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Indian

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Title:
Indian
Alternate Title:
The Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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|University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Sunday Supplement
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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___iait


Vol. IV, No. 27


U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 August 1949


NOB School Term To Begin September 12


NEW MOBILE CANTEEN
DUE HERE IN NOVEMBER

O LT K. W. Strebel, Ship's Service
Officer, announced this week that a mobile canteen will make its appearance here in Guantanamo Bay in early November. This is just one more of the many innovations the Ship's Service Department has introduced to make life here in Gtmo. more like stateside.
The mobile unit is slated for use
at baseball, softball and basketball . games, at the New Town dances
and other public gatherings. Included in the list of refreshments which will be handled by the mobile unit are; hamburgers, hot dogs, pies, coffee, cokes, milk, ice cream
and sandwiches.
Mr. Strebel said that the unit,
purchased by the Naval Ship's Service Office in New York, is the same type as is now being used at various naval bases in
the States.

BASE PLACED ON
* HURRICANE "ALERT"

The Naval Operating Base was
placed on the "alert" against a possible hurricane at 0830 on Thursday morning after a disturbance was reported brewing in a large area at sea, approximately 150 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay. Early afternoon reports said however that the disturbance was not a hurricane and the word to secure from the alert, was passed
at 1400 Thursday.

"0" CLUB LOCKERS CLOSED TO MINORS

It was announced this week that
with completion of construction of a door and passageway from the south side of the locker building, all minor male dependents will be required to use that entrance to
* the Officer's Club swimming pool.
The new passageway will permit boys' access to the men's showers but they will be barred from the
Officers' locker room.


The Naval Operating Base School, grades kindergarten through 12, will start the winter semester on Monday, September 12, according to a School Board announcement made by Captain John H. Lewis, Chairman, following last Tuesday's regular meeting of the Board. Supervising Principal John A. Permenter and an instructional staff of fifteen teachers, a school secretary, and three custodians, will meet with approximately 300 children in two modern, newly decorated plants to begin the year's school program, according to the announcement. The important information which follows has been supplied by the School Board for the guidance and help of parents and old and new NOB School students.
Kindergarten Entering Age
and Registration
There will be no nursery school this 'year. Entering kindergarten age has been set at 4 years 6 months. All children who reach this age by September 1, 1949 or during the month of September, may be registered for kindergarNEW UNIFORM FOR NAVY EM

New dress-up blue uniforms are in the offing for Navy enlisted men, but the new model will not be authorized for wear until July
1, 1952.
Features of the new uniform will be hip and side pockets, instead of the tiny watch pocket in the present
uniform and the drop front j will be replaced with a zipper.
However the traditional bell I bottom trousers will be retained in the new style. ! = The jumper will have coat
style sleeves instead of the
present tight button cuff now
being worn.
,| ,. ( { 0 0 0 O -


ten on Monday, August 29, and on no other day. Registration will be held in the School Library from 8 until 12 A.M. and from 2 until 6 P.M. Children who reach kindergarten age during the month of September will not be actually enrolled until all registered children who have reached this age have been enrolled. Acceptance of kindergarten children reaching the age of 4 years 6 months during the month of September will depend entirely upon available facilities and teachers, and those in this category who can be accepted will be enrolled chronologically, according to age. It is not anticipated that any child can be accepted for kindergarten enrollment who reaches the entering age after September (or who was born after March 31, 1945). The age of all children entering both kindergarten and first grade must be established by one of the following methods: (1) Birth Certificate, (2) Baptismal record, or (3) sworn affadavit.
First Grade
Any child who will reach the age of 5 years and 8 months by September 1, 1949 (or who was born on or before January 1, 1945) will be qualified for first grade registration if otherwise acceptable. This is a liberal entrance age requirement and deviation from it is not anticipated by the School Board. Many intelligent children are needlessly harmed by entrance into the first grade before they have reached the proper maturity level. First grade registration will be held concurrently with that of the kindergarten, also in the school library.
All Other Grades
Entrance into the second grade will be by certificate of satisfactory completion of the first grade. Doubtful or conditional cases for entrance into any grade may be given entrance or readiness tests to help determine proper placement. Second and third grade registra(Continued on Page Five)


REGISTRATION SET FOR AUGUST 29, 30, AND 31








Papre Two Tl NINStra,2 uut14


Editorial Offiice, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 27 August 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN---------------Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR----------Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless Indicated otherwise.


LITTLE THEATRE NEWS

A great deal of activity has taken place at the Little Theatre since the curtain fell on the last performance of "Years Ago" The living room of the Jones family has long since disappeared and the set of Mrs. Feeley's junk yard, in which the action of our new play, "Suds in Your Eye", takes place is gradually taking shape. A fence of Hatuey bottles forming one boundary of the 'yard' has already been built and set designers are well along in their planning on the remainder of the hectic Feeley domain.
Rehearsals have been in progress for the past two weeks for the main roles. An unusually large cast is required for 'Suds'-twentythree in all-and some of the lesser male roles are yet to he filled. Anyone interested, is urged to come to The Little Theatre any evening, Monday through Thursday at 7:30 for a try-out.
Thought and effort is being made to improve the Theatre to add to the comfort of the audience as well as to ease the burden on the players. Mr. Dalton, resident Western Electric engineer, has offered his advice and help to improve the acoustics and it is hoped that, within the limits of the funds available, progress in this regard can be made. The possibility of obtaining a suitable sound system is being investigated too and, with cooler weather due, all these things should make "SUDS" an enjoyable experience for all concerned.


YOU CAN'T WIN

DICE GAMES ARE SIMPLE, A CINCH TO GYP SUCKERS

By Ernest Blanche

(This, another in a series based on Mr. Blanche's new book, "You Can't Win".)

Rattling resonately down the ages, dice games have provided mankind with one of its favorite forms of self-invited risk.
Always of widespread interest, dice games are probably at the peak of their popularity today-the outgrowth of the war time introduction of millions of young men to the "galloping dominoes".
The standard game of dice is the one known in the vernacular as "craps". It is a game of mechanical simplicity.
Odds Against Winning
In the standard game, the tosser wins if he scores a 7 or 11 on the first throw. The probability of a seven .is 6 out of 36, and fat an 11 it is 2 out of 36.
The tosser loses if a 2, 3, or 12 appears on the first throw. The probability of a 2 is 1 out of 36; for a 3 it is 2 out of 36 and for twelve it is again one out of 36.
Thus the tosser has twice as much chance winning on the first toss as he does of losing. If the first toss is any other number, the shooter continues to throw the dice until he repeats the number, thus winning, or until he tosses a 7, thus losing.
Careful computation shows that the dice tosser has 244 chances to win out of 495, and 251 chances to lose. Thus the odds are always 251 to 244 against the dice-tosser.
Six to Five You Lose
There is a standard saying: "Never bet with the dice". Why is this so?
Notice for example, that the chance of making an 8 on a single toss of the dice is 5 out of 36, while the probability of making a seven are 6 out of 36. The shooter with an eight for a point will win even money if he tosses an eight before a 7, but the chances are 6 to 5 he won't win. The same thing is true of the point 6.
In small games, there is often another condition which works against the tosser. A "professional" game organizer may take a slice of the money being wagered for acting as the judge and handling the money.
Sometimes gambling houses use dice which are so constructed as to toss certain numbers more often than others. Some have special tables wired so they can be magnetized, the dice containing metal. And phoney dice often are used. Clever manipulators can interchange these dice whenever they choose.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, August 28, 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


Arrivals: Born
to C1 and Mrs.
William M u mm a w, USN, their second child, Ruth Ann, 4 pounds 9 ounces, on 18
- August 1949.
Mummaw is atNOT Stached to the USS
SHAKORI ATF 165. To BMC and
Mrs. Clarence N. Nelson, USN, their second child, Nancy, 7 pounds 9 ounces, on 21 August 1949. Chief Nelson is attached to the Base Police.
Reporting in off leave this week we have: Simmons, HN; Schimmel, HN; Cook, SN; and Lauder, HN. All reported a wonderful time in the States.
Orders are in for Patrick Caruso, HM3, to the U. S. Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for a normal tour of shore duty. He will be detached next week. Re-enlisting on board on the 20th of August was V. A. Mertz, CS3, for a period of three years.
Martin, HM3, Hammer, HM3; Murray, HA; and MacDonald, HA; returned to the hospital Monday evening after spending the weekend in Kingston, Jamaica. The quartet made the weekend recreation cruise to Jamaica aboard the USS SALEM (CA 139). They reported a fine time both while on the Salem and in Kingston.
This week we welcome aboard two new members to our staff. The first was LTJG Walter T. Annon, MC, USNR. who reported aboard for two years active duty. He will be the Assistant to the Chief of Surgery.
The second new member to join us was Miss Jean Cushman, native of Titusville, Florida. Miss Cushman has accepted a position as Nurses Aide in the Dependents' Clinic. Born to ADi and Mrs. James I. Miller, USN, their second child, Patricia Lynn, 8 pounds 8 ounces, in 11 August 1949. Miller is attached to VU-10.


r.


0














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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 27 August 1949


Page Two








Saturday 27 August 1949 TPave Three


TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
Ask any of the Little Theatre teen-age members what they did last Saturday night and notice their starry-eyed looks as they tell you about the party there. Some of the teen-age girls spent all morning cleaning and decorating the place and then went home for those important before-party preparations. That night they danced, played jokes on each other and-oh well you've probably been hearing about it all week.
Pat Besse's 14th birthday rolled around with a wonderful picnic at Windmill Beach. Her guest list included Jill, Jan, Pat Burke, Bob, Eunice, Jack, Jeaneen, Dixie, and Russel. Swimming, hiking, and eating seems to have been the plan of the day-with eating taking first place-and what food! Happy Birthday Pat! -have another one soon!
Hi Joan, it sure is nice to see you around again. Joan McNeal, who has spent two weeks in Ocala, Florida got back Friday before last. It "ain't" the same without you, kid!
Mr. McNeal's Sunday school class is looking forward to their picnic today. They are going via a great big truck, and so far thats


NAVY WAVES SENT TO OVERSEAS POSTS
Boston, Mass. (AFPS)-Plans to assign Waves to overseas duty with the Navy have been anrounced. The first group of 12 enlisted women will leave for London in September.
The Navy also announces that additional small contingents will be assigned to Hawaii and Alaska during subsequent months when current surveys are completed to determine the number of Waves who can be utilized. Additional overseas assignments will be made in the Caribbean and the Canal Zone.
Another Navy announcement stated that the first four enlisted Waves to be commissioned in the r gular Service have been enrolled in the Navy's General Line School.
The four women are among 26, all newly commissioned, who will take the five-month indoctrination course in Naval administration.

all we know about it. Tell you next week though.
Hey kids lets start filling up that chatter-box again, its begining to get a rather hungry look about it. What about it? Remember its your column.


GTMO. FISHERMAN
MAKES "ALL HANDS"

W. W. Stansell, EMI, attached to the Naval Station Boatshed, who broke into the news here in early May with his prize haul of a 52pound, 61-inch barracuda while trolling is featured in the August issue of ALL HANDS.
A picture showing Stansell measuring his fish and a short story on fishing in general in the Guantanamo area is included in the article which is entitled, "Hook Line and Sinker Sailors". Stansell, whose home is in Macon, Georgia, caught the prize barracuda just after reporting aboard the Naval Station for duty.

WGBY TO BROADCAST
BASEBALL SERIES
Jim Herrington, program manager of WGBY, the local outlet station of the Armed Forces Radio Service announced this week that WGBY will carry a play-by-play broadcast of the forthcoming baseball series to determine the base champions.
Remember, if you can't go set your dial at 1450 and let Jim Herrington tell you all about it.


FIRST HALF WINNERS.... ......................... NAS FLYERS













A~tI4 A s4


, A 111


FRONT ROW (L to R): Martorana, Werz, Treamer, LTJG Fellers (Coach) Scott, Keane, R. Brown, Comeaux BACK ROW - Adams, Gallagher, Eggebrecht, Akers (scorekeeper), Leighton, Berg, Arnsmeyer, Faile and Benningfield. Not Shown - Graves, Gaskin, Neely, Barthelemy, Torrence and Ruest.


Saturday 27 August 1949


THE IND)IAN


Page Three








Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 27 August 1949


AIR ACADEMY PLAN GOES TO CONGRESSS; AF NEED STRESSED

Washington (AFPS)-Plans for s $171 million Air Force Acadcrmy, comparable to West Point and Annapolis, have been subinitted to Congress by Defense Secretary Louis Johnson. Mr. Johnson pointed out that the Air Force is handicapped by lack of training facilities for its officers and urgently needs a separate academy.
Mr. Johnson's plans were based on the recommendations of a special board headed by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower and Dr. Robert L. Stearns, president of the University of Colorado.
The board disapproved suggestions for attempts to expand West Point and the Annapolis Naval Academy, and held that a sep:-rate Air Force Academy would promote service unification by placing the Air Force on an equal basis with the other Services in the matter of training facilities.

SHIP NAMED FOR
IWO JIMA HERO

Boston, Mass. (AFPS) - The Navy's newest anti-submarine destroyer, the U. S. S Basilone, honors a former Marine.
The Navy vessel was recently named in honor of John Basilone of Raritan, N. J., known to his buddies as "Manila John".
Basilone, the second enlisted man to receive the Congressional medal of honor was killed on Iwo Jima after surviving bloody battles on Guadacanal.
The Basilone (DD-824) is slated to arrive in Guantanamo Bay on the 24th of October and stay here through December 1. While here on her shakedown cruise, she will also participate in Anti-submarine drills.

BANANAWEIGHT CHAMP ENLISTS IN THE MARINES

Cincinnati (AFPS)-Glenn Bathalter of Covington, Ky., is the unofficial bananaweight champion of the world. For three years he was in the lightweight class, but just couldn't nake the minimum limit of 148 pounds necessary to achieve his ambition of joining the Marines.
When he tried to enlist again recently, he was only seven pounds shy. So he got ten pounds of bananas and started in peeling and eating. Two and a half hours later, he nudged the scales slightly over the mark, and he's in boot class now.

BUY SAVINGS BONDS


NAVY BEGINS WORK ON ANTI-SUB BLIMP TO COMBAT SNORKEL
(Answers on Page Six)
Washing t on (AFPS)-Consiruction has been started on a new anti-submarine blimp developed for the Navy, which will be fitted with the latest equipment for combating snorkel submarines, o recent NME release states.
The new blimp designated as N-type, will be capable of longiange patrol over ocean areas and will be able to hover motionless while its equipment is used to detect and track sumarines.
The new ship will be the largest non-rigid airship ever built, with an overall length of 324 feet.
The N-type will be able to refuel in flight by dropping a fuel line to a surface ship, and to reballast by scooping water from the ocean. It will have air-sea rescue devices, including an electrical winch for hauling survivors aboard.
The gas bag will have a capacity of 875,000 cubic feet and will be inflated with non-inflammnable helium. The ship will be capable of a speed of 75 knots and will carry a load of more than 4% tons.

SPORTIN' AROUND

1. Who was the last National league pitcher to win 30 games in one season?
2. Vince Foster, welterweight fighter killed recently in an auto accident, became famous almost overnight. Do you remember whom he defeated to win national acclaim?
3. Was there ever a World Series played in which every game was a shutout?
4 How long did Marcel Cerdan hold the world's middleweight championship and from whom did be win it?
5. What is the record speed for the 500-mile Indianapolis Speedway race? Who holds the mark?
6. What two well-known tennis stars participated in the finals of this year's national professional tennis championship, and who won the crown?
7. How many times was Joe Louis defeated after he won the heavyweight title from Jimmy Braddock in 1937?
8. In what famous American race are horses entered before their birth ?
9. Who clouted the first homer 'n the annual American LeagueNational League All-Star game?
10. What has been hailed as the greatest pitching performance in the history of the All-Star classic?


CHUCKLES
* * *
By Armed Forces Press Service

Chick: "Was that a Chinese we saw looking in the window last right? "
Edee: "Yes, that was a Peiping
Tom."4

Scene: Kansas cyclone country.
Si: "Say, that was a mighty powerful wind we had last night. Hurt your house any?"
Lem: "Don't know as yet. Haven't found anything but the porch so far."

Blonde: (haughtily) "Sir, my lips are saved for another!"
Marine: "Okey, hold still, and I'll give you another and anether."
4 * *
"What's the trouble with Jack today?"
"Oh, he had a shoeshine, and then remembered he had on his roommate's shoes."

Prof: "Young lady, why do you knit in my class?"
Coed: "I need something to keep my mind occupied while I'm listening to your lecture."
* * *
"Another thing I like about me is, I never over indulge in the consumption of things I don't like."

PERTINENT REFERENCES FOR CPO EXAM LISTED

(SEA) -If you're an eligible first class petty officer preparing for the Navy-wide competitive examination on 1 December for CPO, acting appointment, here are briefly outlined handy references on various requirements and qualifications.
19 4 9 Announcement-BuPers Circ. Ltr. 107-49 (NDB, 30 June 1949).
Exam Administration Details
-BuPers Circ. Ltr. 106-49 (NDB, 30 June 1949).
General Requirement-Articles C-7201, C-7202 and C-7208, BuPers Manual, 1948; BuPers Circ. Ltr. 155-48 (NDB, 15 Aug. 1948, p. 63, 48-612).
Service, Sea Duty, MarksBuPer Circ. Ltr. 155-48.
Qualifications for Advancement in Rating (NavPers 18068), including Change No. 1 thereto.
Training School-BuPers Circ. Ltr. 81-49 (NDB, 15 May 1949, p. 31, 49-363).
Waves, USNR personnel on active duty, Fleet Reservists and retired EMs on active duty; repatriated EMs and temporary USN and USNR officers whose permanent status is enlisted-enclosure
(G) to BuPers Circ. Ltr. 155-48.


Page Four


THE INDIAN


Saturday, 27 August 1949








Satuday 27 ugut 199 TE INIANPage Five


REGISTRATION
DATES SET
(Continued from Page One)

tion will also be held on Monday, August 29 at the same time and place as kindcrgarten-first grade. Parents will register for kindergarten and primary age children who should not be brought to school during registration.
Grades four through eight will register during the same hours and at the same place on Tuesday, August 30; and grades nine through twelve, on Wednesday, August 31, similarly. There will be no school bus transportation during registration and the regular school bus schedule for children will not go into operation until the opening day of school.
General Information
No tuition will be collected during registration. Monthly bills will be sent out after school begins and tuition and fees will be payable monthly in advance for nine calendar months. Hours and place of payment will be announced later.
Books, workbooks, and essential supplies (including paper, pencils, erasers, rulers, etc.) will be furnished in normal amounts by the school in grades 1 through 8, and a charge of $1.00 per month for eight months will be included with tuition bills. In grades 9 through 12, only pencils, notebook binders, notebook paper, and scratch paper will be furnished, and a charge of 50, per month for eight months will be included on tuition bills in these grades. Textbooks, workbooks, and other senior high school required or optional personal supplies will be the responsibility of individual students. Texts and workbooks will be ordered by the school and billed on a cost basis when made available, as was done last year.
More than $3000.00 worth of the most modern instructional materials and equipment available have been ordered by the school board and most of it will be on hand and ready for use by the opening of school. These materials include maps, globes, charts, strip films, recordings, record players, reference and library books, and other valuable teaching aids. Textbooks have been ordered for all grades and it is expected that most of them will be available for the opening week of school.
The new school building and some other important information concerning the plans for the opening of school will be discussed in next week's INDIAN.

(SEA) - Madagascar's pitcher plant is a shrub four feet high, bearing jug-shaped, water-filled pitchers in which it traps and digests unwary insects.


Mr. dames A. Marsden, Commodity Specialist, who arrived via MATS Monday night, and was met by LCDR. Weatherson, has accepted a position with the Naval Supply Depot. His last position was with the Boston Naval Shipyard. Mr. Marsden will be working with the NSD Material Department in connection with the Identification and Preservation Program. His home is located in New Bedford, Mass. While he is with NSD he will be residing at OP-8. Welcome aboard Mr. Marsden, and may your position with NSD, and stay in Guantanamo be a pleasant one.
For personnel interested in Langouste fishing, they seem to be plentiful at the present time. If anyone is in doubt, ask Chief Quinn who went out last week and caught 56! LTJG Foster also went out and came back with 16, but said there were plenty more if he had wanted them.
HITCHENS, BMC, reported on board during the week, and has been assigned the duties of Chief Master at Arms of NSD, and Chief in Charge of the inventory crew. Welcome aboard!

MARINE FLASHES

By PFC. Ed. Kazmierski
A Beer Party Picnic was held at the Race Track last Saturday afternoon. The more energetic played a few games, including a softball game between the Brown Baggers and the Single Stripers.
Excellent food was served by Mess Sergeant Stroud, and the refreshments were dominated by the famed "One Eyed Indian", so naturally everyone had a good time.
In all the excitement during the past couple of weeks it appears that we neglected to mention what should be one of the most important news items down here ... that being of course, the reenlistment of CPL. Robert Keys. The Corporal feels that when a man reenlists, it should be considered top news so we'll agree with him and extend congratulations. Marine Barracks welcomes aboard 1stLT. Robert L. Neef who reported in from Marine Barracks, New London. LT. Neef will relieve our present Post Exchange Officer, LT. Cass of his extra duty in the latter part of September.
Congratulations are extended to our Provost Marshal who climbed another rung on the Ladder of Success . . . William H. Souder was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.
BUY SAVINGS BONDS


HERE ARE CPO
SERVICE, SEA, MARK
REQUIREMENTS

(SEA) -Service, sea duty and mark requirements of first class petty officers desiring to be recommended to take the Navy-wide competitive examination for CPO are as follows:
Service-36 months in pay grade 2. Sea duty of at least six months as P01, except for Waves and personnel in IM, OM, CT, MA, DM, JO and aviation ratings as well as those classified for limited shore duty by BuMed.
Proficiency in Rating-No mark less than 3.0 for preceding 24 months and an average of not less than 3.5 for 24 months preceding advancement.
Conduct-No mark less than 3.0 for preceding 24 months and an average of not less than 3.5 for 24 months preceding advancement.

PHOTO VIEW FINDER
TO IMPROVE NAVY CARRIER LANDINGS

(SEA) -Problems of airplane landings on Navy carriers may be solved by a new development in aviation - a photographic view finder which makes it possible for a pilot to see the image of his own plane as well as the terrain below.
With such a view finder (with certain modifications) naval photo technicians believe alignment can be made more accurately of carrier planes with their floating bases. It also would assist visual observation in the helicopter rescue system when the objective is directly below the rotary-wing ship.






NAVAL STATION LYCEUM

Saturday Aug. 27 Through
Tuesday Aug. 30.
Saturday
AN INNOCENT AFFAIR
F. McMurray Madeline Carrol
Sunday
BAMBA, THE JUNGLE BOY J. Sheffield Peggy Ann Garner
Monday
EL PASO
John Wayne Gail Rusell
Tuesday
LET'S LIVE A LITTLE
Hedy LaMarr Robert Cummings
NOTE: Due to the fact that a fresh supply of movies have not yet reached the local film exchange it is impossible to print a full weekly schedule. A day-by-day schedule will be printed in the Papoose until the new films arrive.


Saturday, 27 August 1949


THE INDIAN


Page Five







Page Six TEIDA lm.By2 u 121


MARINE CLAIMS RECORD WITH 194-PAGE LETTER

(SEA)-Those marine marathon men of letters are at it again. The latest leatherneck letter-writer to lay claim to some sort of a record is a prolific penman by the name of Don Wilson who's a private first class assigned to the Marine Corps detachment aboard USS Pasadena (CL 65). He composed a 194-page billet-doux to his future wife. The massive missive, in small writing, covered both sides of 97 standard-size sheets. The project consumed 45 hours during a voyage from U. S. to China, from where, because of its bulk, it had to be packaged and mailed out under a customs declaration.
Earlier in the yeai, a corporal at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Calif., had stood in the literary light by virtue of a 64-page affair which knocked a Guam devildog's 52-page masterpiece off the writing-record pedestal.

A RUBBER X

Miami (AFPS)-Lewis West
can't read or write, but he's serving eleven months in Federal prison on a forgery charge. Secret Service agents say he . simply marked an "X" on the back of the checks, and gullible merchants paid off.

SPORTING' AROUND
(Answers)
1. Dizzy Dean, St. Louis Cardinals hurler did it in 1934.
2. Foster gained nation-wide recognition by kayoing Tony Pellone.
3. In the 1905 Series between the Giants and Athletics, all five games ended in shutouts. The Giants took the series.
4. Cerdan won the title from Tony Zale in September, 1948, and lost the crown to Jake Lamotta in June, 1949
5. Bill Campbell set a new record of 121.327 miles an hour in winning the 1949 race in four hours, seven minutes and 15.97 seconds.
6. Bobby Riggs defeated Don Budge for the pro championship.
7. Louis was never beaten while heavyweight champ. His only pro defeat was administered by Max Schmeling on June 19, 1936 when the latter scored a twelfth-round kayo.
8. The Futurity.
9. Babe Ruth smacked the first All-Star game homer in the third inning of the 1933 event to pace the American Leaguers to a 4 to 2 victory.
10. Carl Hubbell's feat in striking out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmy Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin in the 1934 game at the Polo Grounds.


Rain Again Interrupts Play

FLYERS BOW TO SLUGGERS, 4 - 2; TWO TILTS REMAIN
TO BE PLAYED TO FINISH SEASON

By Allen Collier, Sports Editor
Apparently Mother Nature has same manner as they did in the
decided to keep everyone in sus- washed out game last week, on pense a little while longer as rain overthrows, passed balls and errors. interrupted play in the final round The Sluggers failed to score in of the Baseball league for the sec- their half of the third and no one ond week in a row. scored until the Flyers got their
The big game of the week was, second run across in the top of the
of course, the replay of the Naval fifth virtually the same way. Station-NAS battle washed out Sluggers Rally
in the ninth inning last week. In the bottom of the sixth the
Came Tuesday night and some 650 Sluggers came to life momentarily
fans again made their way to the and tied the score with a two-run fleet recreation diamond to see rally. Things went along on an
these two teams battle each other. even keel until the bottom of the
As was predicted, the game turn- eighth. Joe Stocklosa led off for ed out to be more of a pitcher's the Sluggers and managed to get duel than anything else with John- on first. He stole second and scored ny Werz, noted Flyer right hander a few moments later when Gerald being opposed by Jim Webster, Keane, Flyer third baseman, let
Slugger southpaw ace. Primm's hot ground ball go through
The first inning was almost the his legs into left field, Primm same for both sides. Werz struck legged it all the way around when out all three Sluggers to face him Graves, Flyer left fielder, was and Webster disposed of two of caught napping on the play and
the three Flyers to face him via the made a desperation dive for the
same route. At that moment it ball but failed to come up vith
looked like it would be a long hard it. It was the second home run ball game possibly going into for Primmn against the Flyers and overtime, it came exactly the same way
down the left field line.
The Flyers got one run in the That was the deciding break of
top of the third in identically the the ball game Flyer fans got a


j




















JIM WEBSTER, southpaw pitching ace of the Naval Station will probably hurl for the Sluggers in their final game of the second round against VI! 10. Webster who hurled two-hit ball on Tuesday night once pitched a no-hitter against an Indiana team while Playing American Legion baseball


S


bit of a thrill in the ninth when Ernie Faile drilled a long line drive into deep centerfield, but Menear went back to haul it in. The Flyers managed to get one man to second in the final frameJim Eggebrecht-a pincbhitter, but he was picked off with the oldest trick in baseball-the hidden ball.
Webster Hurls two-Hitter
For the Sluggers, Webster hurled beautiful two-hit ball, and although he was consistently behind the hitters he came through with the o right pitch. He whiffed 15. Carlisle started behind the plate for the Sluggers but was replaced by Webb after letting a couple of balls get by him.
Since rain has postponed play in the league until further notice, the Naval Station will most surely enter the VU-10 game in the role of the favorite. Almost without a doubt, Webster will again twirl for the Sluggers. The Airdales will probably counter with their onetwo punch of Slone and Stever.
In the only other action of the week, the Marines chalked up their first and only win of the second round by belting the Training Group by a 13-5 count. The Training Group has one game left to play, that with the Hospital. Dates for the last two games of the second round and the opening of the Championship series will be announced in the Indian, if possible, and over WGBY.


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___iaa Vol. IV, No. 27 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 27 August 1949 NOB School Term To Begin September 12 NEW MOBILE CANTEEN DUE HERE IN NOVEMBER LT K. W. Strebel, Ship's Service Officer, announced this week that a mobile canteen will make its appearance here in Guantanamo Bay in early November. This is just one more of the many innovations the Ship's Service Department has introduced to make life here in Gtmo. more like stateside. The mobile unit is slated for use at baseball, softball and basketball games, at the New Town dances and other public gatherings. Included in the list of refreshments which will be handled by the mobile unit are; hamburgers, hot dogs, pies, coffee, cokes, milk, ice cream and sandwiches. Mr. Strebel said that the unit, purchased by the Naval Ship's Service Office in New ,York, is the same type as is now being used at various naval bases in the States. BASE PLACED ON HURRICANE "ALERT" The Naval Operating Base was placed on the "alert" against a possible hurricane at 0830 on Thursday morning after a disturbance was reported brewing in a large area at sea, approximately 150 miles southeast of Guantanamo Bay. Early afternoon reports said however that the disturbance was not a hurricane and the word to secure from the alert, was passed at 140.0 Thursday. "0" CLUB LOCKERS CLOSED TO MINORS It was announced this week that with completion of construction of a door and passageway from the south side of the locker building, all minor male dependents will be required to use that entrance to the Officer's Club swimming pool. The new passageway will permit boys' access to the men's showers but they will be barred from the Officers' locker room. The Naval Operating Base School, grades kindergarten through 12, will start the winter semester on Monday, September 12, according to a School Board announcement made by Captain John H. Lewis, Chairman, following last Tuesday's regular meeting of the Board. Supervising Principal John A. Permenter and an instructional staff of fifteen teachers, a school secretary, and three custodians, will meet with approximately 300 children in two modern, newly decorated plants to begin the year's school program, according to the announcement. The important information which follows has been supplied by the School Board for the guidance and help of parents and old and new NOB School students. Kindergarten Entering Age and Registration There will be no nursery school this year. Entering kindergarten age has been set at 4 years 6 months. All children who reach this age by September 1, 1949 or during the month of September, may be registered for kindergarNEW UNIFORM FOR NAVY EM I New dress-up blue uniforms are in the offing for Navy enlisted men, but the new model will not be authorized for wear until July I 1, 1952. j Features of the new uniform will be hip and side pockets, instead of the tiny watch pocket in the present uniform and the drop front will be replaced with a zipper. I However the traditional bell bottom trousers will be retained in the new style. The jumper will have coat 5 style sleeves instead of the present tight button cuff now being worn. ten on Monday, August 29, and on no other day. Registration will be held in the School Library from 8 until 12 A.M. and from 2 until 6 P.M. Children who reach kindergarten age during the month of September will not be actually enrolled until all registered children who have reached this age have been enrolled. Acceptance of kindergarten children reaching the age of 4 years 6 months during the month of September will depend entirely upon available facilities and teachers, and those in this category who can be accepted will be enrolled chronologically, according to age. It is not anticipated that any child can be accepted for kindergarten enrollment who reaches the entering age after September (or who was born after March 31, 1945). The age of all children entering both kindergarten and first grade must be established by one of the following methods: (1) Birth Certificate, (2) Baptismal record, or (3) sworn affadavit. First Grade Any child who will reach the age of 5 years and 8 months by September 1, 1949 (or who was born on or before January 1, 1945) will be qualified for first grade registration if otherwise acceptable. This is a liberal entrance age requirement and deviation from it is not anticipated by the School Board. Many intelligent children are needlessly harmed by entrance into the first grade before they have reached the proper maturity level. First grade registration will be held concurrently with that of the kindergarten, also in the school library. All Other Grades Entrance into the second grade will be by certificate of satisfactory completion of the first grade. Doubtful or conditional cases for entrance into any grade may be given entrance or readiness tests to help determine proper placement. Second and third grade registra(Continued on Page Five) REGISTRATION SET FOR AUGUST 29, 30, AND 31

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Pag~e Two THE INDIAN Stra,2 uut14 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 27 August 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, JOSN-------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. LITTLE THEATRE NEWS A great deal of activity has taken place at the Little Theatre since the curtain fell on the last performance of "Years Ago" The living room of the Jones family has long since disappeared and the set of Mrs. Feeley's junk yard, in which the action of our new play, "Suds in Your Eye", takes place is gradually taking shape. A fence of Hatuey bottles forming one boundary of the 'yard' has already been built and set designers are well along in their planning on the remainder of the hectic Feeley domain. Rehearsals have been in progress for the past two weeks for the main roles. An unusually large cast is required for 'Suds'-twentythree in all-and some of the lesser male roles are yet to be filled. Anyoneinterested, is urged to come to The Little Theatre any evening, Monday through Thursday at 7:30 for a try-out. Thought and effort is being made to improve the Theatre to add to the comfort of the audience as well as to ease the burden on the players. Mr. Dalton, resident Western Electric engineer, has offered his advice and help to improve the acoustics and it is hoped that, within the limits of the funds available, progress in this regard can be made. The possibility of obtaining a suitable sound system is being investigated too and, with cooler weather due, all these things should make "SUDS" an enjoyable experience for all concerned. YOU CAN'T WIN DICE GAMES ARE SIMPLE, A CINCH TO GYP SUCKERS By Ernest Blanche (This, another in a series based on Mr. Blanche's new book, "You Can't Win".) Rattling resonately down the ages, dice games have provided mankind with one of its favorite forms of self-invited risk. Always of widespread interest, dice games are probably at the peak of their popularity today-the outgrowth of the war time introduction of millions of young men to the "galloping dominoes". The standard game of dice is the one known in the vernacular as "craps". It is a game of mechanical simplicity. Odds Against Winning In the standard game, the tosser wins if he scores a 7 or 11 on the first throw. The probability of a seven is 6 out of 36, and for an 11 it is 2 out of 36. The tosser loses if a 2, 3, or 12 appears on the first throw. The probability of a 2 is 1 out of 36; for a 3 it is 2 out of 36 and for twelve it is again one out of 36. Thus the tosser has twice as much chance winning on the first toss as he does of losing. If the first toss is any other number, the shooter continues to throw the dice until he repeats the number, thus winning, or until he tosses a 7, thus losing. Careful computation shows that the dice tosser has 244 chances to win out of 495, and 251 chances to lose. Thus the odds are always 251 to 244 against the dice-tosser. Six to Five You Lose There is a standard saying: "Never bet with the dice". Why is this so ? Notice for example, that the chance of making an 8 on a single toss of the dice is 5 out of 36, while the probability of making a seven are 6 out of 36. The shooter with an eight for a point will win even money if he tosses an eight before a 7, but the chances are 6 to 5 he won't win. The same thing is true of the point 6. In small games, there is often another condition which works against the tosser. A "professional" game organizer may take a slice of the money being wagered for acting as the judge and handling the money. Sometimes gambling houses use dice which are so constructed as to toss certain numbers more often than others. Some have special tables wired so they can be magnetized, the dice containing metal. And phoney dice often are used. Clever manipulators can interchange these dice whenever they choose. 4* CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, August 28, 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0980-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) Arrivals: Born to CS1 and Mrs. William Mu mSma w, USN, their second child, Ruth Ann, 4 pounds 9 ounces, on 18 August 1949. Mummaw is atM tached to the USS NOTE S SHAKORI ATF 165. To BMC and Mrs. Clarence N. Nelson, USN, their second child, Nancy, 7 pounds 9 ounces, on 21 August 1949. Chief Nelson is attached to the Base Police. Reporting in off leave this week we have: Simmons, HN; Schimmel, HN; Cook, SN; and Lauder, HN. All reported a wonderful time in the States. Orders are in for Patrick Caruso, HM3, to the U. S. Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for a normal tour of shore duty. He will be detached next week. Re-enlisting on board on the 20th of August was V. A. Mertz, CS3, for a period of three years. Martin, HM3, Hammer, HM3; Murray, HA; and MacDonald, HA; returned to the hospital Monday evening after spending the weekend in Kingston, Jamaica. The quartet made the weekend recreation cruise to Jamaica aboard the USS SALEM (CA 139). They reported a fine time both while on the Salem and in Kingston. This week we welcome aboard two new members to our staff. The first was LTJG Walter T. Annon, MC, USNR. who reported aboard for two years active duty. He will be the Assistant to the Chief of Surgery. The second new member to join us was Miss Jean Cushman, native of Titusville, Florida. Miss Cushman has accepted a position as Nurses Aide in the Dependents' Clinic. Born to AD1 and Mrs. James I. Miller, USN, their second child, Patricia Lynn, 8 pounds 8 ounces, in 11 August 1949. Miller is attached to VU-10. 0 THE INDIAN Saturday, 27 August 1949 Page Two

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, Pae Three TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP Ask any of the Little Theatre teen-age members what they did last Saturday night and notice their starry-eyed looks as they tell you about the party there. Some of the teen-age girls spent all morning cleaning and decorating the place and then went home for those important before-party preparations. That night they danced, played jokes on each other and-oh well you've probably been hearing about it all week. Pat Besse's 14th birthday rolled around with a wonderful picnic at Windmill Beach. Her guest list included Jill, Jan, Pat Burke, Bob, Eunice, Jack, Jeaneen, Dixie, and Russel. Swimming, hiking, and eating seems to have been the plan of the day-with eating taking first place-and what food! Happy Birthday Pat! -have another one soon! Hi Joan, it sure is nice to see you around again. Joan McNeal, who has spent two weeks in Ocala, O Florida got back Friday before last. It "ain't" the same without you, kid! Mr. McNeal's Sunday school class is looking forward to their picnic today. They are going via a great big truck, and so far thats NAVY WAVES SENT TO OVERSEAS POSTS Boston, Mass. (AFPS)-Plans to assign Waves to overseas duty with the Navy have been announced. The first group of 12 enlisted women will leave for London in September. The Navy also announces that additional small contingents will be assigned to Hawaii and Alaska during subsequent months when current surveys are completed to determine the number of Waves who can be utilized. Additional overseas assignments will be made in the Caribbean and the Canal Zone. Another Navy announcement stated that the first four enlisted Waves to be commissioned in the regular Service have been enrolled in the Navy's General Line School. The four women are among 26, all newly commissioned, who will take the five-month indoctrination course in Naval administration. all we know about it. Tell you next week though. Hey kids lets start filling up that chatter-box again, its begining to get a rather hungry look about it. What about it? Remember its your column. GTMO. FISHERMAN MAKES "ALL HANDS" W. W. Stansell, EM1, attached to the Naval Station Boatshed, who broke into the news here in early May with his prize haul of a 52pound, 61-inch barracuda while trolling is featured in the August issue of ALL HANDS. A picture showing Stansell measuring his fish and a short story on fishing in general in the Guantanamo area is included in the article which is entitled, "Hook Line and Sinker Sailors". Stansell, whose home is in Macon, Georgia, caught the prize barracuda just after reporting aboard the Naval Station for duty. WGBY TO BROADCAST BASEBALL SERIES Jim Herrington, program manager of WGBY, the local outlet station of the Armed Forces Radio Service announced this week that WGBY will carry a play-by-play broadcast of the forthcoming baseball series to determine the base champions. Remember, if you can't go set your dial at 1450 and let Jim Herrington tell you all about it. FIRST HALF WINNERS ...NAS FLYERS FRONT ROW (L to R): Martorana, Werz, Treamer, LTJG Fellers (Coach) Scott, Keane, R. Brown, Comeaux BACK ROW -Adams, Gallagher, Eggebrecht, Akers (scorekeeper), Leighton, Berg, Arnsmeyet, Faile and Benningfield. Not Shown -Graves, Gaskin, Neely, Barthelemy, Torrence and Ruest. Saturday 27 August 1.949 THE INDIAN Page Three

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TRE INDIAN Saturday. 27 August 1949 AIR ACADEMY PLAN GOES TO CONGRESSS; AF NEED STRESSED Washington (AFPS)-Plans for a $171 million Air Force Academy, comparable to West Point and Annapolis, have been submitted to Congress by Defense Secretary Louis Johnson. Mr. Johnson pointed out that the Air Force is handicapped by lack of training facilities for its officers and urgently needs a separate academy. Mr. Johnson's plans were based on the recommendations of a special board headed by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower and Dr. Robert L. Stearns, president of the University of Colorado. The board disapproved suggestions for attempts to expand West Point and the Annapolis Naval Academy, and held that a separate Air Force Academy would promote service unification by placing the Air Force on an equal basis with the other Services in the matter of training facilities. SHIP NAMED FOR IWO JIMA HERO Boston, Mass. (AFPS) -The Navy's newest anti-submarine destroyer, the U. S. S Basilone, honors a former Marine. The Navy vessel was recently named in honor of John Basilone of Raritan, N. J., known to his buddies as "Manila John". Basilone, the second enlisted man to receive the Congressional medal of honor was killed on Iwo Jima after surviving bloody battles on Guadacanal. The Basilone (DD-824) is slated to arrive in Guantanamo Bay on the 24th of October and stay here through December 1. While here on her shakedown cruise, she will also participate in Anti-submarine drills. BANANAWEIGHT CHAMP ENLISTS IN THE MARINES Cincinnati (AFPS)-Glenn Bathalter of Covington, Ky., is the unofficial bananaweight champion of the world. For three years he was in the lightweight class, but just couldn't make the minimum limit of 148 pounds necessary to achieve his ambition of joining the Marines. When he tried to enlist again recently, he was only seven pounds shy. So he got ten pounds of bananas and started in peeling and eating. Two and a half hours later, he nudged the scales slightly over the mark, and he's in boot class now. BUY SAVINGS BONDS NAVY BEGINS WORK ON ANTI-SUB BLIMP TO COMBAT SNORKEL (Answers on Page Six) Washington (AFPS)-Construction has been started on a new anti-submarine blimp developed for the Navy, which will be fitted with the latest equipment for combating snorkel submarines, v recent NME release states. The new blimp designated as N-type, will be capable of longiange patrol over ocean areas and will be able to hover motionless while its equipment is used to detect and track sumarines. The new ship will be the largest non-rigid airship ever built, with an overall length of 324 feet. The N-type will be able to refuel in flight by dropping a fuel line to a surface ship, and to rehallast by scooping water from the ocean. It will have air-sea rescue devices, including an electrical winch for hauling survivors aboard. The gas bag will have a capacity of 875,000 cubic feet and will be inflated with non-inflammable helium. The ship will be capable of a speed of 75 knots and will carry a load of more than 4% tons. SPORTIN' AROUND 1. Who was the last National league pitcher to win 30 games in one season? 2. Vince Foster, welterweight fighter killed recently in an auto accident, became famous almost overnight. Do you remember whom he defeated to win national acclaim? 3. Was there ever a World Series played in which every game was a shutout? 4 How long did Marcel Cerdan hold the world's middleweight championship and from whom did he win it? 5. What is the record speed for the 500-mile Indianapolis Speedway race? Who holds the mark? 6. What two well-known tennis stars participated in the finals of this year's national professional tennis championship, and who won the crown? 7. How many times was Joe Louis defeated after he won the heavyweight title from Jimmy Braddock in 1937? 8. In what famous American race are horses entered before their birth? 9. Who clouted the first homer in the annual American LeagueNational League All-Star game? 10. What has been hailed as the greatest pitching performance in the history of the All-Star classic? CHUCKLES By Armed Forces Press Service Chick: "Was that a Chinese we saw looking in the window last night?" Edee: "Yes, that was a Peiping Tom." Scene: Kansas cyclone country. Si: "Say, that was a mighty powerful wind we had last night. Hurt your house any?" Lem: "Don't know as yet. Haven't found anything but the porch so far." Blonde: (haughtily) "Sir, my lips are saved for another!" Marine: "Okey, hold still, and I'll give you another and anether." "What's the trouble with Jack today?" "Oh, he had a shoeshine, and then remembered he had on his roommate's shoes." Prof: "Young lady, why do you knit in my class?" Coed: "I need something to keep my mind occupied while I'm listening to your lecture." "Another thing I like about me is, I never over indulge in the consumption of things I don't like." PERTINENT REFERENCES FOR CPO EXAM LISTED (SEA) -If you're an eligible first class petty officer preparing for the Navy-wide competitive examination on 1 December for CPO, acting appointment, here are briefly outlined handy references on various requirements and qualifications. 1 9 4 9 Announcement---BuPers Cire. Ltr. 107-49 (NDB, 30 June 1949). Exam Administration Details -BuPers Circ. Ltr. 106-49 (NDB, 30 June 1949). General Requirement-Articles C-7201, C-7202 and 0-7208, BuPers Manual, 1948; BuPers Circ. Ltr. 155-48 (NDB, 15 Aug. 1948, p. 63, 48-612). Service, Sea Duty, MarksBuPer Circ. Ltr. 155-48. Qualifications for Advancement in Rating (NavPers 18068), including Change No. 1 thereto. Training School -BuPers Circ. Ltr. 81-49 (NDB, 15 May 1949, p. 31, 49-363). Waves, USNR personnel on active duty, Fleet Reservists and retired EMs on active duty; repatriated EMs and temporary USN and USNR officers whose permanent status is enlisted-enclosure (G) to BuPers Cire. Ltr. 155-48. ap 0 Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday 27 Augus 9

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Satuday 27 ugut 199 TE INIANPagze Five REGISTRATION DATES SET (Continued from Page One) tion will also be held on Monday, August 29 at the same time and place as kindergarten-first grade. Parents will register for kindergarten and primary age children who should not be brought to school during registration. Grades four through eight will register during the same hours and at the same place on Tuesday, August 30; and grades nine through twelve, on Wednesday, August 31, similarly. There will be no school bus transportation during registration and the regular school bus schedule for children will not go into operation until the opening day of school. General Information No tuition will be collected during registration. Monthly bills will be sent out after school begins and tuition and fees will be payable monthly in advance for nine calendar months. Hours and place of payment will be announced later. Books, workbooks, and essential supplies (including paper, pencils, erasers, rulers, etc.) will be furnished in normal amounts by the school in grades 1 through 8, and a charge of $1.00 per month for eight months will be included with tuition bills. In grades 9 through 12, only pencils, notebook binders, notebook paper, and scratch paper will be furnished, and a charge of 500 per month for eight months will be included on tuition bills in these grades. Textbooks, workbooks, and other senior high school required or optional personal supplies will be the responsibility of individual students. Texts and workbooks will be ordered by the school and billed on a cost basis when made available, as was done last year. More than $3000.00 worth of the most modern instructional materials and equipment available have been ordered by the school board and most of it will be on hand and ready for use by the opening of school. These materials include maps, globes, charts, strip films, recordings, record players, reference and library books, and other valuable teaching aids. Textbooks have been ordered for all grades and it is expected that most of them will be available for the opening week of school. The new school building and some other important information concerning the plans for the opening of school will be discussed in next week's INDIAN. (SEA) -Madagascar's pitcher plant is a shrub four feet high, bearing jug-shaped, water-filled pitchers in which it traps and digests unwary insects. Mr. James A. Marsden, Commodity Specialist, who arrived via MATS Monday night, and was met by LCDR. Weatherson, has accepted a position with the Naval Supply Depot. His last position was with the Boston Naval Shipyard. Mr. Marsden will be working with the NSD Material Department in connection with the Identification and Preservation Program. His home is located in New Bedford, Mass. While he is with NSD he will be residing at OP-8. Welcome aboard Mr. Marsden, and may your position with NSD, and stay in Guantanamo be a pleasant one. For personnel interested in Langouste fishing, they seem to be plentiful at the present time. If anyone is in doubt, ask Chief Quinn who went out last week and caught 56! LTJG Foster also went out and came back with 16, but said there were plenty more if he had wanted them. HITCHENS, BMC, reported on board during the week, and has been assigned the duties of Chief Master at Arms of NSD, and Chief in Charge of the inventory crew. Welcome aboard! MARINE FLASHES By PFC. Ed. Kazmierski A Beer Party Picnic was held at the Race Track last Saturday afternoon. The more energetic played a few games, including a softball game between the Brown Baggers and the Single Stripers. Excellent food was served by Mess Sergeant Stroud, and the refreshments were dominated by the famed "One Eyed Indian", so naturally everyone had a good time. In all the excitement during the past couple of weeks it appears that we neglected to mention what should be one of the most important news items down here that being of course, the reenlistment of CPL. Robert Keys. The Corporal feels that when a man reenlists,'it should be considered top news so we'll agree with him and extend congratulations. Marine Barracks welcomes aboard 1stLT. Robert L. Neef who reported in from Marine Barracks, New London. LT. Neef will relieve our present Post Exchange Officer, LT. Cass of his extra duty in the latter part of September. Congratulations are extended to our: Provost Marshal who climbed another rung on the Ladder of Success ...William H. Souder was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. BUY SAVINGS BONDS HERE ARE CPO SERVICE, SEA, MARK REQUIREMENTS (SEA) -Service, sea duty and mark requirements of first class petty officers desiring to be recommended to take the Navy-wide competitive examination for CPO are as follows: Service-36 months in pay grade 2. Sea duty of at least six months as P01, except for Waves and personnel in IM, OM, CT, MA, DM, JO and aviation ratings as well as those classified for limited shore duty by BuMed. Proficiency in Rating-No mark less than 3.0 for preceding 24 months and an average of not less than 3.5 for 24 months preceding advancement. Conduct-No mark less than 3.0 for preceding 24 months and an average of not less than 3.5 for 24 months preceding advancement. PHOTO VIEW FINDER TO IMPROVE NAVY CARRIER LANDINGS (SEA) -Problems of airplane landings on Navy carriers may be solved by a new development in aviation -a photographic view finder which makes it possible for a pilot to see the image of his own plane as well as the terrain below. With such a view finder (with certain modifications) naval photo technicians believe alignment can be made more accurately of carrier planes with their floating bases. It also would assist visual observation in the helicopter rescue system when the objective is directly below the rotary-wing ship. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Saturday Aug. 27 Through Tuesday Aug. 30. Saturday AN INNOCENT AFFAIR F. McMurray Madeline Carrol Sunday BAMBA, THE JUNGLE BOY J. Sheffield Peggy Ann Garner Monday EL PASO John Wayne Gail Rusell Tuesday LET'S LIVE A LITTLE Hedy LaMarr Robert Cummings NOTE: Due to the fact that a fresh supply of movies have not yet reached the local film exchange it is impossible to print a full weekly schedule. A day-by-day schedule will be printed in the Papoose until the new films arrive. Saturday, 27 August 1949 THE INDIAN Page Five

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Paffe Six THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-24 Aug 49-2510 MARINE CLAIMS RECORD WITH 194-PAGE LETTER (SEA)-Those marine marathon men of letters are at it again. The latest leatherneck letter-writer to lay claim to some sort of a record is a prolific penman by the name of Don Wilson who's a private first class assigned to the Marine Corps detachment aboard USS Pasadena (CL 65). He composed a 194-page billet-doux to his future wife. The massive missive, in small writing, covered both sides of 97 standard-size sheets. The project consumed 45 hours during a voyage from U. S. to China, from where, because of its bulk, it had to be packaged and mailed out under a customs declaration. Earlier in the year, a corporal at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Calif., had stood in the literary light by virtue of a 64-page affair which knocked a Guam devildog's 52-page masterpiece off the writing-record pedestal. A RUBBER X Miami (AFPS)-Lewis West can't read or write, but he's serving eleven months in Federal prison on a forgery charge. Secret Service agents say he .simply marked an "X" on the back of the checks, and gullible merchants paid off. SPORTIN' AROUND (Answers) 1. Dizzy Dean, St. Louis Cardinals hurler did it in 1934. 2. Foster gained nation-wide recognition by kayoing Tony Pellone. 3. In the 1905 Series between the Giants and Athletics, all five games ended in shutouts. The Giants took the series. 4. Cerdan won the title from Tony Zale in September, 1948, and lost the crown to Jake Lamotta in June, 1949 5. Bill Campbell set a new record of 121.327 miles an hour in winring the 1949 race in four hours, seven minutes and 15.97 seconds. 6. Bobby Riggs defeated Don Budge for the pro championship. 7. Louis was never beaten while heavyweight champ. His only pro defeat was administered by Max Schmeling on June 19, 1936 when the latter scored a twelfth-round kayo. 8. The Futurity. 9. Babe Ruth smacked the first All-Star game homer in the third inning of the 1933 event to pace the American Leaguers to a 4 to 2 victory. 10. Carl Hubbell's feat in striking out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmy Foxx, Al Simmons and Joe Cronin in the 1934 game at the Polo Grounds. Rain Again Interrupts Play FLYERS BOW TO SLUGGERS, 4 -2; TWO TILTS REMAIN TO BE PLAYED TO FINISH SEASON By Allen Collier, Sports Editor Apparently Mother Nature has same manner as they did in the decided to keep everyone in suswashed out game last week, on pense a little while longer as rain overthrows, passed balls and errors. interrupted play in the final round The Sluggers failed to score in of the Baseball league for the sectheir half of the third and no one ond week in a row. scored until the Flyers got their The big game of the week was, second run across in the top of the of course, the replay of the Naval fifth virtually the same way. Station-NAS battle washed out Sluggers Rally in the ninth inning last week. In the bottom of the sixth the Came Tuesday night and some 650 Sluggers came to life momentarily fans again made their way to the and tied the score with a two-run fleet recreation diamond to see rally. Things went along on an these two teams battle each other. even keel until the bottom of the As was predicted, the game turneighth. Joe Stocklosa led off for ed out to be more of a pitcher's the Sluggers and managed to get duel than anything else with Johnon first. He stole second and scored ny Werz, noted Flyer right hander a few moments later when Gerald being opposed by Jim Webster, Keane, Flyer third baseman, let Slugger southpaw ace. Primm's hot ground ball go through The first inning was almost the his legs into left field, Primm same for both sides. Werz struck legged it all the way around when out all three Sluggers to face him Graves, Flyer left fielder, was and Webster disposed of two of caught napping on the play and the three Flyers to face him via the made a desperation dive for the same route. At that moment it ball but failed to come up with looked like it would be a long hard it. It was the second home run ball game possibly going into for Primm against the Flyers and overtime. it came exactly the same way The Flyers got one run in theline. toohe lyer gotionrn i na the That was the deciding break of top o the hirdin idnticllyte red utl thme Flyers ag ot ai JIM WEBSTER, southpaw pitching ace of the Naval Station will probably hurl for the Sluggers in their final game of the second round against VU-10. Webster who hurled two-hit ball on Tuesday night once pitched a no-hitter against an Indiana team while playing American Legion baseball. 0 bit of a thrill in the ninth when Ernie Faile drilled a long line drive into deep centerfield, but Menear went back to haul it in. The Flyers managed to get one man to second in the final frameJim Eggebrecht-a pinchhitter, but he was picked off with the oldest trick in baseball-the hidden ball. Webster Hurls two-Hitter For the Sluggers, Webster hurled beautiful two-hit ball, and although he was consistently behind the hitters he came through with the .right pitch. He whiffed 15. Carlisle started behind the plate for the Sluggers but was replaced by Webb after letting a couple of balls get by him. Since rain has postponed play in the league until further notice, the Naval Station will most surely enter the VU-10 game in the role of the favorite. Almost without a doubt, Webster will again twirl for the Sluggers. The Airdales will probably counter with their onetwo punch of Slone and Stever. .In the only other action of the week, the Marines chalked up their first and only win of the second round by belting the Training Group by a 13-5 count. The Training Group has one game left to play, that with the Hospital. Dates for the last two games of the second round and the opening of the Championship series will be announced in the Indian, if possible, and over WGBY. Page Six THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-24 Aug 49-2500


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