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Vol. IV No.35 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 22 October 1949


FORMER MEMBER OF
EMBASSY STAFF IN
RUSSIA SPEAKS HERE

Captain R. J. Vaughn, MC, USN,
Medical Officer on the Staff of ComServLant who inspected the
*. Naval Hospital here during the
operational readiness inspection last week, gave an informal talk before members of the Hospital
Staff last Thursday.
Dr. Vaughn's address was based
on experiences he had while acting as Embassy physican, in the American Embassy in Moscow, Russia.
Dr. Vaughn was in Moscow for a period of 27 months extending from late 1946 through early 1949.
In his talk, which was a resume
of his observations, both medical
0 and non-medical, Dr. Vaughn
indicated that medicine as practiced in the U.S. S. R. was 50 years behind that practiced in the United States. Moscow Hospitals, he said, were far below the standards of U. S. Hospitals. He asserted that while in Russia, for more than two years he had tried unsuccessfully to visit Naval or Military
hospitals of the Soviet Union.
The former Embassy physican S said that he and other members of
the Embassy Staff were under constant surveillance by Russian
Secret Service police.
Educationally, Dr. Vaughn said,
the school systems in Moscow would compare favorably with those in the United States. Illiteracy is very un-common in the Soviet
Union he said.
The Russians, he asserted, are
interested in politics. While only 2 % of the population are actually members of the Communist Party, the remaining 971/2%, from his observations, would remain
loyal Russians.
Dr. Vaughn said he was intensely
glad to'be relieved and he recommended that the tour of duty there be cut to one year because of the mental and physical strain resulting from Russian spying on
foreigners.
Following his talk, he answered ' the questions which were asked
by the audience. Dr. Vaughn has delivered similiar addresses before groups in the United States a.id
Western Europe.


James Francis Gordon, 48
an employee of the Public Works Power Plant for the past two and a half years died in the Civilian barracks, Tuesday 18 October. Gordon, a native of Princestown, Trinidad, B. W. I., is surviv ed by his son, Winston Gordon, of Santiago de Cuba. Through the kindness of Senor Jose "Pepe" Guerra, of Caimanera, arrangements have been made to carry the remains from the Base to Santiago for,
burial there.


UTINA TO MAKE TRIP TO KINGSTON THURSDAY

The USS Utina (ATF-163) wiil leave Guantanamo Bay at 0500 Thursday morning with eighty passengers primarily enlisted personnel, in addition to the rdgular crew for a visit to Kingston, Jamaica.
Present plans indicate arrival of the Utina will be at 2000 Thursday. The ship will depart Kingston Sunday 0500, 30 October and will arrive here at 2100 the same day.
The following list of instructions apply to the idrthcoming voyage:
(1) No dependents under 18 years of age will be permitted to make this trip; (2) Dependents cannot be messed aboard the Utina;
(3) The bartering or selling of American made goods, such as cigarettes, is prohibited; (4) Hotel arrangements will be the responsibility of the individual and it is suggested to those going on this trip /that they be made in advance It is understood that persons waiting until arrival to obtain hotel reservations have had difficulty getting suitable accomodations.
It is expected that all hands desiring to make this trip can be accomodated but in case of over subscription, enlisted personnel will have precedence over officer personnel.


80,000 TROOPS TO
PARTICIPATE IN 1950
CARIBBEAN WAR GAMES

Numerous fleet units containing several thousand Navy and Marine personnel, and portions of Navy and Marine Air Groups will again visit Guantanamo Bay enroute to and from the 1950 Caribbean War Games. In addition, two Air Force jet air groups will stop at Leeward Point enroute to and from the exercises and several hundred Army paratroopers will stage through McCalla Field, it was announced early this week.
According to an Armed Forces Press Service release in Washington, "Operation Portex", as the 1950 joint exercises will be called officially, will involve approximately 80,000 troops. The realistic war exercise will begin in January and continue through mid-March. The remainder of the AFPS report is carried below.
Under the overall command of Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, Commander in Chief Atlantic and U. S. Atlantic Fleet, the exercise as directed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff will provide training for Armed Forces personnel and test procedures and equipment in joint airborne-amphibious operations.
Climax of the War games that will employ the largest number of troops ever assembled for a joint peacetime exercise in this hemi,sphere, will be a combined land, sea and air assault on Vieques Island, four miles off the eastern tip of Puerto Rico. Ground operations with the Navy and Air Force in support of Army units will follow the amphibious and airborne phase of the maneuver.
The Navy will muster 162 vessels of all types from the Atlantic Fleet including aircraft carriers, submarines, destroyers, cruisers, minecraft, the battleship Missouri, and various types of amphibious and service ships.
Air Power will be supplied by the Continental Air Command and will include a mobile tactical air force consisting of two fighter groups, a troop carrier group, a p h o t o reconnaissance squadrpn (Jets), a night photo reconnaissance squadron and auxiliary ground units.








Pao' tr1 THTwoNaudy,2 cobr14


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 206-Phone 254
Saturday, 22 October 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. X. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN --------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for Sfree distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1946.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

EARLY DISCHARGES
AUTHORIZED AS NAVY STRENGTH IS REDUCED

(SEA)-Certain Regular Navy enlisted personnel now may be discharged as early as three months before expiration of their enlistments.
Early discharges are being made of enlisted personnel-at the discretion of commanding officerswho (1) do not intend to re-enlist, or (2) who do not intend to extend their enlistment on board, or (3) who will not be recommended for re-enlistment by their COs.
The move toward early discharges is necessitated by immediate and "sizable reduction in enlisted personnel strength."
Enlisted men' on continental U. S. stations or ships whose enlistments expire on or after 15 October to be discharged at least one month and not more than three months before their enlistments expire. COs,'st their own discretion, may transfer men in their commands for separation three months early, but are obliged to initiate discharge action no later than one ,month before expiration of enlistments.
Any enlisted man, regardless of his duty station, may be discharged up to three months before his enlistment expires, at the CO's discretion.
The early discharge provisions, as announced by Alnav 89 (NDB, 15 Sept 1949), is in addition to existing BuPers Manual procedures.
Anticipated budgetary limitations necessitates the immediate reduction of enlisted strength. These considerations have resulted in a sharp curtailment of recruiting quotas.


KEEP YOUR RECORD
CLEAN - IT PAYS
By Armed Forces Press Service
"I wish I had an honorable discharge instead of the one I have. I can't get a job because of it".
Letters like that, according to Armed Forces Talk 288, titled, "The Importance of an Honorable Discharge," still arrive every week at the Discharge Review Boards. What can be done about them? Nothing.
That is, nothing can be done about them after the discharges have been issued except in the cases where a veteran can show they were issued unfairly.
Plenty can be done by the Serviceman, however, before the time comes for discharge. And it can be done easily-by keeping his record clean. It's to illustrate the importance of that simple remedy that the Talk outlines the types of discharges and various benefits and consquences.
"Until recently", the Talk points out, "The Army and the Air Force issued three types of dischargeshonorable, undesirable and dishonorable. These were the familiar white, blue and yellow discharges. The Navy issued several other kinds.
"Now, however, each of the services issues five types of discharges-honorable, general, undesirable, bad conduct and dishonorable."
The first three are white. The last two are blue with yellow no longer in use.
Here's how you earn them and what they mean to you: An honorable discharge goes only to those whose character rating is at least "very good", whose efficiency ratings are at least "excellent" and who have no conviction by a general court martial, and no more than one by special or summary courtmartials. In other words, this certificate indicates the Serviceman's record has been highly satisfactory.
The general discharge - next down the line -is also commendable but does not show quite so good a record. Either of these types, however entitles the discharged serviceman to all, veterans benefits.
Those who receive the undesirable discharge generally arecases of fraudulent enlistment, physically unfit, deserters, those convicted in civil courts and those declared unfit for military service. It may or may not deprive the individual of veterans' benefits. The same is true of the bad conduct discharge.
The bad conduct certificate and, the dishonorable discharge as well, are issued to those convicted by various types of courts martial, depending on the circumstances.
The dishonorable discharge always deprives it's holder of all veterans' benefits and in some cases also civil rights. And though the


Sunday, October 23, 1949 CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions 'before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

PROTESTANT CHOIR
PREPARES FOR
CHRISTMAS

The Protestant Chapel Choir announces that the major work of the Christmas Season to be presented by the Choir will be "The Story of Christmas", a Cantata for Christmastide and Epiphany, composed by H. Alexander Matthews This work, for four solo voices and mixed chorus with organ accompaniment, will be sung at the Protestant Christmas Eve Service and will constitute the major, portion of this service. The music was received in the recent shipments from the States, and study cf the score by the Choir will begin immediately at the regular rehearsals. Anyone desiring to join the Choir will be welcome and all are urged to come to the Chapel at 1930 on Thursdays, as voices to augment all sections will be needed' to present this work in its fullest
beauty.
Matthews is a-modern AmeriCani writer of sacred and liturgical music, having written several Cantatas for various holidays of the Church calendar in addition to shorter works and anthems for vocal groups. The composer has retold the story of Christmas by solos and choruses which has given the familiar words new beauty and meaning. Divided into four parts, the first part declares the prophecy and the annunciation. Part two ielates the vision and the journey of the shepherds, and the voices from the sky. The third part deals with the quest of the Magi, and the last part concludes the work with the exultant words of the fulfillment of the prophecy.

law doesn't say so, any discharge that's, "Blue" can haunt you the rest of your life. That's because employers who have so much good material to choose from don't have to take chances these days.
What type discharge are you earning?


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 22 October 1949







THEir FourSaudy 2 cobr14


TENTH DIVISION NEWS
By B. W. Richards, YNC
CBM W. L. Beeson and Mrs.
Beeson made the recent trip to Kingston, Jamaica to save money; Beeson claims a saving of about 30% of 80 pounds spent, which in good American dollars amounts to close to $80.00 saved, at present exchange rates. At that rate, he could save enough to support him in comfort in his old age if he could make the trip once a week, over a period of a few years. Not many enlisted men can save $80.00 every
time they make a pleasure trip.
CBM Leonard Garvin, who has
been the leading chief of the Base Harbor Patrol for a long, long time, has received transfer orders to the Geodetic Survey Ship AGS-15, (USS Tanner). We trust he'll enjoy
the change.
John T. Bromm, yeoman striker
of the Tenth Division for many months past, has been advanced to SN as of 1 October. Bromm has O earned the advance, and probably will be YN3 as soon as Naval Proceedure and BuPers Regulations allow.
Mr. L.D. Irving, of intelligence Department, who occupies desk space in the Tenth Division office, reports good hunting in Cuba. In a recent excursion into Cuban territory he and his party
'bagged a couple of score of fine
game birds.
MLC Edmund Zapasnik, of the
Base Police, and his wife, are hosts to his sister, Mrs. Petrovich, of Pennsylvania, who is vacationing with them for an indefinite period.
Mrs. Zapasnik and Mrs. Petrovich accompanied Mrs. B. W. Richards on a sightseeing tour of Guantanamo City on Monday of. this week.
Base Police, members of the
Masonic Lodge in Caimanera were sadly, disappointed Saturday night in-not being able to remain for the banquet following the meeting.
Long and impressive speeches by brother Masons'occupied the time until Base members had to leave to catch their boat back to the Base. Those few who were fortunate enough to sample the food can vouch for its tasty and delicious flavor.
Bos'n A. M. Christiansen and
family -have returned from the States after an enjoyable leave; the Bos'n drove his car from Santiago de Cuba to Havana, sent it to Florida via the newly initiated ferry service to Key West, and drove on to South Dakota and back.
He reports that there was (brrrr) snow in western South Dakota and Nebraska, and that the. nights
were bitterly cold.
BM1 G. K. Dennehy of the Base
Police has returned from an emergency-leave to the U. S., we extend him our sympathy in the death of
his father.
With the present weather making a pond of my garden, I can


HO MANN! Gloria Mann that is. She began her career as a child film star and is now heard frequently on NBC programs. Also appearing in New York stage productions, Gloria specializes in the "Southern Belle", "Dixie Deb" sort.

BOOK ON MIDWAY, CORAL SEA BATTLES PUBLISHED

(SEA) - "Coral Sea, Midway, and Submarine Actions," the fourth in a series of historical volumes of naval operations in World War II, has been published and is now on sale. It was written by Samuel Eliot Morison, a Harvard university historian, Pultizer Prize winner, and Naval Reserve captain.
Announcement of the book's publication was made to the Navy in Chief of Naval 'Operations letter 49-606 (NDB, 31 Aug 1949). CNO's letter points out that the Director of Naval Records and History does not and will not have copies for distribution, but the volume may be purchased commercially.
be glad I have some fishing, gear handy; no telling what may turn up in the back yard.
During a recent sudden downpour, Chief Tye told Bromm, the YN striker of the Base. Police, to roll up the windows in his jeep; always prompt to obey an order, Bromm rushed out in the rain and was thoroughly drenched before he realized there are no windows on the jeep.
Mr. I. Teagle, living at 102 Newtown, has reported that he killed a large snake at the dump which has been identified as a species of Boa Constrictor, and says there is another there. He has the skin to prove his first statement and we sincerely hope he's wrong about the other. This {s a n1atter of unusual interest and it is suggested that you take care if you have any reason to be in the vicinity of the dump.


HERE'S ADVICE FOR MEN EXPECTING SHORE DUTY
(SEA)-If your name is on the Bureau of Naval Personnel's shore duty eligibility list, here's some good advice-keep BuPers informed of any change in address, rating, or choices for a billet on the beach.
This reminder to enlisted men on SDEL is given by BuPers to insure such persons being ordered promptly to that much-desired shore duty, When a man's name reaches the top of the eligibility list, a set of orders is sent to him as quickly as possible-at his last available address.
If you haven't kept BuPers informed of any address .change, there will be unnecessary delay in sending out orders for shore duty. It's not necessary, however, to resubmit a request for shore duty when reporting any change in address, rating or choices for shore duty.
Another word to those on the SDEL-it is impossible to find out how you stand on the list by writing to BuPers. Merely keep BuPers *up to date on any status changes, then sit back and wait until your orders arrive.
For any status changes, address the Chief of Naval Personnel (Attn: Pers-6305), Navy Department, Washington 25, D. C.

TEST DEFENSES OF HAWAIIAN ISLANDS
Washington (AFPS) - Nearly 40,000 members of the Armed Forces are at present training for Exercise Miki, a joint operation designed to dislodge an "aggressor" force from the Hawaiian Islands.
United staffs of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps are now assembled at the Presidio, San Francisco, Calif.; Fort Lewis, Wash., and at Oahu, Hawaii, where plans for the defense and the invasion are being completed.
Training on a large scale is underway and will increase in intensity until early October when the invasion forces, commanded by Vice Adm. Gerald F. Bogan, will board nearly 100 ships near San Diego for a final rehearsal before launching the major operation against Oahu.
Soldiers at! Fort' Lewis "are. learning to scramble up and down landing nets as did their brothers during World War II, while Navy and Marine Corps officers and enlisted men are working with members of, the Second Infantry Division in planning details of the amphibious operation. This highly trained division will form the, bulk of-the amphibious troops under the command of- Maj. Gen. Harry J. Collins.
Additional units of specialized troops will be drawn from Army organizations throughout the country.


'THE IERWAN


� Pa e Four


Saturdav, 22 October 1949







"~~~a~~ui'd~~~~#,P 22Otbr64 H NINP~,c Three


LETTER OF
APPRECIATION

A letter of appreciation for services rendered during a recent training period was received this week from the USS Recovery (ARS-43). The letter in full said:
"This command wishes to express appreciation to the Training Group and also to the Naval Station Repair Unit, for the wonderful cooperation received by- this vessel during the recent refresher training period.
"Cooperation in training and technical assistance is particularly helpful to a vessel of this size, having a limited allowance and limited facilities for technical repair."

MEDICINE TO PREVENT AIR AND SEASICKNESS IS 71.3% EFFECTIVE
Washington (AFPS)- - Dramamine, the new air and seasickness remedy with which the Armed Services have been experimenting recently, proved 71.3 per cent effective in tests made at the USAF School of Aviation Medicine.
Originally developed as a hay fever remedy, Dramamine was found to cure car sickness when taken by a patient treated for hay fever. Experiments made on Army transports showed it also was fairly effective against seasickness. ,The recent Air Force tests were made on 18 volunteers in flights at 5,000 feet altitude, with pilots manipulating the planes to simulate flight through "gentle and moderately turbulent air."
Further studies under actually turbulent conditions are planned

UN OFFICIAL SAYS NEW GERM MAKES A-BOMB OBSOLETE
I(AFPS)-The atom bomb has
been rendered obsolete by new bacteriological weapons capable of wiping out mankind, says Dr. Brock Chisholm, director general of the United Nations World Health Organization.
Addressing a recent conference of the organization at St. Cerque, Switzerland, Dr. Chisholm declared that scientists have found one substance so deadly that seven ounces, properly distributed, could kill all the people in the world within six hours. He -did not name the substance.
The UN health chief appealed for a "new maturity" to prevent future wars, adding: "'One more war can result in the killing of as much as nine-tenths of the human race."
Oleomarghrine is a food bought by people who have seen butter days.


URGE. EARLY SHIPMENT .OF O'SEAS YULE GIFTS
Washington .(AFPS)-Christmas mail and gift packages for members of the Armed Forces stationed overseas should be mailed between October 15 and November 15 to assure holiday season delivery.
Gifts should be packed securely in box materials of metal, wood or strong fiberboard.. (Many stores feature special containers for overseas mailing.) Each such parcel should be plainly marked "Christmas parcel."
The addressee's name and address, together with a list of the parcel's contents, should be written on a slip of paper and placed within the box. This precaution will enable delivery to be made if the outside address should be obliterated.
The address should be placed directly on the container or wraping and not on gummed labels, which may become moist and fall off. The weight limit is 70 pounds and maximum measurement 100 inches, length and girth combined. This is about the size of an Army foot locker or U. S. mail bag.

STORY OF A 1692 NOOSE MAKES SOME 1949 NEWS
Boston (AFPS)-The Massachusetts legislature has been 'asked to reverse the convictions of 21 persons who were hanged 257 years ,ago for allegedly practicing witchcraft.
State Representative Daniel Rudstein recently introduced a resolution asking that 16 women and five men who were hanged at Salem, Mass., in 1692 during the flareup of witch hunting be absolved of any crime.


"COLD - KILLER" CHEMICAL DISCOVERED BY NAVY
By Armed Forces Press Service
It's here at last-a cure for the common cold. Credit the Navy.
Surrender of the sniffles, the sneezes, the headaches and the coughs has been announced in an official communique publishedby the U. S. Naval Medical Bulletin.
The no longer-secret weapon that did them in-a red-coated pill named "Coricidin".
This victory over one of man's most irritating enemies came as an accident, since the Naval researchers actually had their guns trained on hay -fever and other allergies. But the common coldwhich turned out to be hiding in the same battery of ailmentsgave up first, to the medics at the U. S. Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Illinois.
The Waterloo of the cold is a newly - perfected anti - histaminic drug called chlortrimetim. It's backed up in the same miracle pill by aspirin and other old-line remedies.
Navy Captain John M. Brewster says these pills are so effective they cure 90 percent of cold victims who use them within one hour after symptoms develop.
Effectiveness is only three percent less within two hours. And 74 percent for Ahe patients who received treatment within 12 hours are cured.
(SEA) The first passenger railroad in the U. S. (the Baltimore an& Ohio) was begun 4 July 1828. The first 14 miles was opened to traffic (horse-drawn railcar) 24 May 1830.


.98


. Sweepers man your brooms, clean sweep+ down, fore and aft"


-latu~dim 29,0ctober 1949


THE INDIAN








Saturday. 22 October 1949 TEIIA aeFv


By CPL. Ed. Kazmierski
General Military Subject Test
for promotion was administered to seventy-six PFC's and CPL's on Tuesday October 18th, and on Wednesday to five SGT's and above.
The results. of these tests will be
announced at a later date.
It's been a question among a few
of the men here at Marine Barracks just where SGT Joseph Maribile is employed' . � Post Supply ? ? ?
or Navy Side ? ? ?
Not too much activity was seen
on the volleyball court since last weeks standings. The Officers adde.a five, points to the three they held last week, and what a record for a start ... eight wins and one loss. The loss was handed to them by 'the HqCo ball club in a crucial
tilt Monday.
Ta Volleyball Standings
Team Points
HqCo ------------------- 8
Officers -------------------8
2nd Plt GdCo -------------7
Staff NCO's ---------------3
lstPlt GdCo ---------------1

PROTESTANT VESPERS
OFF TO GOOD START

� Last Sunday Protestant Vesper Service was held at the Station Chapel for the first time in many months and the interest shown was very encouraging. This service is being held as a very informal kind of service consisting of a song service and a brief talk. This service has been planned so as to be of special interest to the younger men, young married couples, nd teen-agers. Services will actually be conducted by members of the group. A survey was made to determine subjects which the group would like to hear discussed.
The subject chosen for next Sunday night is "What is God's plan for
the family".
Ted McKenney, the leader of the
musical part of the program, 'has promised that there will be special music. Although this service is considered primarily of interest to younger personnel, all are cordially
invited to attend.

LITTLE THEATER NOTES
The Little Theater Group would
like to take this opportunity to thank all Base Personnel for their patronage and cooperation. Without them "Suds" would have
gone flat.
The Group will hold its business
meeting, Tuesday October 25th, at the Little Theater Building, Marine
Site #3. Time 7:30 -p.m./
Due to' the coming election of officers this will be an important meeting. Everyone is urged to
attend ! ! �


WINE MUSINGS


4 a


TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP

By Cecil Pederson and
Skiddy Masterson
Guess what kids, last week there wasn't any column. Did you miss us? (Don't answer that) Now we'll try to brief you on what's happened in the last two weeks. Cross your fingers and hope that we do it right.
The election of the President and Vice-President has come and gone, but at this writing, the outcome had not been announced. It was a close run between Charles and Skiddy, Jeaneen and Marty, all the way, and all of us really got excited about the campaigning of each. There were some pretty good campaign stunts in those two weeks, thanks to the initative of Eunice and Ed Groome, the campaign managers. Next year there will be another election, and let's hope that the spirit is as good then as it was this year.
The clubs are slowly but surely getting organized. Skiddy, Jill, Dixie and Betty wrote a constitution for the Dramatic Club, and it will probably be ratified at the next meeting. Then it will be time to elect the officers and begin working on the first play. The Library club is already organized, and thd officers are as follows: Dixie Adair, president; Fred Wilson, vice-president; and Barbara Burke is secretary-treasurer.
Oops, we almost forgot! the G.A. A. (This means Girls Athletic Association, if you didn't know) has elected it's officers too.
Jan is president; Dixie, vicepresident; Jill, secretary-treasurer, and Ramona Sparks and Ramona Moses are the sport writers.
It sure is swell to have all these organizations started now and let's hope they will all be a success.
Sweet sixteen and never-ah well happy birthday, Joan. Besides the cake and punch brought to the school by Jeaneen, your party made Wednesday quite a day! The decorations, food, games and fortune telling make us wish you'd have another birthday soon.
Orchids to Joan, Marty and Jill for their performances in "Suds In Your Eye". You all played your parts wonderfully, and Jeaneen, Ramona, Cecil and Phyliss looked prettier in their evening dresses than any boy could. From the grease-paint on Cecil, Jeaneen and Skiddy's hands, you could tell what they were doing-make-up of course.
Hey, you. senior girls, Yvonne Irwin's mother needs assistance in setting up a girl scout troop. We know some of you are interested, so how about calling her at 343.

"Does your orchestra ever play requests?"
"Why, certainly, sir. What would you like us to play?"
"Pinochle . . ."


THE INMIAN


Page Five


Nursery News:
James Burke De1UL lehainty born 15
I 9etober to Mr. & Mrs. J.E. Delehanty; Michele Marie Charbonneau born 16 October to ME1 and Mrs. W. A. Charbonneau.
CAPT Wilson
has departed for the U. S. for three weeks leave to be spent hunting and fishing in his native North Carolina. We are wondering if the bird population of this Base will increase during his absence.
J. White, HM3, editor of the Hospital Echo, returned from leave in the U. S. Evidently it looked so good to him he can't stay away-he is requesting, an early discharge to take a position at the Veteians Hospital in Dublin, Georgia.
The Hospital 'Needles' are preparing for a big season of basketball. Three players, Call, Zimmerman and Reardon, from last years team. All that's lacking right now are several new men with basketball experience to round out the team. All thats lacking right now is a coach-does anybody know where we might find one?
One of the outstanding events to take place in the hospital in its entire history was CAPT R. W. Vaughn's talk last Wednesday evenning. CAPT Vaughn, Force Medical Officer, Atlantic Fleet was here with the inspection party and very graciously consented to talk to the hospital staff and their guests on his 27-month tour of duty at the Embassy in Moscow. The talk was both entertaining and informative, 'nd greatly appreciated by all who heard it.

Recruit: "Before I came into the Army, I once eliminated eating lunches to save money. Then I could afford to spend two weeks at the hospital."
Buddy: "What were you suffering from ?"
Recruit: "Malnutrition."





NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Saturday
TULSA
Susan Hayward Robert Preston
Sunday
SHORT SUBJECT PROGRAM Monday
ALBUQUERQUE
Randolph Scott Barbara Britton
Tuesday
ROGUES REGIMENT
Dick Powell Marta Toren







audy ~ coe 1949iH i I nI to ay2 c 920


By Allen Collier, Sports Editor

THE INDIAN PRESENTS IT'S FIRST
ANNUAL ALL- STAR BASEBALL-TEAM
The Indian this week polled the coaches of the six teams who entered the 1949 baseball league and came up with the following team which the managers decided was to constitute the Indian's first annual all-star baseball team.
The Team
Position Player Team First Base "Scotty" Scott NAS Second Base Al Miller NavSta Third Base Manuel J. Garcia MarBrks Shortstop Ernie Faile NAS Outfielder Frank Leighton NAS Outfielder Tom Carcelli MarBrks Outfielder Dick Menear NavSta Outfielder Charles Collum VU-10 First Catcher Dick Koehler VU-10 Second Catcher "Jose" Martorana NAS Pitcher Johnny Werz NAS Pitcher Jim Webster NavSta Pitcher "Jack" Machtolff NavSta
Honorable Mention goes to first basemen, Strechik of VU-10, Clauss of the Hospital and Webb of the Naval Station; second basemen Hamden, VU-10, Barthelemy, NAS, Rosario, NavSta, and Szymurski, of F1TraGrp; Third basemen White, NavSta,
Stocklosa, NavSta and Hoppe,
PLAN WINTER SPORTS VU-10; Faile was an unanimous PROGRAM FOR OFFICERS selection at shortstop; Outfielders, DeSimone, MarBrks, Watford, TraPlans for Base officers' competi- Grp and Buchma, NavSta; Pitchers, tion in bowling, volleyball and Slone, VU-10 and Neely, NAS. softball during the coming winter Unanimous Choices season were announced Thursday In tabulating results, the Indian by LCDR P. H. Teeter, Aide to gave the man with the highest the Commander who heads a vol- number of votes for him in his untary officers' athletic committee. position, the number one spot.
In a meeting of the committee Only in the outfield did we have Wednesday, it was agreed to com- a tie, thus the four outfielders mence a bowling league during included on the all-star team. The the first week in November. The managers were given a form to season will run about ten weeks fill out listing a complete team with with a final play off of the two two catchers and three pitchers. high teams. There will be no handi- Johnny Werz, of the Champion capping of the\ bowling league but Flyers and Jim Webster 'of the an effort will be made to equalize runner up NavSta Sluggers were all teams. unanimous choices as was Ernie
The volleyball schedule will Faile the "all-star" short-stop. The commence the first week in Decem- other races were closely contested ber and a new softball league will with the exception of one outfield be drawn up in late January. slot. Frank Leighton polled five
LCDR Teeter emphasized that out of the six votes cast to cinch competition is open to all officers a berth on the first team. The and civilians who are accorded the remaining three outfielders each privileges of the Officers Club. polled three votes. Interested persons should submit And there you have it fans, the their names to Command athletic Indian's first annual all-star baseofficers prior to noon Monday, ball team as selected by the team October 24 for bowling and managers. We wish to thank the volleyball. Will managers for their aid in pieking
Persons now on the Base ~ this team and to announce that not be added to bowling teams after the second annual all-star team that time to prevent the possibility will be chosen next -year, and (we of- "packing" any one team. hope) each year following.


"Where did you take a bath?" "In the spring." "I said where, not when."
"Waiter, there's a button in my soup."
"Typographical error, sir. It should be mutton."


A man who had his purse stolen some years previously received the following letter:
"Sur, years ago I stole your muny. Remorse is gnawing me so I send some back. Went it gnaws me again I will send sum more.


SWIM AND WATER
BALLET OCT. 27TH.

The NOB High School Physical Education class will participate in a swimming meet and a girls' water ballet on October 27th from 2:30 till 5:00 p.m. at the Fleet Recreation swimming Pool. This water ballet is the first to be organized in the Guantanamo Bay area and is under the supervision of Mrs. Barbara Broughton, Physical Education and swimming instructor.
Members of the ballet are. Dixie Adair, Pat Besse, Barbara Broughton, Barbara Gould, Jan Hiers, Jeaneen Hummel, Phyllis Hummel, Janet Leckenby, Joan McNeel and Ramona Sparks.
The entire High School, both boys and girls, is being represented in various swimming and diving events. Each contest will be judged and awards will be presented to the winners. All parents, teachers, and Base personnel are cordially invited to attend.
For further news of this event and the names of the judges, see the PAPOOSE.

SPORTS QUIZ

WHO CAGHT THE PASSES?
What kind of a football fan are you? How many of the pass receivers can you name that caught the aerials of the following pigskin artists:
1. Notre Dame's Gus Dorais.
2. Yale's Clint Frank.
3. Stanford's Frankie Albert.
4. Alabama's Dixie Howell.
5. Notre Dame's Angelo Bertelli
6. Michigan's Tommy Harmon.
7. Army's Arnold Tucker.
8. Notre Dame's Harry Stuhldreher.
9. Columbia's Gene Rossides.
10. Indiana's Hunchie Hoernschmeyer.
11. Georgia's Frankie Sinkwich. Check on another part of this page to see what kind of a score you racked up. 4-6 is fair, 7-8 is good, 9-11 makes you an expert.
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FOOTBALL TODAY
Football today on: AFRS, and WGBY locally, will be the game between the Columbia Lions and Army's unbeaten Cadets. Game time is 1:30. Broadcast 2:00. U pon completion of this game the ast quarters of the Minnesota-Michigan will be aired.


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PAGE 1

Vol. IV No.35 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 22 October 1949 FORMER MEMBER OF EMBASSY STAFF IN RUSSIA SPEAKS HERE Captain R. J. Vaughn, MC, USN, Medical Officer on the Staff of ComServLant who inspected the Naval Hospital here during the operational readiness inspection last week, gave an informal talk before members of the Hospital Staff last Thursday. Dr. Vaughn's address was based on experiences he had while acting as Embassy physican, in the American Embassy in Moscow, Russia. Dr. Vaughn was in Moscow for a period of 27 months extending from late 1946 through early 1949. In his talk, which was a resume of his observations, both medical and non-medical, Dr. Vaughn indicated that medicine as practiced in the U. S. S. R. was 50 years behind that practiced in the United States. Moscow Hospitals, he said, were far below the standards of U. S. Hospitals. He asserted that while in Russia, for more than two years he had tried unsuccessfully to visit Naval or Military hospitals of the Soviet Union. The former Embassy physican said that he and other members of the Embassy Staff were under constant surveillance by Russian Secret Service police. Educationally, Dr. Vaughn said, the school systems in Moscow would compare favorably with those in the United States. Illiteracy is very un-common in the Soviet Union he said. The Russians, he asserted, are interested in politics. While only 22% of the population are actually members of the Communist Party, the remaining 971/%, from his observations, would remain loyal Russians. Dr. Vaughn said he was intensely glad to be relieved and he recommended that the tour of duty there be cut to one year because of the mental and physical strain resulting from Russian spying on foreigners. Following his talk, he answered the questions which were asked by the audience. Dr. Vaughn has delivered similiar addresses before groups in the United States and Western Europe. / James Francis Gordon, 48 an employee of the Public Works Power Plant for the past two and a half years died in the Civilian barracks, Tuesday 18 October. Gordon, a native of Princestown, Trinidad, B. W. I., is survi ed by his son, Winston Gordon, of Santiago de Cuba. Through the kindness of Senor Jose "Pepe" Guerra, of Caimanera, arrangements have been made to carry the remains from the Base to Santiago for burial there. UTINA TO MAKE TRIP TO KINGSTON THURSDAY The USS Utina (ATF-163) will leave Guantanamo Bay at 0500 Thursday morning with eighty passengers primarily enlisted personnel, in addition to the regular crew for a visit to Kingston, Jamaica. Present plans indicate arrival of the Utina will be at 2000 Thursday. The ship will depart Kingston Sunday 0500, 30 October and will arrive here at 2100 the same day. The following list of instructions apply to the forthcoming voyage: (1) No dependents under 18 years of age will be permitted to make this trip; (2) Dependents cannot be messed aboard the Utina; (3) The bartering or selling of American made goods, such as cigarettes, is prohibited; (4) Hotel arrangements will be the responsibility of the individual and it is suggested to those going on this trip that they be made in advance. It is understood that persons waiting until arrival to obtain hotel reservations have had difficulty getting suitable accomodations. It is expected that all hands desiring to make this trip can be accomodated but in case of over subscription, enlisted personnel will have precedence over officer personnel. 80,000 TROOPS TO PARTICIPATE IN 1950 CARIBBEAN WAR GAMES Numerous fleet units containing several thousand Navy and Marine personnel, and portions of Navy and Marine Air Groups will again visit Guantanamo Bay enroute to and from the 1950 Caribbean War Games. In addition, two Air Force jet air groups will stop at Leeward Point enroute to and from the exercises and several hundred Army paratroopers will stage through McCalla Field, it was announced early this week. According to an Armed Forces Press Service release in Washington, "Operation Portex", as the 1950 joint exercises will be called officially, will involve approximately 80,000 troops. The realistic war exercise will begin in January and continue through mid-March. The remainder of the AFPS report is carried below. Under the overall command of Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, Commander in Chief Atlantic and U. S. Atlantic Fleet, the exercise as directed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff will provide training for Armed Forces personnel and test procedures and equipment in joint airborne-amphibious operations. Climax of the war games that will employ the largest number of troops ever assembled for a joint peacetime exercise in this hemisphere, will be a combined land, sea and air assault on Vieques Island, four miles off the eastern tip of Puerto Rico. Ground operations with the Navy and Air Force in support of Army units will follow the amphibious and airborne phase of the maneuver. The Navy will muster 162 vessels of all types from the Atlantic Fleet including aircraft carriers, submarines, destroyers, cruisers, minecraft, the battleship Missouri, and various types of amphibious and service ships. Air Power will be supplied by the Continental Air Command and will include a mobile tactical air force consisting of two fighter groups, a troop carrier group, a photo reconnaissance squadron (Jets), a night photo reconnaissance squadron and auxiliary ground units.

PAGE 2

Page~ Two~TEI~TNStrdy 2Otbr14 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 22 October 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, JOSN----------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR---------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for ,free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. EARLY DISCHARGES AUTHORIZED AS NAVY STRENGTH IS REDUCED (SEA)-Certain Regular Navy enlisted personnel now may be discharged as early as three months before expiration of their enlistments. Early discharges are being made of enlisted personnel-at the discretion of commanding officerswho (1) do not intend to re-enlist, or (2) who do not intend to extend their enlistment on board, or (3) who will not be recommended for re-enlistment by their COs. The move toward early discharges is necessitated by immediate and "sizable reduction in enlisted personnel strength." Enlisted men on continental U. S. stations or ships whose enlistments expire on or after 15 October to be discharged at least one month and not more than three months before their enlistments expire. COs, at their own discretion, may transfer men in their commands for separation three months early, but are obliged to initiate discharge action no later than one month before expiration of enlistments. Any enlisted man, regardless of his duty station, may be discharged up to three months before his enlistment expires, at the CO's discretion. The early discharge provisions, as announced by Alnav 89 (NDB, 15 Sept 1949), is in addition to existing BuPers Manual procedures. Anticipated budgetary limitations necessitates the immediate reduction of enlisted strength. These considerations have resulted in a sharp curtailment of recruiting quotas. KEEP YOUR RECORD CLEAN -IT PAYS By Armed Forces Press Service "I wish I had an honorable discharge instead of the one I have. I can't get a job because of it". Letters like that, according to Armed Forces Talk 288, titled, "The Importance of an Honorable Discharge," still arrive every week at the Discharge Review Boards. What can be done about them? Nothing. That is, nothing can be done about them after the discharges have been issued except in the cases where a veteran can show they were issued unfairly. Plenty can be done by the Serviceman, however, before the time comes for discharge. And it can be done easily-by keeping his record clean. It's to illustrate the importance of that simple remedy that the Talk outlines the types of discharges and various benefits and consequences. "Until recently", the Talk points out, "The Army and the Air Force issued three types of dischargeshonorable, undesirable and dishonorable. These were the familiar white, blue and yellow discharges. The Navy issued several other kinds. "Now, however, each of the services issues five types of discharges-honorable, general, undesirable, bad conduct and dishonorable." The first three are white. The last two are blue with yellow no longer in use. Here's how you earn them and what they mean to you: An honorable discharge goes only to those whose character rating is at least "very good", whose efficiency ratings are at least "excellent" and who have no conviction by a general court martial, and no more than one by special or summary courtmartials. In other words, this certificate indicates the Serviceman's record has been highly satisfactory. The general discharge -next down the line -is also commendable but does not show quite so good a record. Either of these types, however entitles the discharged serviceman to all veterans benefits. Those who receive the undesirable discharge generally are cases of fraudulent enlistment, physically unfit, deserters, those convicted in civil courts and those declared unfit for military service. It may or may not deprive the individual of veterans' benefits. The same is true of the had conduct discharge. The bad conduct certificate and the dishonorable discharge as well, are issued to those convicted by various types of courts martial, depending on the circumstances. The dishonorable discharge always deprives it's holder of all veterans' benefits and in some cases also civil rights. And though the Sunday, October 23, 1949 CHURCH SERVICE SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R. W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold. USN (Catholic) PROTESTANT CHOIR PREPARES FOR CHRISTMAS The Protestant Chapel Choir announces that the major work of the Christmas Season to be presented by the Choir will be "The Story of Christmas", a Cantata for Christmastide and Epiphany, composed by H. Alexander Matthews. This work, for four solo voices and mixed chorus with organ accompaniment, will be sung at the Protestant Christmas Eve Service and will constitute the major portion of this service. The music was received in the recent shipments from the States, and study cf the score by the Choir will begin immediately at the regular rehearsals. Anyone desiring to join the Choir will be welcome and all are urged to come to the Chapel at 1930 on Thursdays, as voices to augment all sections will be needed to present this work in its fullest beauty. Matthews is a modern American writer of sacred and liturgical music, having written several Cantatas for various holidays of the Church calendar in addition to shorter works and anthems for vocal groups. The composer has retold the story of Christmas by solos and choruses which has given the familiar words new beauty and meaning. Divided into four parts, the first part declares the prophecy and the annunciation. Part two relates the vision and the journey of the shepherds, and the voices from the sky. The third part deals with the quest of the Magi, and the last part concludes the work with the exultant words of the fulfillment of the prophecy. law doesn't say so, any discharge that's "Blue" can haunt you the rest of your life. That's because employers who have so much good material to choose from don't have to take chances these days. What type discharge are you earning? THE INDIAN Page Two Saturday, 22 October 1949

PAGE 3

Pae FourT TENTH DIVISION NEWS By B. W. Richards, YNC CBM W. L. Beeson and Mrs. Beeson made the recent trip to Kingston, Jamaica to save money; Beeson claims a saving of about 30%1 of 80 pounds spent, which in good American dollars amounts to close to $80.00 saved, at present exchange rates. At that rate, he could save enough to support him in comfort in his old age if he could make the trip once a week, over a period of a few years. Not many enlisted men can save $80.00 every time they make a pleasure trip. CBM Leonard Garvin, who has been the leading chief of the Base Harbor Patrol for a long, long time, has received transfer orders to the Geodetic Survey Ship AGS-15, (USS Tanner). We trust he'll enjoy the change. John T. Bromm, yeoman striker of the Tenth Division for many months past, has been advanced to SN as of 1 October. Bromm has earned the advance, and probably will be YN3 as soon as Naval Proceedure and BuPers Regulations allow. Mr. L. D. Irving, of intelligence Department, who occupies desk space in the Tenth Division office, reports good hunting in Cuba. In a recent excursion into Cuban territory he and his party bagged a couple of score of fine game birds. MLC Edmund Zapasnik, of the Base Police, and his wife, are hosts to his sister, Mrs. Petrovich, of Pennsylvania, who is vacationing with them for an indefinite period. Mrs. Zapasnik and Mrs. Petrovich accompanied Mrs. B. W. Richards on a sightseeing tour of Guantanamo City on Monday of this week. Base Police members of the Masonic Lodge in Caimanera were sadly disappointed Saturday night in not being able to remain for the banquet following the meeting. Long and impressive speeches by brother Masons occupied the time until Base members had to leave to catch their boat back to the Base. Those few who were fortunate enough to sample the food can vouch for its tasty and delicious flavor. Bos'n A. M. Christiansen and family have returned from the States after an enjoyable leave; the Bos'n drove his car from Santiago de Cuba to Havana, sent it to Florida via the newly initiated ferry service to Key West, and drove on to South Dakota and back. He reports that there was (brrrr) snow in western South Dakota and Nebraska, and that the nights were bitterly cold. BM1 G. K. Dennehy of the Base Police has returned from an emer.agency leave to the U. S.; we extend him our sympathy in the death of his father. With the present weather making a pond of my garden, I can HO MANN! Gloria Mann that is. She began her career as a child film star and is now heard frequently on NBC programs. Also appearing in New York stage productions, Gloria specializes in the "Southern Belle", "Dixie Deb" sort. BOOK ON MIDWAY, CORAL SEA BATTLES PUBLISHED (SEA) -"Coral Sea, Midway, and Submarine Actions," the fourth in a series of historical volumes of naval operations in World War II, has been published and is now on sale. It was written by Samuel Eliot Morison, a Harvard university historian, Pultizer Prize winner, and Naval Reserve captain. Announcement of the book's publication was made to the Navy in Chief of Naval Operations letter 49-606 (NDB, 31 Aug 1949). CNO's letter points out that the Director of Naval Records and History does not and will not have copies for distribution, but the volume may be purchased commercially. be glad I have some fishing gear handy; no telling what may turn up in the back yard. During a recent sudden downpour, Chief Tye told Bromm, the YN striker of the Base Police, to roll up the windows in his jeep; always prompt to obey an order, Bromm rushed out in the rain and was thoroughly drenched before he realized there are no windows on the jeep. Mr. I. Teagle, living at 102 Newtown, has reported that he killed a large snake at the dump which has been identified as a species of Boa Constrictor, and says there is another there. He has the skin to prove his first statement and we sincerely hope he's wrong about the other. This is a matter of unusual interest and it is suggested that you take care if you have any reason to be in the vicinity of the dump. HERE'S ADVICE FOR MEN EXPECTING SHORE DUTY (SEA)-If your name is on the Bureau of Naval Personnel's shore duty eligibility list, here's some good advice-keep BuPers informed of any change in address, rating, or choices for a billet on the beach. This reminder to enlisted men on SDEL is given by BuPers to insure such persons being ordered promptly to that much-desired shore duty. When a man's name reaches the top of the eligibility list, a set of orders is sent to him as quickly as possible-at his last available address. If you haven't kept BuPers informed of any address change, there will be unnecessary delay in sending out orders for shore duty. It's not necessary, however, to resubmit a request for shore duty when reporting any change in address, rating or choices for shore duty. Another word to those on the SDEL-it is impossible to find out how you stand on the list by writing to BuPers. Merely keep BuPers up to date on any status changes, then sit back and wait until your orders arrive. For any status changes, address the Chief of Naval Personnel (Attn: Pers-6305), Navy Department, Washington 25, D. C. TEST DEFENSES OF HAWAIIAN ISLANDS Washington (AFPS) -Nearly 40,000 members of the Armed Forces are at present training for Exercise Miki, a joint operation designed to dislodge an "aggressor" force from the Hawaiian Islands. United staffs of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps are now assembled at the Presidio, San Francisco, Calif.; Fort Lewis, Wash., and at Oahu, Hawaii, where plans for the defense and the invasion are being completed. Training on a large scale is underway and will increase in intensity until early October when the invasion forces, commanded by Vice Adm. Gerald F. Bogan, will board nearly 100 ships near San Diego for a final rehearsal before launching the major operation against Oahu. Soldiers at Fort Lewis are learning to scramble up and down landing nets as did their brothers during World War II, while Navy and Marine Corps officers and enlisted men are working with members of the Second Infantry Division in planning details of the amphibious operation. This highly trained division will form the bulk of the amphibious troops under the command of Maj. Gen. Harry J. Collins. Additional units of specialized troops will be drawn from Army organizations throughout the country. THE IlNiAN Page Four Saturday. 22 October 1949

PAGE 4

~~atutday,~Pag 22Ocoer1r9THeeD LETTER OF APPRECIATION A letter of appreciation for services rendered during a recent training period was received this week from the USS Recovery (ARS-43). The letter in full said: "This command wishes to express appreciation to the Training Group and also to the Naval Station Repair Unit, for the wonderful cooperation received by this vessel during the recent refresher training period. "Cooperation in training and technical assistance is particularly helpful to a vessel of this size, having a limited allowance and limited facilities for technical repair." MEDICINE TO PREVENT AIR AND SEASICKNESS IS 71.3% EFFECTIVE Washington (AFPS)-Dramamine, the new air and seasickness remedy with which the Armed Services have been experimenting recently, proved 71.3 per cent effective in tests made at the USAF School of Aviation Medicine. Originally developed as a hay fever remedy, Dramamine was found to cure car sickness when taken by a patient treated for hay fever. Experiments made on Army transports showed it also was fairly effective against seasickness. The recent Air Force tests were made on 18 volunteers in flights at 5,000 feet altitude, with pilots manipulating the planes to simulate flight through "gentle and moderately turbulent air." Further studies under actually turbulent conditions are plannedE UN OFFICIAL SAYS NEW GERM MAKES A-BOMB OBSOLETE (AFPS)-The atom bomb has been rendered obsolete by new bacteriological weapons capable of wiping out mankind, says Dr. Brock Chisholm, director general of the United Nations World Health Organization. Addressing a recent conference of the organization at St. Cerque, Switzerland, Dr. Chisholm declared that scientists have found one substance so deadly that seven ounces, properly distributed, could kill all the people in the world within six hours. He did not name the substance. The UN health chief appealed for a "new maturity" to prevent future wars, adding: "One more war can result in the killing of as much as nine-tenths of the human race." Oleomargarine is a food bought by people who have seen butter days. URGE EARLY SHIPMENT OF O'SEAS YULE GIFTS Washington (AFPS)-Christmas mail and gift packages for members of the Armed Forces stationed overseas should be mailed between October 15 and November 15 to assure holiday season delivery. Gifts should be packed securely in box materials of metal, wood or strong fiberboard. (Many stores feature special containers for overseas mailing.) Each such parcel should be plainly marked "Christmas parcel." The addressee's name and address, together with a list of the parcel's contents, should be written on a slip of paper and placed within the box. This precaution will enable delivery to be made if the outside address should be obliterated. The address should be placed directly on the container or wraping and not on gummed labels, which may become moist and fall off. The weight limit is 70 pounds and maximum measurement 100 inches, length and girth combined. This is about the size of an Army foot locker or U. S. mail bag. STORY OF A 1692 NOOSE MAKES SOME 1949 NEWS Boston (AFPS)-The Massachusetts legislature has been asked to reverse the convictions of 21 persons who were hanged 257 years ,ago for allegedly practicing witchcraft. State Representative Daniel Rudstein recently introduced a resolution asking that 16 women and five men who were hanged at Salem, Mass., in 1692 during the flareup of witch hunting be absolved of any crime. "COLD -KILLER" CHEMICAL DISCOVERED BY NAVY By Armed Forces Press Service It's here at last-a cure for the common cold. Credit the Navy. Surrender of the sniffles, the sneezes, the headaches and the coughs has been announced in an official communique published by the U. S. Naval Medical Bulletin. The no longer-secret weapon that did them in-a red-coated pill named "Coricidin". This victory over one of man's most irritating enemies came as an accident, since the Naval researchers actually had their guns trained on hay fever and other allergies. But the common coldwhich turned out to be hiding in the same battery of ailmentsgave up first, to the medics at the U. S. Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Illinois. The Waterloo of the cold is a newly -perfected anti -histaminic drug called chlortrimetim. It's backed up in the same miracle pill by aspirin and other old-line remedies. Navy Captain John M. Brewster says these pills are so effective they cure 90 percent of cold victims who use them within one hour after symptoms develop. Effectiveness is only three percent less within two hours. And 74 percent for the patients who received treatment within 12 hours are cured. (SEA) The first passenger railroad in the U. S. (the Baltimore and Ohio) was begun 4 July 1828. The first 14 miles was opened to traffic (horse-drawn railcar) 24 May 1830. iU (c2 -41.Sweepers man your brooms, clean sweep down, fore and aft" Satuiday, 22 October 1949 THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 5

Saturday, 22 October 1949 C p MARINE MUSINGS By CPL. Ed. Kazmierski General Military Subject Test for promotion was administered to seventy-six PFC's and CPL's on Tuesday October 18th, and on Wednesday to five SGT's and above. The results of these tests will be announced at a later date. It's been a question among a few of the men here at Marine Barracks just where SGT Joseph Maribile is employed ..Post Supply ? ? ? or Navy Side ? ? ? Not too much activity was seen on the volleyball court since last weeks standings. The Officers added five points to the three they held last week, and what a record for a start ...eight wins and one loss. The loss was handed to them by the HqCo ball club in a crucial tilt Monday. Volleyball Standings Team HqCo -----------------Officers -----------------2nd Plt GdCo -----------Staff NCO's ------------1stPlt GdCo -------------Points 8 8 7 3 1 PROTESTANT VESPERS OFF TO GOOD START Last Sunday Protestant Vesper Service was held at the Station Chapel for the first time in many months and the interest shown was very encouraging. This service is being held as a very informal kind of service consisting of a song service and a brief talk. This service has been planned so as to be of special interest to the younger men, young married couples, and teen-agers. Services will actually be conducted by members of the group. A survey was made to determine subjects which the group would like to hear discussed. The subject chosen for next Sunday night is "What is God's plan for the family". Ted McKenney, the leader of the musical part of the program, has promised that there will be special music. Although this service is considered primarily of interest to younger personnel, all are cordially invited to attend. LITTLE THEATER NOTES The Little Theater Group would like to take this opportunity to thank all Base Personnel for their patronage and cooperation. Without them "Suds" would have gone flat. The Group will hold its business meeting, Tuesday October 25th, at the Little Theater Building, Marine Site #3. Time 7:30 p.m. Due to the coming election of officers this will be an important meeting. Everyone is urged to attend ! TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Cecil Pederson and Skiddy Masterson Guess what kids, last week there wasn't any column. Did you miss us? (Don't answer that) Now we'll try to brief you on what's happened in the last two weeks. Cross your fingers and hope that we do it right. The election of the President and Vice-President has come and gone, but at this writing, the outcome had not been announced. It was a close run between Charles and Skiddy, Jeaneen and Marty, all the way, and all of us really got excited about the campaigning of each. There were some pretty good campaign stunts in those two weeks, thanks to the initative of Eunice and Ed Groome, the campaign managers. Next year there will be another election, and let's hope that the spirit is as good then as it was this year. The clubs are slowly but surely getting organized. Skiddy, Jill, Dixie and Betty wrote a constitution for the Dramatic Club, and it will probably be ratified at the next meeting. Then it will be time to elect the officers and begin working on the first play. The Library club is already organized, and the officers are as follows: Dixie Adair, president; Fred Wilson, vice-president; and Barbara Burke is secretary-treasurer. Oops, we almost forgot! the G. A. A. (This means Girls Athletic Association, if you didn't know) has elected it's officers too. Jan is president; Dixie, vicepresident; Jill, secretary-treasurer, and Ramona Sparks and Ramona Moses are the sport writers. It sure is swell to have all these organizations started now and let's hope they will all be a success. Sweet sixteen and never-ah well happy birthday, Joan. Besides the cake and punch brought to the school by Jeaneen, your party made Wednesday quite a day! The decorations, food, games and fortune telling make us wish you'd have another birthday soon. Orchids to Joan, Marty and Jill for their performances in "Suds In Your Eye". You all played your parts wonderfully, and Jeaneen, Ramona, Cecil and Phyliss looked prettier in their evening dresses than any boy could. From the grease-paint on Cecil, Jeaneen and Skiddy's hands, you could tell what they were doing-make-up of course. Hey, you .senior girls, Yvonne Irwin's mother needs assistance in setting up a girl scout troop. We know some of you are interested, so how about calling her at 343. "Does your orchestra ever play requests?" "Why, certainly, sir. What would you like us to play?" "Pinochle .." Nursery News: James Burke Delehanty born 15 October to Mr. & Mrs. J. E. Delehanty; Michele Marie Charbonneau born 16 October to ME1 and N QT Mrs. W. A. CharNOT S bonneau. CAPT Wilson has departed for the U. S. for three weeks leave to be spent hunting and fishing in his native North Carolina. We are wondering if the bird population of this Base will increase during his absence. J. White, HM3, editor of the Hospital Echo, returned from leave in the U. S. Evidently it looked so good to him he can't stay away-he is requesting an early discharge to take a position at the Veterans Hospital in Dublin, Georgia. The Hospital 'Needles' are preparing for a big season of basketball. Three players, Call, Zimmerman and Reardon, from last years team. All that's lacking right now are several new men with basketball experience to round out the team. All thats lacking right now is a coach-does anybody know where we might find one? One of the outstanding events to take place in the hospital in its entire history was CAPT R. W. Vaughn's talk last Wednesday evenning. CAPT Vaughn, Force Medical Officer, Atlantic Fleet was here with the inspection party and very graciously consented to talk to the hospital staff and their guests on his 27-month tour of duty at the Embassy in Moscow. The talk was both entertaining and informative, and greatly appreciated by all who heard it. Recruit: "Before I came into the Army, I once eliminated eating lunches to save money. Then I could afford to spend two weeks at the hospital." Buddy: "What were you suffering from?" Recruit: "Malnutrition." NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Saturday TULSA Susan Hayward Robert Preston Sunday SHORT SUBJECT PROGRAM Monday ALBUQUERQUE Randolph Scott Barbara Britton Tuesday ROGUES REGIMENT Dick Powell Marta Toren THE INIAN Page Five Saturday 22 October 1949

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Saturday, 22 October 1949 THE INDIAT%~ Otmo. Bny-20 Oct 49-2500 By Allen Collier, Sports Editor THE INDIAN PRESENTS IT'S FIRST ANNUAL ALL-STAR BASEBALL TEAM The Indian this week polled the coaches of the six teams who entered the 1949 baseball league and came up with the following team which the managers decided was to constitute the Indian's first annual all-star baseball team. The Team Position Player Team First Base "Scotty" Scott NAS Second Base Al Miller NavSta Third Base Manuel J. Garcia MarBrks Shortstop Ernie Faile NAS Outfielder Frank Leighton NAS Outfielder Tom Carcelli MarBrks Outfielder Dick Menear NavSta Outfielder Charles Collum VU-10 First Catcher Dick Koehler VU-10 Second Catcher "Jose" Martorana NAS Pitcher Johnny Werz NAS Pitcher Jim Webster NavSta Pitcher "Jack" Machtolff NavSta Honorable Mention goes to first basemen, Strechik of VU-10, Clauss of the Hospital and Webb of the Naval Station; second basemen Hamden, VU-10, Barthelemy, NAS, Rosario, NavSta, and Szymurski, of FITraGrp; Third basemen White, NavSta, PLAN WINTER SPORTS Stocklosa, NavSta and Hoppe, PLAN VU-10; Faile was an unanimous PROGRAM FOR OFFICERS selection at shortstop; Outfielders, DeSimone, MarBrks, Watford, TraPlans for Base officers' competiGrp and Buchma, NavSta; Pitchers, tion in bowling, volleyball and Slone, VU-10 and Neely, NAS. softball during the coming winter Unanimous Choices season were announced Thursday In tabulating results, the Indian by LCDR P. H. Teeter, Aide to gave the man with the highest the Commander who heads a volnumber of votes for him in his untary officers' athletic committee. position, the number one spot. In a meeting of the committee Only in the outfield did we have Wednesday, it was agreed to coma tie, thus the four outfielders mence a bowling league during included on the all-star team. The the first week in November. The managers were given a form to season will run about ten weeks fill out listing a complete team with with a final play off of the two two catchers and three pitchers. high teams. There will be no handiJohnny Werz, of the Champion capping of the bowling league but Flyers and Jim Webster of the an effort will be made to equalize runner up NavSta Sluggers were all teams. unanimous choices as was Ernie The volleyball .schedule will Faile the "all-star" short-stop. The commence the first week in Decemother races were closely contested ber and a new softball league will with the exception of one outfield be drawn up in late January. slot. Frank Leighton polled five LCDR Teeter emphasized that out of the six votes cast to cinch competition is open to all officers a berth on the first team. The and civilians who are accorded the remaining three outfielders each privileges of the Officers Club. polled three votes. Interested persons should submit And there you have it fans, the their names to Command athletic Indian's first annual all-star baseofficers prior to noon Monday, ball team as selected by the team October 24 ,for bowling and managers. We wish to thank the volleyball. managers for their aid in picking Persons now on the Base this team and to announce that not be added to bowling teams after the second annual all-star team that time to prevent the possibility will be chosen next year, and (we of packing any one team. hope) each year following. "Where did you take a bath?" "In the spring." "I said where, not when." * "Waiter, there's a button in my soup." "Typographical error, sir. It should be mutton." A man who had his purse stolen some years previously received the following letter: "Sur, years ago I stole your muny. Remorse is gnawing me so I send some back. Went it gnaws me again I will send sum more. SWIM AND WATER BALLET OCT. 27TH The NOB High School Physical Education class will participate in a swimming meet and a girls' water ballet on October 27th from 2:30 till 5:00 p.m. at the Fleet Recreation swimming Pool. This water ballet is the first to be organized in the Guantanamo Bay area and is under the supervision of Mrs. Barbara Broughton, Physical Education and swimming instructor. Members of the ballet are. Dixie Adair, Pat Besse, Barbara Broughton, Barbara Gould, Jan Hiers, Jeaneen Hummel, Phyllis Hummel, Janet Leckenby, Joan McNeal and Ramona Sparks. The entire High School, both boys and girls, is being represented in various swimming and diving events. Each contest will be judged and awards will be presented to the winners. All parents, teachers, and Base personnel are cordially invited to attend. For further news of this event and the names of the judges, see the PAPOOSE. SPORTS QUIZ WHO CAI GHT THE PASSES? What kind of a football fan are you? How many of the pass receivers can you name that caught the aerials of the following pigskin artists: 1. Notre Dame's Gus Dorais. 2. Yale's Clint Frank. 3. Stanford's Frankie Albert. 4. Alabama's Dixie Howell. 5. Notre Dame's Angelo Bertelli. 6. Michigan's Tommy Harmon. 7. Army's Arnold Tucker. 8. Notre Dame's Harry Stuhldreher. 9. Columbia's Gene Rossides. 10. Indiana's Hunchie Hoernschmeyer. 11. Georgia's Frankie Sinkwich. Check on another part of this page to see what kind of a score you racked up. 4-6 is fair, 7-8 is good, 9-11 makes you an expert. no'I .6 :uepxwrI Jaem1a .8, :lAuQ uuaiD -L !1lsn5A1SUAa lsoJ.tod '9 !awtouok utlof *g !uoslnH uo(I T~ !nmauaullu Tf~H *9 '&IIa)I SBISSVd BHL LHDflV9 OHMI OZ SIIBIISNV FOOTBALL TODAY Football today on AFRS, and WGBY locally, will be the game between the Columbia Lions and Army's unbeaten Cadets. Game time is 1:30. Broadcast 2:00. Upon completion of this game the last quarters of the Minnesota-Michigan will be aired. e Saturday, 22 October 1949 THE INW~AN Otmo. Bay-20 Oct 49-2500