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Vol. IV No. 36 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 29 October 1949


Skip's Store Ashore

Progress Reviewed

Sixteen .months ago, in June 1948, the Ship's Store Ashore (Come missary) displayed only 514 items of stock in a building whosp interior
appearance wa's reminiscent of a dark dingy warehouse. Many items carried were literally "dead stock." With huge excesses of one item
and too little, or none of another, stock control existed in name only.
As an example, Lieutenant John
Cozy who took over the store, ma- month from Norfolk and 30 tons nagement, at that time fell heir per month from Miami. The value to enough FARINA and apple of grocery items on hand Septemsauce to feed all the babies in Cuba ber 30, 1949 was $175,304.63 as and Florida. compared with an invertory of
In the rejuvenation process the $113,535.38 on June 30, 1948.
store has suffered, by necessity In July 1949 base patrons conthe surveying of considerable sumed 17,000 pounds of potatoes, worthless stock. In July 1948 fresh 19,200 quarts of milks, 36,602 milk, now available to all at state- pounds of bread, $22,000.00 worth side prices, was available for hos- ' of meats, $5.977.98 worth of vegepital use and for babies only. Fresh tables, and $4,000.00 worth of
vegetables and frozen foods were frozen foods.
obtainable only occasionally, and Lack of courtesy on the part of then in small quantities. Frozen employees in this "Gtmo. Super items stocked have grown from 33 Market" is not tolerated. A constant to 85. check is made on prices to keep
Your reporter now finds 1710 them as low as possible. Occasionalitems of stock of excellent quality ly one finds certain "leader" items in a clean, well lighted, and well advertised by Miami retail stores ventilated s t o r e. Improvements at a price lower than here. On the
made include a ladies rest room, other hand one can find items sold a cellutex ceiling, ten large electric for considerably less here than in fans, fluorescent lighting of sales Miami. The Navy purchasing sysfloor and offices, complete new tem provides for large contracts at "Gondola" type shelving, and the current market and if the mar"Super Market" style self service ket price falls, as many have in frozen food lockers. In addition a recent months, it is not always branch store for Newtown- Bargo possible for the Navy to take impatrons has been opened and many medicate benefit of the lower prices.
new contracts have been let to Admiral Commends Staff
provide the best brands and lowest In an interview this week, Rear prices. Further improvements, un- Admiral Phillips, the Base Comder consideration or already start- mander, told this reporter that it
ed are: new meat lockers for pre- was his opinion that in his long package and self service shopping, service in the U. S. Navy he has additional frozen food service, new never seen a better commissary vegetable show cases, and'a Butler than the Guantanamo Ship's Store building being added to the rear Ashore as run by Lieutenant John of the store to provide bulk storage Cozy and LTJG Rasimus and their for more items, staff under the direction of ComVital Statistics mander L.P. Kimball. He cited
With the housing of more specifically the careful and intelfamilies, average monthly sales ligent planning backed by a pro-, have grown from $56,418.67 to found knowledge of all manner of $74,020.20, of which 71% are cre- food stuffs, plus hard work, condit sales. The present 748 pa- siderable loss of sleep, and ability trons (families) nake an average to listen patiently to many inconof 12,600 visits inonthly, or better sequential complaints as well as
than 600 customers served per day the few legitimate ones.
that the store is open. Average In the opinion of this' reporter stock shipped in is 76 tons per you ladies "never had it so good".


RADM PHILLIPS
HONORARY MEMBER
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips was installed as an honorary member of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association at the regular business meeting of the branch this last Tuesday evening. This action was authorized by the delegates representing some 30,000 members of the association assembled in Annapolis, Maryland early in September who unanimously elected Admiral Phillips to honorary membership. In a short speech to the inembers the Admiral praised -the work of the local branch, and particularly their Ladies Auxiliary.
The members who were not able to be present at the installation take this opportunity to say "welcome aboard, Shipmate".

BOY SCOUT TROOP
ORGANIZATION
After many weeks of planning, the time has come to organize sthe Guantanamo Bay Troop, Boy Scouts of America. The Troop will be organized under the sponsorship of Branch 100, Fleet - Reserve Association.
On 1 November 1949 there will be a meeting of all boys who have reached their eleventh birthday, their parents and others who are interested in the Boy Scout movement, at the Little Theatre, Marine Site 3. The organization of the Troop will be'launched at this meeting.
It is expected that the meeting will consist of the showing of the film entitled "Scouting Trails To Citizenship", a presentation of the plans for the Troop on this Base, and an introduction of all those who will carry on the Souting work here and finally, a registration of boys who desire to join the Boy Scout Troop. Parents are urged to discuss this matter with their boys and to make plans to attend this meeting for no boy will be registered unless accompanied by at least one parent. The meeting will begin at 1900 and following the, registration of the boys refreshments will be served to all who are present. Full explanation as
(Continued on Page Six)


I N A








Pan Two THE INbiMAN Saturdav. 29 October 1949


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg..
Room 205-Phone 254
Saturday, 29 October 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
A. E. Smith. SN -----------------Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFFS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

ST&TE BONUS BRIEFS
AFPS . . . Delaware joins the growing ranks of States granting World II veterans bonuses. An estimated, 33,000 will qualify. Meanwhile, Connecticut has extended the application deadline for bonuses to July 1, 1951. Washington State bonuses are still pending. New Jersey and Pennsylvania bonus proposals will be decided at the polls during November. Voters rejected bonus proposals in Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, Oregon and Wisconsin.

BONERS

Red-faced designers of General Motors who forgot to make provision for license plates on the new Buick Special may share their chagrin with our neighbors across the sea. A Royal delegation meeting a U. S. Navy cruiser at a British port recently broke out their only American flag. Over forty years old, Old Glory had two stars too few. Possibly hazy about flags, another boner was disclosed on the initial 27 minute flight -of Britain's new super transport, the giant Bristol Barbazon. Costing nearly sixty million dollars and the penultimate in transport aircraft design, the huge British plane has the Union Jack on the tail printed upside down!

(SEA)-The first flag ever unfurled aboard an American warship was hoisted by Lieutenant John Paul Jones on board the flagship Alfred at Philadelphia 3 Dec. 1775. It was the "grand union" flag, having 13 American stripes, with the English union jack in the field.


VU-10 NOTES

By F. R. Pledger ALC

Congratulation are in order for I.CDR Charles E. Van Bibber and LT E.J. Tougas upon their recent promotions.
The following men have recently reported aboard for duty: John V. Castro, AA, Kenneth B. Seely, AN, both from NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, and Floyd R. Pledger, ALC from Air Transport Squadron ONE, Patuxent River, Maryland. Welcome aboard shipmates.
Joseph M. Strichek, AN was recently transferred to VF-131 based at NAS Jackso.1ville, and Forest E. Sawyer, ADC has departed for VA-135 also based at JAX.
Bachelor CPO's miss the regular attendance of Chief Sawyer at the "Hatuey Box", and unanimously vote him good luck at his new assignment.
Floyd 0. Holder, AOC is anxiously awaiting the arrival of the USS Tom Jeff Friday morning. Chief Holder's main -interest in the Jefferson is the fact that his wife and two little Holders are aboard. Gtmo Ladies Auxiliary Branch #100, FRA please note!
While on the subject of the Fleet Reserve Association, it is interesting to note that the following new members from VU-10 were initiated into the FRA Tuesday night: R. G. Hendricks AD1, and C. P. Douglas PN1. Reinstatements in-, eluded: J. J. Medica, BMC, W. F. Fant YNC, F. M. Hale ALC, and W. W. Wright AEC; all of UtRon 10.
The combined NAS-VU-10 childrens Christmas Party is well under way under the leadership of committee chairman, J. L. Jbhnson, ADC, and guidance of LTJG Hayden, NAS Recreation officer. Basic plans, selection of gifts, and statement of cost of gifts have been accomplished and submitted for approval. Chief Johnson made an appeal for aid at the Regular meeting of the FRA, Branch 100 Tuesday night. Help is needed for wrapping the christmas gifts. It is urged that interested persons, either ladies or gentlemen, wishing to help with this phase of the Christmas Party contact Chief Johnson at Telephone Number 858 or Chief Pledger at Telephone Number 892, any time during working hours and leave your name. At this time, there are over two hundred children from 1 month to 13 years of age to arrange for.
(SEA)-On 9 Aug. 1787, the ship Columbia and the sloop Washington sailed from Boston, Mass., and in 1790 returned, being the first American vessels to circumnavigate the ,globe.

The exclamation mark is -being discarded because people aren't surprised at anything these days ...


Sunday, October 30, 1949 CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold. USN
(Catholic)

PROTESTANT VESPERS CONTINUES TO GROW
With an even larger attendance and more enthusiastic group meeting at the Station Chapel at 1900 last Sunday, interest in the Vesper Service continues to grow. Plans are being made to institute a time of fun and laughter following the Vesper Service on the lawn at theChapel. All teen-agers, sailors and marines, young married couples, etc., are invited. In accord with a, request of the group the subject for the coming Sunday evening will be "Will Christ Visibly Return to Earth?"
Dress uniform is not required of Officers and Chiefs.

12,000 RELEASED
OFFICERS TO GET EMPLOYMENT AID

Washington (AFPS) - Prompt aid in returning to civilian employment the 12,000 Reserve officers shortly to be released from the Armed Forces was recently pledged by the Department of Labor.
Robert K. Salyers, director of the department's Bureau of Veterans' Re-employment Rights, announced that local offices throughout the nation would be prepared to advise the officers returning to civilian life. 1 .
Mr. Sayler's statement was in reply to a request from Brig. Gen. E.A. Evans, executive director of the Reserve Officers W Association.
"Many of these officers are not fully aware of the fact that they do have re-employment rights to the position they left to enter military service", said General Evans,
"They have served their coun. try long and faithfully, and the association wishes to insure them,' of every assistance in obtaining jobs to which they are entitled."
(SEA)-Bird's nest is the term 9 applied to a defect of distended strands in wire rope caused by a kink.


Pa wo


THE INI}/A







Satui'dav. 29 October 1949 TEIDA'Pr he


PENNIES GALORE

LT Strebel, Ships Service Officer,
was astounded by the amount of pennies that were turned in, in answer to his recent request published in the PAPOOSE.
Base' personnel and dependents
came to the rescue by exchanging their pennies to a total of 7,500,
or seventy five dollars.
"Thank you", is extended to all
by Mr. Strebel.
NAVY WINS TREASURY
AWARD IN SAVINGS
BOND CAMPAIGN

The Department of the Navy
recently received the U. S. Treasury's Distinguished Service Award in recognition of the Navy's number one position in the Federal payroll savings program and its participation record in the recent
savings bond Opportunity Diive.
Secretary of -the Navy Francis
P. Matthews was presented the award by Vernon L. Clark, assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury and Director of the, Savings Bond Division of the Treasury Department, at a ceremony in the Pentagon, attended by the Chiefs of Navy Department offices and
bureaus.
.Naval, military and civilian personnel are investing more than $10,000,000 a month in U. S. Savings Bonds through the allotment and payroll savings program. The Navy bond purchases during' the last year was 35 per cent of the total invested by all Federal employees through payroll savings.
In addition, the Navy's civilian
payroll participation' reached 64.1 .per cent in August, 1949, which is
2.4 per cent higher than the second highest Government agency's record, that of the Treasury Department. It represents the Navy's highest participation record since
October, 1945.
The Treasury's award, the first
to be presented to a Government agency in connection with the Opportunity Drive, cited the Department of the Navy "for leadership in building security for the . people and the nation through
United States Savings Bonds".
Mr. Clark, a Des Moines, Iowa,
businessman, has served at full time without pay for the last four years as national director of the Savings Bond Division of the
Treasury Department.
(SEA)-Kangaroos have
shrunken. The largest living specimens in Australia now range from seven to eight feet in height. Their
ancestors were 12 to 20 feet.

(SEA)-There are 132 small
businesses located in the Palau islands of the Navy-administered
Pacific Trust Territory.


THE LOWDOWN
ON POKER:
It's All a Game of Skill
By Armed Forces Press Service
"You can too win," says Air Force M/Sgt. George S. Coffin, taking strong exception to 4 recent article on poker that said "you cant" written 1by Ernest E. Blanche and distributed by Armed Forces Press Service.
And Sergeant Coffin, right or wrong, speaks with enough authority to rate a hearing. He's successful author himself, his latest volume being "Fortune Poker."
What particularly arouses Sergeant Coffin's ire is the statement by Mr. Blanche who is chief statistician for the Logistics Division of the Army General Staff. "Poker is all chance governed by amazing odds. It is difficult to understand how anyone can conclude that poker is a game of skill rather than chance."
In rebuttal, Sergeant Coffin now stationed at Hanscom Airport, Bedford Mass., writes:
"With all due respect to Mr. Blanche, this statement is bunkutter bunk. Years of consistent winning by many strong poker players, including myself, will substantiate this.
"What the statisticians ignore," says the Sergeant-author, "are the vital techniques of the position game and the sandbagging game. These" he insists, "are not covered by the 'amazing odds' outlined by Mr. Blanche in the AFPS article."
And Sergeant Coffin isn't alone in this position. No less an authority than card expert Ely Culbertson thinks so much of the airman's latest book that he contributes a laudatory foreword which says:
"Despite myths to the contrary and though many people are surprised to learn it, poker is a game of skill second to none."
Also enthusiastic about Sergeant Coffin's view is New York Times book reviewer George S. Hellman who calls it an "excellent" volume. The reviewer, however, insists that Sergeant Coffin is "also aware of the element of luck."
"Yes," says Sergeant Coffin, he does concede a "minor element of luck in honest poker."
But he still insists: "If you are a consistent loser and nobody's cheating, your technique is bad, not your luck. If you cannot improve your technique, you'd better give up poker.
"How about you, Mr. Blanche?"

(SEA)-The first balloon voyage in the U. S. was made 9 Jan. 1793 by a Frenchman by the name of Blanchard. The flight was made in the presence of George Washington, in Philadelphia, the balloon landing in Woodbury, N. J.


RUSSIA TO RETURN
30 U. S. WARSHIPS

Washington (AFPS)-The Soviet government has agreed to return 30 vessels supplied by the U. S. under the World War II lendlease plan.
Among the vessels are three ice breakers, which cost $3 million each, and 27 frigates. The Russian Commission informed the U. S. that one of the frigates had been lost.
Under the agreement, the vessels will be delivered to the U.. S. by December 1. The ice breakers will be delivered to Bremerhaven, Germany, and the frigates at Yokosuka, Japan.
Russia has failed to return numerous other vessels supplied her by the U. S. during the war. She is obligated to return all equipment not "destroyed, lost, or consumed." The U. S. loaned the Sov iets equipment costing $11 billion during the war.

LITES & MIKES

By Armed Forces Press Service
Operation Hollywood . . . It's "H-Hour" all over again on the movie lots. A dozen new films mark the production trend away from noncombat themes that im, mediately followed the war. Now Hollywood offers its own version of the active, combat phase in a parcel of soon-to-be-released pica with titles like: "Sands of Iwo Jima," "Battleground," "Twelve o'Clock High," "Three Came Home" and "Task Force."
Television .. . which also Xrayed the war, by adapting General Eisenhower's "Crusade in Europe," had to go through 165,000,000 feet or 31.060 miles of World War II films to do it. To avoid similar headaches Hollywooders chose fresh film, with actors in the uniforms. But that brought problems too-like a com-plete naval wardrobe for Gary Cooper's role in "Task Force.' It ranges from two gold stripes of lieutenant to glittering "scrambled- eggs" of rear admiral.
Quote-. . . deliciously dumb Marie Wilson on the problems of what to do if she found a million bucks: "If it belonged to a poor person I'd return it." Quote . . . Arthur Godfrey on TV: "If television makes everybody look like they need a shave why doesn't it make a bald guy look like he needs a haircut?" End quote.

(SEA)-The 24-hour clock system, long in effect in the Navy, was adopted by the Almy in July 1942. It is patterned on the English system of beginning the day at midnight and numbering the hours around the clock.


THE INDIAN


Pa~re Three








PwForTHE INDIAN Saturday. 29 Octobe 1949


A SPECIAL
LITTLE THEATRE NOTE
By Evelyn Perdue
Before all the wondrous laighter and applause dies away to become just another pleasant memory, we of the Little Theatre would like to add our own special note of thanks to those involved in the so successful production of what we proudly call plain old 'SUDS". This- energetic team of twenty or thirty people have given us something to live up to.
We all know this time we actually had a hit, for there was no necessity to manufacture excuses for this person's or that's inadequacy, praise came unasked for from comparative strangers and above all, you, the audience, came back again and filled the house for an additional night.
What did it? Well, first of all, a wonderfully written play, almost custom-tailored for this base. And secondly, that team we mentioned before under the leadership of most amazing and ambitious young man, Ken Allen, who is, if not the backbone of the group, a large section of the vertebra.
Casting began several months ago-and no one relished the job of finding twenty-one distinct characters from the small number gathered at Marine Site Three. But slowly they did come forward, and not a prima donna among them.
You won't easily forget the three old gals, will you? And even seeing them today as Dot Seigler, Pearl Cleary, and Evelyn Perdue, you think of Miss Tinkham, Mrs. Feeley, and Mrs. Rasmussen-and beer. Mrs. Cleary, ,who had never "trod the boards" before, improved steadily during the weeks of rehearsal. Yet she practically walked off with all acting laurels during each performance.
Martin Lampman as the alwaysthere Chinatown more than adequately upheld the dignity of Mrs. Feeley when it, dangerously started slipping, and when her friends moved in, did the same for them. That handsome nephew of hers represented no problem to D.J. Burton, who, every day of the week actually is a handsome Navy Chief. There was no problem to courting, sviftly but well, Kate Logan, or Shirley Childs, who, every day of the week, is an extremely attractive young lady. Did many of you merry gobs recognize the, the-er, "line"? Or perchance, file for future reference ?
The red-headed villain, the hardhearted tax collector who almost broke up the romance, but got his "in the end" (?), was Jerry Ruyf, a specialist in characters, so to speak. His was the slothful Mr. Sparrow of "Years Ago". /Danny Green, or Mr. Reynolds, was also a villain, but the miz-uble critter just fell off the wagon, poor soul.


And then there was Mr. Wilson, quite the killer type. Killed all the jokes he told, and thought he killed all the women. What a reputation Bill Lampman has to live down!
Conchita, of course, tried to break up the affair too. Who wouldn't for a pair of nylons in those days? No one suspected sweet little Joan McNeal had such predatory instincts for Jill Hyers' change in fastidiousness. Wasn't Mrs: Rasmussen's daughter Brunnhilde sloppy, though, and didn't she make you feel itchy too?
We know two fellows who had the time of their lives-G.G. Seigler and Danny Alves-Pinky and Ormond, the detectives with an eye for oppressed old women young in spirit.
Every role was played to perfection, no matter how big or small. Remember Mac and June (Don Lackey and Barbara Johnson) bringing Springtime magic in pantomime? Our tired worker who needed a kitchen sink and a shave was Earl Stanton. Stage Manager Ruth Swann doubled as Mrs. Miller, the giggling satellite of obnoxious Mr. Wilson. Thank heavens we had C. D. Malone to be on hand to catch Miss Tinkham after he scared the life out of our girlfriends with his summons. Cute little Betty Borreson aged many years and pounds to portray Mrs. Katz. OY, OY, OY! Who but good old Harry Davis could give Moe's one line, 'Eight!" all the oomph he did, after having appeared in the very opening act as a hopeful buyer?
There! We covered the cast! But not once did we give full credit to them. Only one who has done it can realize the sacrifices demanded by nights of rehearsal, one right after the other. Suffice it to say, everybody was very cooperative and "gave their all"-this last not in a bantering tone.
How about backstage.? Isn't it common knowledge that the workers back there usually out-number the actors ? But this was one exception. The cast took almost every member of the group before the footlights. So they, too hammered, painted, dragged in junk for the junk-yard, searched for the impossible costumes (Mis Tinkham's of course). Notable exceptions of course, as follows.
Electricians extraordinaire, this title to be appropriately applied to Chief Jacobs and E.W. Bielefeld. Also Mr. M. G. Phillips, who taught us a bit about lighting. The sweat of their brows, namely the cast, and of Ken Allen, L. H. Chitty; and Ruth Swann, produced that set for Norvall Shoop and helpers to paint on. Oh, how they aged and weeded that plywood house! You noticed, of course, the backdrop. A masterpiece in perspective that would give any Broadway stage a competitor. That could be said of the stage as a whole. Those so real artificial flowers, and genuine Gtmo


PERSONNEL IN
SHANGHAI GET MAIL
BY NAVY RADIO

(SEA)-During World War II it was V-Mail. Now it's mail by Navy Radio. At least that's the case for naval personnel and members of the American Foreign Service at Shanghai, China. The Americans in Shanghai have begun to receive their correspondence through use of a Navy radio link. It's very welcome since they had been without close home ties via the mails for four months.
Limited to 200 'words, letters are transmitted by Navy radio between Shanghai and Guam. From Guam the correspondence is transmitted to the U. S. by regular mail. To make certain that continental U. S. correspondents know their letters aren't exactly private, each letter contains a note stating that naval radio was intermediary.
Interruption of transportation to and from the Shanghai area is reponsible for this latest Navy innovation.

shrubbery.
Doylene Hansen took charge of the beer-pouring and other problems that confront property managers. Those outlandish clothes of Miss Tinkham's were quite the gay numbers, no? Mrs. Wava Hummel, and Mrs. Evelyn Ernest had a huge task in outfitting the entire cast, but they completed it wonderfully well. Betty Borreson was in charge of publicity for this production. And when amateur artists daubbed their faces with excess greasepaint, who was there to "erase" their mistakes and do an extremely efficient job but Donna Hatfield? Let's not forget our house manager, H. 0. White, and the receptionists and stage crew. Fogle, Deadrick, Haag, and "Skiddy" Masterson. Arbuckle, Feeback, and Bellar were responsible for quenching your thirst. On hand, constantly watching for slips and miscues were Louise McNeal and Mary Spicer. Jean Strohl, Babs MacDonald, Mildred Irwin, and Clarice Kendall also at backstage work on props.
Whew! Can you see now why it is such a chore, though pleasant, to sufficiently thank everyone? So many have contributed, and enjoyed it. It's those many crazy things that go on behind the curtain that brought this gang so close together and made them a team, working for each other instead of selfishly. What a pity it is over, but all good things must come to an end. Not original but true.
One more thank you, this time to you, for your support. Not only will we ask it of you again, but we, in turn, vill try to be worthy (of it. So "Suds", "Skol", and "Cheerio"-here's to future successes.


S


THE INDIAN







Qn41,,Q)THE IND~iAFiv


TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS

Since the last time this column
appeared in the Indian the Training Group has undergone various
changes.
In the personnel picture we find
a new Personnel Officer in the person of LTJG Jack Edwards.
LTJG Edwards hails from the southern part of Florida so this warm climate doesn't bother him at all. Over in the Engineering Department we find the new face belongs to LT L. Enos who hasn't made up his mind whether he likes
Gtmo or not.
Last Saturday morning we found
ENS W. P. Haney in the Captain's Office exchanging his old gold bars for nice, shiny new silver ones.
Congratulations to the new "JG"
are extended.
What Happened? The Captain
held Mast, Meritorious Mast that is, last Saturday morning to commend Ed Hupenece, S02 and "Mumbles" Tregembo, S03. This was due to their excellent showing in a class of Integrated Sonar at Fleet Sonar School, Key West, Florida. The boys stood 1 and 4 respectively in a class of 24. Nice
going fellows.
The Training Group Officers
have formed two, nine-men bowling . teams to compete in the Officers'
Winter Bowling League. Good luck to both'teams and remember someone has to lose.
The Training Group said farewell last Saturday morning to Albert Ciancio, EM2, who, for the past year had been serving as MAA for the Training Group Barracks.
We hope he finds his new duty station, which by the way is USS
* Reina Mercedes at Annapolis, Md.,
as pleasant as he says this one was. Also seen at FLSW as his O shipmates sang "Auld Lang Syne"
was Leon Gunderson, CSC who was heading stateside for a
new job.
Remember the "animated pipe!'
in the first act of "Suds in Your Eyes" -well the initials of the yeoman on the end of it was our boy Stanton-who knows-he'll probably start playing villain next.
We also find in the last minute
dash before the presses begin to roll that we have four more new faces in the Group. CDR J. C.
Fisher who reported for COC Officer and LT A. W. Hayward reports for duty as Hanger Deck Officer in the Air Department. In the "white-hat" division we find Stanley Sandroski, YN2 and J.P.
Griffin, RD3 for duty in the Train-'
ing' Office and COG respectively.

(SEA)-Robert Fulton, on 17
Aug. 1807, made his first steamboat trip (in the Clermont) from New York to Albany and back; was 22 hours going, and 30 hours returning to New York.


Nursery News:
Claudia Gail
Akins born 23
October to BT2
and Mrs. E. J.
Akins; Beth Arleen Bellair born 22 October to OMC and Mrs.
.F. Bellair;
No-r$ PeggyEllen Rollins born 19 October to BM2 and Mrs. J. T. Rollins.
CAPT J. H. Robbins, MOIC has been on the sick list since last Sunday with an infected ear. Whether or not he rates any stars as the 'ideal patient' this reporter has been unable to learn. However, the doctors who have been attending him should rate something special for the Captain is well on the road to recovery. Incidentally, we think that perhaps CDR F rte has set a record of some kind in the way he has gone up the line of command; Tuesday of last week he took over as Executive Officer whei CAPT Wilson departed on leave, and then to MOIC on Sunday.
LT Vonfraenkel has returned from the medical conference in Chicago and reports having had a veryl fine trip. CDR J. A. Fields. MC, our former EENT man, also attended the conference and sends greetings to his friends in Gtmo.
LT Dutcher, Administrative Assistant, has received change of duty orders upon reporting of a relief. Mr. Dutcher will go to NAS, Alameda, California. We shall all be sorry to see Mr. Dutcher go and hope that he will enjoy his new duty.
Miss Trask, Red Cross worker at the hospital, has gotten the patients' weekly fishing trips going again. Since they leave the hospital at 0530, Miss Trask has been getting up at 0500 and preparing breakfast for the would be Isaac Waltons. If you hear of any patients having a relapse, you might investigate Red Cross ra. quirements on short oider cooks. We haven't heard any complaintsnor have we heard about any fish being caught.

FAIR SEX SMELLS
SWELL, SCENT SENSE
SUPER SHARP
New York (AFPS)-Men, you don't smell so good. So says Samuel Klein, perfume researcher, who teaches a class in "olfactory evaluation" at New York University.
Klein said recent tests conducted 'at NYU and Columbia College of Pharmacy reveal women have much better sense of smell than men.
"It may be", Klein said, "that women' s 'olfactory perception' is better because they drink less, or take better care of their health and do not smoke as much as men-do."


TEEN AGE ROUNDUP

Here we are once again bringing you the hi-lights of Gtmo. High School.
Election Results:
Friday morning the final ballots were cast for the President and Vice-President of Student Council. The school congratulates Charlie and Jeaneen and know they will fill these jobs to the best of their ability, and thats good enough for all of us.
This past week-end the boys really had themselves a field day'from school books right down to girls were forgotten and we noticed that the families of these energetic boys were either thumbing rides or riding the buses, the heavy rain Friday night didn't stop the boys. About 8'oclock six wet boys came charging up to Martin's door. There was little he could do except invite them in -for a short game of cards and refreshments.
Bright and early Saturday morning, 8 sleepy boys trudged slowly but surely down the long road to Blue Beach. The morning was spent swimming, diving, exploring the cliffs, and of course eating. After a hard day they picked themselves up and started on the long dreary road home. We know they had a wonderful time by the talk, sunburned and freckled faces, and the sleepy-eyed looks in church.
Here's a notice to all you
Hill-Billies!
There's going to be a .square dance on Saturday Nov. 5th-in the school building at Victory Hill. Look' here next week and we'll give you more data,
Last Saturday Jeanette Leckenby celebrated her 15th birthday with a big party, which was enjoyed by all who attended. The entertainment and refreshments were wonderful and we're all anxious for another one soon.
Just because the Hi School kids were water-soaked at school Friday had nothing to do with the swimming meet the day before. We wish to say thanks to everyone who made this event possible. Also congrats to the winners and all the people who participated. My wasn't the water ballet pretty? And the clowning acts were far from morbid. Hope we have another one next year.
Welcome, and hi'is extended to Al and -Anne Havard. They both come fom Norfolk and hope they will enjoy it here as much as they did there. Al will be in the 12th and Ann in the 7th. Our pigtail set just seems to get bigger and bigger. It will be nice for Charlie and Cecil, at least, giving them a chance to catch up on all the home town news.
We're sorry to hear Janet Poe is in the Hospital. Get well soon Janet we sure do miss you.
Thanks for helping with the column this week, Joan.


THE INDIAN


Pa~pe Five







Saturday. 29 October 1949 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-27 Oct 49-2500


BOY SCOUT TROOP

(Continued from Page One)
to the plans for this Troop will be made and all questions will be answered concerning this Troop.
Branch 100 of the Fleet Reserve Association invites all boys on this Base to avail themselves of this opportunity for active participation in the Boy Scout movement.
Note: To parents who are interested in the organization of Cub Scouts, announcement will be made -later concerning this organization. The meeting of 1 November is for Boy Scouts only, those who have reached their eleventh birthday.
TENTH DIVISION
NEWS ITEMS
By B.W. Richards, YNC, USN
FN W. W. Stinson of the Harbor Police has been recommended to take the examination for entry into the NROTC Program. We wish him success in this enterprise.
Hawkshaw Greenawalt, ENC, returned from The Military Police School, Camp Gordon, Ga., on 14 October, bearing a sheaf of certificates attesting his prowess as a budding detective. So far he hasn't been seen tracing footprints with a six-inch magnifying glass, but give him time-give him time.
Leading Chief E. H.' Tye, BMC, and IMC Pete Peterson went fishing on Saturday, Oct. 22, and f6und the right place and the right bait. They caught a nice mess of tasty snappers, but requested that the important details remain Top Secret.
MMC Groome of the Base Police is expecting the return of his wife today (Sat., 29 Oct.) from the Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Md., where she has been undergoing observation for a back injury for some months. Groome says he'll have some housecleaning to do before her arrival. To Mrs. Groome, greetings; we hope you're feeling better.
BOSN Chtistiansen has been hobbling around with his foot in a sling for the past few days as the result of an ingrown toenail.
Considering the number of Tenth Division personnel we see suffering from colds ranging from the sniffles to -red noses and snuffles, It appears the Navy isn't putting the new cold cure into effect on this station; or maybe it won't benefit the Base Police.

(SEA) -An artificial wall or bank, usually of stone, that is parallel and touching upon the shore of a harbor or the bank of a river, is ,called a quay.

A detour is the roughest distance between two points.


A CHILD'S EYE
COULD HAVE BEEN LOST

Fortunately, a child was not the victim of an accident which occurred in the Naval Station Ship's Service last week, but the setting was ideal. Unfortunately, a lady received a painful laceration of the arm which required surgical attention.
Two repairmen were engageed in replacing a broken glass in a display counter and had temporarily'laid the new sheet of glass on top of the adjacent counter, and in such manner that one corner projected several inches out into the aisle. The lady in walking by struck her arm against the sharp edge. The distance above floor level made an ideal trap for- a, child's eye or throat.
One of the first things that should be considered in planning a job-any kind of job, no matter how simple-is the possible hazard involved and the necessary safety precautions required. Needless to say, in future situations of this kind danger signs will be posted and the area roped off.
Many home accidents happen in the kitchen when the cook thoughtlessly leaves the handles of hot cooking utensils extending out over the edge of the stove where they can be bumped against or pulled over by small children.
Usually spectacular and highly dangerous jobs are well planned and elaborate precautions are taken. Most often it is the thoughtless little everyday acts that get us into trouble.




By CPL. Ed. Kazmierski

In accordance with instructions received from Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington D. C. regarding the new "Table of Organization" for this post a few changes already have ocurred. HqCo is now HqPlat and GdCo will be called GdPlat. The 1st and 2nd Plat are now designated as "lst Gd Section" and "2nd Gd. Section", repectively.. The administrative set-up is also affected by this new T/0, and reorganization is now underway.
Father Herold, the Catholic Chaplain at this Base, has requested the assistance of some of our Marines who are musically inclined to sing in the choir at the Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. All men interested are urged to contact the Chaplain as soon as possible.
While we're on the subject of Christmhas, which is just around the corner (56 das), SSgt Wilson from our post office would like to remind all hands that Christmas mail and gift packages should be mailed as soon as possible to insure


OFFICERS BOWLING
LEAGUE

Completion of plans and a schedule for the Commissioned Officers' Mess (OPEN) Bowling Season were announced this week by LCDR P. H. Teeter for the Oflcers' Volunteer Committe on Athlqics.
Twelve teams entered, with a total membership of 113 officers and civilians, will commence a double round robin schedule in each of two leagues of six teams Monday, October 31. 'The schedule calls for play of one match at 2000 nightly, Monday through Friday, with an extra match at 1700 each Thursday, until January 6.
All matches are scheduled for alleys 1 and 2 on the Officers' Club alleys. Matches will consist of three games between five man teams, one point going to the winning team for each game, with a fourth point for each match going to the team with the greatest total pin fall for the three games combined.
On completion of the double round robin in each league in January, the winning teams in each league will be paired off in a five game base officers' championship series.
Teams and their captains are: American League Hosp. - Dent. LTJG E. L. Claus VU,10 LT C. L. Powell TraGrp CDR T. M. Peterson NSD LT W. L. Foster Marines Capt. R. Pie] NOR CDR R. Faulk National League
Training Group CDR R. W. Allen NSD LCDR W. B. Jones Hosp. - Dent. LT C. H. Dutcher VU-10 LCDR W. Slone NavSta LT C.T. Linneman NAS LT D. G. Wray

(SEA)-By estimates based on Old Testament description, Noah's Ark was a 20;000-ton ship. The flood is estimated to have happened in 2348 B.C.
(SEA)-Galileo constructed his first telescope at Padua, Italy, in 1609, or 340 years ago.

holiday delivery.
Rumors were flyin' . . . Within a period of two weeks Marine Barracks welcomed aboard two new Corpsmen afker the vacancy left by HN Ollie Frakes who left Gtmo via the "emergency leave route". The Hospital sent HN-3 Reardon to pinch hit for Ollie and assist HN Abraham with the duties around the sick bay. Immediately upon Reardon's arrival a rumor spread in regards to the Marine Basketball Club having a new pivot man. It took exactly two days for that rumor to reach the Hospital 'cause within two days our sick bay bid a farewell to Hospital's hook shot artist, and welcomed another in his place, HN Birchmore.


Saturday. 29 October 1949


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-27 Oct 49-2500




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PAGE 1

Vol. IV No. 36 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 29 October 1949 Ship's Store Ashore Progress Reviewed Sixteen months ago, in June 1948, the Ship's Store Ashore (Commissary) displayed only 514 items of stock in a building whose interior appearance was reminiscent of a dark dingy warehouse. Many items carried were literally "dead stock." With huge excesses of one item and too little, or none of another, stock control existed in name only. As an example, Lieutenant John Cozy who took over the store, ma-month from Norfolk and 30 tons nagement at that time fell heir per month from Miami. The value to enough FARINA and apple of grocery items on hand Septemsauce to feed all the babies in Cuba her 30, 1949 was $175,304.63 as and Florida. compared with an inventory of In the rejuvenation process the $113,535.38 on June 30, 1948. store has suffered, by necessity, In July 1949 base patrons conthe surveying of considerable summed 17,000 pounds of potatoes, worthless stock. In July 1948 fresh 19,200 quarts of milks, 36,602 milk, now available to all at statepounds of bread, $22,000.00 worth side prices, was available for hosof meats, $5.977.98 worth of vegepital use and for babies only. Fresh tables, and $4,000.00 worth of vegetables and frozen foods were frozen foods. obtainable only occasionally, and Lack of courtesy on the part of then in small quantities. Frozen employees in this "Gtmo. Super items stocked have grown from 33 Market" is not tolerated. A constant to 85. check is made on prices to keep Your reporter now finds 1710 them as low as possible. Occasionalitems of stock of excellent quality ly one finds certain"leader items in a clean, well lighted, and well advertised by Miami retail stores ventilated stor e. Improvements at a price lower than here. On the made include a ladies rest room, other hand one can find items sold a cellutex ceiling, ten large electric for considerably less here than in fans, fluorescent lighting of sales Miami. The Navy purchasing sysfloor and offices, complete new tem provides for large contracts at "Gondola" type shelving, and the current market and if the mar"Super Market" style self service ket price falls, as many have in frozen food lockers. In addition a recent months, it is not always branch store for Newtown -Bargo possible for the Navy to take impatrons has been opened and many medicate benefit of the lower prices. new contracts have been let to Admiral Commends Staff provide the best brands and lowest In an interview this week, Rear prices. Further improvements, unAdmiral Phillips, the Base Coinoder consideration or already startwander, told this reporter that it ed are: new meat lockers for prevas his opinion that in his long package and self service shopping, service in the U. S. Navy he has additional frozen food service, new never seen a better commissary vegetable show cases, and a Butler than the Guantanamo Ship's Store building being added to the rear Ashore as run by Lieutenant John of the store to provide bulk storage Cozy and LTJG Rasimus and their for more items. staff under the direction of CoinVital Statistics mander L. P. Kimball. He cited With the housing of more specifically the careful and intelfamilies, average monthly sales ligent planning backed by a pro have grown from $56,418.67 to found knowledge of all manner of $74,020.20, of which 71%L are crefood stuffs, plus hard work, condit sales. The present 748 pasiderable loss of sleep, and ability ctrons (families) make an average to listen patiently to many inconof 12,600 visits monthly, or better sequential complaints as well as than 600 customers served per day the few legitimate ones. that the store is open. Average In the opinion of this reporter stock shipped in is 76 tons per you ladies "never had it so good". RADM PHILLIPS HONORARY MEMBER Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips was installed as an honorary member of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association at the regular business meeting of the branch this last Tuesday evening. This action was authorized by the delegates representing some 30,000 members of the association assembled in Annapolis, Maryland early in September who unanimously elected Admiral Phillips to honorary membership. In a short speech to the inembers the Admiral praised the work of the local branch, anO particularly their Ladies Auxiliary. The members who were not able to be present at the installation take this opportunity to say "welcome aboard, Shipmate". BOY SCOUT TROOP ORGANIZATION After many weeks of planning the time has come to organize the Guantanamo Bay Troop, Boy Scouts of America. The Troop will be organized under the sponsorship of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association. On 1 November 1949 there will be a meeting of all boys who have reached their eleventh birthday, their parents and others who are interested in the Boy Scout movement, at the Little Theatre, Marine Site 3. The organization of the Troop will be launched at this meeting. It is expected that the meeting will consist of the showing of the film entitled "Scouting Trails To Citizenship", a presentation of the plans for the Troop on this Base, and an introduction of all those who will carry on the Souting work here and finally, a registration of boys who desire to join the Boy Scout Troop. Parents are urged to discuss this matter with their boys and to make plans to attend this meeting for no boy will be registered unless accompanied by at least one parent. The meeting will begin at 1900 and following the registration of the boys refreshments will be served to all who are present. Full explanation as (Continued on Page Six)

PAGE 2

I~a~ No THE INIMAN &ituiday, 29 October 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205Phone 254 Saturday, 29 October 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander A. E. Smith, SN-----------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. STATE BONUS BRIEFS AFPS ...Delaware joins the growing ranks of States granting World II veterans bonuses. An estimated 33,000 will qualify. Meanwhile, Connecticut has extended the application deadline for bonuses to July 1, 1951. Washington State bonuses are still pending. New Jersey and Pennsylvania bonus proposals will be decided at the polls during November. Voters rejected bonus proposals in Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, Oregon and Wisconsin. BONERS Red-faced designers of General Motors who forgot to make provision for license plates on the new Buick Special may share their chagrin with our neighbors across the sea. A Royal delegation meeting a U. S. Navy cruiser at a British port recently broke out their only American flag. Over forty years old, Old Glory had two stars too few. Possibly hazy about flags, another boner was disclosed on the initial 27 minute flight of Britain's new super transport, the giant Bristol Barbazon. Costing nearly sixty million dollars and the penultimate in transport aircraft design, the huge British plane has the Union Jack on the tail printed upside down! (SEA)-The first flag ever unfurled aboard an American warship was hoisted by Lieutenant John Paul Jones on board the flagship Alfred at Philadelphia 3 Dec. 1775. It was the "grand union" flag, having 13 American stripes, with the English union jack in the field. VU-10 NOTES By F. R. Pledger ALC Congratulation are in order for I.CDR Charles E. Van Bibber and LT E. J. Tougas upon their recent promotions. The following men have recently reported aboard for duty: John V. Castro, AA, Kenneth B. Seely, AN, both from NAS Corpus Christi, Texas, and Floyd R. Pledger, ALC from Air Transport Squadron ONE, Patuxent River, Maryland. Welcome aboard shipmates. Joseph M. Strichek, AN was recently transferred to VF-131 based at NAS Jacksonville, and Forest E. Sawyer, ADC has departed for VA-135 also based at JAX. Bachelor CPO's miss the regular attendance of Chief Sawyer at the "Hatuey Box", and unanimously vote him good luck at his new assignment. Floyd 0. Holder, AOC is anxiously awaiting the arrival of the USS Tom Jeff Friday morning. Chief Holder's main interest in the Jefferson is the fact that his wife and two little Holders are aboard. Gtmo Ladies Auxiliary Branch #100, FRA please note! While on the subject of the Fleet Reserve Association, it is interesting to note that the following new members from VU-10 were initiated into the FRA Tuesday night: R. G. Hendricks AD1, and C. P. Douglas PN1. Reinstatements included: J. J. Medica, BMC, W. F. Fant YNC, F. M. Hale ALC, and W. W. Wright AEC; all of UtRon 10. The combined NAS-VU-10 childrens Christmas Party is well under way under the leadership of committee chairman, J. L. Jbhnson, ADC, and guidance of LTJG Hayden, NAS Recreation officer. Basic plans, selection of gifts, and statement of cost of gifts have been accomplished and submitted for approval. Chief Johnson made an appeal for aid at the Regular meeting of the FRA, Branch 100 Tuesday night. Help is needed for wrapping the christmas gifts. It is urged that interested persons, either ladies or gentlemen, wishing to help with this phase of the Christmas Party contact Chief Johnson at Telephone Number 858 or Chief Pledger at Telephone Number 892, any time during working hours and leave your name. At this time, there are over two hundred children from 1 month to 13 years of age to arrange for. (SEA)-On 9 Aug. 1787, the ship Columbia and the sloop Washington sailed from Boston, Mass., and in 1790 returned, being the first American vessels to circumnavigate the globe. The exclamation mark is being discarded because people aren't surprised at anything these days Sunday, October 30, 1949 CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) PROTESTANT VESPERS CONTINUES TO GROW With an even larger attendance and more enthusiastic group meeting at the Station Chapel at 1900 last Sunday, interest in the Vesper Service continues to grow. Plans are being made to institute a time of fun and laughter following the Vesper Service on the lawn at the Chapel. All teen-agers, sailors and marines, young married couples, etc., are invited. In accord with a request of the group the subject for the coming Sunday evening will be "Will Christ Visibly Return to Earth?" Dress uniform is not required of Officers and Chiefs. 12,000 RELEASED OFFICERS TO GET EMPLOYMENT AID Washington (AFPS) -Prompt aid in returning to civilian employment the 12,000 Reserve officers shortly to be released from the Armed Forces was recently pledged by the Department of Labor. Robert K. Salyers, director of the department's Bureau of Veterans' Re-employment Rights, announced that local offices throughout the nation would be prepared to advise the officers returning to civilian life. Mr. Sayler's statement was in reply to a request from Brig. Gen. E. A. Evans, executive director of the Reserve Officers Association. "Many of these officers are not fully aware of the fact that they do have re-employment rights to the position they left to enter military service", said General Evans. "They have served their country long and faithfully, and the association wishes to insure them of every assistance in obtaining jobs to which they are entitled." (SEA)-Bird's nest is the term applied to a defect of distended strands in wire rope caused by a kink. 0 Pao 'Two THE IN1MAN Saturday, 29 October 1949

PAGE 3

S'atufdav 29 October 1949 PENNIES GALORE LT Strebel, Ships Service Officer, was astounded by the amount of pennies that were turned in, in answer to his recent request published in the PAPOOSE. Base personnel and dependents came to the rescue by exchanging their pennies to a total of 7,500, or seventy five dollars. "Thank you", is extended to all by Mr. Strebel. NAVY WINS TREASURY AWARD IN SAVINGS BOND CAMPAIGN The Department of the Navy recently received the U. S. Treasury's Distinguished Service Award in recognition of the Navy's number one position in the Federal payroll savings program and its participation record in the recent savings bond Opportunity Drive. Secretary of the Navy Francis P. Matthews was presented the award by Vernon L. Clark, assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury and Director of the Savings Bond Division of the Treasury Department, at a ceremony in the Pentagon, attended by the Chiefs of Navy Department offices and bureaus. Naval, military and civilian personnel are investing more than $10,000,000 a month in U. S. Savings Bonds through the allotment and payroll savings program. The Navy bond purchases during the last year was 35 per cent of the total invested by all Federal employees through payroll savings. In addition, the Navy's civilian payroll participation reached 64.1 per cent in August, 1949, which is 2.4 per cent higher than the second highest Government agency's record, that of the Treasury Department. It represents the Navy's highest participation record since October, 1945. The Treasury's award, the first to be presented to a Government agency in connection with the Opportunity Drive, cited the Department of the Navy "for leadership in building security for the people and the nation through United States Savings Bonds". Mr. Clark, a Des Moines, Iowa, businessman, has served at full time without pay for the last four years as national director of the Savings Bond Division of the Treasury Department. (SEA)-Kangaroos have shrunken. The largest living specimens in Australia now range from seven to eight feet in height. Their ancestors were 12 to 20 feet. i ~ *: (SEA)-There are 132 small businesses located in the Palau islands of the Navy-administered Pacific Trust Territory. THE LOWDOWN ON POKER: It's All a Game of Skill By Armed Forces Press Service "You can too win," says Air Force M/Sgt. George S. Coffin, taking strong exception to a recent article on poker that said "you cant" written by Ernest E. Blanche and distributed by Armed Forces Press Service. And Sergeant Coffin, right or wrong, speaks with enough authority to rate a hearing. He's successful author himself, his latest volume being "Fortune Poker." What particularly arouses Sergeant Coffin's ire is the statement by Mr. Blanche who is chief statistician for the Logistics Division of the Army General Staff. "Poker is all chance governed by amazing odds. It is difficult to understand how anyone can conclude that poker is a game of skill rather than chance." In rebuttal, Sergeant Coffin now stationed at Hanscom Airport, Bedford Mass., writes: "With all due respect to Mr. Blanche, this statement is bunkutter bunk. Years of consistent winning by many strong poker players, including myself, will substantiate this. "What the statisticians ignore," says the Sergeant-author, "are the vital techniques of the position game and the sandbagging game. These" he insists, "are not covered by the 'amazing odds' outlined by Mr. Blanche in the AFPS article." And Sergeant Coffin isn't alone in this position. No less an authority than card expert Ely Culbertson thinks so much of the airman's latest book that he contributes a laudatory foreword which says: "Despite myths to the contrary and though many people are surprised to learn it, poker is a game of skill second to none." Also enthusiastic about Sergeant Coffin's view is New York Times book reviewer George S. Hellman who calls it an "excellent" volume. The reviewer, however, insists that Sergeant Coffin is "also aware of the element of luck." "Yes," says Sergeant Coffin, he does concede a "minor element of luck in honest poker." But he still insists: "If you are a consistent loser and nobody's cheating, your technique is bad, not your luck. If you cannot improve your technique, you'd better give up poker. "How about you, Mr. Blanche?" (SEA)-The first balloon voyage in the U. S. was made 9 Jan. 1793 by a Frenchman by the name of Blanchard. The flight was made in the presence of George Washington, in Philadelphia, the balloon landing in Woodbury, N. J. RUSSIA TO RETURN 30 U. S. WARSHIPS Washington (AFPS)-The Soviet government has agreed to return 30 vessels supplied by the U. S. under the World War II lendlease plan. Among the vessels are three ice breakers, which cost $3 million each, and 27 frigates. The Russian Commission informed the U. S. that one of the frigates had been lost. Under the agreement, the vessels will be delivered to the U. S. by December 1. The ice breakers will be delivered to Bremerhaven, Germany, and the frigates at Yokosuka, Japan. Russia has failed to return numerous other vessels supplied her by the U. S. during the war. She is obligated to return all equipment not "destroyed, lost, or consumed." The U. S. loaned the Soviets equipment costing $11 billion during the war. LITES & MIKES By Armed Forces Press Service Operation Hollywood ...It's "H-Hour" all over again on the movie lots. A dozen new films mark the production trend away from noncombat themes that im, mediately followed the war. Now Hollywood offers its own version of the active, combat phase in a parcel of soon-to-be-released pies with titles like: "Sands of Iwo Jima," "Battleground," "Twelve o'Clock High," "Three Came Home" and "Task Force." Television ...which also Xrayed the war, by adapting General Eisenhower's "Crusade in Europe," had to go through 165,000,000 feet or 31.060 miles of World War II films to do it. To avoid similar headaches Hollywooders chose fresh film, with actors in the uniforms. But that brought problems too-like a complete naval wardrobe for Gary Cooper's role in "Task Force.' It ranges from two gold stripes of lieutenant to glittering "scrambled eggs" of rear admiral. Quote ...deliciously dumb Marie Wilson on the problem of what to do if she found a million bucks: "If it belonged to a poor person I'd return it." Quote Arthur Godfrey on TV: "If television makes everybody look like they need a shave why doesn't it make a bald guy look like he needs a haircut?" End quote. (SEA)-The 24-hour clock system, long in effect in the Navy, was adopted by the Army in July 1942. It is patterned on the English system of beginning the day at midnight and numbering the hours around the clock. THE INDIAN Saturdayy 29 October 1 9 Page Three

PAGE 4

Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday. 29 October 1949 A SPECIAL LITTLE THEATRE NOTE By Evelyn Perdue Before all the wondrous laughter and applause dies away to become just another pleasant memory, we of the Little Theatre would like to add our own special note of thanks to those involved in the so successful production of what we proudly call plain old "'SUDS". This energetic team of twenty or thirty people have given us something to live up to. We all know this time we actually had a hit, for there was no necessity to manufacture excuses for this person's or that's inadequacy, praise came unasked for from comparative strangers and above all, you, the audience, came back again and filled the house for an additional night. What did it? Well, first of all, a wonderfully written play, almost custom-tailored for this base. And secondly, that team we mentioned before under the leadership of most amazing and ambitious young man, Ken Allen, who is, if not the backbone of the group, a large section of the vertebra. Casting began several months ago-and no one relished the job of finding twenty-one distinct characters from the small number gathered at Marine Site Three. But slowly they did come forward, and not a prima donna among them. You won't easily forget the three old gals, will you? And even seeing them today as Dot Seigler, Pearl Cleary, and Evelyn Perdue, you think of Miss Tinkham, Mrs. Feeley, and Mrs. Rasmussen-and beer. Mrs. Cleary, swho had never "trod the boards" before, improved steadily during the weeks of rehearsal. Yet she practically walked off with all acting laurels during each performance. Martin Lampman as the alwaysthere Chinatown more than adequately upheld the dignity of Mrs. Feeley when it dangerously started slipping, and when her friends moved in, did the same for them. That handsome nephew of hers represented no problem to D. J. Burton, who, every day of the week actually is a handsome Navy Chief. There was no problem to courting, swiftly but well, Kate Logan, or Shirley Childs, who, every day of the week, is an extremely attractive young lady. Did many of you merry gobs recognize the, the-er, "line"? Or perchance, file for future reference ? The red-headed villain, the hardhearted tax collector who almost broke up the romance, but got his "in the end" (?), was Jerry Ruyf, a specialist in characters, so to speak. His was the slothful Mr. Sparrow of "Years Ago". Danny Green, or Mr. Reynolds, was also a villain, but the miz-uble critter just fell off the wagon, poor soul. And then there was Mr. Wilson, quite the killer type. Killed all the jokes he told, and thought he killed all the women. What a reputation Bill Lampman has to live down! Conchita, of course, tried to break up the affair too. Who wouldn't for a pair of nylons in those days? No one suspected sweet little Joan McNeal had such predatory instincts for Jill Hyers' change in fastidiousness. Wasn't Mrs. Rasmussen's daughter Brunnhilde sloppy, though, and didn't she make you feel itchy too? We know two fellows who had the time of their lives-G. G. Seigler and Danny Alves-Pinky and Ormond, the detectives with an eye for oppressed old women young in spirit. Every role was played to perfection, no matter how big or small. Remember Mac and June (Don Lackey and Barbara Johnson) bringing Springtime magic in pantomime? Our tired worker who needed a kitchen sink and a shave was Earl Stanton. Stage Manager Ruth Swann doubled as Mrs. Miller, the giggling satellite of obnoxious Mr. Wilson. Thank heavens we had C. D. Malone to be on hand to catch Miss Tinkham after he scared the life out of our girlfriends with his summons. Cute little Betty Borreson aged many years and pounds to portray Mrs. Katz. OY, OY, OY! Who but good old Harry Davis could give Moe's one line, "'Eight!" all the oomph he did, after having appeared in the very opening act as a hopeful buyer? There! We covered the cast! But not once did we give full credit to them. Only one who has done it can realize the sacrifices demanded by nights of rehearsal, one right after the other. Suffice it to say, everybody was very cooperative and "gave their all"-this last not in a bantering tone. How about backstage? Isn't it common knowledge that the workers back there usually out-number the actors? But this was one exception. The cast took almost every member of the group before the footlights. So they, too hammered, painted, dragged in junk for the junk-yard, searched for the impossible costumes (Mis Tinkham's of course). Notable exceptions of course, as follows. Electricians extraordinaire, this title to be appropriately applied to Chief Jacobs and E. W. Bielefeld. Also Mr. M. G. Phillips, who taught us a bit about lighting. The sweat of their brows, namely the cast, and of Ken Allen, L. H. Chitty, and Ruth Swann, produced that set for Norvall Shoop and helpers to paint on. Oh, how they aged and weeded that plywood house! You noticed, of course, the backdrop. A masterpiece in perspective that would give any Broadway stage a competitor. That could be said of the stage as a whole. Those so real artificial flowers, and genuine Gtmo PERSONNEL IN SHANGHAI GET MAIL BY NAVY RADIO (SEA)-During World War II it was V-Mail. Now it's mail by Navy Radio. At least that's the case for naval personnel and members of the American Foreign Service at Shanghai, China. The Americans in Shanghai have begun to receive their correspondence through use of a Navy radio link. It's very welcome since they had been without close home ties via the mails for four months. Limited to 200 words, letters are transmitted by Navy radio between Shanghai and Guam. From Guam the correspondence is transmitted to the U. S. by regular mail. To make certain that continental U. S. correspondents know their letters aren't exactly private, each letter contains a note stating that naval radio was intermediary. Interruption of transportation to and from the Shanghai area is reponsible for this latest Navy innovation. shrubbery. Doylene Hansen took charge of the beer-pouring and other problems that confront property managers. Those outlandish clothes of Miss Tinkham's were quite the gay numbers, no? Mrs. Wava Hummel and Mrs. Evelyn Ernest had a huge task in outfitting the entire cast, but they completed it wonderfully well. Betty Borreson was in charge of publicity for this production. And when amateur artists daubbed their faces with excess greasepaint, who was there to "erase" their mistakes and do an extremely efficient job but Donna Hatfield? Let's not forget our house manager, H. 0. White, and the receptionists and stage crew. Fogle, Deadrick, Haag, and "Skiddy" Masterson. Arbuckle, Feeback, and Bellar were responsible for quenching your thirst. On hand, constantly watching for slips and miscues were Louise McNeal and Mary Spicer. Jean Strohl, Babs MacDonald, Mildred Irwin, and Clarice Kendall also at backstage work on props. Whew! Can you see now why it is such a chore, though pleasant, to sufficiently thank everyone? So many have contributed, and enjoyed it. It's those many crazy things that go on behind the curtain that brought this gang so close together and made them a team, working for each other instead of selfishly. What a pity it is over, but all good things must come to an end. Not original but true. One more thank you, this time to you, for your support. Not only will we ask it of you again, but we, in turn, will try to be worthy of it. So "Suds", "Skol", and "Cheerio"-here's to future successes. 0 S 0 0 THE INDIAN Saturday. 29 October 1949 Page Four

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a ur ay, c o e TRAINING GROUP TRIVIALS Since the last time this column appeared in the Indian the Training Group has undergone various changes. In the personnel picture we find a new Personnel Officer in the person of LTJG Jack Edwards. LTJG Edwards hails from the southern part of Florida so this warm climate doesn't bother him at all. Over in the Engiieering Department we find the new face belongs to LT L. Enos who hasn't made up his mind whether he likes Gtmo or not. Last Saturday morning we found ENS W. P. Haney in the Captain's Office exchanging his old gold bars for nice, shiny new silver ones. Congratulations to the new "JG" are extended. What Happened? The Captain held Mast, Meritorious Mast that is, last Saturday morning to commend Ed Hupenece, S02 and "Mumbles" Tregembo, S03. This was due to their excellent showing in a class of Integrated Sonar at Fleet Sonar School, Key West, Florida. The boys stood 1 and 4 respectively in a class of 24. Nice going fellows. The Training Group Officers have formed two, nine-men bowling teams to compete in the Officers' Winter Bowling League. Good luck to both teams and remember someone has to lose. The Training Group said farewell last Saturday morning to Albert Ciancio, EM2, who, for the past year had been serving as MAA for the Training Group Barracks. We hope he finds his new duty station, which by the way is USS Reina Mercedes at Annapolis, Md., as pleasant as he says this one was. Also seen at FLSW as his shipmates sang "Auld Lang Syne" was Leon Gunderson, CSC who was heading stateside for a new job. Remember the "animated pipe" in the first act of "Suds in Your Eyes" -well the initials of the yeoman on the end of it was our boy Stanton-who knows-he'll probably start playing villain next. We also find in the last minute dash before the presses begin to roll that we have four more new faces in the Group. CDR J. C. Fisher who reported for COC Officer and LT A. W. Hayward reports for duty as Hanger Deck Officer in the Air Department. In the "white-hat" division we find Stanley Sandroski, YN2 and J. P. Griffin, RD3 for duty in the Training Office and COC respectively. (SEA)-Robert Fulton, on 17 Aug. 1807, made his first steamboat trip (in the Clermont) from New York to Albany and back; was 22 hours going, and 30 hours returning to New York. Nursery News: Claudia Gail Akins born 23 October to BT2 and Mrs. E. J. Akins; Beth Arleen Bellair born 22 October to OMC and Mrs. G.F. Bellair; NOTE S Peggy Ellen Rollins born 19 October to BM2 and Mrs. J. T. Rollins. CAPT J. H. Robbins, MOIC has been on the sick list since last Sunday with an infected ear. Whether or not he rates any stars as the 'ideal patient' this reporter has been unable to learn. However, the doctors who have been attending him should rate something special for the Captain is well on the road to recovery. Incidentally, we think that perhaps CDR Forte has set a record of some kind in the way he has gone up the line of command; Tuesday of last week he took over as Executive Officer whel CAPT Wilson departed on leave, and then to MOIC on Sunday. LT Vonfraenkel has returned from the medical conference in Chicago and reports having had a very fine trip. CDR J. A. Fields. MC, our former EENT man, also attended the conference and sends greetings to his friends in Gtmo. LT Dutcher, Administrative Assistant, has received change of duty orders upon reporting of a relief. Mr. Dutcher will go to NAS, Alameda, California. We shall all be sorry to see Mr. Dutcher go and hope that he will enjoy his new duty. Miss Trask, Red Cross worker at the hospital, has gotten the patients' weekly fishing trips going again. Since they leave the hospital at 0530, Miss Trask has been getting up at 0500 and preparing breakfast for the would be Isaac Waltons. If you hear of any patients having a relapse, you might investigate Red Cross ra quirements on short order cooks. We haven't heard any complaintsnor have we heard about any fish being caught. FAIR SEX SMELLS SWELL, SCENT SENSE SUPER SHARP New York (AFPS)-Men, you don't smell so good. So says Samuel Klein, perfume researcher, who teaches a class in "olfactory evaluation" at New York University. Klein said recent tests conducted at NYU and Columbia College of Pharmacy reveal women have much better sense of smell than men. "It may be", Klein said, "that women's 'olfactory perception' is better because they drink less, or take better care of their health and do not smoke as much as men do." TEEN AGE ROUNDUP Here we are once again bringing you the hi-lights of Gtmo. High School. Election Results: Friday morning the final ballots were cast for the President and Vice-President of Student Council. The school congratulates Charlie and Jeaneen and know they will fill these jobs to the best of their ability, and thats good enough for all of us. This past week-end the boys really had themselves a field dayfrom school books right down to girls were forgotten and we noticed that the families of these energetic boys were either thumbing rides or riding the buses, the heavy rain Friday night didn't stop the boys. About 8'oclock six wet boys came charging up to Martin's door. There was little he could do except invite them in for a short game of cards and refreshments. Bright and early Saturday morning, 8 sleepy boys trudged slowly but surely down the long road to Blue Beach. The morning was spent swimming, diving, exploring the cliffs, and of course eating. After a hard day they picked themselves up and started on the long dreary road home. We know they had a wonderful time by the talk, sunburned and freckled faces, and the sleepy-eyed looks in church. Here's a notice to all you Hill-Billies! There's going to be a square dance on Saturday Nov. 5th-in the school building at Victory Hill. Look here next week and we'll give you more data. Last Saturday Jeanette Leckenby celebrated her 15th birthday with a big party, which was enjoyed by all who attended. The entertainment and refreshments were wonderful and we're all anxious for another one soon. Just because the Hi School kids were water-soaked at school Friday had nothing to do with the swimming meet the day before. We wish to say thanks to everyone who made this event possible. Also congrats to the winners and all the people who participated. My wasn't the water ballet pretty? And the clowning acts were far from morbid. Hope we have another one next year. Welcome, and hi is extended to Al and Anne Havard. They both come from Norfolk and hope they will enjoy it here as much as they did there. Al will be in the 12th and Ann in the 7th. Our pigtail set just seems to get bigger and bigger. It will be nice for Charlie and Cecil, at least, giving them a chance to catch up on all the home town news. We're sorry to hear Janet Poe is in the Hospital. Get well soon Janet we sure do miss you. Thanks for helping with the column this week, Joan. Page Five S t d 29 O tb r 1940 THE INDIAN

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Saturday. 29 October 1949 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-27 Oct 49-2500 BOY SCOUT TROOP (Continued from Page One) to the plans for this Troop will be made and all questions will be answered concerning this Troop. Branch 100 of the Fleet Reserve Association invites all boys on this Base to avail themselves of this opportunity for active participation in the Boy Scout movement. Note: To parents who are interested in the organization of Cub Scouts, announcement will be made later concerning this organization. The meeting of 1 November is for Boy Scouts only, those who have reached their eleventh birthday. TENTH DIVISION NEWS ITEMS By B. W. Richards, YNC, USN FN W. W. Stinson of the Harbor Police has been recommended to take the examination for entry into the NROTC Program. We wish him success in this enterprise. Hawkshaw Greenawalt, ENC, returned from The Military Police School, Camp Gordon, Ga., on 14 October, bearing a sheaf of certificates attesting his prowess as a budding detective. So far he hasn't been seen tracing footprints with a six-inch magnifying glass, but give him time-give him time. Leading Chief E. H. Tye, BMC, and IMC Pete Peterson went fishing on Saturday, Oct. 22, and found the right place and the right bait. They caught a nice mess of tasty snappers, but requested that the important details remain Top Secret. MMC Groome of the Base Police is expecting the return of his wife today (Sat., 29 Oct.) from the Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Md., v;here she has been undergoing observation for a back injury for some months. Groome says he'll have some housecleaning to do before her arrival. To Mrs. Groome, greetings; we hope you're feeling better. BOSN Christiansen has been hobbling around with his foot in a sling for the past few days as the result of an ingrown toenail. Considering the number of Tenth Division personnel we see suffering from colds ranging from the sniffles to red noses and snuffles, it appears the Navy isn't putting the new cold cure into effect on this station; or maybe it won't benefit the Base Police. (SEA) -An artificial wall or bank, usually of stone, that is parallel and touching upon the shore of a harbor or the bank of a river, is called a quay. 4: * A detour is the roughest distance between two points. A CHILD'S EYE COULD HAVE BEEN LOST Fortunately, a child was not the victim of an accident which occurred in the Naval Station Ship's Service last week, but the setting was ideal. Unfortunately, a lady received a painful laceration of the arm which required surgical attention. Two repairmen were engageed in replacing a broken glass in a display counter and had temporarily laid the new sheet of glass on top of the adjacent counter, and in such manner that one corner projected several inches out into the aisle. The lady in walking by struck her arm against the sharp edge. The distance above floor level made an ideal trap for a child's eye or throat. One of the first things that should be considered in planning a job-any kind of job, no matter how simple-is the possible hazard involved and the necessary safety precautions required. Needless to say, in future situations of this kind danger signs will be posted and the area roped off. Many home accidents happen in the kitchen when the cook thoughtlessly leaves the handles of hot cooking utensils extending out over the edge of the stove where they can be bumped against or pulled over by small children. Usually spectacular and highly dangerous jobs are well planned and elaborate precautions are taken. Most often it is the thoughtless little everyday acts that get us into trouble. By CPL. Ed. Kazmierski In accordance with instructions received from Headquarters Marine Corps, Washington D. C. regarding the new "Table of Organization" for this post a few changes already have ocurred. HqCo is now HqPlat and GdCo will be called GdPlat. The 1st and 2nd Plat are now designated as "1st Gd Section" and "2nd Gd. Section", repectively. The administrative set-up is also affected by this new T/O, and reorganization is now underway. Father Herold, the Catholic Chaplain at this Base, has requested the assistance of some of our Marines who are musically inclined to sing in the choir at the Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. All men interested are urged to contact the Chaplain as soon as possible. While we're on the subject of Christmas, which is just around the corner (56 das), SSgt Wilson from our post office would like to remind all hands that Christmas mail and gift packages should be mailed as soon as possible to insure OFFICERS BOWLING LEAGUE Completion of plans and a schedule for the Commissioned Officers' Mess (OPEN) Bowling Season were announced this week by LCDR P. H. Teeter for the Officers' Volunteer Committe on Athletics. Twelve teams entered, with a total membership of 113 officers and civilians, will commence a double round robin schedule in each of two leagues of six teams Monday, October 31. The schedule calls for play of one match at 2000 nightly, Monday through Friday, with an extra match at 1700 each Thursday, until January 6. All matches are scheduled for alleys 1 and 2 on the Officers' Club alleys. Matches will consist of three games between five man teams, one point going to the winning team for each game, with a fourth point for each match going to the team with the greatest total pin fall for the three games combined. On completion of the double round robin in each league in January, the winning teams in each league will be paired off in a five game base officers' championship series. Teams and their captains are: American League Hosp. -Dent. LTJG E. L. Claus VU-10 LT C. L. Powell TraGrp CDR T. M. Peterson NSD LT W. L. Foster Marines Capt. R. Piel NOR CDR R. Faulk National League Training Group CDR R. W. Allen NSD LCDR W. B. Jones Hosp. -Dent. LT C. H. Dutcher VU-10 LCDR W. Slone NavSta .LT C. T. Linneman NAS LT D. G. Wray (SEA)-By estimates based on Old Testament description, Noah's Ark was a 20,000-ton ship. The flood is estimated to have happened in 2348 B.C. (SEA)-Galileo constructed his first telescope at Padua, Italy, in 1609, or 340 years ago. holiday delivery. Rumors were flyin' ...Within a period of two weeks Marine Barracks welcomed aboard two new Corpsmen after the vacancy left by HN Ollie Frakes who left Gtmo via the "emergency leave route". The Hospital sent HN-3 Reardon to pinch hit for Ollie and assist HN Abraham with the duties around the sick bay. Immediately upon Reardon's arrival a rumor spread in regards to the Marine Basketball Club having a new pivot man. It took exactly two days for that rumor to reach the Hospital 'cause within two days our sick bay bid a farewell to Hospital's hook shot artist, and welcomed another in his place, HN Birchmore. 0 Saturday. 29 October 1949 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-27 Oct 49-2500