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Vol. IV, No. 25


U. S. Nava! Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 August 1949


INSURANCE DIVIDEND APPLICATIONS TO BE READY ON AUGUST 29

(SEA)-Application forms for
the National Service Life Insurance special dividends to be paid some
* 16,000,000 present and former
policyholders will become available
29 August.
Naval personnel may obtain their
forms (VA Form 9-430) through benefits and insurance officers of their respective commands. Blanks will be available, as well, at all post cffices, Veterans Administration offices, and veterans' service organizations
Payments will be made to all
present or former NSLI policyholders who paid premiums on their insurance for at least three n'onths prior to the anniversary of the policy in 1948-the "cut off!' date. The special dividend will not be paid on policies issued after 1 Jan. 1949. In other words, in order to be eligible for dividends, a person must have taken out an NSLI policy-either term or permanent plan insurance-no later then 31 Dec. 1947 and must have paid premiums on it for at least three
ronths.
No Reproduction Of Forms
Forms may, not be reproduced for
distribution or mailing to VA, since they become part of the permanent records of VA and must be on the special paper provided and of correct size to fit computing and re-, cording machines. Any off-standard or off-size paper would only serve O to delay processing as the cards
would have to be thrown off the
production line.
VA officials have pointed out that
forms received at administration headquarters before 29 August will not be considered for processing, therefore "jumping the gun" will
be to no avail.
It is expected that mailing of
payment checks will begin in January. 1950.
Forms Contain Instructions
All a serviceman or veteran has
to do is to obtain an official application which contains instructions forfilling it out, and mail it to VA.
The mailing address is printed on the card, but it will be necessary to
(Continued on Page Four)


ROTHSCHILD TAKES OVER RETAIL STORE
Mr. Milton Rothschild arrived in Guantanamo on August 8 to take ever the duties of Retail Store Manager in the Ship's Service Depart ent. This position was formerly held by Mr. G. M. Marchus.
Mr. Rothschild has had many years of experience in the retail merchandising field, including positions with several large department stores, and his presence is a welcome addition to LT. Strebel's Ship's Service staff.

GTMO. SUGGESTIONS IN NAVY PUBLICATION
A beneficial suggestion submitted by two employees of the Naval Air Station appears in the May issue of "Navy Beneficial Suggestions Digest."
An improvement on the DeWalt saw was the suggestion submitted by Leonard Thomas and Victor Mustelier, joiners in the NAS Supply Department. Each received a cash award of $10 from the local committee on beneficial suggestions, and will be eligible for an additional award if the suggestion is successfully adopted by other Naval activities.

NAVY SHOWS GAIN
OF 1,500 IN JUNE
(SEA)-Navy personnel strength on 30 June was 449,500, an increase of 1,500 from 31 May.
The results for June as compiled from preliminary reports showed 1,412 one-year enlistees, 5,111 other new recruits, 1,764 immediate reenlistments and extensions, and 1,338 other enlistments.
Marine Corps strength on 30 June was approximately 85,000. Army figures showed a total, of 658,800, while the Air Force strength was 420,200.
The estimated total armed forces recruitment during June was 43,159, or about 13,700 more than during May. New recruits, including one year enlistments of 18year-olds under the Selective Service Act, totaled more than 48 per cent of the total enlistments for the month.


OFFICERS ELECT NEW EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
In elections held last week, the following officers were elected to Reserve on the Executive Committee of the Commissioned Officers Mess (Open). CDR R.J.C. Maulsby, Naval Air Station, LCDR W.A. Arthur, Fleet Training Group, LCDR J.N. Fitzgerald, Utility Squadron Ten, and 1st LT. B.G. Cass, Jr., Marine Barracks. CDR Maulsby will serve as chairman of the Committee.
Club members anticipate big things from the new committee in planning and coordinating a schedule which will attract fuller use of club facilities by Base Personnel.

WARNING TO THOSE WHO HOLD MEMBERSHIP IN SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES
By Ship's Editorial Association
Naval Personnel who join or become associated with organizations considered by the U.,S. Attorney General as disloyal to this country, will jeopardize their naval careers. This caution has been issued by the Chief of Naval Personnel who has had published a list of 36 additional groups considered "disloyal".
The new list, appearing in BuPers Circular Letter 98-49 (NDB, 30, June 1949), supplements a previous group announced in BuPers Circ. Ltr. 4-49 (NDB, 15 Jan. 1949). The Attorney General considers groups "disloyal" which:
Are totalitarian, fascist, communist or subversive.
Advocate or approve commission of acts of violence or force to deny persons their rights under the U.S. Constitution.
Seek to alter U4 S. government by unconstitutional means.

3� G.A.R. STAMP
TO HONOR UNION VETS
Indianapolis, Ind. (AFPS)-A special three cent commemorative postage stamp honoring the final encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic will go on sale here August 29.


9&








TT.1 TNDIA Saturday. 13 August 1949
.. THEINI-


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 13 August 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN --------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless Indicated otherwise.

THE NAVAL UNIFORM

The Naval uniform has been worn proudly by generations of Navy men. Much of the criticism leveled against us has been as a result of a few individuals, ,mostly our younger men, who have felt a desire to be "salty" after the merchant marine fashion or who have felt that a touch of "Harlem color" in various proportions would express their individuality. The uniforms are intended to be alike because they are uniforms distinctive of the Naval Service. They should be worn correctly. As a sidelight it is interesting to note how rolling up to cuffs got started: back in' the- prohibition days the Coast Guardsmen used to roll up their cuffs in order to conceal the Coast Guard Shield'which was the only difference between their uniform and those of the Navy, in order to make people think they were in the Navy instead of the Coast Guard which was somewhat in disfavor with some people. Just why it became a "fad" in naval circles is rather uncertain.
-Reprinted from the
"DOPE SHEET".

ERNIE PYLE BURIED IN HAWAII CEMETERY

Honolulu (AFPS)-Ernie Pyle, war correspondent, is home at last.
The body of the beloved chronicler of the Infantry recently was returned from his temporary resting place on Ie Shima for reinternment in the mountain crater of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific.


A little bundle
of joy, titled RoL bert James Connor, Jr., was presented to D K 1 and Mrs. Robert J. Connor, Sr. of NSD, at 1710 on 2 August 1949.
Robert Jr. tipped the scales at 6 lbs. and 10 ozs.
and was the only baby born this week to Gtmo. families.
The Hospital welcomed aboard a few new members to the staff this week. Among them was HMC Henry W. Minehan, who prior to reporting here, completed a course in Medical Administration at the Navy School of Hospital Administration, National Navy Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Chief Minehan replaced Chief Barret at the Labor Board Dispensary.
Also new in our midst is HMC James W. Kemp who reported in from the Naval Mine Depot, Yorktown, Virginia. Chief Kemp has been assigned-to the Base Sanitation Office. Also reporting in early this week was WOHC Frank L. Maxwell. Mr. Maxwell came to us from the Naval Hospital, Long Beach, California.
R. C. Brauwn, SN, and I. J Coolbrith, HM2, will be advanced to HM3 and HM1 repectively effective the 16th of August 1949. Our congratulations to the both of you. HMC's Barrett and Cummings bade us goodbye last week and took to the sky to report to new duty stations after short leaves in the States. Chief Cummings will report to the Naval Hospital, San Diego, California and Chief Barret to the Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland.
Back off leave in the past week we, have: LTJG Carrie J. Webb, NC; Frank Anthony, HM3; Anthony Butkovich, SN; and Wayne Copp, SN.

NEW AIRMAN RECRUIT
PROGRAM UNDERWAY.

The Navy is conducting a new Airman Recruit program to supplement its high school airman recruit program and aviation electronics program.
The new program for airman differs from the other two aviation programs in that applicants are not required to have, necessarily, a high school education. They must however, score a higher mark on the applicant qualification test then is required for seaman recruits.
Airman recruits will receive their boot-training at Great Lakes, Illinois or San Diego, California. After gra-luating from recruit training they will be assigned to aviation activities. Approximately 1,000 recruits are being enlisted each month under the three programs.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


NEW 'PITCH' PROPELLER INCREASES TUG POWER
(SEA) -With an aim to increasing tugboat operation effic-ency, a new controllable and reversible pitch propeller is being tested at sea by engineers of the U. S. Naval Engineering Experimental Station, Annapolis, Md., and David Taylor Model Basin, Carderock, Md.
The new propeller, developed by BuShips and installed on the harbor tug USS Chohonaga (YTB 500), has a nine and one-half-foot diameter and a controllable pitch. Its setting is controlled from the pilot house, enabling tug operators to get the best performance from their engines.
Its action can be compared with a trailer truck shifting into low gear to go up a hill. With a controllable pitch propeller digging into the water at the desired angle, a tugboat can pull a heavy load with a minimum strain on the engine and a maximum use of horsepower. With the usual fixed propeller, the extra horsepower is not available in towing work because you can't "shift gears."

NME EYES CIVIL LIST WITH VIEW TO BIG CUT
Washington (AFPS)-The Armed Forces are studying the feasibility of a drastic cut in the number of civilian employees on its pay-roll.
A survey being made at present, has so far produced no definite figure, but the number of civilians involved may number from 100,000 to 200,000, it was recently disclosed.
The Armed Forces had 897,365 civilian employees as of May 30. This figure includes those overseas as well as in the United States.
Secretary' of Defense Louis Johnson told a Senate appropriations sub-committee that, without hurting the combat efficiency of the Services, he thought that about $1 billion could be saved by eliminating waste "and cutting down unnecessary civilian employment."


0


THE INDIAN







Saudy 3Ars 99THE INDIAN Pa e Three


S NEW STABILIZATION
SYSTEM MAY REDUCE
SHIP'S ROLL 80%
By Ship's Editorial Association
It will be smoother sailing for
chips of the future if a new stabilization system under test by Navy engineers proves successful.
Designed to reduce the rolling
motion of a vessel by 80 percent, the system, described as the"activiated" tank" method, has been under study by naval architects and engineers for a number of years, but never has been tested at sea with the modifications
recently added.
The system has been installed
aboard the large mine sweeper USS Peregrine (AM 373) at Naval Slhipyard, Norfolk, Va., and will receive extensive sea tests in rough weather off the Virginia Capes in
* August.
Counter-Balance Principle
Operating on a counter-balance
principle, the new stabilizing system consists of two pairs of large tanks mounted on opposite sides of the ship. The bottoms of the tanks, each half filled with ballast water, are connected athwartships by
transfer ducts.
Powerful, electronically - c o nt r o 11 e d impellers automatically pump water back and forth at a rapid rate to counter balance the ship's rolling rpotion. Actually, the motion is corrected just as it commences. The electronic equipment detects the roll at a very early stage, immediately producing a signal to actuate the pumping equipment. The pumping is accomplished with two large variable pitch propellers in the transfer ducts near the bottoms of the
tanks.
Peregrine's temporary installation of the stabilizing gear was attached outside the ship's hull to
minimize structural changes in the ship for the test period.
Should the method prove successful and be adopted for general ship use, the anti-rolling tanks would be built into a vessel's hull
adjacent to the shell.
Low-Cost Installation
The system could be installed on
a new vessel at a cost in weight of approximately one per cent of the ship's displacement, naval engineers believe. They estimate that the system' would increase the monetary cost of ships by about three per cent and would require only two per cent of the ship's
propulsive power.
Naval ordnancemen and engineers point out that accuracy of weapons would be greatly imroved by the more stable platrms offered by a successful stabilizer, carrier landing operations would be simplified, and the dis* charge of cargo and troops in open seaways, with the vessel at anchor,
would be expedited.


NAS SLIPSTREAM
Since-this column last appeared in print some three weeks ago, there have been several incidents cf interest at the Naval Air Station.
In last week's issue, the story of the PAA plane's emergency landing at McCalla Field omitted one significant item. Operations personnel were seen clustered bout the "wounded" plane as the PAA mechanic went about his work. Many questions were asked by Chiefs as well as "whitehats". It appeared that both added to their knowledge as a result of the question and answer period.
Captain Pederson was very well pleased with the appearance of all hands at inspection last Saturday His sentiments expressed were to the effect that the Saturday inspection was the best held since his arrivial here in February.
Over 100 men are slated to participate in the September tests for advancement in rating. This is the largest group in the history of the Air Station. Some 65 went up in April establishing the high mark until recommendations for the fall exams were turned in.
Returning to Gtmo. this week after TAD orders in the States was James E. Case, AM1 who arrived here Monday from Memphis. Also arriving for a tour of duty here was John J. Clark, TD3, from U. S. NAAS, Saufley Field, Pensacola, Florida, and Alex D. Cook, AKAN, who comes to Guantanamo from Memphis, Tennessee.
Slated to leave us shortly is LT. P. H. Dalton, Personnel Officer who is returning to the States for duty with the Bureau of Naval /Personnel in Washington. LTJG D. C. Wray, his relief, is slated to report aboard about 10 September from the ComAirPac staff in San Diego. LT. Dalton will leave on Tuesday's FLSW flight. LT. W. H. Looney will act as personnel officer until LTJG Wiay arrives. Slated to leave Guantanamo Bay today is W. L. Benningfield, MMC, who goes to Norfolk, Virginia for a course of training before being assigned to the Naval Training Center at 9reat Lakes, Ill., to "push boots'.
L. C. Serig, Chief Clerk, at NAS, is slated to leave soon on a 50-day leave in the States. He will go up on the General Mann and return on the USS President Thomas Jefferson. LT. Looney will take over the duties of Chief Clerk during Mr. Serig's absence.


WATCH NEXT WEEK'S
INDIAN FOR LATEST
NEWS ON "SUDS IN
YOUR EYE"
n-i w n n U alH-UM N u ~ . e In


NAVY SET TO TEST
SUB POWER PLANTS
AND ROLLING SHIPS

Washington (AFPS) - Extensive research aimed at the development of a "completely new" type of propulsion for submarines will be undertaken by the Navy during 1950.
The experimental work, described as abnormally hazardous and secret, was revealed recently with the tentative approval by the House Armed Services Committee of the Navy's building iund program, a part of which will be used to finance the project.
The plan calls for the construction of new submarine power plants, including a test, plant for engine work at the Naval Engineering Experiment Station at Annapolis, Md.
The Navy also announced the development of a device for reducing the rolling of ships as much as 80 per cent for improved firing accuracy, carrier landing operation, amphibious landingsand of course-relief from seasickness.
First tests of the device, which consists of two pairs of large tanks on opposite sides of a ship, are under way in the turbulent waters of the Virginia Capes. In operation, ducts transfer ballast water from one set of tanks to the other by electronic equipment automatically to counterbalance the ship's rolling motion.


VaOU FIGURE BETTER
WITH PAYROLL -SAVIN6S.


Invest in U. S. Savings Bondssure and safe as the credit of the Unites States-the best on earth.


Saturday, 13 Aueust 1949


THE INDIAN








Pag PorTEIDA" aura,1 uut14


$75 PER MONTH PAY FOR NAVY CAPTAINS

By Ship's Editorial Association
Seventy-five dollars a month pay for Navy captains? Yes, you read it correctly. That,- however, was 155 years ago.
But let's go back to the year 1785 when the United States was entirely destitute of a navy. A wave of Barbary piracy, coupled with the later outbreak of the European war of thd French Revolution, had assumed major proportions as a s e r i o u s menace to American shipping.
On the 27th of March in 1794, Congress enacted the original law authorizing the U. S. Navy to provide protection for our commerce at sea. This law contained but nine sections, three of which had to do with the pay and subsistence of naval personnel.
Officers' Pay, Subsistence
Captains, $75 per month and six rations per day; lieutenants, $40 per month and three rations per day; surgeons, $50 per month and two rations per day; chaplains, sailing masters and pursers, $40 per month and two rations per day;. surgeon's mates, $30 per month and two rations per day; lieutenants of marines, $26 per month and two rations per day; boatswains, gunners sailmakers and carpenters, $14 per month and two rations per day.
Enlisted Pay Status
It was further enacted "That the pay to be allowed to the petty officers, midshipmen, seamen, ordinary seamen and marines, shall be fixed by the President of the United States;' provided, that the whole sum to be given for the whole pay aforesaid, shall not exceed twentyseven thousand dollars per month, and that each of the said persons shall be entitled to one ration per day." When it is considered that the six vessels involved in the original law carried a total complement oi close to 2,000 personnel other than warrant or commissioned officers, it can readily be seen that the financial lot of the petty officer or seaman was anything but lucrative.
Daily Ration Allowance
As for subsistence, it was enacted that "the ration shall consist of as follows: Sunday, one pound of bread, one pound and a half of beef, and a half a pint of rice. Monday, one pound of bread, one pound of pork, half a pint of peas or beans, and four ounces of cheese. Tuesday, one pound of bread, one pound and a half of beef, and one pound of potatoes or turnips, and pudding. Wednesday, one pound ,of bread, two ounces of butter, or in lieu thereof, six ounces of molasses, four ounces of cheese, and a half pint of rice. Thursday, one pound of bread, one pound of pork, and half a pint of peas or beans. Friday, one pound of bread, one pound of salt fish, two


By R. A. Barchenger, YNC

The NSD picnic, held on Tuesday afternoon at the NAS Race Track, was a great success, with an abundance of beer, coke, and sports; and a magnificant dinner of fried chicken, baked ham, baked beans, potato salad, potato chips, pickles, olives, hot rolls, and coconut custard pie, thoroughly enjoyed by all hands.
Inmediately following the dinner, a softball game between the NSD personnel and Ship's Store Ashore personnel was played with a time limit being set, and ended in a 7 - 7 tie. SSA tied it up in the last half of the seventh inning.
Following the ball game, the !00 yard dash, ball throwing contest, and scooter race, were won by GREENE, DK2, LUSTER, SKSN, and FRENCH, SKSN, respectively. The officers and chiefs upset the white hats at volleyball by taking two straight games 21-10 and 21-15. Winners of all events were awarded assorted prizes.
The NSD-MARINE Officer softball team won the base championship Tuesday night by defeating VU-10 Officers 11 to 2 LCOL Johnston, CDR Kimball, LCDR Weatherson, LT Keating, LT Jones, CAPT Sullivan, LTJG Luebbe, LT Weizenegger, LT Cass, and LT Oglesby. NSD extends their congratulations to the winners.
Recent arrivals on board were ROBINSON, SKC, assigned duty in GSK, McCALL, GMC; to Base Police, and DE MICCO, SK3, to Ship's Ashore. Welcome aboard!

FORRESTAL MEMORAL

Washington (AFPS)-To honor America's first Defense Secretary, the late James V. Forrestal, Senator Millard F. Tydings, Maryland, is sponsoring a memorial fund to place a bronze bust of the former Secretary in the Pentagon. Following :.an initial contribution of one dollar by Senator Tydings, Defense Secretary Louis A. Johson gave the second dollar to the fund which is to be acquired by additional voluntary contributions.

onces of butter or one gill of oil, and one pound of potatoes. Saturday, one pound' of bread, one pound of pork, half a pint of peas or beans, and four ounces of cheese. And there shall'also be allowed one half pint of distilled spirits per day, or in lieu thereof, one quart of beer per day, to each ration."


RHODE ISLAND BONUS DEADLINE EXTENDED
Rhode Island veterans of World War II have until October 31, 1949 to file their applications for the Rhode Island state bonus according to a communication received from R. C. Long, Veterans Liason Officer to the ,Governor.
The new deadline is the result of recent legislative action which also required that all payments be completed by December 31, 1949,
Provisions of the Rhode Island bonus are as follows: Amount$200: Service required-Service between September 16, 1940 and September 2, 1945. Discharge or release other than dishonorable or still in active service. Residence. required: Six months immediately prior to entering Service.
Address all inquiries to: Veterans Bonus Board, State House, Providence 2, R. I.

CHUCKLES

By Armed Forces Press Service
Fact File
Incompatibility: When a husband loses his income and a wife loses her patibility.
* * *
Burlesque show: Where everyone is from Missouri.
"Sweet Adeline": Bottle-hymn of the Reptiblic.
* * *
Strong willed: What I am. Pigheaded: What you are.
* * *
Civilized Nation: One that is horrified by other civilized nations.
* * *
Sophistication: The art of admitting- that the unexpected is' just what you anticipated.
Penny: Chip off ,he old buck.
* **
Pawn Shop Motto: "Come see up at your earliest inconvenience.
Indigestion: Failure to fit a square meal to a round stomach.
, * * *
Two carrier pigeons, winging messages from HQ to an outfit on maneuvers, met in a tree top.
1st Bird: "What order are you carrying,"
2nd Bird: "SO 121."
1st B.. Well, you better get a move on. I have the order that rescinds it."
During the war, new soldiers were introduced , to the slogan: "If it moves, salute it. If it doesn't move, pick it up. If you can't pick it up, paint it."
These days. it has changed to: \'If it cries, change it. If it's on wheels, buy it. If it's hollow, rent it."


0


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Page Four,


THE INIiAN


Saturday, 13 August 1949








Saud-1 urs 99THE INDIANPaeFv


ARM4Y MEDICS' GIVEN
NAVAL HOSPITAL DUTY

Washington (AFPS) -Assignment of Army personnel to four Naval hospitals, pursuant to recommendations )f the Hawley Board, has been announced by Maj. Gen. Raymond W. Bliss,
Army Surgeon General.
The joint staffing of NME hos.
pitals is intended to effect economies in the assignment of physicians and other professional personnel, and to reduce the total
number of hospitals.
Under the plan, -hospitals of
each Service allocate a certain number of beds for personnel of
other Services.
Joint staffing of the four hospitals will provide 825 beds ?or Army and Air Force patients. The four hospitals affected are: St.
Alban's, Long Island, N. Y., W Corona and Long Beach Hospitals, California; and Portsmouth . Hospital, Portsmouth, Va.
Nine Army Medical officers
were assigned to St. Alban's Hospital, making 450 beds available for Army-Air Force personnel, and making possible the closing of Fort Totten General Hospital, Long Island, and reduction of Tilton General Hospital, Fort Dix,
N. J., to station hospital status.

PIGS IS PIGS-EVEN
IF THEY'RE SWIMMING

(SEA)-If you happen to be
sailing around the Bahama Islands and think you've spotted some pigs swimming in the ocean, you're not just "seeing things"-they
could be pigs.
The National Geographic Society
tells us that wild pigs found on some of the Bahamas, unlike our domesticated swine, are not strictly land-based animals-they often go to sea as well. They swim from island to island in search of food ,or to escape the dogs of huntsmen
ot natives.

HISTORY OF
O GUADALCANAL READY
FOR PUBLICATION

(SEA)-Navy and Marine Corps
personnel who participated in the armed forces assault on Guadalcanal will be interested in the documentary story "Guadalcanal: First Offensive," scheduled for
publication in July.
The fourth volume of the Army's
official history of the war, the book deals primarily with Army operations but also contains summarized accounts of the activities of the other services. It may be obtained from the Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at $4 per
copy.


TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP
By Skiddy Masterson and
Cecil Pederson
As the plane soared into the air last Saturday, we waved good-bye to two of our old friends, Joan McNeal and Bill Barrett, who were leaving for the States. Joan will stay in Ocala, Florida while her mother undergoes medical treatment. Here's hoping Mrs. McNeal has a speedy recovery and that we'll soon have Joan with us again. Bill will be living near Washington, D. C. where his father has been transferred. We hope Bill has loads of fun and we know he'll make friends there easily, as he did here. We've been a little slow on the new teen-agers down here, but it's hard to find out everything, especially when, so little is put in the "Chatter-Box". We're sorry we missed Shirley Morris' arrival from Jacksonville on July 18. Shirley, who is a sophomore, came in by Fleet Logistics Support wing Flight and is visiting her brother. We all hope she likes us well- enough to stay for school this coming year. We also apologize to Peggy Claar, who arrived July 7 on the President Jackson for our belated welcome. Peggy, who is 14, expects to live in Gtmo. for two years and will be in the eighth grade this year. It's swell having you down here girls!
Happy 14th birthday, Henry! We all had a scrumptious time at your house last Monday. That was a wonderful cake and the dancing and games made it a party we siall all remember as top notch. We'd like to thank you and your family for a perfect evening.
Nancy Boughnou and Ramona Moses tell us they had a wonderful time in Guantanamo City Tuesday. They left by boat early that morning for Caimaneia and went Itrom there to Guantanamo where they spent the day. On Wednesday, the crashboat carried three other teen-agers to Santiago. Cynthia and Cecily Allen and Barbara Goud went there with their parents and had a swell time trying out their Spanish.
The Allens, Smiths, and Mastersons drove to Glorieta, bout 15 miles this side of Guantanamo City, last Sunday. According to the account which Cynthia,' Cecily, Butchy and Skiddy will give to anyone who will listen, they "drove along a beautifully paved highway swam in the crystal clear Yateras River . . ." Anyway, they had a good time.
P. S. Thanks for helping write the column this week, Jeaneen.

(SEA)-The term "keelhauling", a holdover from old' Navy days and at that time referring to a form of punishment, is sometimes used today to express a verbal reprimand.


N.Y. STATE WAR
BALLOTS AVAILABLE

(SEA)-The State of New York will hold a general election 8 November. Servicemen who are residents of the state and qualified to vote may obtain absentee war ballots by filing application with the Division for Servicemen's Voting, State of New York, Albany 1, N. Y. before .18 October. Ballots will be mailed to applicants after 80 September and they must be returned to DSV, Albany by 7 November. Information on the proper procedure for making application may be obtained from commanding or voting officers.
Among proposed constitutional amendments to be submitted to voters are two of special interest to members of the armed forces since they effect veterans. One has to do with the payment of a state bonus to former servicemen who were residents of the State et the time of their enlistment but who have taken up residence outside the state of New York. The other relates to preference given to veterans in civil service exams.

DELAWARE VOTES BONUS

Wilmington, Del. (AFPS) - A var service bonus for Delaware's
-service men and women recently was assured after state voters had approved the measure by a 5-to-1 majority.
The State Legislature will meet in the fall to determine the amount each veteran will receive.






NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 14 August to Sat. 20 August
Sunday
WE WERE STRANGERS
Jennifer Jones John Garfield
Monday
STRIKE IT RICH
Rod Cameron Bonita Granville
Tuesday
ALASKA PATROL
Richard Travis Helen Wescott
Wednesday
THE CRIME DOCTOR'S DIARY Adele Jergens Stephen Dunne
Thursday
GIRL FROM MANHATTAN D. Lamour Charles Laughton
Friday
THE BRIBE
Robert Taylor Ava Gardner
Saturday
THE YOUNGER BROTHERS
Janis Paige Wayne Morris


Paee Five


,q urcl v_ 1.2 Au u. t 1949











Baseballers Begin Final Week Of Play


With VU-10 and the Naval Station still deadlocked for top rung in the second half of the baseball league at press time today the teams prepared to open their stretch drive for their final week of competition.
The Naval Air Station, winners of the first round, will be the guests of the Marines tomorrow afternoon when they clash on the Recreation baseball diamond, at 2:30. The Flyers wind up their season with a return tilt with the Naval Station on Wednesday night at 8:00 p.m.
Led by their flashy southpaw, Jim Webster, the Naval Station has looked like the team to beat this half after a disappointing first half. Their record of three wins ond no losses in the second round is just ahead of VU-10's 2-0 record. The Utron Ten club was to have played Training Group last night and was expected to annex their third win of the second round. I Possibility of a play-off for the second half crov n is possible but improbable. There 'is a chance that both the Naval Station and VU-10 will be undefeated right down to their Friday night battle. The 'airdales" must get by the Hospital on Monday night while the Naval Station lads face a revenge-seeking NAS nine on Wednesday night. All in all it promises to be a teriffic week of baseball for Guantanamo Bay.
The Results
Looking back over the results of the second round thus far we find the Naval Station boasting an 18-3 win over Fleet Training Group to begin the second round, on August 3.
The Hospital, called "hitless hospitalmen", in, another " newspaper" with Base-wide circulation,' came to life in the second game of current round and belted the Marines by a 13-2 count. Clements was credited with the win and O'Connor tagged with the defeat.
VU-10 kept the line of revengeseekers moving with an '8 to 2 win over the Naval Air Station. The "one-two" combination of VU-10, namely, Stever and Slone, kept the Flyer bats stilled. Big wallop for the Flyers was Gallagher's home zun. An unorthodox homerun scored three runs for VU-10 in the fourth ,and a couple innings later two more runs scored on an outfield error. Johnny Werz was handed his first defeat as he went the route for NAS.
The Naval Station tripped the Hospital Sunday, 13-6, to make their two game series even. The Hospital won from the Naval Sta-


tion in the first round, 7-3.
Monday night, VU-10 put an eni to the uprising by the revengeseeking clubs by blasting the Marines 16 to 6. VU-10 won their game from the Marines in the first round 8-7 in ten innings.
Tuesday night saw NAS clip the Training Group, 8-2. Eggebrecht was the winning pitcher, Wine the loser.
Wednesday night the Naval Staton shoved the Marines completely out of the secona round picture by nipping them. 9-6. Webster went the route for the victorious Naval Station and struck out 13. Y'Connor went the route for the Marines.
Thursday night saw the second
-hutout of the season as tie Naval Air Station rolled to a 17-0 victory over the Hospital. Johnny Werz was credited with the win for che Flyers. Ernie Faile, hard hitting Flyer shortstop led the victors at the plate by hammering out four hits in six trips, to raise his searon batting mark to .567.
THE GRAND FINALE
Sunday ------- Marines vs. NAS Monday ---- Hospital vs. VU-10 Tuesday ... Marines vs. TraGrp. Wednesday --- NavSta vs. NAS Thursday .. TraGrp vs. Hospital Friday ------- VU-10 vs NavSta.
THE STANDINGS
Team W. L. Naval Station ---------3 0
VU-10 ----------------2 0
NAS ------------------2 1
Hospital --------------1 2
TraGrp -------------- 0 2
Marines ---------------- 0 3
NSD-MARINE OFFICERS 1949 BASE CHAMPIONS

The combined NSD-Marine softball team won the 1949 Base Championship in the Officers Softball league with a decisive 11-2 wallop-t ing of the officers representing VU-10 on Tuesday night.
The victory in the Championship contest climaxed an uphill battle for the NSD-Marine squad. After a mediocre showing in the first half of the league, they hit their stride in the second half, deadlocking VU-10 for the second half title and then beating them 10-9 in the play-off for the second half title.
Tuesday night's game pitted the same two teams as first and second half champions with the aforementioned results. LCDR Weatherson was the winning pitcher for the NSD-Marine combo with LTJG Whitey Jones being charged with the loss.


MARINES HOST TO NAS TOMORROW; SEASON ENDS WITH VU-10-NAVSTA FRACAS FRIDAY


Baseball Facts,

INTERESTING SIDELIGHTS
The score of both no-hit games pitched in the major leagues last season was identical, 2-0. Bob Lemon pitched the Cleveland Indians to victory over Detroit in the American in one, and Rex Barney topped the Giants for the Dodgers in the other.
Bob Feller holds the distinction of being the only pitcher to hurl a no-hit game on the opening day of the season. Rapid Robert turned the trick in 1940 against the Chicago White Sox. The Indians won the game 1-0.
Records show that the year the New York Giants set two winning streaks, one of which still stands, they did not win the National league pennant. The Giants in the early part of the season won 17 straight ball games and in the latter part of the season set the major league record of 26 straight wins., Despite this they wound up in fourth place in the final standings
Did you know that it is impossible for a pitcher to balk to second base? ? ?
Cliff Mapes' terrific throw in from deep right field in a recent game between the Yankees and the Cleveland Indians amazed baseball fans the nation over. Those who heard the game here over AFRS were talking about it days after it occured. The throw brings to mind one that occurred here last season. According to personnel here at the time, "Red" Webber, at the time attached to GCA at the Naval Air Station hauled in a long fly to deep centerfield almost to the present basketball courts and thew on the INSURANCE DIVIDEND APPLICATIONS TO BE READY ON AUGUST 29

(Continued from Page One)
affix a one-cent postage stamp. In the event an applicant does
not l;now the number of his insurance policy, it will not be necessary for him to write the Bureau of Naval Personnel or to the VA office, as the applicant can readily be identified by service number, rate or rank, and the exact name used during service with the. armed forces.


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THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-10 August 49--2500




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___ian Vol. IV, No. 25 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 13 August 1949 INSURANCE DIVIDEND APPLICATIONS TO BE READY ON AUGUST 29 (SEA)-Application forms for the National Service Life Insurance special dividends to be paid some 16,000,000 present and former policyholders will become available 29 August. Naval personnel may obtain their forms (VA Form 9-430) through benefits and insurance officers of their respective commands. Blanks will be available, as well, at all post offices, Veterans Administration offices, and veterans' service organizations Payments will be made to all present or former NSLI policybolders who paid premiums on their insurance for at least three ironths prior to the anniversary of the policy in 1948-the "cut off" date. The special dividend will not be paid on policies issued after 1 Jan. 1949. In other words, in order to be eligible for dividends, a person must have taken out an NSLI ,policy-either term or permanent plan insurance-no later then 31 Dec. 1947 and must have paid premiums on it for at least three months. No Reproduction Of Forms Forms may not be reproduced for distribution or mailing to VA, since they become part of the permanent records of VA and must be on the special paper provided and of correct size to fit computing and recording machines. Any off-standard or off-size paper would only serve .to delay processing as the cards would have to be thrown off the production line. VA officials have pointed out that forms received at administration headquarters before 29 August will not be considered for processing, therefore "jumping the gun" will be to no avail. It is expected that mailing of payment checks will begin in January. 1950. Forms Contain Instructions All a serviceman or veteran has to do is to obtain an official application which contains instructions for filling it out, and mail it to VA. The mailing address is printed on the card, but it will be necessary to (Continued on Page Four) ROTHSCHILD TAKES OVER RETAIL STORE Mr. Milton Rothschild arrived in Guantanamo on August 8 to take over the duties of Retail Store Manager in the Ship's Service Department. This position was formerly held by Mr. G. M. Marchus. Mr. Rothschild has had many years of experience in the retail merchandising field, including positions with several large department stores, and his presence is a welcome addition to LT. Strebel's Ship's Service staff. GTMO. SUGGESTIONS IN NAVY PUBLICATION A beneficial suggestion submitted by two employees of the Naval Air Station appears in the May issue of "Navy Beneficial Suggestions Digest." An improvement on the DeWalt saw was the suggestion submitted by Leonard Thomas and Victor Mustelier, joiners in the NAS Supply Department. Each received a cash award of $10 from the local committee on beneficial suggestions, and will be eligible for an additional award if the suggestion is successfully adopted by other Naval activities. NAVY SHOWS GAIN OF 1,500 IN JUNE (SEA)-Navy personnel strength on 30 June was 449,500, an increase of 1,500 from 31 May. The results for June as compiled from preliminary reports showed 1,412 one-year enlistees, 5,111 other new recruits, 1,764 immediate reenlistments and extensions, and 1,338 other enlistments. Marine Corps strength on 30 June was approximately 85,000. Army figures showed a total of 658,800, while the Air Force strength was 420,200. The estimated total armed forces recruitment during June was 43,159, or about 13,700 more than during May. New recruits, including one year enlistments of 18year-olds under the Selective Service Act, totaled more than 48 per cent of the total enlistments for the month. OFFICERS ELECT NEW EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE In elections held last week, the following officers were elected to serve on the Executive Committee of the Commissioned Officers Mess (Open). CDR R. J. C. Maulsby, Naval Air Station, LCDR W. A. Arthur, Fleet Training Group, LCDR J. N. Fitzgerald, Utility Squadron Ten, and 1st LT. B. G. Cass, Jr., Marine Barracks. CDR Maulsby will serve as chairman of the Committee. Club members anticipate big things from the new committee in planning and coordinating a schedule which will attract fuller use of club facilities by Base Personnel. WARNING TO THOSE WHO HOLD MEMBERSHIP IN SUBVERSIVE ACTIVITIES By Ship's Editorial Association Naval Personnel who join or become associated with organizations considered by the U. S. Attorney General as disloyal to this country, will jeopardize their naval careers. This caution has been issued by the Chief of Naval Personnel who has had published a list of 36 additional groups considered "disloyal". The new list, appearing in BuPers Circular Letter 98-49 (NDB, 30, June 1949), supplements a previous group announced in BuPers Circ. Ltr. 4-49 (NDB, 15 Jan. 1949). The Attorney General considers groups "disloyal" which: Are totalitarian, fascist, communist or subversive. Advocate or approve commission of acts of violence or force to deny persons their rights under the U. S. Constitution. Seek to alter U. S. government by unconstitutional means. 3 G.A.R. STAMP TO HONOR UNION VETS Indianapolis, Ind. (AFPS)-A special three cent commemorative postage stamp honoring the final encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic will go on sale here August 29.

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Pa g TDA Saturday, 13 August 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 13 August 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, JOSN-------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. THE NAVAL UNIFORM The Naval uniform has been worn proudly by generations of Navy men. Much of the criticism leveled against us has been as a result of a few individuals, mostly our younger men, who have felt a desire to be "salty" after the merchant marine fashion or who have felt that a touch of "Harlem color" in various proportions would express their individuality. The uniforms are intended to be alike because they are uniforms distinctive of the Naval Service. They should be worn correctly. As a sidelight it is interesting to note how rolling up to cuffs got started: back in the prohibition days the Coast Guardsmen used to roll up their cuffs in order to conceal the Coast Guard Shield which was the only difference between their uniform and those of the Navy, in order to make people think they were in the Navy instead of the Coast Guard which was somewhat in disfavor with some people. Just why it became a "fad" in naval circles is rather uncertain. -Reprinted from the "DOPE SHEET". ERNIE PYLE BURIED IN HAWAII CEMETERY Honolulu (AFPS)-Ernie Pyle, war correspondent, is home at last. The body of the beloved chronicler of the Infantry recently was returned from his temporary resting place on le Shima for reinternment in the mountain crater of the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific. A little bundle ASP6r1 of joy, titled Robert James Connor, Jr., was presented to D K 1 and Mrs. Robert J. Connor, Sr. of NSD, at 1710 on 2 August 1949. Robert Jr. tipped NOTES the scales at 6 lbs. and 10 ozs. and was the only baby born this 'week to Gtmo. families. The Hospital welcomed aboard few new members to the staff this week. Among them was HMC Henry W. Minehan, who prior to reporting here, completed a course in Medical Administration at the Navy School of Hospital Administration, National Navy Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland. Chief Minehan replaced Chief Barret at the Labor Board Dispensary. Also new in our midst is HMC James W. Kemp who reported in from the Naval Mine Depot, Yorktown, Virginia. Chief Kemp has been assigned to the Base Sanitation Office. Also reporting in early this week was WOHC Frank L. Maxwell. Mr. Maxwell came to us from the Naval Hospital, Long Beach, California. R. C. Brauwn, SN, and I. J Coolbrith, HM2, will be advanced to HM3 and HM1 repectively effective the 16th of August 1949. Our congratulations to the both of you. HMC's Barrett and Cummings bade us goodbye last week and took to the sky to report to new duty stations after short leaves in the States. Chief Cummings will report to the Naval Hospital, San Diego, California and Chief Barret to the Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland. Back off leave in the past week we, have: LTJG Carrie J. Webb, NC; Frank Anthony, HM3; Anthony Butkovich, SN; and Wayne Copp, SN. NEW AIRMAN RECRUIT PROGRAM UNDERWAY The Navy is conducting a new Airman Recruit program to supplement its high school airman recruit program and aviation electronics program. The new program for airman differs from the other two aviation programs in that applicants are not required to have, necessarily, a high school education. They must however, score a higher mark on the applicant qualification test then is required for seaman recruits. Airman recruits will receive their boottraining at Great Lakes, Illinois or San Diego, California. After graduating from recruit training they will be assigned to aviation activities. Approximately 1,000 recruits are being enlisted each month under the three programs. 0 U Saturday, 13 August 1949 Pa e Two THE INDIAN h,_* CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1990 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) NEW 'PITCH' PROPELLER INCREASES TUG POWER (SEA) -With an aim to increasing tugboat operation efficiency, a new controllable and reversible pitch propeller is being tested at sea by engineers of the U. S. Naval Engineering Experimental Station, Annapolis, Md., and David Taylor Model Basin, Carderock, Md. The new propeller, developed by BuShips and installed on the harbor tug USS Chohonaga (YTB 500), has a nine and one-half-foot diameter and a controllable pitch. Its setting is controlled from the pilot house, enabling tug operators to get the best performance from their engines. Its action can be compared with a trailer truck shifting into low gear to go up a hill. With a controllable pitch propeller digging into the water at the desired angle, a tugboat can pull a heavy load with a minimum strain on the engine and a maximum use of horsepower. With the usual fixed propeller, the extra horsepower is not available in towing work because you can't "shift gears." NME EYES CIVIL LIST WITH VIEW TO BIG CUT Washington (AFPS)-The Armed Forces are studying the feasibility of a drastic cut in the number of civilian employees on its pay-roll. A survey being made at present, has so far produced no definite figure, but the number of civilians involved may number from 100,000 to 200,000, it was recently disclosed. The Armed Forces had 897,365 civilian employees as of May 30. This figure includes those overseas as well as in the United States. Secretary of Defense Louis Johnson told a Senate appropriations sub-committee that, without hurting the combat efficiency of the Services, he thought that about $1 billion could be saved by eliminating waste "and cutting down unnecessary civilian employment."

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Saudy 3Ags 99THE INDIAN Pa0'e The S NEW STABILIZATION SYSTEM MAY REDUCE SHIP'S ROLL 80% By Ship's Editorial Association It will be smoother sailing for Chips of the future if a new stabilization system under test by Navy engineers proves successful. Designed to reduce the rolling motion of a vessel by 80 percent, the system, described as the"activiated tank" method, has been under study by naval architects and engineers for a number of years, but never has been tested at sea with the modifications recently added. The system has been installed aboard the large mine sweeper USS Peregrine (AM 373) at Naval Shipyard, Norfolk, Va., and will receive extensive sea tests in rough weather off the Virginia Capes in August. Counter-Balance Principle Operating on a counter-balance principle, the new stabilizing system consists of two pairs of large tanks mounted on opposite sides of the ship. The bottoms of the tanks, each half filled with ballast water, are connected athwartships by transfer ducts. Powerful, electronically -c o nt r o 11 e d impellers automatically pump water back and forth at a rapid rate to counter balance the ship's rolling motion. Actually, the motion is corrected just as it commences. The electronic equipment detects the roll at a very early stage, immediately producing a signal to actuate the pumping equipment. The pumping is accomplished with two large variable pitch propellers in the transfer ducts near the bottoms of the tanks. Peregrine's temporary installation of the stabilizing gear was ;I attached outside the ship's hull to minimize structural changes in the ship for the test period. Should the method prove successful and be adopted for general ship use, the anti-rolling tanks would be built into a vessel's hull adjacent to the shell. Low-Cost Installation The system could be installed on a new vessel at a cost in weight of approximately one per cent of the ship's displacement, naval engineers believe. They estimate that the system would increase the monetary cost of ships by about three per cent and would require only two per cent of the ship's propulsive power. Naval ordnancemen and engineers point out that accuracy of weapons would be greatly improved by the more stable platforms offered by a successful stabilizer, carrier landing operations would be simplified, and the discharge of cargo and troops in open seaways, with the vessel at anchor, would be expedited. NAS SLIPSTREAM Since this column last appeared in print some three weeks ago, there have been several incidents of interest at the Naval Air Station. In last week's issue, the story of the PAA plane's emergency landing at McCalla Field omitted one significant item. Operations personnel were seen clustered bout the "wounded" plane as the PAA mechanic went about his work. Many questions were asked by Chiefs as well as "whitehats". It appeared that both added to their knowledge as a result of the question and answer period. Captain Pederson was very well pleased with the appearance of all hands at inspection last Saturday His sentiments expressed were to the effect that the Saturday inspection was the best held since his arrivial here in February. Over 100 men are slated to participate in the September tests for advancement in rating. This is the largest group in the history of the Air Station. Some 65 went up in April establishing the high mark until recommendations for the fall exams were turned in. Returning to Gtmo. this week after TAD orders in the States was James E. Case, AM1 who arrived here Monday from Memphis. Also arriving for a tour of duty here was John J. Clark, TD3, from U. S. NAAS, Saufley Field, Pensacola, Florida, and Alex D. Cook, AKAN, who comes to Guantanamo from Memphis, Tennessee. Slated to leave us shortly is LT. P. H. Dalton, Personnel Officer who is returning to the States for duty with the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Washington. LTJG D. C. Wray, his relief, is slated to report aboard about 10 September from the ComAirPac staff in San Diego. LT. Dalton will leave on Tuesday's FLSW flight. LT. W. H. Looney will act as personnel officer until LTJG Wray arrives. Slated to leave Guantanamo Bay today is W. L. Benningfield, MMC, who goes to Norfolk, Virginia for a course of training before being assigned to the Naval Training Center at Great Lakes, Ill., to "push boots". L. C. Serig, Chief Clerk, at NAS, is slated to leave soon on a 50-day leave in the States. He will go up on the General Mann and return on the USS President Thomas Jefferson. LT. Looney will take over the duties of Chief Clerk during Mr. Serig's absence. I I I I I WATCH NEXT WEEK'S INDIAN FOR LATEST NEWS ON "SUDS IN YOUR EYE" NAVY SET TO TEST SUB POWER PLANTS AND ROLLING SHIPS Washington (AFPS) -Extensive research aimed at the development of a "completely new" type of propulsion for submarines will be undertaken by the Navy during 1950. The experimental work, described as abnormally hazardous and secret, was revealed recently with the tentative approval by the House Armed Services Committee of the Navy's building fund program, a part of which will be used to finance the project. The plan calls for the construction of new submarine power plants, including a test, plant for engine work at the Naval Engineering Experiment Station at Annapolis, Md. The Navy also announced the development of a device for reducing the rolling of ships as much as 80 per cent for improved firing accuracy, carrier landing operation, amphibious landingsand of course-relief from seasickness. First tests of the device, which consists of two pairs of large tanks on opposite sides of a ship, are under way in the turbulent waters of the Virginia Capes. In operation, ducts transfer ballast water from one set of tanks to the other by electronic equipment automatically to counterbalance the ship's rolling motion. UOU FIGURE BETTER WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS. 5aa. Invest in U. S. Savings Bondssure and safe as the credit of the Unites States-the best on earth. Saturday, 13 August 1949 THE INDIAN Page Three

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Page Pour THE INDIAN' Saturday, 13 August 1949 $75 PER MONTH PAY FOR NAVY CAPTAINS By Ship's Editorial Association Seventy-five dollars a month pay for Navy captains? Yes, you read it correctly. That, however, was 155 years ago. But let's go back to the year 1785 when the United States was entirely destitute of a navy. A wave of Barbary piracy, coupled with the later outbreak of the European war of thd French Revolution, had assumed major proportions as a s e r i o u s menace to American shipping. On the 27th of March in 1794, Congress enacted the original law authorizing the U. S. Navy to provide protection for our commerce at sea. This law contained but nine sections, three of which had to do with the pay and subsistence of naval personnel. Officers' Pay, Subsistence Captains, $75 per month and six rations per day; lieutenants, $40 per month and three rations per day; surgeons, $50 per month and two rations per day; chaplains, sailing masters and pursers, $40 per month and two rations per day; surgeon's mates, $30 per month and two rations per day; lieutenants of marines, $26 per month and two rations per day; boatswains, gunners, sailmakers and carpenters, $14 per month and two rations per day. Enlisted Pay Status It was further enacted "That the pay to be allowed to the petty officers, midshipmen, seamen, ordinary seamen and marines, shall be fixed by the President of the United States; provided, that the. whole sum to be given for the whole pay aforesaid, shall not exceed twentyseven thousand dollars per month, and that each of the said persons shall be entitled to one ration per day." When it is considered that the six vessels involved in the original law carried a total complement of close to 2,000 personnel other than warrant or commissioned officers, it can readily be seen that the financial lot of the petty officer or seaman was anything but lucrative. Daily Ration Allowance As for subsistence. it was enacted that "the ration shall consist of as follows: Sunday, one pound of bread, one pound and a half of beef, and a half a pint of rice. Monday, one pound of bread, one pound of pork, half a pint of peas or beans, and four ounces of cheese. Tuesday, one pound of bread, one pound and a half of beef, and one pound of potatoes or turnips, and pudding. Wednesday, one pound of bread, two ounces of butter, or in lieu thereof, six ounces of molasses, four ounces of cheese, and a half pint of rice. Thursday, one pound of bread, one pound of pork, and half a pint of peas or beans. Friday, one pound of bread, one pound of salt fish, two By R. A. Barchenger, YNC The NSD picnic, held on Tuesday afternoon at the NAS Race Track, was a great success, with an abundance of beer, coke, and sports; and a magnificant dinner of fried chicken, baked ham, baked beans, potato salad, potato chips, pickles, olives, hot rolls, and coconut custard pie, thoroughly enjoyed by all hands. Inmediately following the dinner, a softball game between the NSD personnel and Ship's Store Ashore personnel was played with a time limit being set, and ended in a 7 -7 tie. SSA tied it up in the last half of the seventh inning. Following the ball game, the 100 yard dash, ball throwing contest, and scooter race, were won by GREENE, DK2, LUSTER, SKSN, and FRENCH, SKSN, respectively. The officers and chiefs upset the white hats at volleyball by taking two straight games 21-10 and 21-15. Winners of all events were awarded assorted prizes. The NSD-MARINE Officer softball team won the base championship Tuesday night by defeating VU-10 Officers 11 to 2. LCOL Johnston, CDR Kimball, LCDR Weatherson, LT Keating, LT Jones, CAPT Sullivan, LTJG Luebbe, LT Weizenegger, LT Cass, and LT Oglesby. NSD extends their congratulations to the winners. Recent arrivals on board were ROBINSON, SKC, assigned duty in GSK, McCALL, GMC, to Base Police, and DE MICCO, SK3, to Ship's Ashore. Welcome aboard! FORRESTAL MEMORAL Washington (AFPS)-To honor America's first Defense Secretary, the late James V. Forrestal, Senator Millard F. Tydings, Maryland, is sponsoring a memorial fund to place a bronze bust of the former Secretary in the Pentagon. Following an initial contribution of one dollar by Senator Tydings, Defense Secretary Louis A. Johson gave the second dollar to the fund which is to be acquired by additional voluntary contributions. ounces of butter or one gill of oil, and one pound of potatoes. Saturday, one pound of bread, one pound of pork, half a pint of peas or beans, and four ounces of cheese. And there shall also be allowed one half pint of distilled spirits per day, or in lieu thereof, one quart of beer per day, to each ration." RHODE ISLAND BONUS DEADLINE EXTENDED Rhode Island veterans of World War II have until October 31, 1949 to file their applications for the Rhode Island state bonus according to a communication received from R. C. Long, Veterans Liason Officer to the Governor. The new deadline is the result of recent legislative action which also required that all payments be completed by December 31, 1948. Provisions of the Rhode Island bonus are as follows: Amount$200: Service required-Service between September 16, 1940 and September 2, 1945. Discharge or release other than dishonorable or still in active service. Residence required: Six months immediately prior to entering Service. Address all inquiries to: Veterans Bonus Board, State House, Providence 2, R. I. CHUCKLES By Armed Forces Press Service Fact File Incompatibility: When a husband loses his income and a wife loses her patibility. Burlesque show: Where everyone is from Missouri. "Sweet Adeline": Bottle-hymn of the Republic. Strong willed: What I am. Pigheaded: What you are. Civilized Nation: One that is horrified by other civilized nations. Sophistication: The art of admitting that the unexpected is just what you anticipated. Penny: Chip off the old buck. Pawn Shop Motto: "Come see u at your earliest inconvenience. Indigestion: Failure to fit a square meal to a round stomach. Two carrier pigeons, winging messages from HQ to an outfit on maneuvers, met in a tree top. 1st Bird: "What order are you carrying?" 2nd Bird: "SO 121." 1st B.: "Well, you better get a move on. I have the order that rescinds it." * During the war, new soldiers were introduced to the slogan: "If it moves, salute it. If it doesn't move, pick it up. If you can't pick it up, paint it." These days. it has changed to: "If it cries, change it. If it's on wheels, buy it. If it's hollow, rent it." D Page Four THE INDIAN Saturday, 13 August 1949 r

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TE 1NDIAN 14 TEFive ARMY MEDICS' GIVEN NAVAL HOSPITAL DUTY Washington (AFPS) -Assignment of Army personnel to four Naval hospitals, pursuant to recommendations of the Hawley Board, has been announced by Maj. Gen. Raymond W. Bliss, Army Surgeon General. The joint staffing of NME hospitals is intended to effect economies in the assignment of physicians and other professional personnel, and to reduce the total number of hospitals. Under the plan, hospitals of each Service allocate a certain number of beds for personnel of other Services. Joint staffing of the four hospitals will provide 825 beds ?or Army and Air Force patients. The four hospitals affected are: St. Alban's, Long Island, N. Y., Corona and Long Beach Hospitals, California; and Portsmouth Hospital, Portsmouth, Va. Nine Army Medical officers were assigned to St. Alban's Hospital, making 450 beds available for Army-Air Force personnel, and making possible the closing of Fort Totten General Hospital, O Long Island, and reduction of Tilton General Hospital, Fort Dix, N. J., to station hospital status. PIGS IS PIGS-EVEN IF THEY'RE SWIMMING (SEA)-If you happen to be sailing around the Bahama Islands and think you've spotted some pigs swimming in the ocean, you're not just "seeing things"-they could be pigs. The National Geographic Society tells us that wild pigs found on some of the Bahamas, unlike our domesticated swine, are not strictly land-based animals-they often go to sea as well. They swim from island to island in search of food or to escape the dogs of huntsmen o natives. HISTORY OF GUADALCANAL READY FOR PUBLICATION (SEA)-Navy and Marine Corps personnel who participated in the armed forces assault on Guadalcanal will be interested in the documentary story "Guadalcanal: First Offensive," scheduled for publication in July. The fourth volume of the Army's official history of the war, the book deals primarily with Army operations but also contains summarized accounts of the activities of the other services. It may be obtained from the Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., at $4 per copy. TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP By Skiddy Masterson and Cecil Pederson As the plane soared into the air last Saturday, we waved good-bye to two of our old friends, Joan McNeal and Bill Barrett, who were leaving for the States. Joan will stay in Ocala, Florida while her mother undergoes medical treatment. Here's hoping Mrs. McNeal has a speedy recovery and that we'll soon have Joan with us again. Bill will be living near Washington, D. C. where his father has been transferred. We hope Bill has loads of fun and we know he'll make friends there easily, as he did here. We've been a little slow on the new teen-agers down here, but it's hard to find out everything, especially when, so little is put in the "Chatter-Box". We're sorry we missed Shirley Morris' arrival from Jacksonville on July 18. Shirley, who is a sophomore, came in by Fleet Logistics Support wing Flight and is visiting her brother. We all hope she likes us well enough to stay for school this coming year. We also apologize to Peggy Claar, who arrived July 7 on the President Jackson for our belated welcome. Peggy, who is 14, expects to live in Gtmo. for two years and will be in the eighth grade this year. It's swell having you down here girls! Happy 14th birthday, Henry! We all had a scrumptious time at your house last Monday. That was a wonderful cake and the dancing and games made it a party we shall all remember as top notch. We'd like to thank you and your family for a perfect evening. Nancy Boughnou and Ramona Moses tell us they had a wonderful time in Guantanamo City Tuesday. They left by boat early that morning for Caimanera and went rrom there to Guantanamo where they spent the day. On Wednesday, the crashboat carried three other teen-agers to Santiago. Cynthia and Cecily Allen and Barbara Goud went there with their parents and had a swell time trying out their Spanish. The Allens, Smiths, and Mastersons drove to Glorieta, bout 15 miles this side of Guantanamo City, last Sunday. According to the account which Cynthia, Cecily, Butchy and Skiddy will give to anyone who will listen, they "drove along a beautifully paved highway swam in the crystal clear Yateras River ..." Anyway, they had a good time. P. S. Thanks for helping write the column this week, Jeaneen. (SEA)-The term "keelhauling", a holdover from old Navy days and at that time referring to a form of punishment, is sometimes used today to express a verbal reprimand. N. Y. STATE WAR BALLOTS AVAILABLE (SEA)-The State of New York will hold a general election 8 November. Servicemen who are residents of the state and qualified to vote may obtain absentee war ballots by filing application with the Division for Servicemen's Voting, State of New York, Albany 1, N. Y. before 18 October. Ballots will be mailed to applicants after 30 September and they must be returned to DSV, Albany by 7 November. Information on the proper procedure for making application may be obtained from commanding or voting officers. Among proposed constitutional amendments to be submitted to voters are two of special interest to members of the armed forces since they effect veterans. One has to do with the payment of a state bonus to former servicemen who were residents of the State et the time of their enlistment but who have taken up residence outside the state of New York. The other relates to preference given to veterans in civil service exams. DELAWARE VOTES BONUS Wilmington, Del. (AFPS) -A war service bonus for Delaware's service men and women recently was assured after state voters had approved the measure by a 5-to-1 majority. The State Legislature will meet in the fall to determine the amount each veteran will receive. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 14 August to Sat. 20 August Sunday WE WERE STRANGERS Jennifer Jones John Garfield Monday STRIKE IT RICH Rod Cameron Bonita Granville Tuesday ALASKA PATROL Richard Travis Helen Wescott Wednesday THE CRIME DOCTOR'S DIARY Adele Jergens Stephen Dunne Thursday GIRL FROM MANHATTAN D. Lamour Charles Laughton Friday THE BRIBE Robert Taylor Ava Gardner Saturday THE YOUNGER BROTHERS Janis Paige Wayne Morris THE INDIAN Pag-e Five Saturday 13 Augus 9

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Baseballers Begin Final Week Of Play With VU-10 and the Naval Station still deadlocked for top rung in the second half of the baseball league at press time today the teams prepared to open their stretch drive for their final week of competition. The Naval Air Station, winners of the first round, will be the guests of the Marines tomorrow afternoon when they clash on the Recreation baseball diamond, at 2:30. The Flyers wind up their season with a return tilt with the Naval Station on Wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. Led by their flashy southpaw, Jim Webster, the Naval Station has looked like the team to beat this half after a disappointing first half. Their record of three wins and no losses in the second round is just ahead of VU-10's 2-0 record. The Utron Ten club was to have played Training Group last night and was expected to annex their third win of the second round. Possibility of a play-off for the second half crown is possible but improbable. There is a chance that both the Naval Station and VU-10 will be undefeated right down to their Friday night battle. The "airdales" must get by the Hospital on Monday night while the Naval Station lads face a revenge-seeking NAS nine on Wednesday night. All in all it promises to be a teriffic week of baseball for Guantanamo Bay. The Results Looking back over the results of the second round thus far we find the Naval Station boasting an 18-3 win over Fleet Training Group to begin the second round, on August 3. The Hospital, called "hitless hospitalmen", in another "newspaper" with Base-wide circulation, came to life in the second game of current round and belted the Marines by a 13-2 count. Clements was credited with the win and O'Connor tagged with the defeat. VU-10 kept the line of revengeseekers moving with an 8 to 2 win over the Naval Air Station. The "one-two" combination of VU-10, namely, Stever and Slone, kept the Flyer bats stilled. Big wallop for the Flyers was Gallagher's home iun. An unorthodox homerun scored three runs for VU-10 in the fourth and a couple innings later two more runs scored on an outfield error. Johnny Werz was handed his first defeat as he went the route for NAS. The Naval Station tripped the Hospital Sunday, 13-6, to make their two game series even. The Hospital won from the Naval Station in the first round, 7-3. Monday night, VU-10 put an enA to the uprising by the revengeseeking clubs by blasting the Marines 16 to 6. VU-10 won their game from the Marines in the first round 8-7 in ten innings. Tuesday night saw NAS clip the Training Group, 8-2. Eggebrecht was the winning pitcher, Wine the loser. Wednesday night the Naval Station shoved the Marines completely out of the second round picture by nipping them 9-6. Webster went the route for the victorious Naval Station and struck out 13. O'Connor went the route for the Marines. Thursday night saw the second shutout of the season as tie Naval Air Station rolled to a 17-0 victory over the Hospital. Johnny Werz was credited with the win for che Flyers. Ernie Faile, hard hitting Flyer shortstop led the victors at the plate by hammering out four hits in six trips, to raise his sea-on batting mark to .567. THE GRAND FINALE Sunday------Marines vs. NAS MondayHospital vs. VU-10 Tuesday-Marines vs. TraGrp. Wednesday---NavSta vs. NAS ThursdayTraGrp vs. Hospital Friday------VU-10 vs NavSta. THE STANDINGS Team W. L. Naval Station ---------3 0 VU-10 ---------------2 0 NAS ---------------2 1 Hospital --------------1 2 TraGrp --------------0 2 Marines ---------------0 3 NSD-MARINE OFFICERS 1949 BASE CHAMPIONS The combined NSD-Marine softball team won the 1949 Base Championship in the Officers Softball league with a decisive 11-2 wallop-i ing of the officers representing VU-10 on Tuesday night. The victory in the Championship contest climaxed an uphill battle for the NSD-Marine squad. After a mediocre showing in the first half of the league, they hit their stride in the second half, deadlocking VU-10 for the second half title and then beating them 10-9 in the play-off for the second half title. Tuesday night's game pitted the same two teams as first and second half champions with the aforementioned results. LCDR Weatherson was the winning pitcher for the NSD-Marine combo with LTJG Whitey Jones being charged with the loss. MARINES HOST TO NAS TOMORROW; SEASON ENDS WITH VU-10-NAVSTA FRACAS FRIDAY Baseball Facts INTERESTING SIDELIGHTS The score of both no-hit games pitched in the major leagues last season was identical, 2-0. Bob Lemon pitched the Cleveland Indians to victory over Detroit in the American in one, and Rex Barney topped the Giants for the Dodgers in the other. Bob Feller holds the distinction of being the only pitcher to hurl a no-hit game on the opening day of the season. Rapid Robert turned the trick in 1940 against the Chicago White Sox. The Indians won the game 1-0. Records show that the year the New York Giants set two winning streaks, one of which still stands, they did not win the National league pennant. The Giants in the early part of the season won 17 straight ball games and in the latter part of the season set the major league record of 26 straight wins. Despite this they wound up in fourth place in the final standings. Did you know that it is impossible for a pitcher to balk to second base?? ? Cliff Mapes' terrific throw in from deep right field in a recent game between the Yankees and the Cleveland Indians amazed baseball fans the nation over. Those who heard the game here over AFRS were talking about it days after it occured. The throw brings to mind one that occurred here last season. According to personnel here at the time, "Red" Webber, at the time attached to GCA at the Naval Air Station hauled in a long fly to deep centerfield almost to the present basketball courts and thew on the fly a perfect strike to the catcher who put out a member of the opposing team who had tagged up at third after the catch. The put out was made some two feet up the basepath from home plate. Some arm huh? ? ? INSURANCE DIVIDEND APPLICATIONS TO BE READY ON AUGUST 29 (Continued from Page One) affix a one-cent postage stamp. In the event an applicant does not know the number of his insurance policy, it will not be necessary for him to write the Bureau of Naval Personnel or to the VA office, as the applicant can readily be identified by service number, rate or rank, and the exact name used during service with the armed forces. .= 0 Page Six THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-10 August 49-2500 ; ?