SN to GM3; T. J. Bennett from HN to HM3; A. Di Caro from HN to HM3; J. C. Robinson from HN to HM3; B.,M. Gerringer from HN to HM3; H. H. Birchmore from HN to HM3; G. 0. Talley from HN to HM3; 0. L. Frakes from HN to HM3; T. H. Burks from HN to HM3; H. E. Davis from SN to ME3; F. A. Fornelli from MU2 to MU1; P.A. Hickle from MUSN to MU3; R. E. Watkins from SN to PH3; R. L. Wendt from SN to PH3; T. R. Warner from PM2 to PM1; L. F. Blanchard from SN to QM3; A. J. Demicco from SK3 to SK2; W. G. Cook from SK2 to SK1; G. L. Cooke from SN to YN3.
Effective promotion date wos 16 November. Congratulations,a men!

(SEA)-Crosswind landing gear, newly developed for airplanes, enables the pilot to land into the wind even when the wind is at an angle to the runway. A caster-like device inside the wheels brings them automatically into line with the runway when they touch the ground.


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THE INDIAN


Page Five








Pagre SixTH ININauda,1Noebr94


GUANTANAMO'S
RANDOLPH RANCH
(Continued from, Page Three)
important of all he loves and understands animals. Most of his service in the Navy had been aboard fighting ships . . . light and heavy cruisers, destroyers and battleships. He studied animal husbandry under an itinerant veterinarian from Pennsylvania and Maryland named John Cyclop. The management of Randolph was a natural for him.
Ranch Employees
Thomas has three men working on the ranch. Augusto Grovenor and Alfonso Louis who are from Barbados and are employed as gardeners, while Wilfred Simon is a native of South Africa. Simon has charge of the hogs and pigs. It was he who exclaimed, "You're killing my friends, Chief, you're killing my friends." The occasion was when two Havalinas (Cuban porkers) were slaughtered. Simon had named them Nancy and Jim. Thomas, who has a heart of gold in spite of his fierce and rugged appearance replied, "Well, you'll just have to find yourself two more friends, Simon."
These men are furnished quarters at the ranch and raise practically all of their own food. Thomas says you couldn't run them away with a club. Grovenor likes the horses so well that he even cuts grass on his own time to feed them so he can be near them.
(Ed. note: Continued next week)


SPECIAL ORDERS AT
SHIP'S SERVICE

Ship's Service Special Order Department is pleased to announce that many lines of sterling silverware are now obtainable on special order at very substantial discounts. Available now are Gorham's, Towle, Wallace, Heirloom, Whiting, Frank Smith, Watson, Lunt, Reed & Horton, International and Manchester.
Delivery averages about six weeks by sets and place settings, however, odd pieces and open stock items generally require longer.
Washing machines will probably be difficult to obtain for several months, due to the steel strike lasting so long. Machines now on order will probably not be received until January or later according to word just received.
Cushman has just announced the production of the Model 62A Scooter, the open frame model such as was used by the Army paratroopers during the war. Prices have not been released yet but should be available within two or three weeks.
Deepfreeze Home Freezers are available and a special feature is the seven cubic foot size, however, the larger sizes may be ordered.
Prices and literature are now available on musical instruments, particularly guitars, trumpets, accordions, trap drums and accessories, batons, mandolins, banjos, violins, saxophones and trombones.


WARDENS NEEDED
By C. E. Britt
Wild life, besides the protection afforded by man-made laws, has a way of protecting itself. It listens with an acutely atuned ear as mother nature speaks, and is instinctively aware of the hazards presented by nature's laws. Wild game is more on its guard when the hunting season opens.
Not so with man. He needs a Warden to continually caution and remind him. There is no closed season on accidents, and the little darts propelled by Nature's bow are continually striking him.
The requirements to qualify are simple. He need not be a scholar of physics or a learned mathematician in order to alert his wards. If not from instinct or training, already they know from observation much about the laws of physics. They know that a cylindrical object is easily rolled; that the application of oil will reduce friction; that an object above ground when released will fall; that the floor of a perfectly level truck on a hill becomes an inclined plane; that an upright object in the truck, when on a hill, is no longer upright, but is tilted, and if unsupported will tend to slide or topple; that a revolving sand disc or rip saw can not distinguish between wood and flesh. Man knows these things but must be continually reminded of them.
Recent accidents on the Base involve these principles.
A man on the ground was struck by a 55-gallon empty oil drum which fell from a height above the stake body sides of a truck on which drums were being loaded. Load was too high or else the sides were too low.
A man's foot was mashed by an overturning cylinder. He and the cylinders (upright and unsupported) were in a truck which stalled on a steep grade. When the truck started up again, the cylinders tilted, and the man attempted to support them with his foot. Foot was caught between cylinders and truck side.
While sanding a small piece of wood on a sanding machine a man pushed with his fingers instead of using a pusher-block. The wood revolved and two fingers were nicely sanded.
Whether you are a supervisor of men, children, or maids, you are hereby elected a member of the Safety-Wardens Club. A sport in which everybody wins. The life you save may be your own.
Two soldiers checked in at the hotel and were shown to a rather dingy room.
1st PFC: What does this pigsty cost?"
Manager: "For one pig, two dollars; for two pigs, three dollars."


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Saturday, 19 November 1949


Pa e Six


THE INDIAN








Saturday. 19 November 1949TH IN ANPeSvn


' HELICOPTER FOCUSES
NEED OF PAVED AREA
Parking Area Paving Need Was
Proved By Maneuvers Last Fall
The helicopter is a very versatile
contraption. New uses for it are being discovered almost every day.
However, not even the most rabid helicopter backers could have surmised that it would serve an important function in paving an
automobile parking area!
Have you seen the new automobile parking area in front of the NOB Administration Building?
This area, formerly an eyesore, was brought into prominence last fall when a helicopter from one of the carriers made a landing
and take-off there.
Spectators Blasted By Dust
We say "it made a landing and
take-off, although, with scores of people to observe, the swirls of dust and stone enveloped the craft whenever the rotor was "revved up" and neither landing nor takeoff could be seen. This cloud of dust and stone not only blasted the onlookers but slammed into the open jalousies of the Administration Building. Everything was coated with dust to such a considerable depth it was necessary to double up on janitor crews and work several days overtime in an attempt to uncover papers, files, office . equipment, and possibly missing
persons so that work routines could
be restored to normal.
The die was cast. Attention was
immediately focused upon the landing area and, although its use as a helicopter landing field was not routine, the necessity for dust abatement was made evident.
Construction Begins
Within a short time draftsmen
went to work, followed by surveySors, then bulldozers, graders, and concrete mixers. Unfortunately, however, the heavy rains of the fall of 1948 prevented paving operations to finish the job, and for many months the concluding work was held up. Then paving operations on the air strip at Leeward Field and the Bargo Road took priority and required use of the automatic paving machine until. about two weks ago when it
completed the surfacing.
Still Needs Sealing
After a waiting period to permit
the newly laid asphalt to "cure"
it was rolled into a smooth surface and is now in use. After a few more weeks it will be necessary to "seal" the surface to increase its life. When the seal coat has dried parking lanes will be laid out to insure maximum use of the space
available.
The helicopter may now take a
bow for its part in starting the project which was accomplished under the supervision of Mr. Ralph Mason, Base Public Wbrks Quarterrhan.:


CHIEF JOHNSON
ORDERED TO FLEET
RESERVE
James L. "Johnny" Johnson, ADC USN received orders to the Twelfth Naval District for duty or assignment while awaiting retirement on 15 May, 1950. He is being transferred to the Fleet Reserve after twenty years and four days naval service which excludes about two years of broken service.
Enlisting at NRS Little Rock, Arkansas on 3 October, 1928, Johnson's service has been marked with many responsible assignments. Instructor at Chicago University He is a graduate of the Link Trainer school, Atlanta, Georgia, the Link Celestial Navigation Trainer school, Seattle, Washington, Advanced Aviation Engine school, Chicago, Illinois, Flight Engineer school, LaGuardia Field, New York, and he was an instructor at the Aviation Structural class of the University of Chicago.
During the late war, Johnson saw action with the aviation detachment aboard the USS Marblehead and VC-8 aboard the USS Liscombe Bay where he earned the air medal with two clusters. In addition, he holds the Presidential Unit Citation, the Navy Unit Commendation, and various lesser medals.
Asiatic Fleet Featherweight Champ
An old shipmate of Johnson's, John McPhaul, .ADC, who is now stationed at Coco Solo, C. Z., reports that he and Johnny put NAS Opalocka, Florida in commission, and that he knows for a fact that at one time Johnson was the proud holder of the featherweight championship belt of the Asiatic Fleet. (Ed: He is still handy with his dukes).
Chief and Mrs. Johnson will be missed by their friends here. They have been active in civic affairs on the Base, as Johnny is a member of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association, and chairman of the NAS-VU-10 Children's Christmas Party Committee.
Mrs. Johnson is a member of Unit 100, Ladies Auxiliary Dependents Service Committee. To Johnny and Mildred we say, "Hasta la vista".

IN THE DOG HOUSE, EH?

Ithaca (AFPS)-In the dog house? Then you've never had it so good, according to the latest book by Cornell professor Clive M. McCay.
"I believe the average dog food," he writes, "provides as good. or better nutrition than the food consumed by the average child in America."
The professor adds that the poor man's dog and the rich man's get the worst food, because "they dine on menus of theiT own selection."


EMPLOYEES LOW IN
BOND PARTICIPATION
American citizen employees at Guantanamo Bay are below the Navy average in Savings Bonds participation, and stand next to the bottom of the list of TENTH Naval District activities, according to figures recently released by the District Commandant.
Figures for September showed only 23.6% participation at this Base, as compared with 30.4 for Roosvelt Roads and 62.1 for District Headquarters and Naval Station, San Juan. NOB, Trinidad was low with a participation of 15%.
The fact that many American citizens on the alien and native schedule of wages are included in computations for this Base partially accounts for the low average, according to the Base Industrial Relations Department. However, it.was pointed out that a large number of those on the continental schedule are failing to take advantage of the Payroll Savings plan for buying Bonds.

ARE YOU A PASSERBY?
(Continued from Page Two)
plenty of passersby right here on the Base.
My entire outlook and future at Guantanamo Bay was changed by a kindly invitation to. dinner and an offer by a passerby to drive me around the Base. :
"C'mon, let's go up to the club and meet the fellows." These and other kindnesses started the ball rolling. Interest was created -iif the Base and the people who are its inhabitants. Never have I seen a place where friendliness, a kind word, and a smile mean so much and are practiced so extensively. It is even catching.
Oldtimers down here get blue occasionally, especially after mail call. They didn't get that letter from the wife and kids. And what do you think I saw a newcomer do? He walked up to his shipmate and said, "Don't feel badly, Pat' there wasn't much mail anyway this time. Just look at the other guys that didn't get a letter either." It worked like a charm.
A good prescription for loneliness is to smile, even if you have to force yourself to do so; and Keep BUSY. Take an interest in what is going on around you. There are many activities you may associate yourself with after working hours are over. The Hobby Shop, Boy Scouts, Little Theater, clubs, golfing, swimming, tennis, to name a few.
'Bear in mind that no matter how :lonely you may be, there is someone around who is probably lonelier. Look for him and give him that smile and kind word that helps so much and yout own loneliness :will be forgotten.


THE INDIAN


Page Seven








ga+,Thv 19 Novemberv 1949 THE INDIAN Gm.By1 o 920


ALL-STAR-CIVILLIAN
BASEBALL SERIES

By H. L. Broughton
The first game of the All StarCuban Civilian baseball series resulted in a 5 to 2 victory for the Civilians. The All Star's pitcher, "Wonder Boy" Webster walked the first two men at bat in the first inning and then the third man hit a home run. This homer was made by the Civilian's left fielder, Martin, and was the only home run of the game.
After the first inning the game settled into a pitchers' duel with Webster striking out 16 men and the Civilian's pitcher, Rey struck out 14 men. The Civilians were fortunate to win the game as their power hitters were not in the game.
Tuesday and Thursday's games were rained out, however, weather permitting there will be another game Tuesday, 22 November. These games are bang-up baseball so come on out; give your favorite team your support by rooting for them.

OFFICERS' BOWLING
LEAGUE

The middle of the third week of bowling in the Officer's Club Bowling League finds the Naval Station leading the National League and the Supply Depot "Civilians" leading the American League. Statistics to this point indicate the American League has the majority of the high average bowlers, but LT Wesson of Naval Station made a big advance this week with a 522 series to boost his average to 164. Mr. Badger at NSD still leads the pack with a 169 average. The leading ten bowlers in the first two weeks were:
Name Games Ave. Badger (NSD-A) ---- 6 174.3 Serig (NAS) --------3 169.6 Ziz (NSD-A) -------- 6 168
Berkeley (VU-10-A) - 3 161 Wesson (NavSta) --- 3 155 Ondrasik (NOB) ---- 5 154 Lukcas (NAS) ------ 3 153 Shepard (Hosp-Dent) 5 151 Wray (NAS) --------1 149 Stevenson (FTG-A) -_ 4 148
Team high single -game, NSD
(A), 825; Individual high single game, Badger, NSD (A), 232; Individual high three games, Badger, NSD(A) 532.
The NSD team won three games in a hot match Tuesday night with the Hospital-Dental combo in the American League. Two of the games were decided by seven and ten pins respectively. This NSD outfit appears to be unbeatable; when one of their civilian bowlers


falls down the other picks up to carry the "under 100" bowlers on to victory. It is reported that one of their officers is improving and is not going over the foul line with his former regularity. However, he was forced to call NSD transportation one night to remove him from the pit where it is rumored he had been kicking over the pins his ball missed. Now he only goes half way down the alley when his thumb sticks in the ball, and he walks back.
Standing in both leagues as of completion of play Wednesday, November 16, were:
American League
Games Tot. Tot. Team Won Lost Pins Pts. NSD --------- 7 2 2 9
NOB -------- 3 3 1 4
FTG ---------3 3 1 4
VU-10 -------3 3 4
Marines ----- 3 3 1 4 Hosp-Dental - 2 7 1 3
National League
Games Tot. Tot. Team Won Lost Pins Pts. NavSta ------7 1 3 10 NAS -------- 6 0 2 8
Hosp-Dental - 4 5 2 6 FTG --------- 3 6 1 4
VU-10 ------ 2 7 0 2
NSD -------- 1 4 0 1
Individual Averages
High Five Men
Names Games Ave. Badger ------------ 9 169
Ziz -----------------9 164
Wesson -------------6 164
Berkeley ------------ 3 161
Serig ---------------5 160

SPORTS QUIZ

QUESTIONS
1. Has a fair ball ever been hit out of the Yankee Stadium?
2. Who was the first U.S. President to throw out the first ball of the season?
3. Which club failed to win the pennant despite four 20-game winners?
4. How can a batter drive in three runs without hitting a fair ball ?
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CONFIRMATION BY
ARCHBISHOP
(Continued from Page One)
Children: Regina Helen Scanlon, Judith Catherine Elton, James Michael Radcliffe, Lewis Anthony Claar, Dorothy Ann Claar, Jeanette Mary Jessing, Henry Anthony McElderry, Isabel Mary Keehn, Patrick David Lanigan, Madeline Mary Piel, Sandra Patricia Craig, Patricia Mary Paresi, Barbara Mary Roy, Constance Theresa Lesesne, Joseph Michael Pitts, George Joseph Swallow, Robert Charles Pitts, Michael John Piel, Thomas Chistopher Greenwood, Thomas Joseph Carcelli, James Edward Piel, Leland Joseph Roy, Michael Christopher Lanigan, Robert Joseph Keehn, David Joseph Jessing, Francis Joseph Stroud, Richard Joseph Lesesne, Richard Joseph Jessing, Norman Carl Huddy, George Francis MacMichael, Patricia Christine Besse, Betina Josephine Parks and Margarite Ann Claar. Commander and Mrs. Joseph Scanlon were sponsors for all those who were confirmed. Mrs. G. A. Greenwood and Mrs. L. R. Lindenborn assisted Father Herold in preparing the children for the reception of the Sacrament.
A Short sermon was delivered by the Archbishop and translated by Dr. Antonio Civit, in which he expressed his extreme pleasure at the opportunity to administer the. sacrament on the Base, and he expressed his gratitude and everlasting prayers for the good relations between the American and Cuban peoples,
Following the confirmation, Archbishop Serantes conferred the Apostolic blessing on the members present and distributed holy pictures and rosaries.
At 1230 a luncheon was held at the Officers' Club in honor of the Archbishop and his party following which they made a tour of the Base before departing for the evening services in Guantanamo City.





NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Saturday 19 November
TAP ROOTS
Van Heflin Susan Hayward
Sunday 20 November GAY RANCHERO
Roy Rogers Jan Frazee
Monday 21 November
WINTER MEETING
Bette Davis Jim Davis
Tuesday 22 November
PHILO VANCE RETURNS
William Wright Terry Austin
Wednesday 23 November
THE FLAME
John Carrol Vera Ralston
Thursday 24 November
THE WINNERS CIRCLE
Johnny Longden Morgan Farley


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THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-17 Nov 49-2500


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SIda Vol. IV No. 39 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 19 November 1949 ADDITIONAL EMPLOYEES GET POST ALLOWANCE Increase Will Be Retroactive For All Employees A fat boost in salaries is in the offing this week for a number of Base employees in positions subject to the Classification Act. Most of them are dependents of military or civilian personnel who previously were ineligible to receive the post allowance authorized for this area. Under a recent policy revision, all American citizens occupying Classification Act positions at this Base will receive the post allowance, amounting in most cases to some 25% of basic salary. Until the revision of policy, payment of the post allowance was restricted to American citizens whose presence at this Base was attributable to their employment. The new policy is the result of a decision by the Secretary of Defense personnel policy committee, and. will be placed into effect as of 1 October, 1949. CANADIAN AIRCRAFT CARRIER TO VISIT GTMO. On Thursday 24 November HMCS Magnificent with HMCS Haida and Swansea as plane guards, will arrive for a one day stay. The Magnificent, with the 18th Carrier Air Group aboard is on a three week cruise to afford the Air Group an opportunity to carry out flying exercises at sea under good weather conditions. The Magnificent, commanded by COMO K. F. Adams, RCN is a light fleet aircraft carrier, and she displaces 18,000 tons. She is 695 feet long with a beam of 80 feet and a draft of 24 feet 3 inches. The plane guards Haida and Swansea are commanded by LCDR E. T. G. Madwick, RCN, and LCDR J. P. P. Dawson, RCN, respectively, are destroyers with a displacement of 2,745 tons. They are 377 feet long with a draft of 11 feet 8 inches. The complement of the Magnificent is 100 officers and 750 men while the Haida and Swansea carry 10 officers and 150 men each. MARINE BORERS SUBJECT OF INVESTIGATION An inspection team consisting of CDR Frank Tyrell, CEC, USN, Mr. George Knox, Mr. R. C. Stokes, and Mr. K. E. Wright from the Bureau of Yards and Docks and Dr. Herbert McKennis of the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, arrived by FLSW Tuesday, 14 November to make a study of damage to underwater woodwork by virtue of attack by marine borers. According to CDR L. M. Davis, Base Public Works Officer, and his staff, the two predominant species of marine borers in this area are the Teredo Navalis or ship worm, and the Limnoria. The Teredo Navalis, which breathes through it's tail, is classified as a Molluscan marine borer and has the appearance of a worm with teeth while the Limnoria is of the Crustacea variety and resembles a short shrimp with pincers. A sample of the NAS sea plane ramp was brought to the editorial office for a closer look. The marine borers had virtually honeycombed the wood. A year and a half ago the sample had been a substantial piece of timber of six by six inch dimensions that had been thoroughly creosoted before installation. Today that piece of wood weighs about one third of its original weight. This borer activity is seriously reducing structural strength of timber piers,. and extensive repair work is contemplated as a result of the findings of the experts. PASSENGER STATUS IS TO BE CHANGED Effective 1 December, 1949 enlisted men of the first three pay grades will be assigned cabin accommodations when traveling with dependents. This means that aboard military ship transports of the CMSTS, these men may share cabins with their dependents. Formerly they were assigned troop quarters while their dependents were assigned to cabins. The new arrangement should be a Godsend to mothers traveling with children, as it enables the fathers to give them a hand. CONFIRMATION BY ARCHBISHOP Archbishop Serantes of Oriente Administers Sacraments Archbishop Enrique Perez Serantes of Oriente Province administered the Sacrament of Confirmation to Roman Catholics of the Naval Operating Base for the first known time in Base history Wednesday, November 16 in the Base Chapel. Archbishop Serantes came to the Base accompanied by his secretary, Father A. Hernandez, and by Fathers A. Borjas, Gregorio Garcia, and Alfonso Alonzo, all of Guantanamo City. The Archbishop was in Guantanamo City for the observance of St. Christopher's Day at the invitation of the Chauffeurs' Union there and came to the Naval Operating Base to confirm forty new members of the church at the invitation of Chaplain Herold. At a 6:30 a.m. street mass in Guantanamo City the the Archbishop conferred a blessing upon all the assembled vehicles of the members of the drivers' union. The street mass in Guantanamo City was attended by twenty-one Base personnel in company with Chaplain Herold. Members of this party including COL J. R. Lanigan CDR and Mrs. Jos. Scanlon, LCDR and Mrs. W.N. Gallagher, LCDR and Mrs. E. L. Freitas and Mrs. J. H. Graves, Capt. and Mrs. Piel, Sgt. Major Carcelli, Chief and Mrs. C. J. Paresi, Chief and Mrs. J. MacDonald, Chief and Mrs. J. Phillips and James Schwantner, AG2, accompanied Archbishop Serantes to the Naval Operating Base where he was rendered honors on arrival by the Naval Operating Base band and was met by the Base Commander, Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips at the Officers' landing. At 1100 the Sacrament of Confirmation was administered by the Archbishop in the Naval Operating Base Chapel to the following seven adults and thirty-three children: Hugh George Koerner, Mrs. Bonnie Elizabeth McGowan, Mrs. Audrey Mary Birch, Leon James Bowman, Mrs. Eileen Marguerite Forte, Mrs. Jacqueline Catherine Little, and Jack Patrick Clarke. (Continued on Page Eight)

PAGE 2

Pae Two TNSaturday 19 November 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 19 November 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander F. R. Pledger, ALC----------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR_Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. CHRISTMAS PARTY WORKERS LAUDED The fact that Friday, 11 November was a holiday on the Base did not halt the work of Santa's helpers at the Naval Air Station. Mrs. Walter (Red) Shallis, Mrs. J. S. Poteet, Mrs. R. L. Reed, and Mrs. J. L. Johnson wrapped over three hundred Christmas packages for the NAS-VU-10 Children's Christmas Party in five hours. The staff of the Indian joins the Christmas party committee in a word of thanks to these energetic ladies for their commendable help towards a successful Christmas Party. NAS SHIP'S SERVICE NEWS By ENS W. K. Lampman, USN The NAS Ship's Service soda fountain is back in commission after undergoing more than two weeks of face lifting. Defective equipment formerly occupying three-fourths of the fountain space has been replaced. The majority of the new equipment consists of ice cream freezers with a total capacity. of sixty gallons. New tables and chairs are on order and should arrive to be placed in use in the very near future. The chairs will be constructed of modernistic tubular chrome and will have leather upholstering. ', The NAS Ship's Service sewing room is to be enlarged to accomodate a large quantity of new material recently received which includes material for dresses, curtains, drapes, and upholstering formerly not carried in stock. (SEA)-Between decks ('tween decks) is the space between any two decks, but especially that in a cargo vessel below the main deck. BLUEJACKET vs WHITEHAT By ComScutButLant Back in the days before sailors had zippers in their jumpers, hip pockets in their blues and belt loops on their white trousers, an enlisted man in the Navy who pulled his jumper on over his head was called a "Bluejacket". This was-and is-a title of dignity and respect whose beginning is lost in antiquity. It was a name which left no question in the mind as to whom it referred. A Bluejacket was a Man-O'-Warsman of the United States. The name was never applied to merchant sailors or to Sunday yachtsmen. The Bluejacket was a stalwart and sturdy part of that "first line of defense, the Navy". He was proud of this name and the heritage handed down by his predecessors, the "Iron men in wooden ships" who bore the name before him. Bluejacket's Manual His Guide His guide, mentor and companion shared his proud title "The Bluejacket's Manual". Thus did that great unknown, the Navy Department, lend further dignity to his title by. this official recognition of its propriety. Now we do not necessarily contend that age and usage make things better. We readily admit the superiority of radar over guesswork; of modern fire control apparatus over the sweating ensign with a slide rule; of the modern miracle drugs over epsom saltsbut not without qualifications. Guesswork leads radar in picking a winner in the third at Tanforan; that sweating ensign could sign a special liberty chit that would be Greek to your modern fire control machines and we know of one job that epsom salts will still do betten than penicillin. So it goes with the name "White Hat" as applied to our modern ManO'-Warsman. This term is flat, colorless and completely devoid of the glamour of its predecessor. It could be applied to a cotton picker, polo player, big game hunter or street sweeper just as appropriately as to an enlisted member of the greatest navy in the world. Your old sailor was a proud old codger and an able one. His counterpart of today is equally ablelet's give him back his pride by returning his name "Bluejacket". Patient: "This is my first operation-I'm quite nervous you know." Surgeon: "I know just how you feel. It's my first too." Old Maid: "He's the sixth man I've fallen in love with without avail." Friend: "Wear one on your next date and maybe you'll have better luck." CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Sunday, November 20, 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -060 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) THANKSGIVING DAY SERVICE Thanksgiving Day comes this year on 24 November. A Protestant Thanksgiving Day Service will be held at the Station Chapel at 1000. All hands are asked to remember this date and plan to make it. a real Thanksgiving. ARE YOU A PASSERBY? By F. R. Pledger, ALC, USN All of us have our dark moments, if we didn't have we wouldn't be human beings. From the time that Adam and Eve disobeyed the Lord to sample the fruit from the tree of knowledge, we have had troubles, sorrows, and unhappiness. The fact that we have them is not, in itself, paramount, but what we DO to overcome them or what we do to HELP those about us, conquer theirs, is. Practically every one has heard the story of the suicide, paused on the railing of a high bridge, whose hardships, imagined or otherwise had finally reached a climax and to his way of thinking, offered only one solution. Just before the leap into eternity, a sympathetic passerby stepped into the picture in time to halt the tragedy with a kind word and a little everyday common sense reasoning. We are all suicides or passersby. Yes, whether you realize it or not, we are! You don't have to jump from a bridge or under a subway to be a suicide, but you can kill your own spirit, and be just as guilty. Upon arrival at this Base, no one was any lonelier than I. My loved ones were thousands of miles away, and probably wouldn't be with me again for months. There is no deeper feeling of despondency than that of loneliness. You can even be in a crowd and still seem alone. But loneliness can be licked by yourself or with the help of a passerby; and there are (Continued on Page Seven) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 THE INDIAN Saturday 19 Novembe 9 Page Two

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Saturday, 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Pare Three O LITTLE THEATER NOTES Off with the Old, On with the new ...The Tuesday, 8 November business meeting at The Little Theatre proved to be a memorable affair. Election of officers, new plans for the future-the theme song could've been "Auld Lang Syne". Mrs. Dorothy Pederson and Nell Abernathy, past president and secretary, repectively, stepped down from their posts to welcome their successors, but not without receiving the appreciation of all for having given, during the past six months, such a big boost to The Little Theatre. With gratification we listened as a letter from Admiral Phillips, commending the executive committee of the past on their work. And now to the new executives, who hope to carry on, and perhaps improve The Little Theatre with their many new plans. To initiate these, who would be better suited than Ken Allen, the one person who has seen every phase of our work as actor, director, and allround stage-hand, recruiter, and "cumshaw" king? His election comes as no surprise. The post of vice-president was vacant for some time after Ruth Kibler returned to the States. To serve in that capacity the group O elected Evelyn Perdue. Nell Abernathy, perhaps with a sigh of relief, handed over her books and many papers to Nan Burton, the new secretary. However we still have Bill Lampman with us to handle the treasury. What infinite trust we have in that man! The new group shall meet to appoint committees to help formulate their ideas for the future. Though the Holiday season has S been recognized as "slack season", plenty of meaty problems have arisen for the new brains to gnaw on. The Constitution will be examined for feasible and necessary changes. The Theatre building itself will be treated to a face-lifting, brushes and hammers this time not to be used on a stage set. Of course the play reading committee is on the look out for a new play, so all will be in readiness after the Holidays. But the biggest job of all lies in organizing "The Little Theatre of the Air". Surprised? Very few people realize that way back in the latter part of 1947 it was the original idea of a few ambitious people to put on radio sketches. But up popped "Arsenic and Old Lace", the first Little Theatre production in Gtmo. Finally the idea has come back to life, and with the cooperation of WGBY it is expected The Theatre will have its radio debut in about a month's time. Keep this in mind, won't you ? Shirley Childs has edited the play, GUANTANAMO'S RANDOLPH RANCH By virtue of an original treaty between the American and Cuban governments in 1903, approximately forty-seven square miles of territory was leased to the United States for the establishment of a Naval Base for the mutual protection of America and Cuba. Within the confines of this area, however, there exists a ranch that is unknown to the majority of Navy people and particularly the personnel stationed at Guantanamo Bay. The NOB Recreation Department maintains and operates a ranch covering thousands of acres that was utilized as grazing land for livestock prior to the treaty. Cuban Cattleman First Rancher From 1915 until 1932 the ranch was operated under contract with the United States by Senor Albelado Marques, a Cuban cattleman. Under this contract Senor Marques raised and slaughtered beef cattle and supplied meat for the fleet, Base, and the Cuban fondas. In 1932 the contract was not renewed, however Senor Marques still resides in Guantanamo City, Cuba. Some of the original feeding pens built under his management are still standing at the ranch. Texas Cattleman Takes Over For nine years the ranch operation was negligible. In 1941, John Randolph, a wealthy Texan, moved his cattle from Cuba to Guantanamo Bay under a new contract to operate the ranch on a corporation basis. It was Randolph who gave the ranch it's name. Formerly it had been called the Marques Ranch. The ranch continued to operate under the management of Randolph until 1943, when he died. A quantity of his stock had been transferred back to Cuba before his death. From 1941 until 1948 the ranch became run down from haphazard management. There was no manager assigned for any great length of time. First, under one manager and then another, the ranch was more of a burden to the Base than it was an asset. Now Managed By Ex BMC In February, 1948, William Thomas, BMC, USFR was employed by the Recreation Department to manage the ranch. Thomas was transferred from active Naval duty after twenty-one years service, the last two of which were spent at Guantanamo Bay. He knows the natives and the country, but most (Continued on Page Six) "My Sister Eileen", to an one hour radio presentation. The scripts will be ready soon for casting and oh! are we on the lookout for "new blood"! Watch for our announcements in the "Papoose". If you're looking for a new form of recreation, this is it! CIVILIAN CHATTER By C. V. Linn Did you know that L. D. Irving, the investigator, is the author of numerous outdoor articles in national magazines ? He recently mailed out another on wild pigeon hunting in Cuba which is sure to hit somewhere. C. V. Agdamag, chief clerk in the Public Works Department, is currently in the States in connection with his application for citizenship. Born in the Philippines, he has been employed on the Base for more than 25 years, and is now taking action to become a full-fledged U. S. citizen. Could that wide grin on Ralph Sierra's face ae due to the move he made last week to Quarters "N"? More space for the four children, and just across the street from work-who could wonder. Welcome to Frederick W. Oesterle, who just reported aboard as Engineering Aide, GS-6, in the Public Works Department. Mrs. Oesterle will be along on first available surface transportation. He finds Gtmo. an agreeable change after completing a contract at NOB, Kodiak. A hearty "welcome back" to Fred Spence, Civil Engineer, who just got back from a month's leave and three weeks schooling at the Naval Unit, Army Chemical Center, Edgewood, Md., and to George Murray, Leadingman Automotive Mechanic, who just got back from leave to begin a new employment agreement. Those sad people who lost the post allowance a few months ago can now be glad again. They get it back, effective 1 October, under a new policy governing the granting of allowances. LT J. F. Pringle, USNR, is the latest to join the ranks of civilian employees. Released to inactive duty in the Reserve last week at Jacksonville, he returned to the Base as Electronics Engineer, GS-11, in the Electronics Facility, Naval Station. WHAT IS A DEFENSIVE DRIVER? By C. E. Britt A Defensive Driver is one who makes allowances for the lack of skill and the lack of knowledge on the part of the other feliow-who recognizes that he has no control over the unpredictable actions of other drivers and pedestrians, nor over conditions of weather and roads, and who, therefore, develops a defense against all these hazards. He concedes his right-of-way and makes other concessions to avoid collision. He is careful to commit no driving errors himself, and is defensively alert to avoid the accident traps and hazards created by weather, roads, pedestrians, and other drivers. Saturday, 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Pag, Four MARINE CELEBRATION HUGE SUCCESS By CPL Ed Kazmierski The Marine Barracks' observance of the 174th birthday of the United States Marine Corps on 10 November 1949, will long be remembered by members of this command as a truly gala occasion. The day's festivities got under way at 8:30 a.m. The competition during the morning consisted of track and field events and a softball game featuring the Hq Platoon. The final results totalled up to a rather top heavy score in Gd Platoon's favor. After a picnic lunch with Chief Hatuey's nectar, all hands assembled on the baseball diamond to see the Staff NCO's down the officers in a run-away contest, this game being played all for the laughs. At 5:00 p.m. all hands again assembled on the parade ground to participate in the Sunset Parade. During this ceremony, our Commanding Officer, Colonel J. R. Lanigan presented the Birthday Athletic Events Plaque to Captain F. E. Sullivan, Platoon Commander of the victorious Guard Platoon. Immediately following the march off of the colors, the Marines and their guests sat down to a birthday dinner which made everyone present wish that the Marine Corps might have been twins!! A more delicious repast could not have been prepared and the quantity of delicacies did justice to even the most voracious appetites. Chaplain Faulk gave the invocation, which was followed by COL Lanigan's reading the Marine Corps' Birthday message, and an appropriate speech by our Base Commander, RADM Phillips. The dinner was climaxed by cutting the birthday cake by COL Lanigan, assisted by Sergeant Major Carcelli and Master Sergeant Pitts. The dinner finished, all guests and troops drifted to the Rustic Pavilion for an evening of dancing, topping off a fine day of celebration. Now with the Birthday duly celebrated and past, we will settle down to the business of doing our small part in making the 175th year of the Marine Corps as honorable and useful in our country's service as the past 174 years. I I I I I I "MY SISTER EILEEN" BEING CAST Tuesday night, 22 November there will be casting for a radio production of "My Sister Eileen" at the Little Theatre, Marine Site Three. A variety of new voices are needed, so come out for an audition. Nursery News: L Cheryl Anne Malone born 10 November to BM2 and Mrs. C. Malone; Franklin Howard Chase born 10 November to ET2 and Mrs. K. H. Chase; and Gilbert Deveriaus Milburn, Jr. born 14 Noevmber to GM1 and Mrs. G. D. Milburn. Mrs. Helen Miller, wife of the American Vice-Consul at Santiago was admitted to the Dependents Ward this week. The Vice-Consul, Mr. E. H. Miller and their infant son accompanied Mrs. Miller to the Base. Mrs. Miller enjoyed a speedy recovery, and all have returned to Santiago. LT Mary Hogan, NC, has returned from 30 days stateside leave; Dr. and Mrs. D. W. Spicer have also returned from emergency stateside leave; R. L. Buchina, HN and J. J. Pippo, HA have departed on 30 days leave. TENTH DIVISION NOTES By B. W. Richards, YNC, USN BOS'N Christiansen is back on the job, although favoring a sore toe with an abbreviated shoe. LTCOL Souder, Base Provost Marshal, turned in to the hospital last week and has not yet returned to duty. We are hoping for his early recovery. Yeoman striker Bromm and I have been assigned to the Admiral's staff, but will continue to do business at the same old stand; we appreciate the honor. Recent additions to this activity are ENC Cushing from NSD, AOC Deitch (Shanghai), from VU-10, ADC Feketey and AMC Kent from NAS; returned to their commands were ALC Hale and AOC Brindley, VU-10, and ADC Ermis, NAS. BM2 Rawls departed on emergency leave on November 8. We extend our sympathy in the death of his grandfather. IM3 Carden turned in to the hospital Wednesday. It looks as though he might get the rest he's been looking for. Shanghai's wife returned from the hospital last week with another boy, which is a chip off the old block. BMC W. L. Beeson, who has been cheerfully handing out (or refusing to hand out) driver's licenses on this Base for the past two years, has left today for duty in Green Cove Springs, Florida. GM3 Bobby Bridges leaves today for discharge; it is our understanding that he expects to go college. Good luck, Bobby. ADC S. T. Rhodes, III, of the NAS, has been assigned to TAD with this division, to replace AD1 Case, who is returning to duty with NAS. THANKSGIVING DAY TEA DANCE Melvin Crissy, ADC, USN, president of the CPO Mess, announces that there will be a Tea Dance at the CPO Club on Thanksgiving Day, 24 November between the hours 1400 and 1700. Cocktails will be served. Music for dancing will be furnished by the Naval Base Band. USS WILLIAMSBURG VISITS GTMO. The USS Williamsburg, presidential yacht, tied up at Pier Baker on Wednesday, 16 November. She is expected to leave today. President Truman was not aboard. VU-10 NOTES By F. R. Pledger, ALC USN Even though it was a payday weekend and liberty has recommenced in Guantanamo City, the liberty list for Friday took a beating to give way to a Squadron Dance held Friday night. The big question now is, when is the next one going to come off? We point out that no matter where you are or how busy you happen to be you can always find time to improve yourself. An excellent example is J. P. Mello, AK1, who has just completed the USAFI course "Military Law" with a final mark of 3.86. Mello can rightfully be proud of his accomplishment. Congratulations for the fine work, "Stores". We welcome aboard B. J. Norton, ADAA from Cabannis Field, Corpus Christi, Texas and bid adios to J. L. Johnson, ADC. "Foulball" Faulkner has promised us an article, in fact, he turned one in, but when it came to deciphering the copy great difficulty was encountered. When asked to, help, Faulkner evaded the job by stating that the copy was one day old, and who did we think he was Einstein ? Chief Medica is whipping together a CPO softball team that should be a good one when they get going. The brown-baggers with the big Navy chests did some history making huffing and puffing after a couple of turns around the diamond last Sunday at Newtown. A friendly discussion between a General Service chief and an Aviation chief came to a screeching halt when the Aviation chief came out with, "Well, I see that you guys in general service have things fixed up your way with this new rating structure. You finally swung it so BuPers now calls us ADC's which any dimwit knows means Air Dale Chiefs." He: "Honey chile, will you all marry me?" She: "Oh, this is so southern." 0 0 e 0 0 THE INDIAN Saturday 19 November 1949 Page Four

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Saturday. 19 November 1949 TEIDA aeFv .TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Skiddy Masterson and Cecil Pederson As we had no Teen-Age column last week, our news is a bit behind times but for those who haven't heard and to refresh the memory of those who have we shall continue. The Student Council has started having night meetings at different members' houses for the comfort and convenience of all concerned. Wednesday before last, the first night meeting took place at Skiddy's at 7:00. It was supposed to be a short meeting, but lasted til 9:15 due to controversy over forthcoming parties. All is well now and straightened out. The Dramatic Club, advised by Mr. Fife, is certainly well underway with a brief but complete constitution and its governing committee elected. The officers consist of: President, Kay Hollis; VicePresident, J e a n e e n; SecretaryO Treasurer, Betty Parks; Technical Manager, Jack; Property Manager, Norman Huddy; Costume mistress, Cecil. Rumors have been heard concerning a Christmas play but nothing definite has been decided. Last Saturday night found Mr. McNeal and his Sunday School class at Skiddy's house. Fun was had by all and a small portion of our appreciation was shown to Mr. McNeal for all the wonderful .things he has done for us when the class gave him another sport shirt to add to his wardrobe. Under the supervision of Mrs. Broughton, their teacher, the 11th and 12th grade homeroom is going to Kittery Beach this afternoon on a hayride. Following this will be a square dance to which the entire high school is invited. We're all anticipating a grand time and will give you further details next week. CONSTITUTION TO LAND AT McCALLA FIELD The Navy's largest plane, the four-motored R60 transport Constitution will make a return visit to McCalla Field next Monday, 21 November. The ship is scheduled to arrive from Puerto Rico at 1000 local time with 71 passengers and will pick up a small load of leave .passengers here and depart at 1130 carrying them to Patuxent River, Md. From there the plane is scheduled to go to Olathe, Kansas. Base residents who were among the five hundred or more persons who were allowed to go through the plane on its first visit here on September 27th were amazed at the size and carrying capacity of the plane and at the ease with which it was landed at this Base. General visiting aboard the Constitution may be prohibited this time due to the number of passengers embarked and the very short stop over scheduled. TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS By J. L. Richard YNSN No doubt the most talked about event of this week has been the recreational trip via crashboat to Santiago de Cuba. Among Training Group personnel who made this most interesting and enjoyable trip was Chief Staff Officer CAPT V. Havard. Although Captain Havard stayed only a day, he was very much impressed by the scenic beauty of this tropical city. A few of the Training Group enlisted lads took advantage of this pleasure cruise to Santiago, and seemed, from all reports, to have made quite a hit with the ladies there. We won't mention any names. However, the trip to Santiago was not all "milk and honey", according to Bellor, Fike and Prunty. Ask these "sailors" when they are going to submit a request for bedroom suites aboard the crashboat. Leach, FTC, who is an active member of our group is enjoying stateside life, involving temporary additional duty. Volner, RD3 from our Radar department has just flown to the states and is practically back in the hills of Tennessee. Guess the hills of Cuba made him a little homesick. As the Christmas holidays near, all hands are really patronizing the dry cleaning establishment on the Base, anticipating annual Christmas leave, and flooding the place with "blues". Best wishes for a speedy recovery go from all hands to LT Utegaard of the Training Group who is in the Hospital. We hope to have him back with us soon. Viewed through the Training Group Sportscope, we see that the Training Group Bowling Team scored a surprising victory over VU-10 by taking the game by three points. The Training Group Officers' Bowling Team ably led by CDR Peterson and LT C. Chavis are gradually getting into shape and should show favorably in the near future. LET'S START A GOSSIP COLUMN The Indian does not lay claim to being as newsy a paper as the Press Scimitar or Commercial Appeal in Memphis, but ...we do feel that we can compete with their social items. We, too, have personnel aboard who go on trips, have guests, marry, have babies, etc. Let's start a social column in the Indian. Be your own Society Reporter. Send in items of interest and we will have a regular weekly gossip session. Instead of gossiping over the back fence about the strange man visiting Mrs. Jones, send that juicy bit into the Indian office and let us all read about it ... PROTESTANT VESPERS The Protestant Vesper Service for Bluejackets and Teen-Agers which meets at 1900, Station Chapel, is still maintaining its high interest. The musical program under the direction of Ted McKenney is a popular part of the service. In order to provide some fun and competition, beginning next Sunday there will be an attendance competition, the congregation having been divided into two sides, port and starboard. The Co-chairmen of the port side are PFC Nelson H. Dukes, Jr. and Joan McNeal. The Co-chairmen of the starboard side are John Dettinger, CSSN, USN, and Jeaneen Hummell. A record will be kept of the attendance of the two sides and it is planned to have a gala party after a few weeks, at which time the losers will have to entertain the winners. All Bluejackets and Teen-Agers are cordially invited to come and join a side. The subject for the Chaplain's talk on Sunday will be "What was Christ's Attitude Towards Sex?" CROWS EARNED BY GTMO. MEN By authority of a dispatch received from the Administrative Office, ComTEN the following men have been advanced to the next higher rating: V. A. Mertz from CS3 to CS2; G. H. Weisenberger from CS3 to CS2; M. J. Di Ferio from SN to CS3; J. R. Dettinger from SN to CS3; G. H. Babcock, Jr., from DC2 to DC1; C. R. Tisdale from DC2 to DC1; J. A. Brand from FN to DC3; R. Sagert FN to EM3; A. E. Machtolff FP2 to FPl; T. A. Brooks from SN to GM3; T. J. Bennett from HN to HM3; A. Di Caro from HN to HM3; J. C. Robinson from HN to HM3; B. M. Gerringer from HN to HM3; H. H. Birchmore from HN to HM3; G. 0. Talley from HN to HM3; 0. L. Frakes from HN to HM3; T. H. Burks from HN to HM3; H. E. Davis from SN to ME3; F. A. Fornelli from MU2 to MUl; P. A. Hickle from MUSN to MU3; R. E. Watkins from SN to PH3; R. L. Wendt from SN to PH3; T. R. Warner from PM2 to PM1; L. F. Blanchard from SN to QM3; A. J. Demicco from SK3 to SK2; W. G. Cook from SK2 to SK1; G. L. Cooke from SN to YN3. Effective promotion date was 16 November. Congratulations,men! (SEA)-Crosswind landing gear, newly developed for airplanes, enables the pilot to land into the wind even when the wind is at an angle to the runway. A caster-like device inside the wheels brings them automatically into line with the runway when they touch the ground. r Saturday, 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Pagre SixTE NINStda,1Noebr94 GUANTANAMO'S RANDOLPH RANCH (Continued from Page Three) important of all he loves and understands animals. Most of his service in the Navy had been aboard fighting ships ...light and heavy cruisers, destroyers and battleships. He studied animal husbandry under an itinerant veterinarian from Pennsylvania and Maryland named John Cyclop. The management of Randolph was a natural for him. Ranch Employees Thomas has three men working on the ranch. Augusto Grovenor and Alfonso Louis who are from Barbados and are employed as gardeners, while Wilfred Simon is a native of South Africa. Simon has charge of the hogs and pigs. It was he who exclaimed, "You're killing my friends, Chief, you're killing my friends." The occasion was when two Havalinas (Cuban porkers) were slaughtered. Simon had named them Nancy and Jim. Thomas, who has a heart of gold in spite of his fierce and rugged appearance replied, "Well, you'll just have to find yourself two more friends, Simon." These men are furnished quarters at the ranch and raise practically all of their own food. Thomas says you couldn't run them away with a club. Grovenor likes the horses so well that he even cuts grass on his own time to feed them so he can be near them. (Ed. note: Continued next week) SPECIAL ORDERS AT SHIP'S SERVICE Ship's Service Special Order Department is pleased to announce that many lines of sterling silverware are now obtainable on special order at very substantial discounts. Available now are Gorham's, Towle, Wallace, Heirloom, Whiting, Frank Smith, Watson, Lunt, Reed & Horton, International and Manchester. Delivery averages about six weeks by sets and place settings, however, odd pieces and open stock items generally require longer. Washing machines will probably be difficult to obtain for several months, due to the steel strike lasting so long. Machines now on order will probably not be received until January or later according to word just received. Cushman has just announced the production of the Model 62A Scooter, the open frame model such as was used by the Army paratroopers during the war. Prices have not been released yet but should be available within two or three weeks. Deepfreeze Home Freezers are available and a special feature is the seven cubic foot size, however, the larger sizes may be ordered. Prices and literature are now available on musical instruments, particularly guitars, trumpets, accordions, trap drums and accessories, batons, mandolins, banjos, violins, saxophones and trombones. "'Aw Right, who threw. the bottle at the umpire?" WARDENS NEEDED By C. E. Britt Wild life, besides the protection afforded by man-made laws, has a way of protecting itself. It listens with an acutely atuned ear as mother nature speaks, and is instinctively aware of the hazards presented by nature's laws. Wild game is more on its guard when the hunting season opens. Not so with man. He needs a Warden to continually caution and remind him. There is no closed season on accidents, and the little darts propelled by Nature's bow are continually striking him. The requirements to qualify are simple. He need not be a scholar of physics or a learned mathematician in order to alert his wards. If not from instinct or training, already they know from observation much about the laws of physics. They know that a cylindrical object is easily rolled; that the application of oil will reduce friction; that an object above ground when released will fall; that the floor of a perfectly level truck on a hill becomes an inclined plane; that an upright object in the truck, when on a hill, is no longer upright, but is tilted, and if unsupported will tend to slide or topple; that a revolving sand disc or rip saw can not distinguish between wood and flesh. Man knows these things but must be continually reminded of them. Recent accidents on the Base involve these principles. A man on the ground was struck by a 55-gallon empty oil drum which fell from a height above the stake body sides of a truck on which drums were being loaded. Load was too high or else the sides were too low. A man's foot was mashed by an overturning cylinder. He and the cylinders (upright and unsupported) were in a truck which stalled on a steep grade. When the truck started up again, the cylinders tilted, and the man attempted to support them with his foot. Foot was caught between cylinders and truck side. While sanding a small piece of wood on a sanding machine a man pushed with his fingers instead of using a pusher-block. The wood revolved and two fingers were nicely sanded. Whether you are a supervisor of men, children, or maids, you are hereby elected a member of the Safety-Wardens Club. A sport in which everybody wins. The life you save may be your own. Two soldiers checked in at the hotel and were shown to a rather dingy room. 1st PFC: What does this pigsty cost?" Manager: "For one pig, two dollars; for two pigs, three dollars." 0 e 0 0 Saturday, 19 November 1949 Page Six THE INDIAN

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Saturday. 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Page Seven HELICOPTER FOCUSES NEED OF PAVED AREA Parking Area Paving Need Was Proved By Maneuvers Last Fall The helicopter is a very versatile contraption. New uses for it are being discovered almost every day. However, not even the most rabid helicopter backers could have surmised that it would serve an important function in paving an automobile parking area! Have you seen the new automobile parking area in front of the NOB Administration Building? This area, formerly an eyesore, was brought into prominence last fall when a helicopter from one of the carriers made a landing and take-off there. Spectators Blasted By Dust We say "it made a landing and take-off, although, with scores 9 .of people to observe, the swirls of dust and stone enveloped the craft whenever the rotor was "revved up" and neither landing nor takeoff could be seen. This cloud of dust and stone not only blasted the onlookers but slammed into the open jalousies of the Administration Building. Everything was coated with dust to such a considerable depth it was necessary to double up on janitor crews and work several days overtime in an attempt to uncover papers, files, office equipment, and possibly missing persons so that work routines could be restored to normal. The die was cast. Attention was immediately focused upon the landing area and, although its use as a helicopter landing field was not routine, the necessity for dust abatement was made evident. Construction Begins Within a short time draftsmen went to work, followed by surveySors, then bulldozers, graders, and concrete mixers. Unfortunately, however, the heavy rains of the fall of 1948 prevented paving operations to finish the job, and for many months the concluding work was held up. Then paving operations on the air strip at Leeward Field and the Bargo Road took priority and required use of the automatic paving machine until. about two weks ago when it completed the surfacing. Still Needs Sealing After a waiting period to permit the newly laid asphalt to "cure" it was rolled into a smooth surface and is now in use. After a few more weeks it will be necessary to "seal" the surface to increase its life. When the seal coat has dried parking lanes will be laid out to insure maximum use of the space available. The helicopter may now take a bow for its part in starting the project which was accomplished under the supervision of Mr. Ralph Mason, Base Public Works Quarterman. CHIEF JOHNSON ORDERED TO FLEET RESERVE James L. "Johnny" Johnson, ADC USN received orders to the Twelfth Naval District for duty or assignment while awaiting retirement on 15 May, 1950. He is being transferred to the Fleet Reserve after twenty years and four days naval service which excludes about two years of broken service. Enlisting at NRS Little Rock, Arkansas on 3 October, 1928, Johnson's service has been marked with many responsible assignments. Instructor at Chicago University He is a graduate of the Link Trainer school, Atlanta, Georgia, the Link Celestial Navigation Trainer school, Seattle, Washington, Advanced Aviation Engine school, Chicago, Illinois, Flight Engineer school, LaGuardia Field, New York, and he was an instructor at the Aviation Structural class of the University of Chicago. During the late war, Johnson saw action with the aviation detachment aboard the USS Marblehead and VC-8 aboard the USS Liscombe Bay where he earned the air medal with two clusters. In addition, he holds the Presidential Unit Citation, the Navy Unit Commendation, and various lesser medals. Asiatic Fleet Featherweight Champ An old shipmate of Johnson's, John McPhaul, .ADC, who is now stationed at Coco Solo, C. Z., reports that he and Johnny put NAS Opalocka, Florida in commission, and that he knows for a fact that at one time Johnson was the proud holder of the featherweight championship belt of the Asiatic Fleet. (Ed: He is still handy with his dukes). Chief and Mrs. Johnson will be missed by their friends here. They have been active in civic affairs on the Base, as Johnny is a member of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association, and chairman of the NAS-VU-10 Children's Christmas Party Committee. Mrs. Johnson is a member of Unit 100, Ladies Auxiliary Dependents Service Committee. To Johnny and Mildred we say, "Hasta la vista". IN THE DOG HOUSE, EH? Ithaca (AFPS)-In the dog house? Then you've never had it so good, according to the latest book by Cornell professor Clive M. McCay. "I believe the average dog food," he writes, "provides as good or better nutrition than the food consumed by the average child in America." The professor adds that the poor man's dog and the rich man's get the worst food, because "they dine on menus of their own selection." EMPLOYEES LOW IN BOND PARTICIPATION American citizen employees at Guantanamo Bay are below the Navy average in Savings Bonds participation, and stand next to the bottom of the list of TENTH Naval District activities, according to figures recently released by the District Commandant. Figures for September showed only 23.6% participation at this Base, as compared with 30.4 for Roosvelt Roads and 62.1 for District Headquarters and Naval Station, San Juan. NOB, Trinidad was low with a participation of 15%. The fact that many American citizens on the alien and native schedule of wages are included in computations for this Base partially accounts for the low average, according to the Base Industrial Relations Department. However, it was pointed out that a large number of those on the continental schedule are failing to take advantage of the Payroll Savings plan for buying Bonds. ARE YOU A PASSERBY? (Continued from Page Two) plenty of passersby right here on the Base. My entire outlook and future at Guantanamo Bay was changed by a kindly invitation to dinner and an offer by a passerby to drive me around the Base. "C'mon, let's go up to the club and meet the fellows." These and other kindnesses started the ball rolling. Interest was created in the Base and the people who are its inhabitants. Never have I seen a place where friendliness, a kind word, and a smile mean so much and are practiced so extensively. It is even catching. Oldtimers down here get blue occasionally, especially after mail call. They didn't get that letter from the wife and kids. And what do you think I saw a newcomer do? He walked up to his shipmate and said, "Don't feel badly, Pal; there wasn't much mail anyway this time. Just look at the other guys that didn't get a letter either." It worked like a charm. A good prescription for loneliness is to smile, even if you have to force yourself to do so; and Keep BUSY. Take an interest in what is going on around you. There are many activities you may associate yourself with after working hours are over. The Hobby Shop, Boy Scouts, Little Theater, clubs, golfing, swimming, tennis, to name a few. Bear in mind that no matter how lonely you may be, there is someone around who is probably lonelier. Look for him and give him that smile and kind word that helps so much and your own loneliness will be forgotten. Saturday. 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Page Seven

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Saturday. 19 November 1949 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-17 Nov 4C-25e0 ALL-STAR-CIVILLIAN BASEBALL SERIES By H. L. Broughton The first game of the All StarCuban Civilian baseball series resulted in a 5 to 2 victory for the Civilians. The All Star's pitcher, "Wonder Boy" Webster walked the first two men at bat in the first inning and then the third man hit a home run. This homer was made by the Civilian's left fielder, Martin, and was the only home run of the game. After the first inning the game settled into a pitchers' duel with Webster striking out 16 men and the Civilian's pitcher, Rey struck out 14 men. The Civilians were fortunate to win the game as their power hitters were not in the game. Tuesday and Thursday's games were rained out, however, weather permitting there will be another game Tuesday, 22 November. These games are bang-up baseball so come on out; give your favorite team your support by rooting for them. OFFICERS' BOWLING LEAGUE The middle of the third week of bowling in the Officer's Club Bowling League finds the Naval Station leading the National League and the Supply Depot "Civilians" leading the American League. Statistics to this point indicate the American League has the majority of the high average bowlers, but LT Wesson of Naval Station made a big advance this week with a 522 series to boost his average to 164. Mr. Badger at NSD still leads the pack with a 169 average. The leading ten bowlers in the first two weeks were: Name Games Ave. Badger (NSD-A) 6 174.3 Serig (NAS) --------3 169.6 Ziz (NSD-A) --------6 168 Berkeley (VU-10-A) -3 161 Wesson (NavSta) 3 155 Ondrasik (NOB) 5 154 Lukeas (NAS) -----3 153 Shepard (Hosp-Dent) 5 151 Wray (NAS) --------1 149 Stevenson (FTG-A) -_ 4 148 Team high single game, NSD (A), 825; Individual high single game, Badger, NSD (A), 232; Individual high three games, Badger, NSD(A) 532. The NSD team won three games in a hot match Tuesday night with the Hospital-Dental combo in the American League. Two of the games were decided by seven and ten pins respectively. This NSD outfit appears to be unbeatable; when one of their civilian bowlers falls down the other picks up to carry the "under 100" bowlers on to victory. It is reported that one of their officers is improving and is not going over the foul line with his former regularity. However, he was forced to call NSD transportation one night to remove him from the pit where it is rumored he had been kicking over the pins his ball missed. Now he only goes half way down the alley when his thumb sticks in the ball, and he walks back. Standing in both leagues as of completion of play Wednesday, November 16, were: American League Games Tot. Tot. Team Won Lost Pins Pts. NSD---------7 2 2 9 NOB --------3 3 1 4 FTG ---------3 3. 1 4 VU-10 -------3 3 1 4 Marines ----3 3 1 4 Hosp-Dental 2 7 1 3 National League Games Tot. Tot. Team Won Lost Pins Pts. NavSta -----7 1 3 10 NAS ----6 0 2 8 Hosp-Dental -4 5 2 6 FTG ---------3 6 1 4 VU-10 -------2 7 0 2 NSD-------1 4 0 1 Individual Averages High Five Men Names Games Ave. Badger -------------9 169 Ziz -----------------9 164 Wesson -------------6 164 Berkeley ------------3 161 Serig ---------------5 160 SPORTS QUIZ QUESTIONS 1. Has a fair ball ever been hit out of the Yankee Stadium? 2. Who was the first U.S. President to throw out the first ball of the season? 3. Which club failed to win the pennant despite four 20-game winners? 4. How can a batter drive in three runs without hitting a fair ball? "sasnq aq; sauaio gatyA 'aldiar a3lumo n us oI-Aaog1.1aq Inol ul lI sll pus ilsq ael; is 9A012 su.{ smioanp trntuasuq pJlT4; aql 'Inol slloa Ilnq aeq; sn lsnr "oumi asuq pall at 2uols Itsq aql~ slunq aaeluq ail 'lno oA,4 tl1lA1 "T s~a;;o319 PH pus 'iZ sJuag{ al IoQ '99 sU1niliA apnnlD 'salJOlaIA CZ s~aaqns{ unqin alldsap puooas paijslu9 xoS alluA& 0Z6T alas 'E .ON 1i SIHAiWSNV Win flmw S141PI,-V a I CONFIRMATION BY ARCHBISHOP (Continued from Page One) Children: Regina Helen Scanlon, Judith Catherine Elton, James Michael Radcliffe, Lewis Anthony Claar, Dorothy Ann Claar, Jeanette Mary Jessing, Henry Anthony McElderry, Isabel Mary Keehn, Patrick David Lanigan, Madeline Mary Piel, Sandra Patricia Craig, Patricia Mary Paresi, Barbara Mary Roy, Constance Theresa Lesesne, Joseph Michael Pitts, George Joseph Swallow, Robert Charles Pitts, Michael John Piel, Thomas Chistopher Greenwood, Thomas Joseph Carcelli, James Edward Piel, Leland Joseph Roy, Michael Christopher Lanigan, Robert Joseph Keehn, David Joseph Jessing, Francis Joseph Stroud, Richard Joseph Lesesne, Richard Joseph Jessing, Norman Carl Huddy, George Francis MacMichael, Patricia Christine Besse, Betina Josephine Parks and Margarite Ann Claar. Commander and Mrs. Joseph Scanlon were sponsors for all those who were confirmed. Mrs. G. A. Greenwood and Mrs. L. R. Lindenborn assisted Father Herold in preparing the children for the reception of the Sacrament. A short sermon was delivered by the Archbishop and translated by Dr. Antonio Civit, in which he expressed his extreme pleasure at the opportunity to administer the sacrament on the Base, and he expressed his gratitude and everlasting prayers for the good relations between the American and Cuban peoples. Following the confirmation, Archbishop Serantes conferred the Apostolic blessing on the members present and distributed holy pictures and rosaries. At 1230 a luncheon was held at the Officers' Club in honor of the Archbishop and his party following which they made a tour of the Base before departing for the evening services in Guantanamo City. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Saturday 19 November TAP ROOTS Van Heflin Susan Hayward Sunday 20 November GAY RANCHERO Roy Rogers Jan Frazee Monday 21 November WINTER MEETING Bette Davis Jim Davis Tuesday 22 November PHILO VANCE RETURNS William Wright Terry Austin Wednesday 23 November THE FLAME John Carrol Vera Ralston Thursday 24 November THE WINNERS CIRCLE Johnny Longden Morgan Farley 0 0 THE INDIAN atma. Bay-17 Nov 49-25oo Saturday, 19 November 1949


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