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Vol. IV, No. 24 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 August 1949


TWO "NEW" BUSES NOW
IN OPERATION HERE

Two "new" buses-new to Guantanamo Bay at least, have recently been added to the regular fleet of
buses serving Base personnel.
The buses, manufactured by the
Yellow Coach bus company and equipped with GMC motors arriv-: Ed here from San Juan where they had been awaiting a checkup and overhaul. Prior to being sent to the Puerto Rican base they had been in use briefly in Trinidad.
Although not new in general
interpretation of the word, the buses are a welcome addition to the Base transportation system.
CDR. L. M. Davis, Jr., Base Public 0 Works officer, has indicated that more replacements for the remainder of the old type buses now in use will be forthcoming as soon
as possible.

NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY
SENDS THANKS

A letter was received recently
by the Base Commander, from the Headquarters of the Navy Relief Society, in Washington, D. C., thanking him for the contribution of $4,750.20 made to the Society
from Guantanamo."
The letter, in part, read, "On
behalf of the Board of Managers, I wish to extend to you, and through you, to the personnel under
_your command, the Society's sincere appreciation for their interest and cooperation in making possible such a generous donation." The letter was signed 'by V. P. Murphy, 'Vice Admiral, USN (Ret.) Admiral Murphy is Executive Vice-President
of the Society.

FLAG RAISERS OF IWO JIMA TO MAKE MOVIE

The three survivors of the six
historic flag raisers who first raised Old Glory over Iwo Jima, are now in Hollywood, to re-enact the historic event for the movies. O In the classic war photo, famous
throughout the world, there were six men who were ,first credited with raising the !flag. Three weme killed later in combat on Iwo Jima.


SENATE COMMITTEE
PASSES PAY BILL

The pay bill has been
approved-9 to 1-by the Senate Armed Services Committee. It must now be passed on the floor of the Senate and signed by the President Pay increases for military personnel would amount to more than $300 million a year under the provisions of the bill. Senator Millard E.
Tydings, chairman of the Committee, said he thought passage of the bill was doubtful "unless savings to offset its increased cost result from other legislation now pending
before Congress."
As reported, the pay bill
would increase general monthly pay over the levels = previously approved by the
House but would reduce their pay for flight and other hazardous duty from $210 to
..$150.1
J n-Wt--.n --u n -ll --IIil-Iln-n-IIf h Il --S'ii

SUPERVISORS PLAN hiABOR DAY PICNIC

Plans are being formulated for a Labor Day picnic, Monday September 5, for all Base civilian supervisors and their wives.
The picnic, plans for which are still in a tentative, stage, would be the first get-together in recent years-and possibly in Base history-for civilian supervisors of the entire Base, including alien and native as .well as American citizen supervisors. Wives of all supervisors are also included in plans for the picnic, but due to the large number of persons involved, it is not planned at this time to include any children.
It will be an opportunity for harassed parents to get away from family cares for a brief time and to enjoy a picnic lunch, athletic events, and other entertainment yet to be determined.
At this writing, Windnill Beach has been tentatively selected bV 'the committee in charge of the picnic.


EMERGENCY LANDING MADE BY PLANE

On Wednesday afternoon at 1635, a Pan American Airways ConVair 240 touched its wheels to the runway at McCalla Field in a deferred emergency landing. Aboard were tventy-eight passengers including four -Americans and seventeen political refugees from the present regime in Venezuela.
Captain H. J. Henderson was the pilot of the unlucky Clipper with W. W. Malcom as co-pilot, 0. H. Perez as purser and Miss Frances Swanson as stewardess. The flight! was the daily PAA 454 flying from the Curacao airfield at La Guira, Venezuela ta Miami. Captain John Olsen flew in a special fllightto Guantanamo at 0042 to pick up passengers from the original flight and to bring along a PAA mechanic.
Henderson, a native of Miami,, said that he began having trouble in the left engine wthen he was 80 miles Southeast of Guantanamo Bay, and that when he was within 20 miles of Guantanamo the motor threatened to quit altogether. It was at this time that he called the tower at McCalla Field and asked permission to land.
Mechanics worked on the plane all morning Thursday and the Clipper took to the air again Thursday afternoon. The plane is one of the famed PAA Clippers and has a seating capacity of 40 persons. The twin-engined product of the Consolidated' Vultee Aiicraft Corp., cruises at approximately 280 miles per hour and climbs at more than 1,000 feet per minute.

NEW SAFETY ENGINEER
REPORTS FOR DUTY

C. E. Britt, recently appointed Base Safety Engineer to succeed R. E. McCullough, this week Was getting acquainted with the Base' and its personnel.
The new safety engineer is a graduate of Clemson College, and his safety experience includes serv-, ice with Bethlehem Steel Co. at sparrows 'Point, Md., as well as military experience, during the war.


,U. S.,Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 August 1949


Vol. IV, No. 24







Page Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 August 1949


Editorial Offiice, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 208- Phone 254
Saturday 6 August 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN --------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
P. A. Barchenger, YNC----Staff Writer E. J. Kazmierski, PFC ------ Staff Writer A. H. Borresen, CHRELE ---- Staff Writer Cecil Pederson ---------- Teen-Age Writer
"Skiddy" Masterson ---- Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member'of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless Indicated otherwise.

ON SPORTSMANSHIP

During the latter- part of last week, an example of very poor sportsmanship reared its ugly head at the Fleet Recreation baseball diamond where a league game was in progress. At the time, the winning team was ahead by an enormous score with still another turn or two left at the plate. It was then that members of the winning team were heard unmercifully "riding" the players of the losing team. Such action indicates that those players were brought up to act in an uncouth manner, and if not, they certainly showed spectators present an example of how NOT to act on a ball field.
The one word which sums up their actions is "sportsmanship", or rather the lack of it in this case. Noah Webster gives this version of the word: "Skill in, or devotion to sports, especially conduct becoming to a sportsman, involving honest rivalry and graceful acceptance of results".
A "sportsman", Mr. Webster further states, is one who "pursues sports, especially one who is fair in sports and generous. A good loser and a graceful winner". There was not one iota of this in the actions of those ball players.
Likewise an ungentlemanly act and one which caused much comment was the repeated use of profanity by an official who was 'working" the game. Such conduct is strictly in bad taste and should be banished from such events.
In the Future, Lets FOLLOW


LET'S SING!
We residents of this rather populous community somewhat rcmoved from our native shores and the center of our own special civilization and culture, are certainly well provided with the reouirements and most of the luxuries of the life to which we are accustomed. We have homes, a school of exceptional qualty, recreational facilities of a considerable variety, and among the necessities of our way of living, a Chapel of dignity and beauty.
To supplement the effectiveness of the place wherein we worship, music is most important. For our Protestant Services here, a volunteer choir has been workingthese past few years, and adding immeasurably to the beauty of the services conducted. From time to\ time members are lost through transfer, thereby requiring new residents of our community to offer their services and talent as they take up their life in our community and in our Church.
*Membership in the Protestant Chapel choir is open to all who desire to sing with the group. An audition is not required, though it is desired to enable the director to best utilize each voice; and, previous musical and vocal training and instruction are not requisites, either. The only requirement is an interest in singing and a willingness to attend the weekly. retbearsals and church services so as to develop the most effective singing of which the group is capable. A large library of excellent music, ranging from Bach, Palestrina and Mozart to Bortniansky and the modern American composers of church music is being collected, and plans are being made for continuation of the performance of larger works as the Stainer CRUQIFIXION, and THE SONG OF CHRISTMAS which have been performed on special Church Holidays in the recent past.
It is urged that any and all
desiring to sing with the Protestant Chapel Choir join the group as soon as possible, for it is hoped that the group will increase in membership and quality during the next few weeks and months in preparation for a festal Christmas season which is not too far in the future. All service personnel, dependents and civilians are invited to contact Chaplain Faulk, the present director, Dr. Childs, or come to the Chapel for rehearsal on Thursdays at 1930. Don't let your inexperience or feeling of inadequacy stop you--come and learn with the group.
ROLAND W. FAULK,
Protestant Chaplain.

THE RULES OF SPORTSMANSHIP as well as those of the game and PLAY BALL!


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0980-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1980
Chaplains at .this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herald. USN
(Catholic)

Chief and Mrs. it. E. W. Quielisch
PIAL returned the 25th
of July after spending 60 days leave in the States. They reported a "swell time" while motoring. through the States and
then later on motoring through Cuba. We are glad to have you back folks.
P.W. Barrett, HMC, recently received orders for the Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland. Chief Barrett will be detached Saturday and after 30 days leave at his I home in Virginia, will report to Bethesda for a normal tour of shore duty. The entire base has known Chief Barret as the Chief in charge of the Labor Board Dispensary and we all join in saying 'Good By' and good luck at your new duty station.
Cigar. passers this week are HN1 and Mrs.- Charles Melton of the Ordnance Division. The good old stork blessed them with a boy whom they named Robert Edward. Congratulations folks.

FLIGHT SCHEDULES OF FLSW CRAFT ALTERED


There is now a slight change in schedules of Fleet Logistic Sup-* port Wings' aircraft traveling from Guantanamo to the States.
Effective August 1st and continuing for the remainder of August at least, the trip to San Juan will be made only on Monday nights. Previously the riun to San Juan had been made on both trips (Monday and Friday).
Time of scheduled arrival and departure from Guantanamo will be the same as it has been in the past. Flights from the States will arrive here at 2000 on Monday and Friday nights and will depart Guantanamo for the States at f200 on Tuesdays and Saturdays. 'On Monday nights the flight will leave Guantanamo for San Juan at 2130 and arrive'here from San Juan at 1000 on Tuesday morning.


0


Saturday, 6 August 1949


Page Two


THE INDIAN









TO LEAVE TUESDAY TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP LITTLE THEATRE NOTES


w


W CDR. OTTO W. SPAHR, JR., Executive Officer of the Naval.Station is slated to leave Tuesday for the States and duty at U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. CDR.
J.F. McFadden who recently reported aboard will assume the duties of the Executive officer. CDR. McFadden came to Guantanamo from the Norfolk Naval
Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va.

DOG DAYS HIT VU-10

OOr something did-what with
Chief Dahl offering to take the part of 'Suds' (supported by a Weil form-fit belt) in the upcoming play "Suds in Your Eye" and our Exec., LCDR Berkeley, doing a Romeo ahd Juliet balcony scene with N. Sweeney, AD3 as Romeo.
0 t h e r surprising developments have ocurred too. In the "don't you believe it" dept., for instance, Leading Chief P. (for patient) Clary reports more volunteers for working parties than he can use while Judge Crissey complain's that all his men care to do is stand watches or messcook. The Operations Dept., better known as Fitzgeralds Service, for the Nervous, is confident all pilots will get their time in this month without difficulty especially since Comptroller Beaumont received a $4,234,O650.33 increase to the current
quarterly Baker Allotment. Beaumont feels that there should be enough left over to buy Chief Barr a new set of wrenches as well as a full sized Wailing Wall ,for the duty section. The Maintenance Dept. was encouraged also when records revealed that, for two days (,Saturday and Sunday) not a single flight discrepancy was listed. The Personnel Dept., reports an unusally quiet time. There have been 'no requests for leave, liberty or time off for a haircut to process which has left Lt. Esders free to teach lip reading to the squadron for such times as he has the ungarbled word to give out at quarters and three planes tuning up


Everyone agrees that Cecil, Diane, Jeaneen, Joan Harris and "Skiddy" did the teen-agers proud by their performances in "Years Ago". The receptionists, Donni Pederson, Eunice Besse, Janet Leckenby, Joan McNeal, Ramona M'oses and Susie Maulsby, and curtain caller, Cynthia Allen, made them equally proud. Mrs. Souders again did a swell job of make-up. Next play we, hope to see even more of you teen-agers in there pitching, remember there are jobs for all.
Last Thursday Jill, Jan, Ruth, Phylliss, Bill Barrett, Bob,' Ed and Jack went to Pat Burke's after the movies. They danced and drank cokes until eleven when they figured it was high time to be going home. They were still exclaiming what a 'good time they had when we asked them about the party several days later.
"Brandy" Brand, Diane's house guest, left Wednesday for homeAlexandria, Virginia, if we have to be exact-to prepare for college. Gee, we wish she could have stayed longer, but maybe she'll come back next summer.
Probably the most exciting event for the younger boys of our group was the hike last Saturday over at Leeward Point. LTJG Lalor took them over in one of the Naval Station boats, and they spent several hours hiking and having a wonderful time. A fire in the boat's engine added to the excitement and, for the boys, to the great success of the outing. Jim Welchel also gave an aftermovie party last Tuesday night. The guest list included Ed, Bill Barret, Pat Burke, Bob, Jack, Pete, Ruth, Jill, Jan and Phyliss, The party broke up after eleven after many thanks for an awfully good time.
Mrs. Souders took the pig-tailors in her Sunday school class horseback riding Wednesday. They may have been sore but they are looking forward to going again.


on the apron.
Sportwise also strange things have happened. An 18 hole 71 was carded by genial Glen Bailey who plays golf like if he was playing baseball and at bat he'd be facing the catcher-sort of. Structures won two volley ball games before anyone noticed the net wasn't up and consequently, all teams are tied for third place. Maybe it's just the heat but Chief, Medica says he found some ball players' with previous playing experience among squadron newcomers. A promising, pinch hitter, J. Di-, maggio, should prove useful during s condhalf games and the team's hard working pitching staff can rely on capable relief hurling from two others, Bob Lemon and Vic Raschi.


Saturday, 6 August 1949


THE INDIAN


Paze" Three


As with every previous play, a great deal of interest has been aroused in the Little Theatre following the successful four-day run of "Years Ago". An especially large attendance is expected at the monthly business meeting to be held at 7:30 P.M., Tuesday, August 9. All of you are, as usual, cordially invited to be present.
There are great plans underway for the play which is next on the agenda. In case you haven't heard, if the Gtmo. Grapevine hasn't forwarded the latest as yet, "SUDS IN YOUR EYE" will be the fifth production. There are twenty-two in the cast-roles that run from heroes to villians, from ingenues to the three, precious old "girls" who dearly love their beer and give Mary Lasswell's play its title.
Casting for this will require more than the usual one night's casting session. Instead three nights have been reserved for the job, starting Wednesday evening, August 10, and continued on August 11, and 12, Thursday and Friday. Exact time, 7:30 P.M. as always.
Before concluding this week's contribution, each of us would like to thank everyone of you for your fine support of the Theatre up till now. Your audience attendance has proven your interest, the applause has urged us to continue. And now why don't you really join in the fun? Honestly, things take on a, gayer, brighter look behind those footlights.






NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 7 August to Sat. 13 August
Sunday
IT HAPPENS EVERY SPRING' Ray Milland Paul Douglas
Monday
DARK PAST
William Holden Lee J. Cobb
Tuesday
BLONDIES BIG DEAL
Penny_ Singleton Arthur Lake
Wednesday
THE GREEN PROMISE
M. Chapman Walter Brennan
Thursday
THUNDERHOOF
Preston Foster Wm. Bishop
Friday
PORTRAIT OF JENNY
Jennifer Jones Joseph Cotton
Saturday
SUNDOWN IN SANTA FE
Alai Lane Eddy Waller







a


Naval Air Station Wins First Round


The Naval Air Station Flyers swept the first round title in the Base baseball league by virtue of their 12-6 win over the Hospital on Tuesday night. It was the fourth straight for the Flyers who began the season by bowing to the Naval Station 10-3. It was the third straight loss for the Hospital who led the league for a time with two straight victories.
The Flyer triumph gave them undisputed possession of first place after the Marines had polished off the Naval Station Sunday 3-2. There was a three-way deadlock for second in the first round and Fleet Training Group was in the cellar with a 40-5 record.
The Naval Station rolled up the largest margin of victory in the first half by routing the Training Group on Wednesday night by a 28-5 margin.
Friday afternoon VU-10 sent Stever, AMC, a left hander to the mound in an effort to stop the Hospital, which at that moment was leading the league with a 2-0 record. Stever met the challenge but was aided the latter part of the game by Slone, a right hander, and the two of them rolled up the firsf and only shutout of the frst round by blanking the Hospital 12.-0 on three hits. VU-10 connected for 10 base hits and made two errors. Hospital was charged with six miscues. !VU-10 'Ibecame the first team to collect two home runs off opposing hurlers as Stever connected for the circuit in the fourth inning. Hamden VU-10 shortstop homered in the first game of the season.
Saturday afternoon, the Marines sent the Hospital reeling back to Hospital hill groping for some of their vitamin pills after walloping them 20-3. Bob O'Connor went the distance for the Marines, chalking up his second win, as he limited the Hospital team to seven hits. The leathernecks meanwhile w e r e amassing twenty hits, one of them a first inning home run by Garcia lead-off man for the Marines.
Sunday afternoon saw the Marines tangling with the Naval Station as Dominic Calva na of the Marines and Jim Webster of the Naval Station hooked up in a pitchers duel. ,Calvagna~imited the sailors to two runs on five hits. He struck out five. His mates made but two errors. Webster, highly touted southpaw, went the route for the losers. He allowed nine hits but scattered them well, walked two and fanned nine. The first two Marine runs crossed the plate as the result of a passed ball with


men on second and third. It was Webster's first defeat.
Monday night VU-10 hit the victory column- again by trouncing the Training Group 18-3. Slone was credited with the win. The VU-10 nine amassed 15 hits and made three errors while the Training Group got five hits and had seven miscues charged against them. Wright was the losing twirler. Klunder homered for VU-10.
Johnny Werz, in a relief role was credited with the win over the Hospital on Tuesday night which ended the first round of play and gave that round to the Flyers. It was the second time Werz had relieved against the Hospital. He was credited with the win in a pre-season exhibition game which NAS won, 9-7.
Eggebrecht started on the mound for the Flyers but ran into trouble in the fourth. Werz, who started the game at second base, came iry to pitch with one out and the bases jammed. Hospital failed to score, as Call forced Clauss at the plate and Clements popped to the first baseman.
Neither team scored in the first inning and the Air Station scored two in the top of the second on three walks two errors and a single by Berg. The Hospital tied it up with two in the bottom of the second with three walks, an error and one single accounting for it. The Flyers roared back to score two more in the third when Werz homered to start the inning. Scott was safe on Strine's error. He stole second, and then went to third on an error charged to Call and scored on "Jose" Mortorana's single.
The Hospital tallied three in the fifth to go ahead 5 to 4 but NAS came back to take over the lead in the sixth with a three run rally. They added three more in the top of the eighth and dilled two more across in the ninth. The Hospital scored one more in the seventh-three singles and two Flyer errors. All told, both teams combined, amassed a total of 15 errors with NAS being charged with 7.
Erratic fielding, was, prominent in the play of both teams. Clements went the route to be tagged for the loss. He fanned eight, walked six and allowed eleven hits. All singles except Werz's'homer. Eggebrecht gave up two hits, walked five and fanned two in the three and a third innings he worked, while Werz yielded three hits, fanned one and did not issue a single free pass.


FLYERS TAKE FOUR STRAIGHT AFTER LOSING
IN SEASON OPENER TO NAVAL STATION


Baseball Facts

RECORDS THAT STILL STAND
Baseball's' longest throw was made in Cincinnati, Ohio on October 12, 1910 when Sheldon Lejeune threw a baseball 426 feet 9% inches.
The longest scoreless tie in major league baseball was played at Ebbets Field, Brooklyn on September 11, 1946 when the Dodgers and the Cincinnati Reds battled 19 scoreless innings. The game was called after four hours and forty minutes play on account of darkness.
Brooklyn was also one of the teams to play the longest gane ever played in the majors. The game, against the Boston Braves was played at Braves Field in Boston on May 1, 1920 and after 26 innings of play the score was tied at 1-1. According to the records both starting batteries went the route. The game was called because of darkness after
3 hours and 50 minutes of play.
Harry Stovey, Philadelphia, A. A./ in 1888' stole 156 bases' in 130 games and that is a record that still stands. Ty Cobb set the mark after the turn of the century by pilfering 96 bases in 156 games in 1915 while playing for the Detroit Tigers.
Josh Devore of the N.Y. Giants has the record of stealing the most bases in one inning-four, a record be set in the ninth inning on June 20,,1912. Bill Hamilton of the Philadelphia Phillies (under another rame at that time) stole seven bases in one game on August 31, 1894. Ed Collins of the Philadelphia Athletics almost equalled his record on September 11, 1912 when he stole six in a single game.

THE STANDINGS
(End of First Half)
Team W L Pct. NAS -----------4 1 .850
NavSta ---------3 2 .600
Marines -------- 3 2 .690
VU-10 ---------- 3 2 .600
Hospital -------- 2 3 .400
TraGrp ----- 0 5 .000.

THIS WEEK'S SCHEDULE

Sunday Hospital vs. Naval, Station. Monday .-.. VU-1O vs. Marines Tuesday ------- TraGrpvs. NAS. Wednesday__ NavSta vs. Marines. Thursday____ NAS vs. Hospital Friday -..... TraGrp vs. VU-1O.


*


0


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay--3 August 49-2500


Pace " Four




Full Text

PAGE 1

IW Vol. IV, No. 24 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 August 1949 TWO "NEW" BUSES NOW IN OPERATION HERE Two "new" buses-new to Guantanamo Bay at least, have recently been added to the regular fleet of buses serving Base personnel. The buses, manufactured by the Yellow Coach bus company and equipped with GMC motors arrived here from San Juan where they had been awaiting a checkup and overhaul. Prior to being sent to the Puerto Rican base they had been in use briefly in Trinidad. Although not new in general interpretation of the word, the buses are a welcome addition to the Base transportation system. CDR. L. M. Davis, Jr., Base Public Works officer, has indicated that more replacements for the remainder of the old type buses now in use will be forthcoming as soon as possible. NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY SENDS THANKS A letter was received recently by the Base Commander, from the Headquarters of the Navy Relief Society, in Washington, D. C., thanking him for the contribution of $4,750.20 made to the Society from Guantanamo. The letter, in part, read, "On behalf of the Board of Managers, I wish to extend to you, and through you, to the personnel under your command, the Society's sincere appreciation for their interest and cooperation in making possible .such a generous donation." The letter was signed by V. P. Murphy, Vice Admiral, USN (Ret.) Admiral Murphy is Executive Vice-President of the Society. FLAG RAISERS OF IWO JIMA TO MAKE MOVIE The three survivors of the six historic flag raisers who first raised Old Glory over Iwo Jima are now in Hollywood to re-enact the historic event for the movies. SIn the classic war photo, famous throughout the world, there were six men who were first credited with raising the flag. Three were killed later in combat on Iwo Jima. SENATE COMMITTEE PASSES PAY BILL I The pay bill has been I approved-9 to 1-by the Senate Armed Services Committee. It must now be passed on the floor of the Senate 1 and signed by the President Pay increases for military personnel would amount to more than $300 million a year under the provisions of the bill. Senator Millard E. Tydings, chairman of the Committee, said he thought passage of the bill was doubtful "unless savings to offset its increased cost result from other legislation now pending before Congress." As reported, the pay bill would increase general monthly pay over the levels previously approved by the House but would reduce their T pay for flight and other haz| ardous duty from $210 to $150. SUPERVISORS PLAN LABOR DAY PICNIC Plans are being formulated for a Labor Day picnic, Monday September 5, for all Base civilian supervisors and their wives. The picnic, plans for which are still in a tentative stage, would be the first get-together in recent years-and possibly in Base history-for civilian supervisors of the entire Base, including alien and native as well as American citizen supervisors. Wives of all supervisors are also included in plans for the picnic, but due to the large number of persons involved, it is not planned at this time to include any children. It will be an opportunity for harassed parents to get away from family cares for a brief time and to enjoy a picnic lunch, athletic events, and other entertainment yet to be determined. At this writing, Windnill Beach has been tentatively selected by the committee in charge of the picnic. EMERGENCY LANDING MADE BY PLANE On Wednesday afternoon at 1635, a Pan American Airways ConVair 240 touched' its wheels to the runway at McCalla Field in a deferred emergency landing. Aboard were twenty-eight passengers including four Americans and seventeen political refugees from the present regime in Venezuela. Captain H. J. Henderson was the pilot of the unlucky Clipper with W. W. Malcom as co-pilot, 0. H. Perez as purser and Miss Frances Swanson as stewardess. The flight was the daily PAA 454 flying from the Curacao airfield at La Guira, Venezuela to Miami. Captain John Olsen flew in a special flight to Guantanamo at 0042 to pick up passengers from the original flight and to bring along a PAA mechanic. Henderson, a native of Miami, said that he began having trouble in the left engine when he was 80 miles Southeast of Guantanamo Bay, and that when he was within 20 miles of Guantanamo the motor threatened to quit altogether. It was at this time that he called the tower at McCalla Field and asked permission to land. Mechanics worked on the plane all morning Thursday and the Clipper took to the air again Thursday afternoon. The plane is one of the famed PAA Clippers and has a seating capacity of 40 persons. The twin-engined product of the Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corp., cruises at approximately 280 miles per hour and climbs at more than 1,000 feet per minute. NEW SAFETY ENGINEER REPORTS FOR DUTY C. E. Britt, recently appointed Base Safety Engineer to succeed R. E. McCullough, this week was getting acquainted with the Base and its personnel. The new safety engineer is a graduate of Clemson College, and his safety experience includes service with Bethlehem Steel Co. at Sparrows Point, Md., as well as military experience during the war.

PAGE 2

Pare Two THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 August 1949 Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday 6 August 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips. USN Commander Allen Collier, JOSN--------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LODR--------Staff Advisor R. A. Barchenger, YNC.Staff Writer E. J. Kazmierski, PFC----Staff Writer A. H. Borresen, CHRELE__ Staff Writer Cecil Pederson---------Teen-Age Writer "Skiddy" Masterson -Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. ON SPORTSMANSHIP During the latter part of last week, an example of very poor sportsmanship reared its ugly head at the Fleet Recreation baseball diamond where a league game was in progress. At the time, the winning team was ahead by an enormous score with still another turn or two left at the plate. It was then that members of the winning team were heard unmercifully "riding" the players of the losing team. Such action indicates that those players were brought up to act in an uncouth manner, and if not, they certainly showed spectators present an example of how NOT to act on a ball field. The one word which sums up their actions is "sportsmanship", or rather the lack of it in this case. Noah Webster gives this version of the word: "Skill in, or devotion to sports, especially conduct becoming to a sportsman, involving honest rivalry and graceful acceptance of results". A "sportsman", Mr. Webster further states, is one who "pursues sports, especially one who is fair in sports and generous. A good loser and a graceful winner". There was not one iota of this in the actions of those ball players. Likewise an ungentlemanly act and one which caused much comment was the repeated use of profanity by an official who was "working" the game. Such conduct is strictly in bad taste and should be banished from such events. In the Future, Let's FOLLOW LET'S SING! We residents of this rather populous community somewhat removed from our native shores and the center of our own special civilization and culture, are certainly well provided with the reouirements and most of the luxuries of the life to which we are accustomed. We have homes, a school of exceptional quality, recreational facilities of a considerable variety, and among the necessities of our way of living, a Chapel of dignity and beauty. To supplement the effectiveness of the place wherein we worship, music is most important. For our Protestant Services here, a volunteer choir has been working these past few years, and adding immeasurably to the beauty of the services conducted. From time to time members are lost through transfer, thereby requiring new residents of our community to offer their services and talent as they take up their life in our community and in our Church. Membership in the Protestant Chapel choir is open to all who desire to sing with the group. An audition is not required, though it is desired to enable the director to best utilize each voice; and, previous musical and vocal training and instruction are not requisites, either. The only requirement is an interest in singing and a willingness to attend the weekly reLearsals and church services so as to develop the most effective singing of which the group is capable. A large library of excellent music, ranging from Bach, Palestrina and Mozart to Bortniansky and the modern American composers of church music is being collected, and plans are being made for continuation of the performance of larger works as the Stainer CRUCIFIXION, and THE SONG OF CHRISTMAS which have been performed on special Church Holidays in the recent past. It is urged that any and all desiring to sing with the Protestant Chapel Choir join the group as soon as possible, for it is hoped that the group will increase in membership and quality during the next few weeks and months in preparation for a festal Christmas season which is not too far in the future. All service personnel, dependents and civilians are invited to contact Chaplain Faulk, the present director, Dr. Childs, or come to the Chapel for rehearsal on Thursdays at 1930. Don't let your inexperience or feeling of inadequacy stop you-come and learn with the group. ROLAND W. FAULK, Protestant Chaplain. THE RULES OF SPORTSMANSHIP as well as those of the game and PLAY BALL! Auui w= CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) Chief and Mrs. E. W. Quielisch returned the 25th of July after spending 60 days leave in the States. They reported a "swell time" while motoring through the States and then later on motoring through Cuba. We are glad to have you back folks. P. W. Barrett, HMC, recently received orders for the Naval Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland. Chief Barrett will be detached Saturday and after 30 days leave at his home in Virginia, will report to Bethesda for a normal tour of shore duty. The entire base has known Chief Barret as the Chief in charge of the Labor Board Dispensary and we all join in saying 'Good By' and good luck at your new duty station. Cigar passers this week are HN1 and Mrs. Charles Melton of the Ordnance Division. The good old stork blessed them with a boy whom they named Robert Edward. Congratulations folks. FLIGHT SCHEDULES OF FLSW CRAFT ALTERED There is now a slight change in schedules of Fleet Logistic Support Wings' aircraft traveling from Guantanamo to the States. Effective August 1st and continuing for the remainder of August at least, the trip to San Juan will be made only on Monday nights. Previously the run to San Juan had been made on both trips (Monday and Friday). Time of scheduled arrival and departure from Guantanamo will be the same as it has been in the past. Flights from the States will arrive here at 2000 on Monday and Friday nights and will depart Guantanamo for the States at 1200 on Tuesdays and Saturdays. On 1VMonday nights the flight will leave Guantanamo for San Juan at 2130 and arrive here from San Juan at 1000 on Tuesday morning. S I U Saturday, 6 August 1949 Page Two THE INDIAN

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Saturday, 6 August 1949 THE INDIAN Page Three TO LEAVE TUESDAY CDR. OTTO W. SPAHR, JR., Executive Officer of the Naval Station is slated to leave Tuesday for the States and duty at .U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. CDR. J. F. McFadden who recently reported aboard will assume the duties of the Executive officer. CDR. McFadden came to Guantanamo from the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va. DOG DAYS HIT VU-10 O Or something did-what with Chief Dah1 offering to take the part of 'Suds' (supported by a Weil form-fit belt) in the upcoming play "Suds in Your Eye" and our Exec., LCDR Berkeley, doing a Romeo and Juliet balcony scene with N. Sweeney, AD3 as Romeo. O t h e r surprising developments have occurred too. In the "don't you believe it" dept., for instance, Leading Chief P. (for patient) Clary reports more volunteers for working parties than he can use while Judge Crissey complains that all his men care to do is stand watches or messcook. The Operations Dept., better known .as Fitzgeralds Service for the Nervous, is confident all pilots will get their time in this month without difficulty especially since Comptroller Beaumont received a $4,234,650.33 increase to the current quarterly Baker Allotment. Beaumont feels that there should be enough left over to buy Chief Barr a new set of wrenches as well as a full sized Wailing Wall ,for the duty section. The Maintenance Dept. was encouraged also when records revealed that, for two days (Saturday and Sunday) not a single flight discrepancy was listed. The Personnel Dept., reports an unusally quiet time. There have been no requests for leave, liberty or time off for a haircut to process S which has left Lt. Esders free to teach lip reading to the squadron for such times as he has the ungarbled word to give out at quarters and three planes tuning up TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP Everyone agrees that Cecil, Diane, Jeaneen, Joan Harris and "Skiddy" did the teen-agers proud by their performances in "Years Ago". The receptionists, Donni Pederson, Eunice Besse, Janet Leckenby, Joan McNeal, Ramona Moses and Susie Maulsby, and curtain caller, Cynthia Allen, made them equally proud. Mrs. Souders again did a swell job of make-up. Next play we hope to see even more of you teen-agers in there pitching, remember there are jobs for all. Last Thursday Jill, Jan, Ruth, Phylliss, Bill Barrett, Bob, Ed and Jack went to Pat Burke's after the movies. They danced and drank cokes until eleven when they figured it was high time to be going home. They were still exclaiming what a good time they had when we asked them about the party several days later. "Brandy" Brand, Diane's house guest, left Wednesday for homeAlexandria, Virginia, if we have to be exact-to prepare for college. Gee, we wish she could have stayed longer, but maybe she'll come back next summer. Probably the most exciting event for the younger boys of our group was the hike last Saturday over at Leeward Point. LTJG Lalor took them over in one of the Naval Station boats, and they spent several hours hiking and having a wonderful time. A fire in the boat's engine added to the excitement and, for the boys, to the great success of the outing. Jim Welchel also gave an aftermovie party last Tuesday night. The guest list included Ed, Bill Barret, Pat Burke, Bob, Jack, Pete, Ruth, Jill, Jan and Phyliss, The party broke up after eleven after many thanks for an awfully good time. Mrs. Souders took the pig-tailers in her Sunday school class horseback riding Wednesday. They may have been sore but they are looking forward to going again. on the apron. Sportwise also strange things have happened. An 18 hole 71 was carded by genial Glen Bailey who plays golf like if he was playing baseball and at bat he'd be facing the catcher-sort of. Structures won two volley ball games before anyone noticed the net wasn't up and consequently, all teams are tied for third place. Maybe it's just the heat but Chief Medica says he found some ball players with previous playing experience among squadron newcomers. A promising pinch hitter, J. Dimaggio, should prove useful during second-half games and the team's hard working pitching staff can rely on capable relief hurling from two others, Bob Lemon and Vic Raschi. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES As with every previous play, a great deal of interest has been aroused in the Little Theatre following the successful four-day run of "Years Ago". An especially large attendance is expected at the monthly business meeting to be held at 7:30 P.M., Tuesday, August 9. All of you are, as usual, cordially invited to be present. There are great plans underway for the play which is next on the agenda. In case you haven't heard, if the Gtmo. Grapevine hasn't forwarded the latest as yet, "SUDS IN YOUR EYE" will be the fifth production. There are twenty-two in the cast-roles that run from heroes to villians, from ingenues to the three precious old "girls" who dearly love their beer and give Mary Lasswell's play its title. Casting for this will require more than the usual one night's casting session. Instead three nights have been reserved for the job, starting Wednesday evening, August 10, fand continued on August 11, and 12, Thursday and Friday. Exact time, 7:30 P.M. as always. Before concluding this week's contribution, each of us would like to thank everyone of you for your fine support of the Theatre up till now. Your audience attendance has proven your interest, the applause has urged us to continue. And now why don't you really join in the fun? Honestly, things take on a gayer, brighter look behind those footlights. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 7 August to Sat. 13 August Sunday IT HAPPENS EVERY SPRING Ray Milland Paul Douglas Monday DARK PAST William Holden Lee J. Cobb Tuesday BLONDIES BIG DEAL Penny Singleton Arthur Lake Wednesday THE GREEN PROMISE M. Chapman Walter Brennan Thursday THUNDERHOOF Preston Foster Wm. Bishop Friday PORTRAIT OF JENNY Jennifer Jones Joseph Cotton Saturday SUNDOWN IN SANTA FE Alan Lane Eddy Waller THE INDIAN Saturday, 6 August 1949 Page Three

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Naval Air Station Wins First Round The Naval Air Station Flyers swept the first round title in the Base baseball league by virtue of their 12-6 win over the Hospital on Tuesday night. It was the fourth straight for the Flyers who began the season by bowing to the Naval Station 10-3. It was the third straight loss for the Hospital who led the league for a time with two straight victories. The Flyer triumph gave them undisputed possession of first place after the Marines had polished off the Naval Station Sunday 3-2. There was a three-way deadlock for second in the first round and Fleet Training Group was in the cellar with a 0-5 record. The Naval Station rolled up the largest margin of victory in the first half by routing the Training Group on Wednesday night by a 28-5 margin. Friday afternoon VU-10 sent Stever, AMC, a left wander to the mound in an effort to stop the Hospital, which at that moment was leading the league with a 2-0 record. Stever met the challenge but was aided the latter part of the game by Slone, a right hander, and the two of them rolled up the first and only shutout of the frst round by blanking the Hospital 12-0 on three hits. VU-10 connected for 10 base hits and made two errors. Hospital was charged with six miscues. VU-10 became the first team to collect two home runs off opposing hurlers as Stever connected for the circuit in the fourth inning. Hamden VU-10 shortstop homered in the first game of the season. Saturday afternoon, the Marines sent the Hospital reeling back to Hospital hill groping for some of their vitamin pills after walloping them 20-3. Bob O'Connor went the distance for the Marines, chalking up his second win, as he limited the Hospital team to seven hits. The leathernecks meanwhile w e r e amassing twenty hits, one of them a first inning home run by Garcia lead-off man for the Marines. Sunday afternoon saw the Marines tangling with the Naval Station as Dominic Calvagna of the Marines and Jim Webster of the Naval Station hooked up in a pitchers duel. Calvagna limited the sailors to two runs on five hits. He struck out five. His mates made but two errors. Webster, highly touted southpaw, went the route for the losers. He allowed nine hits but scattered them well, walked two and fanned nine. The first two Marine runs crossed the plate as the result of a passed ball with men on second and third. It was Webster's first defeat. Monday night VU-10 hit the victory column again by trouncing the Training Group 18-3. Slone was credited with the win. The VU-10 nine amassed 15 hits and made three errors while the Training Group got five hits and had seven miscues charged against them. Wright was the losing twirler. Klunder homered for VU-10. Johnny Werz, in a relief role was credited with the win over the Hospital on Tuesday night which ended the first round of play and gave that round to the Flyers. It was the second time Werz had relieved against the Hospital. He was credited with the win in a pre-season exhibition game which NAS won, 9-7. Eggebrecht started on the mound for the Flyers but ran into trouble in the fourth. Werz, who started the game at second base, came in to pitch with one out and the bases jammed. Hospital failed to score, as Call forced Clauss at the plate and Clements popped to the first baseman. Neither team scored in the first inning and the Air Station scored two in the top of the second on three walks two errors and a single by Berg. The Hospital tied it up with two in the bottom of the second with three walks, an error and one single accounting for it. The Flyers roared back to score two more in the third when Werz homered to start the inning. Scott was safe on Strine's error. He stole second, and then went to third on an error charged to Call and scored on "Jose" Mortorana's single. The Hospital tallied three in the fifth to go ahead 5 to 4 but NAS came back to take over the lead in the sixth with a three run rally. They added three more in the top of the eighth and drilled two more across in the ninth. The Hospital scored one more in the seventh-three singles and two Flyer errors. All told, both teams combined, amassed a total of 15 errors with NAS being charged with 7. Erratic fielding was prominent in the play of both teams. Clements went the route to be tagged for the loss. He fanned eight, walked six and allowed eleven hits. All singles except Werz's homer. Eggebrecht gave up two hits, walked five and fanned two in the three and a third innings he worked, while Werz yielded three hits, fanned one and did not issue a single free pass. FLYERS TAKE FOUR STRAIGHT AFTER LOSING IN SEASON OPENER TO NAVAL STATION Baseball Facts RECORDS THAT STILL STAND Baseball's longest throw was made in Cincinnati, Ohio on October 12, 1910 when Sheldon Lejeune threw a baseball 426 feet 9% inches. The longest scoreless tie in major league baseball was played at Ebbets Field, Brooklyn on September 11, 1946 when the Dodgers and the Cincinnati Reds battled 19 scoreless innings. The game was called after four hours and forty minutes play on account of darkness. Brooklyn was also one of the teams to play the longest game ever played in the majors. The game, against the Boston Braves was played at Braves Field in Boston on May 1, 1920 and after 26 innings of play the score was tied at 1-1. According to the records both starting batteries went the route. The game was called because of darkness after 3 hours and 50 minutes of play. Harry Stovey, Philadelphia, A. A. in 1888 stole 156 bases in 130 games and that is a record that still stands. Ty Cobb set the mark after the turn of the century by pilfering 96 bases in 156 games in 1915 while playing for the Detroit Tigers. Josh Devore of the N.Y. Giants has the record of stealing the most bases in one inning-four, a record he set in the ninth inning on June 20, 1912. Bill Hamilton of the Philadelphia Phillies (under another rame at that time) stole seven bases in one game on August 31, 1894. Ed Collins of the Philadelphia Athletics almost equalled his record on September 11, 1912 when he stole six in a single game. THE STANDINGS (End of First Half) Team W L Pct. NAS ----------4 1 .850 NavSta ---------3 2 .600 Marines --3 2 .600 VU-10 ---------3 2 .600 Hospital --------2 3 .400 TraGrp --------0 5 .000 THIS WEEK'S SCHEDULE Sunday Hospital vs. Naval Station. Monday. -VU-10 vs. Marines Tuesday ------TraGrp vs. NAS. Wednesday_. NavSta vs. Marines. Thursday-.NAS vs. HospitaL Friday ------TraGrp vs. VU-10. 0 0 U THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay--3 August 49-2500 Page Four


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