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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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Language:
English

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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U. S. Nava! Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 August 1949


SAVINGS DEPOSITS POSSIBLE FOR EM

Enlisted men of the Navy may make savings deposits with their disbursing officers it has been recently revealed.
According to the disbursing officials, one deposit may be made each month in an even dollar amount of not less that $5 nor riore than any previously undeposited pay and allowances including accruing travel and reenlistment allowances.
Sums deposited for a period of six months or longer will draw interest at the rate of four per cent per year. All sums deposited will be repaid only upon discharge, release from active duty, transfer to the Fleet reserve, or appointment to warrant or commissioned rank.
Interested personnel should contact the Disbursing office for further information.

INPUT OF NAVCADS
INCREASED AS NAVY SEEKS YOUNG PILOTS

(SEA)-To train younger men
to become pilots, the Navy has inaugurated a stepped-up program of aviation cadet procurement. It features increase the mnput of qualified enlisted personnel and civilian applicants into the Naval Aviation College Program.
Enlisted men who are high school graduates and civilians with at least two years of college are eligible to apply for the NavCad program. During the 12 months starting 1 July 1949, approximately 1,500 cadets are expected to be trained. This would be an increase of almost 700 over last year's quota.
Meanwhile, the Navy stopped the procurement of college graduate civilians and Reserve officers on active duty for the Aviation Ensign Training Program. In this program, cadets upon completion of their training have been receiving commissions as Regular ensigns with designation as aviator. Not more than 200 additional appointments are expected to be made in this program this year.


PLANS PERFECTED FOR SUPERVISORS' PICNIC

Plans went forward this week for the Base-wide supervisors' picnic to be held at Windmill Beach on Labor Day, 5 September.
Softball games and other recreation - plus plenty of good eats - will be the headline attractions which are expected to attract a crowd of 300 persons, including civilian supervisors and their wives and Naval guests of honor.
The Commander, NOB will present Navy Department awards to certain supervisors in one of the outstanding events of the day.
Six committees are busily perfecting details of what is expected to be the best civilian gathering in the history of the Base. Committees and their co-chairmen include: Transportation, Homer H. Cole and Everest Noel; Food and Refreshment, Elmer D. Nichols and David Figueras; Invitation, E. D. Stuck and Augusto Tur; Finance, Benjamin B. Bergman and Axel Heimer; Recreation, Hubert Broughton and Raul Lissarague; Program, Martin G. Phillips and L. A. Foote.
Supervisors who have indicated that they will be unable to attend the picnic still have time to change their minds, it was pointed out by the invitation committee.

WE NEED SOME
COMPETITION

By H. L. Broughton
Among the civilian workers of the Base there are some fine baseball players whose abilities were ably demonstrated in 1947 when there was an Industrial League comprised of civilian players. One of these teams was defeated only once thereby giving them an unofficial championship. This team (with new players for departed members) would like to challenge the 1949 Base Champions and your aid is kindly requested in promoting one or more games. We are sure that the resulting game (or games) would provide good experience for the players and the spectators couldn't ask for more in the way of keen competition and "heads-up" baseball.


DANGER IN HANDLING FLUORESCENT
LIGHTING TUBES

Fluorescent lamps are coated on the inside with a fluorescent powder called phosphor. The composition varies, but the phosphor usually contains a small amount of beiyllium. The lamps also contain small amounts of mercury.
Both beryllium and mercury are poisonous. No danger arises from their presence in unbroken lamps, whether in use or not, because both are sealed inside the lamp. There is possibility of injury, however, when disposing of worn-out lamps. Injury may result from (a) breathing the phosphor dust and mercury vapor liberated when the lamp is broken; or (b) cuts from pieces of glass coated with phosphoros. Such cuts, no matter how small, should be given prompt medical attention. These lamps are dangerous play-things for children.
It is recommended that broken lamps be not disposed of in an incinerator, but be thrown either into water or in a dump where they are not likely to be disturbed.
Persons engaged in the disposal of used lamps should wear full protective goggles, gloves, and sufficient clothing to prevent injury from flying glass; and should avoid breathing dust and vapors that may evolve. To avoid unnecessary dust, the breakage is best done within the waste container.
Personnel who are engaged in breaking large numbers of fluorescent lamps, either intermittently or regularly, where hours may be occupied in the operation, should be supplied with, and required to wear, a respirator approved by the U. S. Bureau of Mines for toxic dusts.

NAVY STARTS BUILDING NEW 600-BED HOSPITAL

St. Albans, Queens, N. Y. (AFPS) -Work on a new $15 000,000 permanent 600-bed Navyhospital has been started here.
When completed in 1951 the new facility will be used jointly by the three Armed Services, the Army, Navy, and Air Force.


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Vol. IV, No. 26








Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 20 August 1949


Editorial Offlice, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 20 August 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN----------------Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR----------Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free diatribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

CAN YOU HELP???

While packing household effects prior to leaving the Base for a new duty station most of us leave behind articles which we no longer to keep. Althoungh these items may seem to be of little value because they do not match, because they are extras, are not the same pattern as our prized possessions or because we are going to a climate where they will not be required, they may be highly desirable to personnel just arriving on the Base, especially if their household effects have not arrived. So why not give such articles to the Thrift Shop? They may tide some family over that difficult "camping out" period until their household effects arrive from the States.
The following items are some of the most in demand: Dishes (even single dishes of any size), knives, forks, spoons (of any type), cooking utensils (just so they hold water and are suitable for use), cribs and baby beds, play pens; high chairs; towels, sheets, light blankets-the Thrift Shop will have these items laundered if needed, lamps (table, floor, any kind); and, after October these items are also in demand: Snow suits, galoshes, sweaters, wool caps, corduroy overalls, overcoats, and children's winter clothing.
If you are departing from this Base and wish to donate any useful items, by calling one of the following numbers a truck will call to pick them up: Thrift Shop 770 (0830-1130); NSD 780 (0800-1700); on weekends 5-042 or 5-181.


YOU CAN'T WIN

HISTORY OF GAMBLING
IS SORDID AND TRAGIC

By Ernest Blanche
(AFPS presents a series of individual stories based on the book "You Can't win" written by Mr. Blanche. The author is chief statistician for the Logistics Division of the Army General Staff.)
The history of wagering is replete with unbelievable stories. Some are fantastic; most are tragic.
It is doubtful whether we will ever again hear tales to match those about John W. (Bet-a-Million) Gates who tossed pennies for $1,000 a turn, wagered $50,000 en a poker hand and hundreds of thousands on the horses.
For the era of high-wide-andhandsome public betting is fast passing, and even Gates offered some remarkable advice before he died in 1911: "Don't gamble; don't play cards; don't bet on horses; don't throw dice."
But gamblers who can't afford to wager on Gates' scale still spend considerable time attempting to devise "systems" for "beating" gambling games.
One of the most popular systems is called double progression (Martingale) betting. It calls for making a wager and then doubling it's size after every loss - on the theory that you're an eventual winner and thereby recoup your losses and show a small profit.
There are two main reasons why this system is worthless: (1) a long series of losses will wipe out a player or force him to wager more than he can afford on the next event; (2) gambling establishments limit the size of wagers.
If you begin with a $1 wager and suffered 25 losses in a row, you would lose over 33 million dollars - if you had that much.
Prolonged sequences are by no means unusual. Tragic Ending, an appropriately named horse, won a $5,000 stake race in 1941, then lost 31 consecutive races. If you had wagered $1 on Tragic Ending in his first race and doubled the bet for each succeeding race you would have lost $2,147,483,647.
The unit progression system is no better than the double progression betting. In the unit system you add one unit to the wager after each loss (from $1 to $2 to $3, etc.).
However, after a sequence of more than three losses in a row in an even-money game, it is impossible to recoup the money lost on previous wagers.
If you had bet on Tragic Ending under this system, you would have wagered $31 on the 31st event and your total loss would have amounted to $496.
The only system which will win consistently has been developed by gambling "operators" who determine in advance what odds to offer


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, August 21, 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1910
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


Four of our
OSP'TPA' members left by
. plane early last
Tuesday afternoon for leave in the States.
Among the lucky four were L. T.
Walker, HM3, Joe
- Morris, SN, WayvTE S- ne Flemming, SN
and R. C. Keeene
HA.
Frank Anthony, returned from leave with the news that he got himself engaged. He left aboard the USS General Mann Wednesday to go aboard the USS Consolation for duty. Also boarding the States-bound Mann was Carles Jacobs, TN, and Dempsey Bruton, CSC. Jacobs is slated to report to LST 542 for duty while Bruton will report to the USS Robinson (DD-220) for duty.
Mrs. Hollis, registered nurse, and her husband, BMC Hollis, CMAA of the NavSta left aboard the Mann for thirty days leave in the U. S.
The Stork had a very easy week
-no deliveries.
A proposed golf tournament is in the process of becoming real if enough of the Hospital Ben Hogans care to make it so. Plans are being made to have a handicap golf tournament for members of the hospital staff.

a specific number of bettors.
Consider the gambler who allows you to select one of two teams in a football game. You must put up $6 to win $5. Then for every wager on Team A he accepts an equal amount on Team B, with the same 6 to 5 odds, put up by supporters of Team B.
If Team A wins the game, the bookmaker wins $1; if Team B is victorious, the bookmaker wins $1. Multiply such wagering and bookmaking by 1,000 and you'll see how lucrative it can be, to the professional bookmaker.
It becomes fairly obvious from the foregoing that you can't win. Later articles will prove this point.


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THE INDIAN


Saturday, 20 August 1949


Pag-e Two








Satuday.20 uffut 199 TE INIANPage Three


VU-10 NOTES

By CHRELE A. H. Borresen
Transferred from the Squadron, which burned prayer papers for their success at new duty stations, were Lt (jg) J. D. Tate, Fred Matchett, AD2, "J" "B" Bowling, AD1, and J. Imgrund, AOAN. Our frayed red plush carpet was rolled out for F. Barton, AD1, J. Patterson, ADC, Lt (jg) (homerun) Tougas, Lt J. M. Sousa and Lt. C. Powell, the unluckiest five card player on Guam.
Taking a firmer grip on the ladder of success and advancing a rung was our boy Schaub, now AL3, and R. Hendrickson sports the newest looking lieutenants bars we've ever seen. E.E. Elliott advanced to A02 and R. G. Phillips is doing some hemstiching on his A03 crows. Congratulations!
Last Saturday the squadron up and had itself a beer party at Windmill Beach. The turnout was almost a hundred percent with all hands participating in one activity or another. A search party, out to find the windmill which gave the place it's name, returned to report "they ain't none". Otherwise, the Quorum which gathered along towards sundown, voted the party an unqualified success and toasted the committee workers who had made it so. The Quorum wondered too if a dozer or two couldn't improve the area for sports which would add to the enjoyment of this spot.
As this is written no word has been received on how Joe McDonald made out in the All-Navy golf finals at Parris Island. Assuming no news to be good news, the squadron has concentrated on rooting it's ball team in a winner. Win or lose, we all feel that Medica has done a fine job of managing the team and that the players, individually and collectively, have given their best and provided .us sideliners with some fine entertainment.

R. A. STROUTS LANDS
PRIZE SNOOK

On a recent fishing expedition to Fresh Water River, R. A. Strouts, YNC, attached to the Commander's Office landed a 21-pound snook using only a handline. As near as can be determined this is the largest snook caught on a handline in Guantanamo, Bay. It exceeds by two pounds the largest one caught in the Miami, Florida area according to a recent story in the Miami Herald.

Mess steward: "I told you to take that pot off when the water reached a boiling point!"
Apprentice Cook: Well, I'm waiting. The water is bubbling, and has a lot of round bumps, but they aren't pointed yet."


TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP

By Skiddy Masterson and
Cecil Pederson
Last Saturday Henry Crommelin, with his family, and Martin Lampman went to Santiago. They stayed in a hotel there overnight, went sightseeing, ate Cuban food and just had a mighty good time.
It was back to Annapolis and the Middies for Nancy Freeman when she left Wednesday for the States via the General Mann. Nancy, who had been staying with Diane, seemed to have had "mucho" fun here, but we know she'll be glad to see her family again.
Whenever you go into the Marine PX, very often you can see Barbara Johnson behind the "Wearing Apparel" counter. The first teen-ager to become ambitious and get a job, she still enjoys it.
We'll see all you teen-age members at The Little Theatre party tonight. Cynthia Allen and Joan Harris had a hand in its planning, so you can bet it will be fun!
Virginia, Ed and Skiddy have all redoubled their efforts at their summer studies this past week. Could it be those College Board exams they are taking Wednesday? We all have our fingers crossed that they pass with flying colors! Good Luck you three!

ESTABLISHMENT OF
AIR FORCE
Washington (AFPS) -Defense Secretary Louis Johnson recently signed the last of a series of 40 transfer orders establishing the Air Force as a separate NME Department.
.The project of separating the Air Force from Army jurisdiction has proceeded steadily for two years under provisions of the National Security Act of 1947.
The Act required completion of the separation within the twoyear period, and provided for the unification of similar Army and Air Force functions to prevent duplication.
Many of the separation adjustments also were directed toward unification. For example, the Army Chief of Engineers was designated real estate and contract construction agent for both Services.
An Army-Air Force Central Welfare fund was established, with officers of both Services sitting as the Board of Directors. Troop Information and Education activities have been unified. The Army performs services common to both Army and Air Force in the fields of transportation and Quartermaster administration.
(SEA)-More than 1,300 times bigger than the earth in mass, Jupiter is the largest planet moving around the sun. It completes its orbit only once every 12 years.


Let's not beat
'bout the bushes this week . . .
let's let our hair down and really
go to town.
Another putput has been zooming around Marine Site 2.
This piece of
transportation in being piloted by SGT. Jimmy Flinchum. Jim calls his scooter the "Blue Bolt", and claims his possession to do sixty miles per. . . per what Jim? ? ? per gallon of gas? ? ?
The trophy for the most valuable player of the soft ball team was awarded to PFC. Roger Rodriguez. It was presented to him by LT COL. Johnston, in the absence of our commanding officer, COL. Lanigan.
At our recent dance, Marine Barracks took time to bid farewell to SSGT. Joseph P. Murphy, who will perform his duties with the Quantico Marines. Good luck Patrick, we sure'll miss you.
There's no doubt about our ball club falling to pieces in the second round of the Base baseball league, however . . . a lot of credit is due to the Leatherneck nine, for the best of teams will go into a slump some time or another, and our batsmen did just that in this second round.
Rumor . . . It's rumored that a diver's helmet was being carted into the recreation building by our flash photographer PFC. Lester "Sam Spade" Pope. Ole Les has taken quite an interest in collecting antiques and other rare gear. With a set of ear phones, and one of his well fixed short-wave radios, Les spends part of the night pickin' up "Far Away Places".






NAVAL STATION LYCEUM

Sun., 21 August to Fri., 19 August
Sunday
THE LUCKY STIFF
Dorothy Lamour Brian Donlevy
Monday
STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO Mae Clark Robert Armstrong
Tuesday
FLAMINGO ROAD
Joan Crawford Zachary Scott
Wednesday
CANADIAN PACIFIC
Randolph Scott Jane Wyatt
Thursday JIGSAW
Franchot Tone Jean Wallace
Friday
FORCE OF EVIL
John Garfield Beatrice Pearson


Saturday, 20 August 1949


THE INDIAN


Page Three










NavSta-NAS Replay Set For Tuesday Night 0


GAME EXPECTED TO DRAW RECORD ATTENDANCE; RAIN SENDS SECOND ROUND INTO EXTRA WEEK

By Allen Collier, Sports Editor
Recreation Officials announced anyone's ball game.
Thursday afternoon that the replay Webster, demonstrated his pitchof the Naval Station-NAS game ing ability again in the early
played Wednesday night, until rain innings, but was obviously shaken washed the battle out in the top some-what by the continued erratic of the ninth, will be held Tuesday support he got. He was relieved night at 2000 on the Fleet Recrea- by Webb in the sixth after he tion lighted diamond. This date loaded the bases with none out. may be cancelled if it rains prior Werz, was relieved by Jim Egto game time. Barring interference gebrecht after being ejected in the from the elements the Tuesday first half of the sixth inning. The night date stands. Sluggers tallied four' runs off
All games scheduled to have "Eggy" in the two and two-third
been played this past week, but innings he hurled before being which were postponed because of lifted in favor of Ernie Faile. Faile wet grounds will be played begin- retired the side and might have ning with the Fleet Training been the winning pitcher had the Group-Marine game on Monday game been completed. As it is
evening. The final game of the everything is completely wiped off
season will be on Thursday night the record books, including a downwhen the Naval Station takes on the foul line home run by Primm, the strong VU-10 squad. the Sluggers' left fielder. The only
Although the game between the other two big blows of the game Flyers and the Sluggers on Wednes- were Rosario's triple for the Naval day night was rained out, fans Station and Gallagher's triple for
had plenty of excitement up until the Flyers. the elements unloaded. Johnny In the only other two contests
Werz was sent to the hill by the this week, The Flyers ripped the Flyers and was opposed by Jim Marines by a 13-6 count on Sunday
Webster, highly touted southpaw afternoon while VU-10 romped of the Naval Station. It is very over the Hospital by a 20-6 count likely that these two fellows will Monday evening.


meet again on Tuesday night and if so a ding dong battle can definitely be expected. The Naval Station will be fighting to go into the VU-10 fray with the same 4-0 record the Airdales sports, while the Flyers, winners of the first half, will be out to defeat the Sluggers and thereby force a three-way tie in the event of a VU-10 victory. Should the Naval Station lose to NAS but defeat VU-10 there would be a three-way tie for the second half title.
Erratic fielding was evident on the part of both the Sluggers and the Flyers in their meeting Wednesday night but crowd thrills were not decreased by this. Rather they were increased. The battle Tuesday night will be billed as "power vs. speed". Among some circles on the Naval Operating Base, the NavSta has been called Gtmo's version of the Yankees. If this be true, the base running antics of the Flyers give them the appearance of being a Brooklyn Dodger farm club. Werz kept the Slugger bats silent for the first five and twothirds innings but then everything broke loose suddenly and the Flyers who had garnered four runs in the three preceeding innings, on passed balls, overthrows and errors with a timely hit here and there, found themselves with a tie ball game at 4-4. From there on it was


VU-10
NavSta NAS
Hospital TraGrp Marines - .


THE STANDINGS


4
3
3
1
0
0


0
0
1
3
3
4


1.000 1.000 .750 .250
.000 .000


WARMIN' THE BENCH

By Armed Forces Press Service Even though it's just August and we're still sweltering in the summer heat, let's take a quick look around the corner at football, waiting-not to patiently-to take cver the nation's sports headlines.
Several pro teams have already opened their grid camps prior to the start of the '49 season, while others are starting their pre-season drills each week. And nearly every college squad that hopes to figure in the national picture will have begun their practice before another month has passed.
The past two years have been great ones in this post-war era of football, and the 1949 season shows semblance of being one of the best football has ever known. So here's a pre-season look around the nation.
East Above Average
This season should mark the return of the East and the Ivy League to the realms of class. The East is well above average in material and team strength. Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Brown and Princeton figure to be the best with Army, Pennsylvania and Penn State close behind. Navy may be a sleeper. The Ivy schools headed by Cornell and Dartmouth, will however, claim the laurels.
Through the South, Tulane, Vanderbilt and North Carolina will be the rave. Tennessee and Georgia will be among the best in a section that will be extremely strong and feature a lot of surprises. Keep an eye on Wake Forest and Clemson. The Southwest and the Far West will be stronger. They always produce winners in the Southwestern Conference and it looks as if SMU is leading the pack again, with a close race all the way.
Determined West
In the Far West, a great revision is underway with a firm determination to become part of the big picture. California, USC, Stanford, Washington, UCLA and Oregon, can all be expected to be greatly improved.
This leaves the Mid-West which is always strong. Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio State and newly added Michigan State will be the class of the Big Ten. The Spartans of Michigan State have a good chance of taking the Michigan Wolverines this year, and of becoming the outstanding team in the nation unless Cornell cops the honored spot.
Notre Dame always fields a terrific squad, and just because Frank Leahy has only 27 lettermen returning isn't sufficient to change that statement.
In general, the outlook is for better football everywhere.


Pag6 Fouf


-( -- ---- - -- ' ---- BASEBALL HITS
HOMER; BEATS I BERLIN BEAUTIES
I I
Berlin (AFPS) - Beauty
struck out and baseball reigns I supreme in the Western section of occupied Germany.
Organizers of Berlin's first
post-war beauty contest, recently held here, were dismayed when only 30 persons turned out to witness a parade of bathing-suited frauleins competing for the title of "Berlin Beach Queen of 1949.". No soldiers were in the group. The contest conflicted with a baseball game; every soldier able to obtain leave was at the Army athletic field watching the Tempelhof Air Field nine play the Berlin Infantry Regiment team.


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Tilt INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay--17 Aug 49--2600




Full Text

PAGE 1

e Sian Vol. IV, No. 26 U. S. Nava! Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 August 1949 SAVINGS DEPOSITS POSSIBLE FOR EM Enlisted men of the Navy may make savings deposits with their disbursing officers it has been recently revealed. According to the disbursing officials, one deposit may be made each month in an even dollar amount of not less that '$5 nor more than any previously undeposited pay and allowances including accruing travel and reenlistment allowances. Sums deposited for a period of six months or longer will draw interest at the rate of four per cent per year. All sums deposited will be repaid only upon discharge, release from active duty, transfer to the Fleet reserve, or appointment to warrant or commissioned rank. Interested personnel should contact the Disbursing office for further information. INPUT OF NAVCADS INCREASED AS NAVY SEEKS YOUNG PILOTS (SEA)-To train younger men to become pilots, the Navy has inaugurated a stepped-up program of aviation cadet procurement. It features increasing the input of qualified enlisted personnel and civilian applicants into the Naval Aviation College Program. Enlisted men who are high school graduates and civilians with at least two years of college are eligible to apply for the NavCad program. During the 12' months starting 1 July 1949, approximately 1,500 cadets are expected to be trained. This would be an increase of almost 700 over last year's quota. Meanwhile, the Navy stopped the procurement of college graduate civilians and Reserve officers on active duty for the Aviation Ensign Training Program. In this program, cadets upon completion of their training have been receiving commissions as Regular ensigns with designation as aviator. Not more than 200 additional appointments are expected to be made in this program this year. PLANS PERFECTED FOR SUPERVISORS' PICNIC Plans went forward this week for the Base-wide supervisors' picnic to be held at Windmill Beach on Labor Day, 5 September. Softball games and other recreation -plus plenty of good eats -will be the headline attractions which are expected to attract a crowd of 300 persons, including civilian supervisors and their wives and Naval guests of honor. The Commander, NOB will present Navy Department awards to certain supervisors in one of the outstanding events of the day. Six committees are busily perfecting details of what is expected to be the best civilian gathering in the history of the Base. Committees and their co-chairmen include: Transportation, Homer H. Cole and Everest Noel; Food and Refreshment, Elmer D. Nichols and David Figueras; Invitation, E. D. Stuck and Augusto Tur; Finance, Benjamin B. Bergman and Axel Heimer; Recreation, Hubert Broughton and Raul Lissarague; Program, Martin G. Phillips and L. A. Foote. Supervisors who have indicated that they will be unable to attend the picnic still have time to change their minds, it was pointed out by the invitation committee. WE NEED SOME COMPETITION By H. L. Broughton Among the civilian workers of the Base there are some fine baseball players whose abilities were ably demonstrated in 1947 when there was an Industrial League comprised of civilian players. One of these teams was defeated only once thereby giving them an unofficial championship. This team (with new players for departed members) would like to challenge the 1949 Base Champions and your aid is kindly requested in promoting one or more games. We are sure that the resulting game (or games) would provide good experience for the players and the spectators couldn't ask for more in the way of keen competition and "heads-up" baseball. DANGER IN HANDLING FLUORESCENT LIGHTING TUBES Fluorescent lamps are coated on the inside with a fluorescent powder called phosphor. The composition varies, but the phosphor usually contains a small amount of beiyllium. The lamps also contain small amounts of mercury. Both beryllium and mercury are poisonous. No danger arises from their presence in unbroken lamps, whether in use or not, because both are sealed inside the lamp. There is possibility of injury, however, when disposing of worn-out lamps. Injury may result from (a) breathing the phosphor dust and mercury vapor liberated when the lamp is broken; or (b) cuts from pieces of glass coated with phosphoros. Such cuts, no matter how small, should be given prompt medical attention. These lamps are dangerous play-things for children. It is recommended that broken lamps be not disposed of in an incinerator, but be thrown either into water or in a dump where they are not likely to be disturbed. Persons engaged in the disposal of used lamps should wear full protective goggles, gloves, and sufficient clothing to prevent injury from flying glass; and should avoid breathing dust and vapors that may evolve. To avoid unnecessary dust, the breakage is best done within the waste container. Personnel who are engaged in breaking large numbers of fluorescent lamps, either intermittently or regularly, where hours may be occupied in the operation, should be supplied with, and required to wear, a respirator approved by the U. S. Bureau of Mines for toxic dusts. NAVY STARTS BUILDING NEW 600-BED HOSPITAL St. Albans, Queens, N. Y. (AFPS) -Work on a new $15 000,000 permanent 600-bed Navyhospital has been started here. When completed in 1951 the new facility will be used jointly by the three Armed Services, the Army, Navy, and Air Force.

PAGE 2

Page T w oT II~ INDIAN Saturday, 20 August 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 20 August 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, JOSN--------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, ,Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of APPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. CAN YOU HELP??? While packing household effects prior to leaving the Base for a new duty station most of us leave behind articles which we no longer to keep. Althoungh these items may seem to be of little value because they do not match, because they are extras, are not the same pattern as our prized possessions or because we are going to a climate where they will not be required, they may be highly desirable to personnel just arriving on the Base, especially if their household effects have not arrived. So why not give such articles to the Thrift Shop? They may tide some family over that difficult "camping out" period until their household effects arrive from the States. The following items are some of the most in demand: Dishes (even single dishes of any size), knives, forks, spoons (of any type), cooking utensils (just so they hold water and are suitable for use), cribs and baby beds, play pens; high chairs; towels, sheets, light blankets-the Thrift Shop will have these items laundered if needed, lamps (table, floor, any kind); and, after October these items are also in demand: Snow suits, galoshes, sweaters, wool caps, corduroy overalls, overcoats, and children's winter clothing. If you are departing from this Base and wish to donate any useful items, by calling one of the following numbers a truck will call to pick them up: Thrift Shop 770 (0830-1130); NSD 780 (0800-1700); on weekends 5-042 or 5-181. YOU CAN'T WIN HISTORY OF GAMBLING IS SORDID AND TRAGIC By Ernest Blanche (AFPS presents a series of individual stories based on the book "You Can't Win" written by Mr. Blanche. The author is chief statistician for the Logistics Division of the Army General Staff.) The history of wagering is replete with unbelievable stories. Some are fantastic; most are tragic. It is doubtful whether we will over again hear tales to match those about John W. (Bet-a-Million) Gates who tossed pennies for $1,000 a turn, wagered $50,000 en a poker hand and hundreds of thousands on the horses. For the era of high-wide-andbandsome public betting is fast passing, and even Gates offered some remarkable advice before he died in 1911: "Don't gamble; don't play cards; don't bet on horses; don't throw dice." But gamblers who can't afford to wager on Gates' scale still spend considerable time attempting to devise "systems" for "beating" gambling games. One of the most popular systems is called double progression (Martingale) betting. It calls for making a wager and then doubling it's size after every loss -on the theory that you're an eventual winner and thereby recoup your losses and show a small profit. There are two main reasons why this system is worthless: (1) a long series of losses will wipe out a player or force him to wager more than he can afford on the next event; (2) gambling establishments limit the size of wagers. If you begin with a $1 wager and suffered 25. losses in a row, you would lose over 33 million dollars -if you had that much. Prolonged sequences are by no means unusual. Tragic Ending, an appropriately named horse, won a $5,000 stake race in 1941, then lost 31 consecutive races. If you had wagered $1 on Tragic Ending in his first race and doubled the bet for each succeeding race you would have lost $2,147,483,647. The unit progression system is no better than the double progression betting. In the unit system you add one unit to the wager after each loss (from $1 to $2 to $3, etc.). However, after a sequence of more than three losses in a row in an even-money game, it is impossible to recoup the money lost on previous wagers. If you had bet on Tragic Ending under this system, you would have wagered $31 on the 31st event and your total loss would have amounted to $496. The only system which will win consistently has been developed by gambling "operators" who determine in advance what odds to offer CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, August 21, 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) Four of our members left by plane early last Tuesday afternoon for leave in the States. Among the lucky four were L. T. Walker, HM3, Joe Morris, SN, Way"uTE ne Flemming, SN and R. C. Keeene HA. Frank Anthony, returned from leave with the news that he got himself engaged. He left aboard the USS General Mann Wednesday to go aboard the USS Consolation for duty. Also boarding the States-bound Mann was Carles Jacobs, TN, and Dempsey Bruton, CSC. Jacobs is slated to report to LST 542 for duty while Bruton will report to the USS Robinson (DD-220) for duty. Mrs. Hollis, registered nurse, and her husband, BMC Hollis, CMAA of the NavSta left aboard the Mann for thirty days leave in the U. S. The Stork had a very easy week -no deliveries. A proposed golf tournament is in the process of becoming real if enough of the Hospital Ben Hogans care to make it so. Plans are being made to have a handicap golf tournament for members of the hospital staff. a specific number of bettors. Consider the gambler who allows you to select one of two teams in a football game. You must put up $6 to win $5. Then for every wager on Team A he accepts an equal amount on Team B, with the same 6 to 5 odds, put up by supporters of Team B. If Team A wins the game, the bookmaker wins $1; if Team B is victorious, the bookmaker wins $1. Multiply such wagering and bookmaking by 1,000 and you'll see how lucrative it can be, to the professional bookmaker. It becomes fairly obvious from the foregoing that you can't win. Later articles will prove this point. 0 0 THE INDIAN Saturday, 20 August 1949 Pagre Two

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Satuday 20 ugut 199 TE INIANPaege Three VU-10 NOTES By CHRELE A. H. Borresen Transferred from the Squadron, which burned prayer papers for their success at new duty stations, were Lt (jg) J. D. Tate, Fred Matchett, AD2, "J" "B" Bowling, AD1, and J. Imgrund, AOAN. Our frayed red plush carpet was rolled out for F. Barton, AD1, J. Patterson, ADC, Lt (jg) (homerun) Tougas, Lt J. M. Sousa and Lt. C. Powell, the unluckiest five card player on Guam. Taking a firmer grip on the ladder of success and advancing a rung was our boy Schaub, now AL3, and R. Hendrickson sports the newest looking lieutenants bars we've ever seen. E.E. Elliott advanced to A02 and R. G. Phillips is doing some hemstiching on his A03 crows. Congratulations! Last Saturday the squadron up and had itself a beer party at Windmill Beach. The turnout was almost a hundred percent with all hands participating in one activity or another. A search party, out to find the windmill which gave the place it's name, returned to report "they ain't none". Otherwise, the Quorum which. gathered along towards sundown, voted the party an unqualified success and toasted the committee workers who had made it so. The Quorum wondered too if a dozer or two couldn't improve the area for sports which would add to the enjoyment of this spot. As this is written no word has been received on how Joe McDonald made out in the All-Navy golf finals at Parris Island. Assuming no news to be good news, the squadron has concentrated on rooting it's ball team in a winner. Win or lose, we all feel that Medica has done a fine job of managing the team and that the players, individually and collectively, have given their best and provided .us sideliners with some fine entertainment. R. A. STROUTS LANDS PRIZE SNOOK On a recent fishing expedition to Fresh Water River, R. A. Strouts, YNC, attached to the Commander's Office landed a 21-pound snook using only a handline. As near as can be determined this is the largest snook caught on a handline in Guantanamo, Bay. It exceeds by two pounds the largest one caught in the Miami, Florida area according to a recent story in the Miami Herald. Mess steward: "I told you to take that pot off when the water reached a boiling point!" Apprentice Cook: Well, I'm waiting. The water is bubbling, and has a lot of round bumps, but they aren't pointed yet." TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Skiddy Masterson and Cecil Pederson Last Saturday Henry Crommelin, with his family, and Martin Lampman went to Santiago. They stayed in a hotel there overnight, went sightseeing, ate Cuban food and just had a mighty good time. It was back to Annapolis and the Middies for Nancy Freeman when she left Wednesday for the States via the General Mann. Nancy, who had been staying with Diane, seemed to have had "mucho" fun here, but we know she'll be glad to see her family again. Whenever you go into the Marine PX, very often you can see Barbara Johnson behind the "Wearing Apparel" counter. The first teen-ager to become ambitious and get a job, she still enjoys it. We'll see all you teen-age members at The Little Theatre party tonight. Cynthia Allen and Joan Harris had a hand in its planning, so you can bet it will be fun! Virginia, Ed and Skiddy have all redoubled their efforts at their summer studies this past week. Could it be those College Board exams they are taking Wednesday? We all have our fingers crossed that they pass with flying colors! Good Luck you three! ESTABLISHMENT OF AIR FORCE Washington (AFPS) -Defense Secretary Louis Johnson recently signed the last of a series of 40 transfer orders establishing the Air Force as a separate NME Department. .The project of separating the Air Force from Army jurisdiction has proceeded steadily for two years under provisions of the National Security Act of 1947. The Act required completion of the separation within the twoyear period, and provided for the unification of similar Army and Air Force functions to prevent duplication. Many of the separation adjustments also were directed toward unification. For example, the Army Chief of Engineers was designated real estate and contract construction agent for both Services. An Army-Air Force Central Welfare fund was established, with officers of both Services sitting as the Board of Directors. Troop Information and Education activities have beek unified. The Army performs services common to both Army and Air Force in the fields of transportation and Quartermaster administration. (SEA)-More than 1,300 times bigger than the earth in mass, Jupiter is the largest planet moving around the sun. It completes its orbit only once every 12 years. Let's not beat 'bout the bushes This week ... let's let our hair down and really go to town. Another putput has been zooming around Marine Site 2. This piece of transportation in being piloted by SGT. Jimmy Flinchum. Jim calls his scooter the "Blue Bolt", and claims his possession to do sixty miles per. ..per what Jim??? per gallon of gas??? The trophy for the most valuable player of the soft ball team was awarded to PFC. Roger Rodriguez. It was presented to him by LT COL. Johnston, in the absence of our commanding officer, COL. Lanigan. At our recent dance, Marine Barracks took time to bid farewell to SSGT. Joseph P. Murphy, who will perform his duties with the Quantico Marines. Good luck Patrick, we sure'll miss you. There's no doubt about our ball club falling to pieces in the second round of the Base baseball league, however ...a lot of credit is due to the Leatherneck nine, for the best of teams will go into a slump some time or another, and our batsmen did just that in this second round. Rumor ...It's rumored that a diver's helmet was being carted into the recreation building by our flash photographer PFC. Lester "Sam Spade" Pope. Ole Les has taken quite an interest in collecting antiques and other rare gear. With a set of ear phones, and one of his well fixed short-wave radios, Les spends part of the night pickin' up "Far Away Places". NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun., 21 August to Fri., 19 August Sunday THE LUCKY STIFF Dorothy Lamour Brian Donlevy Monday STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO Mae Clark Robert Armstrong Tuesday FLAMINGO ROAD Joan Crawford Zachary Scott Wednesday CANADIAN PACIFIC Randolph Scott Jane Wyatt Thursday JIGSAW Franchot Tone Jean Wallace Friday FORCE OF EVIL John Garfield Beatrice Pearson Saturday. 20 Aug~ust 1949 THE INDIAN Page Three

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NavSta-NAS Replay Set For Tuesday Night GAME EXPECTED TO DRAW RECORD ATTENDANCE; RAIN SENDS SECOND ROUND INTO EXTRA WEEK By Allen Collier, Sports Editor Recreation Officials announced anyone's ball game. Thursday afternoon that the replay Webster, demonstrated his pitchof the Naval Station-NAS game ing ability again in the early played Wednesday night, until rain innings, but was obviously shaken washed the battle out in the top some-what by the continued erratic of the ninth, will be held Tuesday support he got. He was relieved night at 2000 on the Fleet Recreaby Webb in the sixth after he tion lighted diamond. This date loaded the bases with none out. may be cancelled if it rains prior Werz, was relieved by Jim Egto game time. Barring interference gebrecht after being ejected in the from the elements the Tuesday first half of the sixth ning The night date stands. Sluggers tallied fourruns off All games scheduled to have "Eggy" in the two and two-third been played this past week, but innings he hurled before being which were postponed because of lifted in favor of Ernie Faile. Failed wet grounds will be played beginretired the side and might have ning with the Fleet Training been the winning pitcher had the Group-Marine game on Monday game been completed. As it is evening. The final game of the everything is completely wiped off season will be on Thursday night the record books, including a downwhen the Naval Station takes on the foul line home run by Primm, the strong VU-10 squad. the Sluggers' left fielder. The only Although the game between the other two big blows of the game Flyers and the Sluggers on Wedneswere Rosario's triple for the Naval day night was rained out, fans Station and Gallagher's triple for had plenty of excitement up until the Flyers. the elements unloaded. Johnny In the only other two contests Werz was sent to the hill by the this week, The Flyers ripped the Flyers and was opposed by Jim Marines by a 13-6 count on Sunday Webster, highly touted southpaw afternoon while VU-10 romped of the Naval Station. It is very over the Hospital by a 20-6 count likely that these two fellows will Monday evening. meet again on Tuesday night and if so a ding dong battle can THE STANDINGS definitely be expected. The Naval Station will be fighting to go into the VU-10 fray with the same 4-0 record the Airdales sports, while the Flyers, winners of the first half, will be out to defeat the Sluggers and thereby force a three-way tie in the event of a VU-10 victory. Should the Naval Station lose to NAS but defeat VU-10 there would be a three-way tie for the second half title. Erratic fielding was evident on the part of both the Sluggers and the Flyers in their meeting Wednesday night but crowd thrills were not decreased by this. Rather they were increased. The battle Tuesday night will be billed as "power vs. speed". Among some circles on the Naval Operating Base, the NavSta has been called Gtmo's version of the Yankees. If this be true, the base running antics of the Flyers give them the appearance of being a Brooklyn Dodger farm club. Werz kept the Slugger bats silent for the first five and twothirds innings but then everything broke loose suddenly and the Flyers who had garnered four runs in the three preceeding innings, on passed balls, overthrows and errors with a timely hit here and there, found themselves with a tie ball game at 4-4. From there on it was VU-10 NavSta NAS Hospital TraGrp Marines 4 3 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 4 1.000 1.000 .750 .250 .010 .000 WARMIN' THE BENCH By Armed Forces Press Service Even though it's just August and we're still sweltering in the summer heat, let's take a quick look around the corner at football, waiting-not to patiently-to take over the nation's sports headlines. Several pro teams have already opened their grid camps prior to the start of the '49 season, while others are starting their pre-season drills each week. And nearly every college squad that hopes to figure in the national picture will have begun their practice before another month has passed. The past two years have been great ones in this post-war era of football, and the 1949 season shows semblance of being one of the best football has ever known. So here's a pre-season look around the nation. East Above Average This season should mark the return of the East and the Ivy League to the realms of class. The East is well above average in material and team strength. Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Brown and Princeton figure to be the best with Army, Pennsylvania and Penn State close behind. Navy may be a sleeper. The Ivy schools headed by Cornell and Dartmouth, will however, claim the laurels. Through the South, Tulane, Vanderbilt and North Carolina will be the rave. Tennessee and Georgia will be among the best in a section that will be extremely strong and feature a lot of surprises) Keep an eye on Wake Forest and Clemson. The Southwest and the Far West will be stronger. They always produce winners in the Southwestern Conference and it looks as if SMU is leading the pack again, with a close race all the way. Determined West In the Far West, a great revision is underway with a firm determination to become part of the big picture. California, USC, Stanford, Washington, UCLA and Oregon, can all be expected to be greatly improved. This leaves the Mid-West which is always strong. Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio State and newly added Michigan State will be the class of the Big Ten. The Spartans of Michigan State have a good chance of taking the Michigan Wolverines this year, and of becoming the outstanding team in the nation unless Cornell cops the honored spot. Notre Dame always fields a terrific squad, and just because Frank Leahy has only 27 lettermen returning isn't sufficient to change that statement. In general, the outlook is for better football everywhere. BASEBALL HITS HOMER; BEATS BERLIN BEAUTIES Berlin (AFPS) -Beauty struck out and baseball reigns supreme in the Western section of occupied Germany. Organizers of Berlin's first post-war beauty contest, recently held here, were dismayed when only 30 persons turned out to witness a parade of bathing-suited frauleins competing for the title of "Berlin Beach Queen of 1949.". No soldiers wbre in the group. The contest conflicted with a baseball game; every soldier able to obtain leave was at the Army athletic field watching the Tempelhof Air Field nine play the Berlin Infantry Regiment team. S Pag6d Fout Tilt INDIAN Gtmo. Bay--17 Aug 49-2600


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