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iaa Vol. IV No. 37 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 5 November 1949 ASST. SECNAV VISITS GUANTANAMO TODAY Hon. John T. Koehler on Inspection Tour of Caribbean Area If you hear what sounds like gunfire on the Base this morning, it will probably be the saluting battery on Fisherman's Point welcoming the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Mr. John T. Koehler, who is scheduled to arrive via special R5D at McCalla Field at 1100. The Assistant Secretary, accompanied by Mrs. Koehler and his Aide, Captain L. H. Chappell and Mrs. Chappell is expected to remain on the Base for about twenty-four hours. The purpose of his visit is to continue his inspection tour, on behalf of the Department of Defense, of re-sale activities (Ship's Services and Post Exchanges) throughout the Caribbean. He arrives in Guantanamo direct from San Juan and a similar, inspection there. It is expected that while here the Assistant Secretary will make a familiarization tour of the Naval Operating Base, visiting such in* stallations as may draw his particular attention. He will be met by Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, Base Commander, and Commanding Officers of all Base commands at McCalla Field on arrival, where he will receive full honors from the Marine Guard and the NOB Band. SO THERE'S NO SNAKES IN GUANTANAMO? By H. L. Broughton The next time you visit the Cuzco Beach area it might be wise to look twice before you pick up a stick to use as a walking staff. Mr. Julio Pamias, a Public Works Supervisor who lives at .Cuzco Beach, heard some commotion among his chickens Wednesday night and upon investigation found a 6 foot 4 inch snake about to devour a young chicken. Mr. Pamias brought the snake, a boa constrictor, to work Thursday morning as positive evidence. It looks as if someone will be sporting a nice new snake skin belt. 1 LETTER OF 1 APPRECIATION I Ii 1 The following message was addressed to the Naval Operating Base on departure of the transport, U.S.S. Thomas Jefferson last Saturday: "On departure this vessel for West coast we wish to express appreciation of the excellent services rendered Jefferson during our recent visit". ARRIVAL OF MOBILE CANTEEN ADDS TO BASE COMFORTS The Ship's Service Mobile Canteen arrived here this week and will be placed in service about November 5th. This canteen is a far cry from the Good Humor man as it features by maximum use of minimum space such items as coffee, cokes, fruit juices, milk, hamburgers, hot dogs, ice cream cups and cones, candies, cigarettes, sandwiches, pies. All the equipment aboard this rolling gedunk stand is the newest and most modern available, particularly notable are the automatic devices which maintain the temperatures in the refrigerators and ice cream cabinets. The automatic devices instantly start gasoline operated engines for power to drive the compressors. So complete is the equipment on board the canteen, that hot water is provided for the washing of utensils. The mobile canteen is here to serve the interests of the Base and suggestions are welcome from everyone that we may utilize it to its fullest operating capacities. We earnestly solicit your suggestions so that the mobile canteen can be located at sporting events, picnics, shipside or wherever there's likely to be a hungry crowd. Work is progressing on the conversion of the fleet restaurant, however, completion is not anticipated by November 15th as previously published due to the delays involved in procurement. GTMO. BOY SCOUT TROOP HOLDS FIRST MEETING "My country tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing"so opened the first meeting of the Guantanamo Bay Boy Scout Troop last Tuesday at the Little Theatre. This meeting was principally for registration and to acquaint the boys and their parents with the "Why's and Wherefores" of the Boy Scout group, introducing the people responsible for its organization. After the opening prayer, Chaplain Faulk introduced Admiral Phillips, who stated his interest in the new group and extended his best wishes to it. Chaplain Faulk spoke briefly about the organization of the troop, pointing out that it is being graciously sponsored by the Guantanamo Bay branch of the Fleet Reserve Association. Mr. Johnson, President of this branch and the next speaker, stated that the members of the F. R. A. considered it "an honor" to sponsor the group. The Troop Committee, which is really a board of directors, and is (Continued on Page Six) NAVY'S DOLLAR DOESN'T GO FAR EITHER Remember way back in 1939 when the whole country was screaming about high prices? Blame and abuse were heaped upon CCC, the WPA, the NRA, "plowing under cotton", "killing the little pigs", unfair Jap competition in world trade, etc. Well, let's take that high cost of living year and compare it with the present in one field where the pinch is now the tightest, namely housing and construction. In spite of the opening of more than 100 additional housing units the last year, this Base is still far short in required housing, and anyone recently arrived from stateside can testify that housing construction still hasn't entered the race to meet requirements. So construction costs affect all of us. Based on nation-wide figures compiled by the Department of Commerce, present cost for state(Continued on Page Six)

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Page Two THE INDIAN__ Saturday, 5 November 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 5 November 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander A. E. Smith, SN -----------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. "TAR -BABY" SHOT AND CREMATED By C. E. Britt Tar-Baby was only two years old. He was a friendly trotting horse and made his home at the Naval Station Corral. He had spent many happy days affording pleasure to many different riders, and thought that by exercising proper horse-sense he could look forward to a long and useful future. But horse-sense was not enough; he failed to take into consideration the human element and the machine age. Tar-Baby's life was cut short on a recent Sunday afternoon while taking one of his many friends for a ride. While rounding a curve on a country road he met a panel truck being driven at excessive speed. The two collided. The rider was treated for minor injuries at the Dispensary. The truck's head light was knocked off and fender bent. The driver of the vehicle was uninjured. Tar-Baby had to be shot and cremated. I TWO NEW NAVY CHIEFS Washington (AFPS)-Two new Navy Department Chiefs were inducted into office in a doubleceremony held recently in the office of Navy Secretary Francis P. Matthews. Vice Adm. Edwin D. Foster became the Chief of Naval Materiel, succeeding Vice Adm. Arthur C. Miles. Rear Adm. Charles W. Fox succeeded Vice Admiral Foster as Chief of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. UNDERSEA WARFARE The Navy, in fulfilling its responsibility for the conduct of undersea warfare, must insure that the gravity of this responsibility is fully understood, both within and without the service. The enormity of the task as well as the consequences in the event of failure must be generally recognized. Otherwise, the required readiness may not be achieved due to inadequate preparation and public apathy. Seapower -Top to Bottom As if in obedience to some unvarying universal law of balance or equilibrium, the submarine injects itself into the family of weapons to maintain the level of the sea as the reference plane of sea power. In terms of altitude, sea power has extended its reach downward as well as upward so that the average is maintained, with many more attendant complications, a b o u t where the ancients saw sky meet sea. For certain tactical purposes, the fast schnorkel submarine, hard to detect undersea, matches the spectacular brilliance of highflying speedy aircraft. A great deal has been said about the error of insufficient emphasis on air power by some of the warring nations in World War H. Not enough has been said about emphasis, or rather the lack of it, on underseas warfare. Sub Deficiency Hurt Japs The United States was fortunate in that Japan failed both to effectively counter our submarine activity and to use her own submarines with expected effectiveness. Had the Japanese Navy been capable of doing either, the war in the Pacific would have been greatly prolonged. Germany made good use of submarines in both world wars, as the record shows especially in World War II that by means of submarines, she denied the Allies absolute control of the seas. Decisive control was obtained by the Allies only at terrific cost in lives, manpower and economic debilitation. Since the advances being made in applied science and technology favor the submarine at least as much as its attackers, if no more, we may rightly assume that the submarine's potency as an instrument of sea power will increase. Its tactical employment will expand. It can do what it was not entirely ready for in World War II-become a terror and mass destruction weapon against land targets. By land targets is meant anything from a densely populated city, miles inland, to a specific military objective. This has been made possible by the advent of rockets and jet-powered missiles into a prominent place in the weapon family. A submarine, which would be too small to mount 16" guns, (Continued on Page Five) CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1749-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) PROTESTANT VESPERS Following the Vespers last Sunday, a farewell party was given for Sgt. Ed Speck who departs on the ADAMS. Sgt. Speck has been one of the mainstays of the Choir for the past two years. The subject for the Vespers discussion next Sunday will be, "Is Any Sin Unpardonable?" Uniform for the Vesper Service is optional and no dress uniform is required. Roland W. Faulk, Chaplain, U. S. N. BILL CHANGES PAY AND GRADE OF EMPLOYEES The Classification Act of 1923, which with its numerous amendments has governed the pay of classified civilian employees for more than 25 years was superseded this week when the President signed the Classification Act of 1949. The new Classification Act grants slight increases in pay to American citizen Group IVb employees, and eliminates all Professional (P), Sub-Professional (SP), and Clerical-Administrative-Fiscal (CAF) designations of classified employees. All these are now grouped under the heading of General Service (GS). No change is made in the Crafts-Protective-Custodial (CPC) designation. Carrying out the provisions of the new Act, which went into effect as of 30 October, the Base Industrial Relations Department is preparing notifications of personnel action (NavExos 1200) for affected employees, indicating their new grade designation and rate of pay. Pay raises will vary for individual employees, amounting in some cases to as little as about $80 per annum, and in others to slightly more than $200 per annum. As an example of the effect of the changes, a Civil Engineer, P-1, at $2,974.80 per annum under the Classification Act of 1923, as amended, will be changed to Civil Engineer, GS-5, at $3,100 per annum. 0 0 S 0 Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 5 November 194)

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Saturday, 5 November 1949TH NINPrThe MATS WILL NOT OPERATE .TO GUANTANAMO BAY By F. R. Pledger Until further official notice there will be no incoming or outgoing MATS flights at NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Furthermore, there never have been any scheduled MATS flights here and chances are, there never will be. Before becoming upset over the above statements, bear in mind that this station is -serviced by scheduled air transport service bi-weekly, rain or shine. The proper name of the air transport service which is servicing this station is the Fleet Logistic Support Wings (FLSW). There have been so many erroneous references to MATS flights, even by high commands, that it might be well to look into the mission and functioning of the highly efficient Fleet Logistic S Support Wings. Operates Under CNO Fleet Logistic Support Wings were established by CNO letter Serial 75p55N, date 14 May, 1948, incident to the consolidation of the Naval Air Transport Service and the Air Transport Service of the Air Force. Initiation of action commenced on 25 May, 1948. Fleet Logistic Support Wings operates as a specialized unit of the U. S Fleet directly under the Chief of Naval Operations. Atlantic and Pacific Wings Fleet Logistic Support Wings are commanded by a naval aviator of appropriate rank, and consist of two wings, the Pacific, or senior wing, and Atlantic Wing. Fleet Logistic Support Wings and the Pacific Wing are commanded, at present, by Captain M. B. Gurney, USN, with headquarters at Moffett Field, California. The Atlantic Wing is commanded by Captain W. Ashforth, USN. The two wings are further divided into squadrons, (both transport and ferry), and the squadrons into detachments. Air Transport Squadron One, under the command of Commander L. S. Price, USN, with headquarters at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland, maintains detachments, scheduled for the Atlantic coast, Caribbean area gnd Argentia, New Foundland. Is Actually VR-1 The activity familiarly known as MATS on this station is actually VR-1 Detachment, NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and is a unit of Air Transport Squadron One, Fleet Logistic Support Wing, Atlantic, and Fleet Logistic Support Wings, and has been ably administered by Lieutenant J. C. Raines, USN, for some time. The mission of the Fleet Logistic Support Wings is the establish.ment, maintenance, and operation of Air Transport essential to naval operations, and to provide delivery of naval aircraft in ferry status (Continued on Page Four) By CPL Ed. Kazmierski There was no United States of America in 1740, but there were American Marines. Three regiments were assembled in New York with Lawrence Washington, brother of General George Washington, among the officers. These Colonial Marines served with distinction under the British flag in the French Indian war at Acadia, Louisburg, Quebec and elsewhere. There was no American nation then; there were, nevertheless, American Marines, known as such and serving on American vessels. From the two battalions authorized in 1775 by the Continental Congress, the U. S. Marine Corps will have come a long way on 10 November, the day of it's 174th anniversary of the Corps and to pay homage in appropriate ceremonies to their brethren who have fallen in our nation's battles. LT Beck our Special Service Officer, has informed your reporter that plans for that day's festivities are now underway. Congratulations are extended to the four men who recently received their second stripe ...CPL's George Cake, William Pillow, Donald Ewing and Frank Brock. In the field of sports, that volleyball is still flyin' high. Hq. Plat. and the Officers ball club are flyin' right with it. Both clubs have racked up enough points to clinch the first and second place in the standings. Monday, 7 November, that "Powerful" Officers ball club will tangle with that "High-Spirited" Headquarters team. This series may determine the, Winnah ! of the '49 Intra Post Volley Ball League. It seems that our baseball team doesn't have it's fill of ball playing for the season. Saturday, October 29, the majority of the baseball team scheduled and played the Cuban All-Stars. CPL Rodriguez started on the slab for the Leatherneck nine, allowing four runs, he then turned over the mound duty to PFC Calvagna who chucked the remainder of the game. CPL Dales and PFC Garcia each made fourbaggers. The game was called after nine innings of play due to darkness. The score board showed a 9 to 9 tie. Volleyball Standings Team Points Hq. Plat. ----------------17 Officers ------------------14 2nd Section ---------------9 Staff --------------------4 1st Section ---------------1 Ed's note: These standings include the games played on or before Monday October 31, 1949. Chinese or Japanese radishes often weigh as much as 40 pounds. HOW RUSSIAN CITIZENS LIVE UNDER COMMUNISM By Armed Forces Press Service "A Captain in the Soviet Army receives almost 170 times the pay of a private." That's one of the many examples, according to Armed Forces Talk 296, of the tremendous wage and class inequalities existing today under the Communist system that once promised to do away with such differences. Despite these Communist Promises, the Talk points out, a small and very privileged elite class holds Russia in the iron grip of dictatorship today much as the Czars ruled before the revolution. Work Around Clock To this new elite class of Party members goes the rare refrigerator and automobile, while the majority of the Soviet population works around the clock for bare subsistence. Thus, in 1946 the average Russian worker had to labor four hours to earn enough for a tooth brush. His American counterpart got the same purchasing power for only 15 minutes of effort. 320 Hours Labor For Shirt For a cotton shirt that would cost an American about three hours of work, the Russian had to labor 320 hours. Forcing acceptance of this lower standard of living is the most dreaded organization in the Soviet Union, currently known as the MVD. "In spite of the civil rights outlined in the Soviet constitution of 1936," the Talk declares, "this MVD police force operates to deny such rights to any citizen of the U.S.S.R. who does not do as he is told." The MVD is far different from the police forces we know in this country, since it possesses not only the power to investigate and arrest but also to try and sentence in secret, with the accused assumed to be guilty on arrest. Many Slave Laborers The far-reaching extent of these political police activities may be judged from eyewitness accounts by some who have escaped. Estimates based on these reports and other sources put the number of slave laborers in the Soviet Union today somewhere between seven and 15-million. Such is life in the nation described by Communists everywhere as the "Socialist Fatherland" -the system to which they would convert the whole world. Despite the myths and promises of fervent Party members, the Talk concludes: "After 30 years of communism in Russia, one dominant fact emerges: the tyranny of the czars has been replaced by the greater tyranny of the Communist Party." Saturday, 5 November 1949 THE INDIAN Pare Three

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Page Four TESaturda 5 Novembhr 1949 TENTH DIVISION NEWS NOTES By B. W. Richards, YNC Has anyone missed getting a cigar from Leading Chief TYE? his chest is all swelled out this week because his dog had pups-6 of them. However, he says they've all been spoken for. Oris, R. B., of the Harbor Police, has successfully passed the competitive examination for BM3, and has been recommended to the Bureau for advancement. Congratulations, R. B., we hope you'll soon be wearing the crow. Beadling, T. H., ME2, myself, and our wives made the trip to Kingston last week-end, together with a large and merry crowd from the rest of the Base, in the USS Utina. The Beadlings stayed in the high priced hotel with the stiff collar set; we and several other couples stayed at the Melrose where we could let our hair down and feel natural. Of course, the price was such that our percentage of saving was lowered, but how we enjoyed spending the difference! And from the majority of those who went on the trip, the sentiment seems to be, "Let's go again". Jamaica is a beautiful country, and to steal a line from British explorers, "The natives are friendly". BOS'N Christiansen, Tenth Division Officer, finally succumbed to the ravages of a cold and an ingrown toenail (sick from one end to the other), and has been confined to his home for several days. We hope to see him back on the job real soon. MATS WILL NOT OPERATE TO GUANTANAMO BAY (Continued from Page Three) within continental United States. Fleet Logistic Support Wings is definitely a tongue-twister, especially when repeated rapidly, however, men who work to make the outfit a smooth operating and efficient organization, refer to it simply, and affectionately as "Flog Wings". They have much to be proud of, because Flog Wings, like the now extinct Naval Air Transport Service, has a record of millions of miles of transporting passengers, air cargo, and mail without a single fatality. Let's give credit, where credit is due, and to the right organization. NEW NAVY PREP SCHOOL Newport, R. I. (AFPS) -The U. S. Naval School Academy and College Preparatory School recently tr a.n sferred here from Bainbridge, Md., has opened for its first session with 400 students. The School prepares enlisted men for entrance to the Naval Academy at Annapolis. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP "The meeting Will please come to order"-and the first meeting of the Student Council, as opened by the President, Charles Pitts, got underway. By that time the class representatives had been elected: Skiddy and Ramona Sparks from the Junior-Senior Class, Jack and Barbara Gould from the Freshman-Sophomore Class, Norman Huddy of the 8th grade, and Yvonne Irwin of the 7th. By the way, in case you hadn't noticed, the minutes of the meeting were posted on the bulletin board. Therefore, the only other mention we will make about the meeting is to congratulate Ramona and Skiddy on their appointments to the tough jobs of Secretary and Treasurer respectively. The entire school thanks the council on its excellent start. Monday was quite an important day, since, aside from being the date of the Student Council's first meeting, it was Halloween, and the setting for a Halloween party. Butchy Masterson gave a spaghetti dinner for his friends on Marine Site 3, with the kids playing games, eating, and trick-or-treating. Tuesday afternoon there was quite a lot of excitement at school as all the girls got ready to try out for cheerleading (need we mention the resulting aches and pains the next morning). Susie, Jeaneen, Joan, and Pat seen to be the choices. As everyone knows, substitutes play an important part in any team, and we're keeping our fingers crossed that Phylliss, Ramona, and Betty will have a chance to show what they can do. Congratulations are extended to all of them! Monday, Wedsnesday, and Friday, all the boys on the basketball team piled into a car and headed for Recreation. Guess what they're doing? Practicing basketball of course; it looks as if they're going to go by that motto, "Where there's a will, there's a way." As everyone knows, they didn't do so poorly last week when they played that team from Guantanamo City. Tonight is the night of our first complete square dance, and everybody seems pretty excited about it. We'll be seeing all of you at seven o'clock sharp. Happy 12th birthday, Donni. We're all looking forward to your tea this afternoon. Chief Machinist's Mate and Mrs. Ballash of CB-70-A, Bargo Point, gave a Birthday Party for Mrs. Ballash's daughter, Barbara Ann Aten. Barbara turned twelve years of age Monday, 31 October. Monday was also Halloween, so the guests wore costumes. After s e v e r a 1 games, and after the presents were opened, the refreshments were served outside at the barbecue pit. The youngsters sure did enjoy roasting frankfurters and marshTRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS In case anyone is wondering who the new Captain is around the Training Group Building, it is none other than Captain Havard, our new Chief Staff Officer. Captain Havard's family were very anxious to get settled in Guantanamo Bay, and arrived on 28 October aboard the USS Thomas Jefferson (APA30), a few days prior to the Captain's arrival. Welcome aboard Captain. The Officer's bowling league started with a bang on 31 Oct. 1949, and what a bang it was. The Training Group Team of the National League Division bowled against the Naval Air Station, and they just couldn't knock down enough pins. Result-Training Group lost all three games. The Training Group is honored this week with the presence of Admiral Kirtland, ComTraComLant, and Admiral Morehouse. ComAirLant, who are here for a few days informal visit and also to observe the Operational Readdiness Inspection of the USS Phillippine Sea (CV-47). In the "White Hat" Division, we see where four of our men reported back from stateside leave. The lucky men to enjoy such a long vacation were Fike, Angela, Verhoeven, and Wright. From what we hear through the chain of gossip, Verhoeven had quite a leave ($$). McDonald is another lucky lad, for he has just departed on leave in the states. Knutton, FCC, has also reported back for duty, but not from leave, he wasn't that fortunate. Knutton spent some time on TAD up in Brooklyn, New York. Good old Brooklyn! Glad to have you all back men. Saltillo, Miss. (AFPS) -The customer is always right, so far as the helpful hen owned by Mrs. George Houston is concerned. When Mrs. Houston found she lacked one egg to make up the two dozen desired by a customer the hen waddled up, sat down in the grass in front of her and obliged with the 24th egg. mallows, and eating the potato chips, cake and soft drinks. Prizes were given to Gene Wilson and Eleanor Million for the best costumes. Present at the party, aside from the two winners of the costume contest, were Fred Wilson, Sally Crommelin, Charlie Hardin, Anita Sierra, Bobby Smith, Gloria McKuin, Kenneth Perry, Eunice Avila, James and Stella Hignight, Edgar Heimer, Patricia Avery, Phyllis Aten, Mrs. Souders, Chief and Mrs. Dotson, J. D. Helmlinger, and Chiefs T. L. McBride and H. L. Bacon. A gala time was enjoyed by all. 0 0 S 0 Saudy5Noebr14 Page Four THE INDIAN

PAGE 5

Saturday, 5 November 1949 THE INPIAN Pare Five iNursery News: Anje Lucille Klunder born 26 October to ATI and Mrs. R. E. Klunder; Ross Reginald Deitch born 27 October to AOC and Mrs. N H. E. Deitch. NOTE S The 'Hospital Family' was happy to welcome into the fold this week LTJG Dorothy M. Troyan, NC, USN. Miss Troyan is relieving LT F. R. Sullivan, NC, USN who departs on the USS President Adams today. New arrivals for duty are L. Buckridge, HMC, S. J. Cooper, HM3 and L. R. Sutton, HA. R. Minsky, HM3, E. R. Rachal, HN and S. E. McRae, HM1 have received transfer orders to the U. S. for duty. Minsky to USNH, Parris Island, Rachal to USNH, St. Albans and McRae to U. S. N. Dispensary, Washington, D. C. Also departing this week is R. Keene, HA for separation. We are also glad to report that CAPT Robbins returned to duty as MOIC after a week of first-hand observation as to how the SOQ functions. R. L. Buchina and J. Pintyr received advancement in rating from HA to HN as of 1 November. CIVILIAN CHATTER 'By C. V. Linn Those lucky people who made the trip to Jamaica last week included Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Hummel, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Quielisch, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Tausch, Mrs. Laura P. Tomasik, and Mr. and Mrs. Arturo Mena. From all reports, they had a wonderful time. We'll be saying good-bye soon to Joe Sack, Electronics Engineer, and his family. He's going to a similar position in the Bureau of Ships, Washington D. C. after more than three years at Gtmo. LT J. F. Pringle, soon to be released to inactive duty, will be the new Electronics Engineer. That Halloween dance at the Officer's Club was a dilly. Among the civilians who turned out (and a lot of them in costumes that would kill you) were Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Moses, Mr. and Mrs. Don .Stuck, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Becker, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Ernest, Mr and Mrs. H. Chapman, Mr. and Mrs. H. P. McNeal, Jim Badger and Miss Mary Jo Warren, and possibly others so well disguised that your eagle-eyed reporter failed to recognize them. Understand that Lou Serig is limbering up his bowling arm to good effect in the current league matches. Same goes for C. L. Ziz, who (so far as we know) still holds the Base record with the perfect score he racked up some months ago. VU-10 NOTES By F. R. Pledger, ALC An amusing incident at the han gar this week provided all hands, including the Squadron "Skipper", Commander Egbert, with a good old fashioned belly-laugh when an unusally large group of men were observed working feverishly stacked up on the hangar deck. As the stack, consisting of 6 metaIsmiths, 5 mechanics, 3 electricians, and 4 kibitzers, came out of the huddle, a TD2C drone came into view. It's presence had been completely obliterated by the above group. When touched upon on the subject, "Windy" Windham, ADC, replied, "Brother, when we hold a check, we really believe in holding a check." "Buck", famous pet pooch of Decker, AD1, fell and brokehis foot, while in the process of being checked out on a scooter. The cast Decker made for his pal's foot is out of this world, and from this time on, it's "Doc" Decker to you. Ross Reginald Dietch, weight 5 pounds 6 ounces, son of "Shanghai" Dietch, AOC, arrived aboard the station via SATS (Stork Air Transport Service) on the 27th of October, lugging a group of black cigars in one arm and a mixture of woods, irons, and putters in the other. Congratulations, Shanghai, and thanks for the stogies. The Halloween party at the-CPO club brought out considerable hidden talent, particularly that displayed by "Mi Kan Tu" Fant, YNC, who arrived at the club in native Chinese dress. The only difference between Mi Kan Tu and any other Chinaman is that Mi Kan Tu wants it plainly understood that he is from southern China, you-all. The club room was decorated simply but attractively with palm fronds which proved quite effective. It certainly would be right in there pitching, if the Board of Governors would consult some gal and get a woman's touch with some drapes, and such, to relieve the barren look until the "Couples Only" room is completed. Mrs. Margaret Patterson and littie Jimmie Patterson, bosses of J. F. "Pat" Patterson, ADC, arrived from stateside to join the old man here in the paradise of the Caribbean. A hearty welcome is also extended to the following new shipmates: G. E. Eastwood, AD2, from NAS, Pensacola. Fla.; A. M. Sims, AT3 from NAS, Norfolk, Va.; E. Delos, AA from Corpus Christi, Texas; and M. T. Snoddy, AA, R. G. Werbo, AA, and R. J. Olds, AA. all arriving from NTC, Great Lakes, Ill. The only departure this week was H. J. McKnight, PR1 who is in for some cold weather at NAS, Seattle, Wash. GTMO. GIRL SCOUT TROOP BEING FORMULATED All persons interested in tentative organization a of girls scout troop are urged to call Mrs. Adeline Irwin at telephone number 343. A meeting is planned looking towards requesting official permission to organize a Girl Scout Troop on this station. Those having previous Girl Scouting experience in organization and leadership are particularly invited. UNDERSEA WARFARE (Continued from Page Two) might easily carry and launch rockets of greater range and destructive power. Therefore, a largE and important portion of the United States has lost the immunity from seaborne attacks which was enjoyed in the past two wars. Sea Water Almost Insurmountable This threatening situation has added impetus to the search for better anti -submarine weapons. Better weapons will appear. A solution of the problem of undersea detection, however, is bound to lag because of the nature of the greatest of all barriers-sea water. The resistance offered by sea water to those electronic detection devices so effective in other media guarantees the submarine's ability to capitalize upon stealth and evasion. In short, if an enemy is allowed to operate submarines, we lose absolute control of the seas, and achieving decisive control will be at great cost. A study of the potentialities of undersea warfare leads to the firm conviction that an adequate Navy is only one which is capable, in shortest time, of preventing an enemy from operating submarines from any base, anywhere in the world. Every type of weapon and every form of naval warfare might be required, from simple mining operations to large-scale amphibiious attacks. Uidersea warfare, by itself, makes the older definitions of an adequate Navy as obsolete as the boarding pike. Such expressions as "Comparative Tonnages", "Naval Ratios" and "Relative Capital Ship Strength", heard frequently during the nineteen twenties and thirties and never valid standards, would be totally misleading now. Matching a potential aggressor nation ship-for-ship and gun-for-gun does not provide security. Such a course might appeal to the American mind, conditioned from childhood to abide by the rules of sportsmanlike conduct, but it would be all the more dangerous. It is worth remembering that wars are fought without umpires and rule books. The "Rules" of warfare as laid down by Sir John Fisher are the three "R's"Ruthless, Relentless, Remorseless. Saturday, 5 November 1949 THE INDIAN Paze Five

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Saturday, 5 No member 1949 THE INDIAN Otmo. nay-s Nov 49-2105 BROUGHTON AND GOULD WIN WATER CARNIVAL The winners and runners-up of the different events of the NOB School Water Ballet held last week are: 7th and 8th Grade girls, winner: Pat Besse, runner-up, Dixie Adair; 7th and 8th Grade boys, winner: Michael Lanigan, runnerup, Norman Huddy; 9th Grade girls: winner, Barbara Gould, runner-up, Janet Leckenby; 9th and 10th Grade Boys, winner: Bennett Richards, runner-up, Thomas Beadling; 11th and 12th Grade girls, winner, Jan Hiers, runner-up, Jeaneen Hummel; 11th and 12th Grade Special Contest, winner: Pete Broughton. Underwater Swim for distance for girls; winner, Barbara Gould, runner-up, Ramona Sparks; Butterfly Stroke, winner, Bennett Richards; Breast Stroke for girls, winner Betty Parks; Boy's underwater swimming for distance: winner, Bennett Richards, runner-up, Henry Crommelin; Boy's diving: winner Pete Broughton, 120 pts, runner-up, Skiddy Masterson, 109 pts.; Girls' Diving winner, Pat Bessie, 104 pts., runner-up, Janet Leckenbey, 95 pts., Boys' Pie Plate Race, winner: Dennis Lanigan; Grand Prize winner for girls, Barbara Gould; Grand Prize for boys, winner Pete Broughton. To all the girls in the Ballet, Jill, Phyllis, Ramona, Dixie, Jeaneen, Barbara, Pat, Janet, and Joan, we wish to extend our congratulations on your beautiful work. Yes, even the clowning acts; the girls who participated in the performance were Betty Parks, Peggy Claar, and Kay Hollis, Betty and Kay depicted old fashioned swimmers. The school wishes to extend thanks to the judges of the swimming Meet: Fireman Jim Bettwig, Chief Boatswain's Mate Webb, and Seaman G. C. Dickson as well as to the recreation staff, Mr. Permenter and all who helped make the show a success. SPORT SHORTS Detroit (AFPS)-The National Hockey League season now underway with the Detroit Red Wings as title defenders will be the longest in history. Seventy games are scheduled for each of the league's six teams-35 at home and 35 on the road. That's a tengame boost over last season's schedule. New York (AFPS)-Three horse shows in the United States and Canada are the goals of the Irish Army's 5-man jumping team arriving here recently with mounts. Their schedule lists shows in Harrisburg, Pa., and Toronto as well as the competition at Madison Square Garden where opponents include Army teams from Canada, Chile and Mexico. OFFICERS' BOWLING LEAGUE Bowling commenced on a big scale at the Officers' Club alleys this week. With the grand total of 113 officers and civilians registered for competition, there have been two leagues organized, the American and the National, which bowl on alternate nights. In the National league Monday night the NAS keglers swept three games from FTG, and Wednesday the NavSta team topped NSD 2 games with a third ending in a tie. In the American league the NOB combination had a fight all the way, with even marks into the last frame each time as they took a clean sweep over the under-manned Hosp-Dent team. To date Lou Serig, NAS stands alone for high single game with a 203. NOB's Ed Ondrasik, with 520, has high average of 173 and high for three games. The Naval Air Station team holds the team high single game mark with 795. Standings of all teams will be published after each team has completed at least one match. GTMO. BOY SCOUT TROOP HOLDS FIRST MEETING (Continued from Page One) to a great extent responsible for the success of the troop, was introduced next. The senior scoutmaster, whom the boys will work with every week and whom they'll probably soon idolize, is Mr. C. W. Abbott. He will be assisted by Edwin A. Bruce, Robert D. Goode, Wayne Freed, Murray Grant, and Harold McBride-all of whom have volunteered to be assistant scoutmasters. For the interest of the parents and boys who were not at the meeting, future Boy Scout meetings will be held every Friday evening at 1900 in the Quonset hut by the sailboat landing. Any boys of Boy Scout age (11 or over) who didn't register at the meeting may do so at any of the regular meetings of the troop, but they must bring one of their parents with them. A film, "Scouting Trails to Citizenship", was planned as part of the program; however, since it was not sent from Jacksonville in time, it was not shown. Refreshments, donated by the Ladies Auxiliary of the F. R. A., were served. Words to the Wise A tip that a restaurant has good roast beef may prove to be a bum steer. Women who swear they have never been kissed should certainly be forgiven for swearing. Advice to the thin: Don't eat fast! Advice to the fat: Don't eat. Fast. NAVY'S DOLLAR DOESN'T GO FAR EITHER (Continued from Page One) side construction compared with those ten years earlier, in 1939, are: Year 1939 -100 Year 1949 -207.8 In other words an average construction job in the states, which you could have completed for $1,000 in 1939 now would cost $2,078. Remember that these are at stateside prices. It has been determined, however, that identical work costs an average 40% more in this area than stateside. Therefore, for this area the following costs would apply: Year 1939: Stateside Cost $1000, Gtmo. Cost $1,400; Year 1949: Stateside Cost $2,078, Gtmo. Cost $2,909. The foregoing figures are not guess work, they are cold facts based on official studies, and the result dovetails closely with commercial studies. How does all this affect you? In many ways. It explains why it was necessary under limited funds to build Bargo Point with war surplus rather than construct more Newtown type houses; if you are on a housing list it explains why the Navy has been unable to secure enough money for more houses to keep pace with the growth of the Base; if you are living in temporary barracks it explains why replacement barracks have not been built; if you. have gotten stuck in the mud on unpaved roads it explains why only essential roads have been paved; if you are about to retire and settle down in Cuba it tips you off that your chicken farm will probably cost three times as much as it did in the good old days-only ten years ago! NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Saturday 5 November THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY Danny Kaye Virginia Mayo Sunday 6 November HELLFIRE William Elliot Marie Windsor Monday 7 November RED STALLION IN THE ROCKIES Arthur Franz Ray Collins Tuesday 8 November TOO LATE FOR TEARS Liz Scott Dan Duryea Wednesday 9 November STAMPEDE Rod Cameron Gale Storm Thursday 10 November MY GIRL TISA Lillie Palmer Sam Wanamaker Friday 11 November THE STREET WITH NO NAME Mark Stevens Barbara Lawrence S 0 S 0 0 vemlber 1949 Saturday, 5 No THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-3 Nov 49-2500