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VoL IV No.23 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 July 1949


TRAIN PILOTS TO FLY
BLIMPS OR AIRPLANES
Lakehurst, N. J. (AFPS)-Pilots
of the Navy's lighter-than-air blimps, which were recently assigned to a new role in antisubmarine . warfare, are now being qualified
to fly conventional aircraft while a group of standard aircraft pilots
are being trained to fly blimps.
* Lighter-than-air pilot-officers in
the rank of commander and below are eligible to apply for the heavier-than-air flight training and Naval Aviators in the rank of lieutenant and below can request non-rigid aircraft training. The first transition class for the latter category will start August 15 at
the Naval Air Station here.
During the Atlantic Command
Exercises held last February and March, two World War II type blimps operated from Navy escort carriers and proved their effectiveness as antisubmarine weapons.
The two airships accounted for or participated in eight "enemy" kills.
This marked the first time nonrigid aircraft flew from an aircraft carrier during maneuvers although such flights had been routine since carrier landing qualifications were held off the Virginia Capes -last
January.
The Navy blimps worked with
a hunter-killer force composed of cruisers, destroyers And - aircraft against both fleet-type World War II submarines and the new streamlined "guppy-snorkel" type submarine. The operation took place at a distance of twice the maximum
* effective operating range of a blimp
from the Naval Air Station at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

IDEAS SAVE NAVY $265,000
(SEA)-Annual savings of more
than $265,000 have been realized from work and time-saving suggestions made by 11 naval civilian employees who have received cash awards totaling $1,525 under the Navy's beneficial suggestion program. The awards were granted ou the basis of reduced costs and yearly savings resulting from Navy-wide application of the suggestions.


ACTION ON PAY BILL
HELD UP IN SENATE

Senator Millard Tydings,
of Maryland, recently stated that the decision of the House Armed Services Committee to postpone action on, the
pending Service "unification"
bill will hold up his committde from acting on the Armed Forces pay bill now before it. The Senator, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said that some members of his committee feel that without the $1 billion saving expected from the "unification" bill, they cannot vote the Armed Forces a pay raise. The Maryland Senator is the author of the "unification" bill, which already has, passed in the
Senate by a wide margin.


MODIFICATION OF NAVY PER DIEM RATES TOLD

The Navy has recently modified its per diem rates 'to coincide with those of the Army and the Air Force it has recently been announced.
Under the old rates, officers under repeated travel orders were allowed $7.00 per day for more than 24 hours travel and the actual expense turned in if they traveled less than 24 hours.
Under the modified rates, they will still receive $7.00 per day more than 24 hours travel but will be paid in one-fourth-of-a-day figures for less than 24 hojfrs travel.
Here's how it will work. For each six-hour travel period or fraction thereof, an officer will receive one fourth of the $7.00 daily allotment or $1.75 (unless travel is entirely between 0800 and 1800, in which case no per diem is allowed).
Thus an officer in a travel status for 9 hours (overlapping the above non-per diem period) will receive two times $1.75 or $3.50 as reimbursement.
BUY SAVINGS BONDS


1949 CPO EXAMS TO BE HELD 1 DECEMBER

Thursday 1 December 1949 has been designated as the date fleetwide examinations for advancement to Chief Petty Officer, acting appointment will be held. This date was set in BuPers Circular Letter 107-49 listed as item 49-471 -(NDB 30 June 1949):
It is important that all personnel eligible for the forthcoming examinations be apprised in' advance of the test date listed above. Examinations will be given on 1 December 1949 only subject to special provisions referred to in paragraph 9 of BuPers Circ. Ltr. 106-49 (NDB 30 June 1949).
Personnel who meet the-requirements for competition are those who are in all respects elegible for advancement as of l Dec. 1949 and those who may normally be expected to become eligible not later than 1 June 1950.
All commanding officers will insure that all petty officers, first class who are recommended for advancement and who are eligible in all respects are nominated. Nominations shall be made to reach the appropriate convening authority not later than 6 September 1949, using mails insofar as is practicable.
All waiting lists which exist for advancement to CPO, acting appointment will be cancelled as of 1 December 1949.

RESERVISTS TO TAKE
PHYSICAL EXAMS
Local Fleet Reservists and officers of the Naval Reserve on inactive duty may expect to be ordered by the District Commandant to report to the Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay for routine physical examinations.
In a letter received recently from the Commandant, TENTH Naval District, it was pointed out that under the provisions, of Article H-1602 of the Bureau of Personnel Manual (for Naval Reserve Officers) and Article H-9604 (for Enlisted Fleet 'Reservists) such personnel must be examined physicaly once every -four years, or oftener as may be deemed necessary.


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Editorial Offiice, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 30 July '1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, JOSN -------------- Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR --------- Staff Advisor
S. F. Dodge, YNC ----------- Staff Writer
J. G. McCarthy, YN1 --------- Staff Writer
R. A. Barchenger, YNC ---- Staff Writer E.4. Kazmierski, PFC -.... Staff Writer A. H. Borresen, CHRELE .... Staff Writer Cecil Pederson--------- Teen-Age Writer "Skiddy" Masterson----Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-$5 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
, THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAB Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

A LEGEND

One night in anient times, three horsemen, were riding across a desert, As they crossed the dry bed of a river, out of the darkness a voice called "Halt". They obeyed. The voice told them to dismount, pick up a handful of pebbles, put the pebbles in their pocket and remount. The voice then said, "You have done as I commanded. Tomorrow at sun-up you will be glad and sorry." Mystified, the horsemen rode on. When -the Sun rose, they reached into their pockets and found that a miracle had happened. The pebbles had been transformed into diamonds, rubies and other ,precious stones. They, remembered the warning. They were both glad and sorry-glad they had taken some, and sorry they had not taken more . .. and this is the story of life insurance.
Be sure you won't be sorry. If you haven't taken the advantage of the benefits of National Service Life Insurance or don't have the type of 4nsurance you desire, to make your permanent plan, See your Isilurnce officer.
-Reprinted from THE ECHO.

The Naval Aviation Cadet prograim will be increased by 50 percent during the Fiscal Year begining July 1. About 1,500 Naval cadets will be trained in the new year.


SURFACE
TRANSPORTATION

By LT. John K. Metzger
Port Director

The old familiar assault transport, President Adams APA-19 has been removed from the run lifting passengers and cargo from NOB Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Instead, the Chief of the Naval transportation Service has released a schedule of -transports from the Pacific to make an east-west coast run on about once each month. These ships are of the General class, such as the General William Mitchell arriving today to lift passengers here for west coast ports.
The General class ships are built along the following lines and are nearly all the same. Length 622 feet 7 inches, Beam 75 feet 6 inches, Displacement full load 19,631 tons. Accommodations for 'cabin class passengers 367, troop class 2,187.
The schedules for these ships, which may be obtained at the Port Directors office, indicate the arrival and departure from Gtmo. On the northbound trip all passengers will disembark at Norfolk, Va. For the west coast departure, passengers embarking here will disembark either in San Diego or San Francisco, California.
It is essential that the Port Director have requests for transportation in: his office six weeks prior to the arrival of a vessel. The Chief of Naval Operations requires that this base submit passenger requirements about six 'weeks before the ship sails from here., Persons contemplating orders, desiring to go on leave, or persons having 'relatives visiting should make plans far enough in advance to request the transportation prior to the six week, interval. Requests received After that time cannot be given the consideration previously given leave status personnel, especially dependents. All personnel travelling NOT under, orders are accommodated only on a space available basis. MWilitary personnel on leave are given a priority four and their dependents a priority six. Visiting relatives are assigned a priority ten, the lowest of surface priorities.
Forms for requesting transportation are obtained from the Port Directors office. ,These forms MUST be filled in correctly and submitted to th Commanding Officers of the activity concerned for approval. In the case of civilian personnel to the Industrial Relations Officer. Ir-properly filled out forms are returned to the individual.
The primary purpose. bf the Naval Transports is to transport those p'ersonnel under orders making a change of duty station, ,and all personnel rate one trip in each direction in a change of duty
(Continued on Page FiVe)


Sunday, 31 July 1949
CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses
0700--Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass - 0630
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930--Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

Mrs. Vera M.
is, NC, USN, de~parted via MATS
Tuesday morning for separation at the Naval Receiving station, Jacksonville, FloS rida. Upon sep'[NOTE aration from the
N a v a 1 Service, Mrs. McMahon will join her husband at the Naval Air Station, Coco Sola, C.Z.
This week we Welcome aboard T. W. Foster, HM1 from duty at COMSERVLANT; A. L. Cave; HM2, from the USS Mt. Olympus AGC8; and C.W. Ramaker, HM3, from 'the USS Salem, CA '139.
Also orders are in this week for L. M. (Kip) Cummings HMC to the Naval Hospital San Diego, California; and C. Jacobs, TN, for assignment by COMPHIBLANT. Congratulations are in order and go to AD2 and Mrs. William C. Jaudon on the birth of a daughter, Patricia Ann on the 21st of July. Jaudon is attached to NAS.
Also other proud parents from NAS are AD1 and Mrs. W.D. Blackmon who were blessed with a daughter, Catherine Rena, on the 23rd of July. Baby Catherine arrived on her parent's 7th wedding anniversary. With N/AS still in the lead, on the 24th of July, Mi. Stork paid a visit to Lt. and Mrs. Joe R. Miller, of Air Station Supply. As in 'the past, this time it too was a girl. The proud parents named her Dorothy.
Then to finish up for the Week, at 0400 on the 24 of July SHI and Mrs. James J. Butler were greeted by a young son, whom they promptly named James William. Butler is attached to the NOB Ship's S'ervice.
(SEA) - Because golf was keeping men from practicing their required archery, the Scottish Parliament in 1457 passed a law banning the sport.


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ARMY SERGEANT HOLDS
TITLE OF "WORLDS
CONTEST CHAMPION",

By Armed Forces Press Service
Meet the world's Contest Champ.
That's the unchallenged title
held by M/Sgt. William C. StilleyBrooklyn-stationed recruiter and contest winner deluxe. And if there is anyone, anywhere who can top his record of winning over 2,000 different prizes, Sergeant Stilley
would like to shake his hand.
Sergeant Stilley came into the
limelight a few years ago when a New York newspaper featured him in a spread slugged, "World's Champion Contestant". And although he isn't too active in contests now his throne has never
been vacated.
After working on unfinished ~'limericks, puzzles and slogans for W twenty years, the veteran Army
man admits that he became pretty proficient. "Toward the end, I didn't S miss", he said. "Everything I
entered netted me something. If I knew at first what I know now,boy!"
What Started Him Off???
"Well, when I was on Governors
Island, N.Y., The company clown won a crossword contest. I thought, if that eight-ball can do it so can I!"
And he did! The contest ran
30 days and Stilley won $1100.
From then on he had the "bug".
My Most Disappointing Case?
"That was when I worked five
months on a radio station puzzle.
I lost the" $25,000 prize by misreading a minor rule. The winner didn't have nearly as good a solution!
Sergeant Stilley can't attempt
to estimate the amount of money or value of merchandise he has accumulated. His coups run from two automobiles, countless radios and phonographs, furniture, season tickets and showers of clothing down, to a dollar he copped in a
local newspaper contest.
"Funny thing about that deal",
he chuckled. "Pretty soon, I began to see posters in all the PX's: 'Army Sergeant Wins Big Contest'.
The newspaper sent them out, but 'course they didn't say it was only
a dollar."

AIR-CONDITIONED "SACK"

Grand Rapids, Michigan (AFPS)
An air-conditioned bed for your
coximfort ... ?
A bed on display here features
a foam rubber mattress with holes at intervals and an air-conditioning
unit underneath.
Lowslung anq set on coasters,
the new bed can be just as com. fortable in summer and winter.
The conditioner can produce either
warm or cool air.


MILITARY AWARD
RIBBONS DEFINITELY
"HERE TO STAY"

(SEA) -You may not have known it before, but there are 60 ribbons which are or have been authorized by the Navy to be worn by its personnel.
The ribbons, as you should know, signify the granting of medals or other awards. As the years have gone by and various military decorations have been authorized, new ribbon designs have come into being. If you've ever wondered about the color combinations employed, -and maybe speculated on whether there is any possibility of running out of them, lend and ear.
There are 1,307,606,368,000 possible color combinations.
All countries of the world have a combined total of 28,000 orders, decorations and medals. And there's a ribbon for each one of them.
Of all the nation's ribbons only 15 colors are used in 105 combinations.
The different color shades are not taken into account in these figures. Blue, for Iinstance, has been broken down into 450 different shades!
All of these facts and figures are not just academic, h o w e v er. Heraldic experts 'and statisticians of the Army Quartermaster Corps have been studying this problem to prevent duplication of ribbon color combinations with any of those used by other countries. So, it's obvious that the ribbons are here to stay.

NEW JET FIGHTER FOR CANAL ZONE

Washington (AFPS)-The U. S.
Air Force has announced production of the Republic F-84-E interceptor, capable of a speed considerably above 600 miles an hour and a range of more than 850 miles.
First units of the new jet job will go to strengthen the 23rd Fighter Group at Howard Air Force Base, Canal Zone.
The F-84-E is a much improved version of the Thunderjet, With 25 per cent greater power and-a service ceiling of above 45,000 feet.
Air Force spokesmen said tle new planes would materially bolster the Canal defenses, since in the event of emergency they would be capable of intercepting even flying-bomb type pilotless missiles launched from enemy submarines.
Aerodynamic fins on the wing tip fuel tanks enable the new interceptor to perform high-speed maneuvers under full load conditions - the first time this has been possible with a jet fighter.


NEW SUB WILL BE EQUIPPED TO LAUNCH GUIDED MISSILES

(SEA) - The guided missile is taking to the submarine. And because it is, its launching from the undersea craft will have a "pronounced effect" on the size of future submersibles, according to Under ,Secretary of the Navy Dan A. Kimball.
Speaking before the graduating class at the U. S. Naval Submarine Base, New London, Conn., the Under Secretary said that a new-type submarine "in the development stage" will be able to launch guided missiles.
Mr. Kimball added that the modern, high-speed, deep-running submarine "will be equipped to function more closely and effectively with our carriers afid planes." He cited improved communications systems wh 'ich will permit control of combat air patrols.
Such operations, he declared, will bring together more closely operations of naval air and undersea craft. Within the next 20 years, he predicted, great advances in undersea warfare can be expected. Mr. Kimball's remarks were made during exercises at which, aside from U. S. Navy personnel, graduates included two lieutenants from the Peruvian Navy and. one from the Royal Canadian Navy.

7,0 00 M.P.H. ROCKETS BEING TESTED BY NAVY

White Oak, Md. (AFPS)- A vacation jaunt from New York City to Hawaii in one hour may be in your future if current research by the Navy proves successful.
At the Naval testing station here, basic research in to the behavior of robot weapons which will fly at 7,000 miles per hour is being made with the use of newlydeveloped wind tunnels. Speeds of more than five times that of sound already have been achieved, the Navy reports. .
The experimental wind tunmels in use are improved models of an earlier version captured from the Germans during, World War II. They are used to itudy and observe tiny models of the big robot weapons, which eventually may be built to span the globe or to reach other planets.

A Marine Corps monetary clothing allowance, effective July 1, provides enlisted personnel with $86 annually per capita for clothing purchase. A quarterly maintenance allowance for Fiscal Year 1950 has been tenatively set at $21.50.

Two hams used to consist the total pay New England school teachers received for a years Work.


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THE INDIAN







Pap~a Four THE INDIAN


SO YOU THINK IT'S HOT? WELL READ THIS

By Ships Editorial Association
Things can always be worseincluding the weather.
In northwest Libia there's a town called Azizia. It lies about 25 miles south of Tripoli, that port famed ip early U.S. naval and marine battle history. And it was in Azizia, in September 1922, that the thermometer soared to 136.4 degrees. And that according to the National Geographic Society, is the highest temperature ever recorded under standard conditions.
United States' number one hot spot is Death Valley in southeastern California. An official reading of 134 degrees has been taken there at the U. S. Weather Bureau station on the valley's edge. Even higher temperatures, ranging ,up to 150 degrees, may accur in the lowlying interior. Phoenix, Arizona, which consistently leads the nation's hot weather parade, has experienced a sweltering 119 degrees.
Still Hotter-Unofficially
Talk with sailors who have operated in the Persian Gulf in southern Iran, and they'll tell you about really hot weather. There, for instance, temperatures of 150 to 180 degrees have been taken in the broiling sun. On Abadan Island at the top of the gulf, the mercury in unprotected thermometers has been reported to climb to a dizzy 189 degrees.
These sun readings are unofficial records, however, since meteorological data, to qualify officially, must be taken on instruments in sheltered and ventilated locations.
Freak Weather
This year's unusual weather conditions have resulted in several freak situations. For instance, on 6 July in Portugal a blast of heat like "tongues of fire" and lasting two minutes following a hurricane shot thermometers up to an unofficial reading of 158 degrees. Hundreds of persons were left prostrate in the streets and thousands of fish and fowl were killed by the scorching wave of hot air. Two days later, thunder and hail storms lashed the nothern section. leaving floods, fires and death in their wake.
Earlier in July, temperatures in Seville, Spain reached 123.8 in the sun and 107,6 in the shade.
And also in July, away up around Spitzbergen in the Arctic Circle, the mercury reached a "sweltering" 50. One official stated "What we need up here right now are refrigerators. We've had difficulty keeping food fresh because of the heat.
Now Cool Down
But why discuss heat in this kind of weather, with all hands concentrating on attempting to keep cool-as possible, let's say. In the northern Siberia village of Verkhoyansk, thermometers hit 90 degrees- below zero in February


M~5~Lo5LAFFS' 1.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 31 July to Sat. 6 August
Sunday
MR. BELVEDERE GOES TO
COLLEGE
Clifton Webb Shirley Temple
Monday
I CHEATED THE LAW
Tom Conway Steve Brodie
Tuesday
EASTER PARADE
Judy Garland Fred Astaire
Wednesday
THE SUN COMES UP
Jeanette MacDonald Lloyd Nolan
Thursday
THE LONG NIGHT
Henry Fonda Barbara Bel Geddes
Friday
THE HIDEOUT
Lloyd Bridges Adrian Booth
Saturday
SOUTH OF ST. LOUIS
Joel McCrea Alexis Smith

TO DETECT SNORKEL
SUBS WITH NEW
NAVY RADAR

Washington (AFPS)-A new
-and secret radar device to "see" the almost invisible and deadly snorkel submarine is now being fitted to Naval Aircraft.
Vice-Admiral J.D. Price, ViceChief of Naval Operations, recently disclosed the Navy's new step in the battle againt the submarine. In discussing the need for the detection of submarines, he told a Senate Appropriations sub-committee that "by 1950, by June of next year, 25 percent of the land based planes, or about 10 percent of the carrier based planes, 'will be properly equipped with the new anti-snorkel equipment and by 1951 about 39 percent of the land based planes and about 31 percent of the carrier-based planes we have on order will be equipped with anti-submarine equipment."

1892-a reading still recognized as the world's record for sub-freezing temperatures. The United States became most, frigid in February 1933 when the glass read 66 degrees below the cipher mark on the Wyoming side of Yellowstone National Park. But, finally, for all-time "unofficial" cold, Mount McKinley in south central Alaska puts in a top bid of-bhrrrrr-minus 100.

BUY SAVINGS BONDS


Adam would be the only man in the world who couldn't say, "Pardon me, haven't I seen you before?"

An alibi is an excuse that's cooked up, but is always half-baked.
"What is a delegate-at-large?"
"A man who goes to a convention without his wife."

In New York, people from Oshkosh look at people from Dubuque in the next theater seats and say, "Humph, these New Yorkers don't dress any better than we do."
Breaking a mirror is a good sign
-it means you're going to live at least another seven years.
Tony dropped a piece of heavy metal on his foot. His foreman had to fill out a long blank under a workingmen's compensation plan. He filled everything out down to the last question, which simply read, "Remarks." He was stumped and went in and asked the boss, "What do they want in hereTony's remarks, or mine2"
Flying over the Bay of Naples, an air pilot turned to his passenger and asked: "Have you ever heard that phrase, 'See Naples and die.'"
"Yes," replied the passenger. ."Well," said'the pilot, "take a good look-the propeller's come off."

Sylvia: "When I applied for a job the manager had the nerve to ask if my punctuation was good".
Mildred: "What did you tell him ?"'
Sylvia: "I said I'd never been late for work in my life."

U. S. TO JOIN WITH
BRITISH AND FRENCH IN FALL MANEUVERS

Heidelberg (AFPS)-American
Army troops in Europe will be joined in training exercises by British and 'French troops from September 6 to 17, EUCOM headquarters has announced.
Reciprocal participation by one battalion of an American regimental combat team with British units in the British Zone from September 15 to October 15, and an American cavalry unit with the French forces in the French Zone for a four-day period, begining about September 28, will round out the Three-nation exchange training program. This interchange of troops, has been standard training policy in the EUCOM for the past two years.


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(Continued from Page Two)
status. All other space is made available for persons in a leave status as a gratuitous gesture of the Navy, therefore it is not in good taste to'complain about a gift
service.
The Naval Transportation Service makes every effort to provide all the comforts and conveniences to the passengers possible, however due- to crowded conditions on the few ships allowed to remain active, there will be some unavoidable inconveniences. The General Mitchell recently arrived here on a trip with 135 Children five years
of age or below.
All personnel travelling on NTS
ships are required to have all inoculations; and dependents, a physical examination, prior to embarkation. Women cannot travel beyond the sixth month of pregnancy, nor until a newborn child
is two months of age.
Persons desiring to transport a
dog or cat must have 1.- a health certificate showing the animal free ' from all diseases 2.- a certificate
indicating the animal has been inoculated for rabies 3.- . all animals must be transported in a
cage provided by the owner.
Alien personnel, dependents and
relatives of service personnel must . have a passport and visa from the
American Vice Consul Santiago,
Cuba.
Automobiles are transported
above the allowance for household effects and' the Naval Transportation Service is not responsible for any damage to, or loss of a privately owndd vehicle. It is recommended that all personnel investigate insurance rates prior to loading of an automobile.

TEEN-AGE TOPICS

Two weeks ago we welcomed Jill
back into our midst, but a, lot of us have been wondering how she did. in- Washington. The stateside life sounded just as exciting as ever as she told us about her stateside 'high 'school, the many dances and house parties. No, she didn't stay put in one place, but traveled in Florida, Virginia, and Maryland. It sounds mighty good!
Guess who went fishing last
Saturday, and caught exactly nothing. Jeanneen and Joan McNeal.
Those two energetic girls got up at five in the morning too- gee,
they must eat their Wheaties!
Charlene and Kay went to Gtmo.
City the Saturday before last. We hear Kay had a hard time carrying all her packages-the rocking of the boat no doubt.- , ' I
What's happened to others 'of . ou ambitious teen-agers-Bab
Hardy and JaclcMcDonough. Drop around the filling station and you'll v ndoubtedly find them at work (if
you look under the right car).


Pfc Ellis
I~7i~7~I(Frenchy) Bourque is now doing his daily chores as a Cook Striker under the
guidance of Pfc
Gus Young. We all know that Gus will share
all his knowledge of the trade with Frenchy, helping him make good.
Another flurry of fists, and close decisions by the referee is in the recreation officer's pending basket. The second smoker of the year is rumored to take place in the early part of August.
Congratulations are extended to Pfc Charles Just, who received word last week that he is the father of a son. With a proud look and a broad smile the ole-man passed out the Phillies.
Pfc's Harvey Box and Robert Lewis left us Tuesday, via MATS for discharge in the States. Lewis will get discharged the 3rd of next month, and Box will be discharged the following day. Best of luck to these men, in their return to civilian life.
Player Of The Week ... This week the spot light shines on ,the outfield, toward the right field foul line. Covering ground there is Cpl Louis Mc Gilbra, better known to the N.A.S. ball club as, "Nothin' Stop Em Mac", and to us, "Big Friend". Mac was up six times and got on base each time. Two of the six were walks, two were hits, and he got on twice by errors. "Mac" is a real clutch hitter, and is leading the team in the RBI Department with four of the important tallies.
AB H AVE
O'connor -------- 5 4 800 Calvagna -------- 4 2 800 Mc Gilbra ------- 10 4 800 Carcelli --------- 9 3 333
De Simone -------6 2 333 Wilson ----------12 3 250
Rotundo --------- 10 2 200
Dukes -----------10 2 200
Garcia ----------11 1 091"
Dales - .-------- 6 0 000
Eds Note: The above standings are for the 1st two league games only

IONOSPHERE ROCKET EXPECTED IN YEAR

San Francisco, Calif. (AFPS)
Scientific exploration of the ionosphere by means of rockets may be undertaken within a year, scientists have predicted. In' a recent paper read before the membership of the American Rocket Society of Mechanical Engineers, K. F. Mundt, of the Aerojet Engineering Company, told of preliminary investigatiois into the fonosphere, the atmospheric layer that begins 50 miles above the earth.


"YEARS AGO" OPENS
FOUR DAY RUN
The three act comedy, "Years Ago" opens a four day run at'the Little Theatre on Tuesday night August 2 at 8:00. Final performance will given Friday night at 8:00. Tickets are now on sale and have been moving rapidly this week so don't get left out. You may obtain-them at either of the Ship's Services or the Marine PX for the small rum of 35 cents.
This week we
introduce you to the final character of the coming production a n d the director. First we have Jeaneen Hummel who takes the part of Anna, one of the
I girl-friends o f iRuth Gordon Jones, the little girl who wishes to become an actor. She and Katherine, another friend of Ruth are inseparable.
Last but not
least we have Mrs. Nell Abernathy, who is the director of this production and a vary capable person as you will see, when , you attend "Y e a r s Ago". Mrs. Abernathy is also secretary of the Little Theatre Group.
Photos of the actors in their "Years Ago" attire are on display where-ever tickets are being sdld and may bear a strong resemblance to people you see when you get out the old family album. This is not an accident for the play centers around the year 1912. So if you want to have some fun come out an enjoy the antics of the Jones'. You won't regret a single moment of it.
NAVY PAINT DEFIES
FUEL TANK FIRES
New York (AFPS) -A new fire-resistant paint developed for the Navy will protect airplane fuel tanks against fire, the Navy reports, following a demonstration at Floyd Bennett Field.
In the demonstration, a selfsealing fuel tank was painted with the new substance and filled with gasoline. A torch was applied. The fuel inside the tank did not ignite and the tank showed little effect from the 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit flame.'
(SEA)-Texas is from the Indian word "Tejas" meaning friends of allies.


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MARINES, HOSPITAL �PLA Y TODA Y @


GAME ORIGINALLY SLATED FOR MONDAY NIGHT
TO BE PLAYED AT MARINE SITE AT 2:30; NAS, NAVSTA THREATEN HOSPITAL LEAD


The scheduled game between the league leading Hospital and the Marine baseballers, slated for Monday night, will be played this afternoon at 2:30 at the Marine diamond located at Marine Site 2. Wet grounds forced the game to be postponed on Monday night.
In other league action this week, the Naval Air Station maintained their steady pace by clouting Training Group 10-2 on Sunday and bowling qver the Marines on Wednesday afternoon, 8-3. Eggebrecht who releived Bob Treamer in the second inning of the Training Group tilt was credited with the win. Wednesday afternoon, the Flyers grabbed a first inning 2-0 lead over the Marines, when Rodriguez left the mound in favor of Dick Lombard. Lombard came in with one man on, one out and a 3-1 count on Scotty Scott, Flyer first sacker. After giving Scott a fourth ball, he was greeted with a double by shortstop Ernie Faile to start the days scoring. The Marines plugged back and scored once in the third fourth and fifth to go ahead 3-2. The, Flyers countered in the last of the seventh with two out. Scott was put out after he overran third and failed 'to beat the throw back. The Flyers tallied three more in the eighth to ice the game. Johnny Werz again hurled P winning game for the Flyers yielding seven hits, fanning six and walking one. The Flyers scored their eight tallies on 12 hits, and seven walks, given up by leatherneck twirlers.
Last Friday the Hospital put another feather in their cap by downing the vaunted Naval Station 7-3. Miller started on the mound but was relieved by Webster, in the second. Clements hurled 'for the Hospital. .
Tuesday afternoon the Naval Station behind the effective hurling of Webster nosed put VU-10, 4-3 on the Marine Site diamond. Stever started on the mound for VU-10 and was relieved by Jack Vienna.
Thursday night, the Naval Station and Training Group were slated to meet on the Recreation diamond and last night Hospital was to have met VU-10. The Hospital at presstime had played but two games with their toughest competition lying ahead of them after last night's game they still must play the Marines (this afternoon) and close out the first half of the league on Tuesday night against the Air Station.


FORMER GTMO. GOLFER NOW PLAYING FOR NAS ATLANTIC CITY
According to an article in the 15 July issue of NASACTIVITIES, the station newspaper of the Naval Air Station, Atlantic City, N.J., Wright North, AMC, formerly of VU-10 is representing his new command in the All-Navy individual elimination tournament.
The veteran golfer placed second in a field, of 46 enteries. He was slated to play against some of the, top golfers of the First and Third Naval Districts last week for the honor of going to the finals of the All-Navy tournament to be held at Parris Island. South Carolina in August.
Chief North was the 1948 Champion of Guantanamo Bay shooting a 66 in'the annual golfers handicap tournament which ended last Thanksgiving Day. His record 29 for the front side of the local course still stands.
THE STANDINGS
Team W L Hospital ----------------2
NAS -------------------3 1
NavSta -----------------2 1
VU-10e---------------- 1 2
/Marines ----- --- 1, 2
TraGrp ----------------0 3
Above standings include all league games played through Wed-, netday July 27.
This Week's Schedule
Sunday ---- Marines vs. NavSta. Monday ---- VU-10 vs. TraGrp. Tuesday----- Hospital vs. NAS.
(End of Round One)
Wednesday_-- NavSta vs. TraGrp. Thursday ... Hospital vs. Marines. Friday ------- NAS vs. VU-10.

PARTIAL RESULTS OF NORFOLK TOURNAMENT

Results of the first two rounds of the Mid-Atlantic Group golf tournament show T/Sgt A.E. Greer, USMC of Quantico out in front with a 144. Greer shot rounds of 71-73 for his 36 hole total.
LT S. R. Wideberg and A. H. Neely, ADC, of Guantanamo were tied for sixth place with three others with identical rounds of 82-74 for 156 total. Further down in the standings was LT. C. H. Dutcher with rounds of 82-84 for a 166 total.
Blotter - A small rectangular piece of porous substance you spend your.time looking for while the ink is drying.


Baseball Facts


DID YOU KNOW
That in spite of invariable player flare ups at umpires' decisions there is absolutely no appeal from any decision of any umpire involving the accuracy of his judgement? (The manager or captain can protest a decision and seek a reversal if same is based soley on an interpretation of the rules).
Did You Know: That the procedure used in designating a class baseball team is by the'total population of the Cities represented in a league?
Babe Ruth, home run king, played in forty one World Series in the major leagues.
Do You Know: That the distance from home plate to second base is 127 feet, % inches?
The pitching distance from home plate, to the pitchers mound is 60 feet 6 inches in the major league,
Did You Know: That if a batter attempts to hinder a catcher, the batter is out. And if a catcher attempts to hinder a batter the batter gets a base?
Did You Know: That all major league baseball parks have to be a certain size aside from the infield?
An official major league baseball
must not weigh less then five ounces and not more then 54 ounces.
That at the close of the 1948 season Luke Appling extended'his record of most games played by a shortstop to 2,057.
That the first intercoflegiate baseball game was played between Williams and Amherst colleges at Pittsfield, Mass. in 1859? (Amherst won the game 66 to 32).
That there is a 20-second time limit for a pitcher to deliver the ball and that the umpire can call a ball in case of infringement?
That on June 18, 1917, Ben Tincup pitching for the Little Rock Travelers against the Birmingham Barons -hurled the ultimate in perfect games. Tincup kept all .7 men facing him from reaching first base.
That umpire Bill Byron was known as the "Humming Bird" because he always broke into a song when confronted by protesting players.
(SEA)-A dog is a short metal rod or bar fashioned to form a clamp/for holding watertight doors and manholes.
(SEA) - Crete is regarded as the world's first great sea power. Her warships in the Mediterranean centuries before Christ are the earliest on record.


Page Six


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-27 July 49--2500




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Vol. IV No.23 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 July 1949 TRAIN PILOTS TO FLY BLIMPS OR AIRPLANES Lakehurst, N. J. (AFPS)-Pilots of the Navy's lighter-than-air blimps, which were recently assigned to a new role in antisubmarine warfare, are now being qualified to fly conventional aircraft while a group of standard aircraft pilots are being trained to fly blimps. Lighter-than-air pilot-officers in the rank of commander and below are eligible to apply for the heavier-than-air flight training and Naval Aviators in the rank of lieutenant and below can request non-rigid aircraft training. The first transition class for the latter category will start August 15 at the Naval Air Station here. During the Atlantic Command Exercises held last February and March, two World War II type blimps operated from Navy escort carriers and proved their effectiveness as antisubmarine weapons. The two airships accounted for or participated in eight "enemy" kills. This marked the first time nonrigid aircraft flew from an aircraft carrier during maneuvers although such flights had been routine since carrier landing qualifications were held off the Virginia Capes last January. The Navy blimps worked with a hunter-killer force composed of cruisers, destroyers and aircraft against both fleet-type World War II submarines and the new streamlined "guppy-snorkel" type submarine. The operation took place at a distance of twice the maximum effective operating range of a blimp from the Naval Air Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. IDEAS SAVE NAVY $265,000 (SEA)-Annual savings of more than $265,000 have been realized from work and time-saving suggestions made by 11 naval civilian employees who have received cash awards totaling $1,525 under the Navy's beneficial suggestion program. The awards were granted on the basis of reduced costs and yearly savings resulting from Navy-wide application of the suggestions. I ACTION ON PAY BILL j HELD UP IN SENATE Senator Millard Tydings, of Maryland, recently stated that the decision of the House Armed Services Committee to postpone action on the pending Service "unification" bill will hold up his committee I from acting on the Armed Forces pay bill now before it. The Senator, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said that some members of his committee I feel that without the $1 billion saving expected from the "unification" bill, they cannot vote the Armed Forees a pay raise. The Maryland Senator is the author of the "unification" bill, which already has passed in the Senate by a wide margin. MODIFICATION OF NAVY PER DIEM RATES TOLD The Navy has recently modified its per diem rates to coincide with those of the Army and the Air Force it has recently been announced. Under the old rates, officers under repeated travel orders were allowed $7.00 per day for more than 24 hours travel and the actual expense turned in if they traveled less than 24 hours. Under the modified rates, they will still receive $7.00 per day more than 24 hours travel but will be paid in one-fourth-of-a-day figures for less than 24 hors travel. Here's how it will work. For each six-hour travel period or fraction thereof, an officer will receive one fourth of the $7.00 daily allotment or $1.75 (unless travel is entirely between 0800 and 1800, in which case no per diem is allowed). Thus an officer in a travel status for 9 hours (overlapping the above non-per diem period) will receive two times $1.75 or $3.50 as reimbursement. BUY SAVINGS BONDS 1949 CPO EXAMS TO BE HELD 1 DECEMBER Thursday 1 December 1949 has been designated as the date fleetwide examinations for advancement to Chief Petty Officer, acting appointment will be held. This date was set in BuPers Circular Letter 107-49 listed as item 49-471 (NDB 30 June 1949). It is important that all personnel eligible for the forthcoming examinations be apprised in advance of the test date listed above. Examinations will be given on 1 December 1949 only subject to special provisions referred to in paragraph 9 of BuPers Cire. Ltr. 106-49 (NDB 30 June 1949). Personnel who meet the requirements for competition are those who are in all respects elegible for advancement as of 1 Dec. 1949 and those who may normally be expected to become eligible not later than 1 June 1950. All commanding officers will insure that all petty officers, first class who are recommended for advancement and who are eligible in all respects are nominated. Nominations shall be made to reach the appropriate convening authority not later than 6 September 1949, using mails insofar as is practicable. All waiting lists which exist for advancement to CPO, acting appointment will be cancelled as of 1 December 1949. RESERVISTS TO TAKE PHYSICAL EXAMS Local Fleet Reservists and officers of the Naval Reserve on inactive duty may expect to be ordered by the District Commandant to report to the Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay for routine physical examinations. In a letter received recently from the Commandant, TENTH Naval District, it was pointed out that under the provisions, of Article H-1602 of the Bureau of Personnel Manual (for Naval Reserve Officers) and Article H-9604 (for Enlisted Fleet Reservists) such personnel must be examined physicaly once every four years, or oftener as may be deemed necessary.

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Pag~e Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg. Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 30 July 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN n Commander Allen Collier, JOSN-------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor S. F. Dodge, YNC---------Staff Writer J. G. McCarthy, YN1--------Staff Writer R. A. Barchenger, YNCStaff Writer E. J. Kazmierski, PFCStaff Writer A. H. Borresen, CHRELE._ Staff Writer Cecil Pederson----------Teen-Age Writer "Skiddy" Masterson-Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. A LEGEND One night in anient times, three horsemen. were riding across a desert, As they crossed the dry bed of a river, out of the darkness a voice called "Halt". They obeyed. The voice told them to dismount, pick up a handful of pebbles, put the pebbles in their pocket and remount. The voice then said, "You have done as I commanded. Tomorrow at sun-up you will be glad and sorry." Mystified, the horsemen rode on. When the sun rose, they reached into their pockets and found that a miracle had happened. The pebbles had been transformed into diamonds, rubies and other precious stones. They remembered the warning. They were both glad and sorry-glad they had taken some, and sorry they had not taken more ...and this is the story of life insurance. Be sure you won't be sorry. If you haven't taken the advantage of the benefits of National Service Life Insurance or don't have the type of insurance you desire to make your permanent plan, see your Insurance officer. -Reprinted from THE ECHO. The Naval Aviation Cadet program will be increased by 50 percent during the Fiscal Year begining July 1. About 1,500 Naval cadets will be trained in the new year. SURFACE TRANSPORTATION By LT. John K. Metzger Port Director The old familiar assault transport,. President Adams APA-19 has been removed from the run lifting passengers and cargo from NOB Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Instead, the Chief of the Naval transportation Service has released a schedule of transports from the Pacific to make an east-west coast run on about once each month. These ships are of the General class, such as the General William Mitchell arriving today to lift passengers here for west coast ports. The General class ships are built along the following lines and are nearly all the same. Length 622 feet 7 inches, Beam 75 feet 6 inches, Displacement full load 19,631 tons. Accommodations for cabin class passengers 367, troop class 2,187. The schedules for these ships, which may be obtained at the Port Directors office, indicate the arrival and departure from Gtmo. On the northbound trip all passengers will disembark at Norfolk, Va. For the west coast departure, passengers embarking here will disembark either in San Diego or San Francisco, California. It is essential that the Port Director have requests for transportation in his office six weeks prior to the arrival of a vessel. The Chief of Naval Operations requires that this base submit passenger requirements about six weeks before the ship sails from here. Persons contemplating orders, desiring to go on leave, or persons having relatives visiting should make plans far enough in advance to request the transportation prior to the six week interval. Requests received after that time cannot be given the consideration previously given leave status personnel, especially dependents. All personnel travelling NOT under orders are accommodated only on a space available basis. Military personnel on leave are given a priority four and their dependents a priority six. Visiting relatives are assigned a priority ten, the lowest of surface priorities. Forms for requesting transportation are obtained from the Port Directors office. These forms MUST be filled in correctly and submitted to the Commanding Officers of the activity concerned for approval. In the case of civilian personnel to the Industrial Relations Officer. Improperly filled out forms are returned to the individual. The primary purpose of the Naval Transports is to transport those personnel under orders making a change of duty station,,and all personnel rate one trip in each direction in a change of duty (Continued on Page Five) -U-* Sunday, 31 July 1949 CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass -0630 Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity CDR R.W. FAULK, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) Mrs. Vera M. McMahon, Lt(jg), NC, USN, departed via MATS Tuesday morning for separation at the Naval Receiving station, Jacksonville, Florida. Upon sepNOTE S aration from the N a v a l Service, Mrs. McMahon will join her husband at the Naval Air Station, Coco Sola, C.Z. This week we welcome aboard T. W. Foster, HM1 from duty at COMSERVLANT; A. L. Cave, HM2, from the USS Mt. Olympus AGC8; and C. W. Ramaker, HM3, from the USS Salem, CA 139. Also orders are in this week for L. M. (Kip) Cummings HMC to the Naval Hospital San Diego, California; and C. Jacobs, TN, for assignment by COMPHIBLANT. Congratulations are in order and go to AD2 and Mrs. William C. Jaudon on the birth of a daughter, Patricia Ann on the 21st of July. Jaudon is attached to NAS. Also other proud parents from NAS are AD1 and Mrs. W. D. Blackmon who were blessed with a daughter, Catherine Rena, on the 23rd of July. Baby Catherine arrived on her parent's 7th wedding anniversary. With NAS still in the lead, on the 24th of July, Mr. Stork paid a visit to Lt. and Mrs. Joe R. Miller, of Air Station Supply. As in the past, this time it too was a girl. The proud parents named her Dorothy. Then to finish up for the week, at 0400 on the 24 of July SH1 and Mrs. James J. Butler were greeted by a young son, whom they promptly named James William. Butler is attached to the NOB Ship's Service. (SEA) -Because golf was keeping men from practicing their required archery, the Scottish Parliament in 1457 passed a law banning the sport. t 0 THE INDIAN Page Two

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THE INDIAN Page Three ARMY SERGEANT HOLDS TITLE OF "WORLD'S CONTEST CHAMPION" By Armed Forces Press Service Meet the world's Contest Champ. That's the unchallenged title held by M/Sgt. William C. StilleyBrooklyn-stationed recruiter and contest winner deluxe. And if there is anyone, anywhere who can top his record of winning over 2,000 different prizes, Sergeant Stilley would like to shake his hand. Sergeant Stilley came into the limelight a few years ago when a New York newspaper featured him in a spread slugged, "World's Champion Contestant". And although he isn't too active in contests now his throne has never been vacated. After working on unfinished limericks, puzzles and slogans for twenty years, the veteran Army man admits that he became pretty proficient. "Toward the end, I didn't miss", he said. "Everything I entered netted me something. If I knew at first what I know now,boy!" What Started Him Off?? ? "Well, when I was on Governors Island, N. Y., The company clown won a crossword contest. I thought, if that eight-ball can do it so can I!" And he did! The contest ran 30 days and Stilley won $1100. From then on he had the "bug". My Most Disappointing Case? "That was when I worked five months on a radio station puzzle. I lost the $25,000 prize by misreading a minor rule. The winner didn't have nearly as good a solution! Sergeant Stilley can't attempt to estimate the amount of money or value of merchandise he has accumulated. His coups run from two automobiles, countless radios and phonographs, furniture, season tickets and showers of clothing down to a dollar he copped in a local newspaper contest. "Funny thing about that deal", he chuckled. "Pretty soon, I began to see posters in all the PX's: 'Army Sergeant Wins Big Contest'. The newspaper sent them out, but 'course they didn't say it was only a dollar." AIR-CONDITIONED "SACK" Grand Rapids, Michigan (AFPS) An air-conditioned bed for your comfort ..? A bed on display here features a foam rubber mattress with holes at intervals and an air-conditioning unit underneath. Lowslung and set on coasters, the new bed can be just as comfortable in summer and winter. The conditioner can produce either warm or cool air. MILITARY AWARD RIBBONS DEFINITELY "HERE TO STAY" (SEA) -You may not have known it before, but there are 60 ribbons which are or have been authorized by the Navy to be worn by its personnel. The ribbons, as you should know, signify the granting of medals or other awards. As the years have gone by and various military decorations have been authorized, new ribbon designs have come into being. If you've ever wondered about the color combinations employed, and maybe speculated on whether there is any possibility of running out of them, lend and ear. There are 1,307,606,368,000 possible color combinations. All countries of the world have a combined total of 28,000 orders, decorations and medals. And there's a ribbon for each one of them. Of all the nation's ribbons only 15 colors are used in 105 combinations. The different color shades are not taken into account in these figures. Blue, for instance, has been broken down into 450 different shades! All of these facts and figures are not just academic, howe ve r. Heraldic experts and statisticians of the Army Quartermaster Corps have been studying this problem to prevent duplication of ribbon color combinations with any of those used by other countries. So, it's obvious that the ribbons are here to stay. NEW JET FIGHTER FOR CANAL ZONE Washington (AFPS)-The U. S. Air Force has announced production of the Republic F-84-E interceptor, capable of a speed considerably above 600 miles an hour and a range of more than 850 miles. First units of the new jet job will go to strengthen the 23rd Fighter Group at Howard Air Force Base, Canal Zone. The F-84-E is a much improved version of the Thunderjet, with 25 per cent greater power and a service ceiling of above 45,000 feet. Air Force spokesmen said the new planes would materially bolster the Canal defenses, since in the event of emergency they would be capable of intercepting even flying-bomb type pilotless missiles launched from enemy submarines. Aerodynamic fins on the wing tip fuel tanks enable the new interceptor to perform high-speed maneuvers under full load conditions -the first time this has been possible with a jet fighter. NEW SUB WILL BE EQUIPPED TO LAUNCH GUIDED MISSILES (SEA) -The guided missile is taking to the submarine. And because it is, its launching from the undersea craft will have a "pronounced effect" on the size of future submersibles, according to Under Secretary of the Navy Dan A. Kimball. Speaking before the graduating class at the U. S. Naval Submarine Base, New London, Conn., the Under Secretary said that a new-type submarine "in the development stage" will be able to launch guided missiles. Mr. Kimball added that the modern, high-speed, deep-running submarine "will be equipped to function more closely and effectively with our carriers acid planes." He cited improved communications systems which will permit control of combat air patrols. Such operations, he declared, will bring together more closely operations of naval air and undersea craft. Within the next 20 years, he predicted, great advances in undersea warfare can be expected. Mr. Kimball's remarks were made during exercises at which, aside from U. S. Navy personnel, graduates included two lieutenants from the Peruvian Navy and. one from the Royal Canadian Navy. 7,000 M.P.H. ROCKETS BEING TESTED BY NAVY White Oak, Md. (AFPS)A vacation jaunt from New York City to Hawaii in one hour may be in your future if current research by the Navy proves successful. At the Naval testing station here, basic research in to the behavior of robot weapons which will fly at 7,000 miles per hour is being made with the use of newlydeveloped wind tunnels. Speeds of more than five times that of sound already have been achieved, the Navy reports. The experimental wind tunnels in use are improved models of an earlier version captured from the Germans during World War II. They are used to study and observe tiny models of the big robot weapons, which eventually may be built to span the globe or to reach other planets. A Marine Corps monetary clothing allowance, effective July 1, provides enlisted personnel with $86 annually per capita for clothing purchase. A quarterly maintenance allowance for Fiscal Year 1950 has been tenatively set at $21.50. Two hams used to consist the total pay New England school teachers received for a years work. Page Three THE INDIAN

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Page Four THE INDIAN SO YOU THINK IT'S HOT? WELL READ THIS By Ships Editorial Association Things can always be worseincluding the weather. In northwest Libia there's a town called Azizia. It lies about 25 miles south of Tripoli, that port famed in early U. S. naval and marine battle history. And it was in Azizia, in September 1922, that the thermometer soared to 136.4 degrees. And that according to the National Geographic Society, is the highest temperature ever recorded under standard conditions. United States' number one hot spot is Death Valley in southeastern California. An official reading of 134 degrees has been taken there at the U. S. Weather Bureau station on the valley's edge. Even higher temperatures, ranging up to 150 degrees, may accur in the lowlying interior. Phoenix, Arizona, which consistently leads the nation's hot weather parade, has experienced a sweltering 119 degrees. Still Hotter-Unofficially Talk with sailors who have operated in the Persian Gulf in southern Iran, and they'll tell you about really hot weather. There, for instance, temperatures of 150 to 180 degrees have been taken in the broiling sun. On Abadan Island at the top of the gulf, the mercury in unprotected thermometers has been reported to climb to a dizzy 189 degrees. These sun readings are unofficial records, however, since meteorological data, to qualify officially, must be taken on instruments in sheltered and ventilated locations. Freak Weather This year's unusual weather conditions have resulted in several freak situations. For instance. on 6 July in Portugal a blast of heat like "tongues of fire" and lasting two minutes following a hurricane shot thermometers up to an unofficial reading of 158 degrees. Hundreds of persons were left prostrate in the streets and thousands of fish and fowl were killed by the scorching wave of hot air. Two days later, thunder and hail storms lashed the northern section. leaving floods, fires and death in their wake. Earlier in July, temperatures in Seville, Spain reached 123.8 in the sun and 107.6 in the shade. And also in July, away up around Spitzbergen in the Arctic Circle, the mercury reached a "sweltering" 50. One official stated "What we need up here right now are refrigerators. We've had difficulty keeping food fresh because of the heat. Now Cool Down But why discuss heat in this kind of weather, with all hands concentrating on attempting to keep cool-as possible, let's say. In the northern Siberia village of Verkhoyansk, thermometers hit 90 degrees below zero in February gWe ***LAFFS NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 31 July to Sat. 6 August Sunday MR. BELVEDERE GOES TO COLLEGE Clifton Webb Shirley Temple Monday I CHEATED THE LAW Tom Conway Steve Brodie Tuesday EASTER PARADE Judy Garland Fred Astaire Wednesday THE SUN COMES UP Jeanette MacDonald Lloyd Nolan Thursday THE LONG NIGHT Henry Fonda Barbara Bel Geddes Friday THE HIDEOUT Lloyd Bridges Adrian Booth Saturday SOUTH OF ST. LOUIS Joel McCrea Alexis Smith TO DETECT SNORKEL SUBS WITH NEW NAVY RADAR Washington (AFPS)-A new and secret radar device to "see" the almost invisible and deadly snorkel submarine is now being fitted to Naval Aircraft. Vice-Admiral J. D. Price, ViceChief of Naval Operations, recently disclosed the Navy's new step in the battle against the submarine. In discussing the need for the detection of submarines, he told a Senate Appropriations sub-committee that "by 1950, by June of next year, 25 percent of the land based planes, or about 10 percent of the carrier based planes, will be properly equipped with the new anti-snorkel equipment and by 1951 about 39 percent of the land based planes and about 31 percent of the carrier-based planes we have on order will be equipped with anti-submarine equipment." 1892-a reading still recognized as the world's record for sub-freezing temperatures. The United States became most frigid in February 1933 when the glass read 66 degrees below the cipher mark on the Wyoming side of Yellowstone National Park. But, finally, for all-time "unofficial" cold, Mount McKinley in south central Alaska puts in a top bid of-bhrrrrr-minus 100. BUY SAVINGS BONDS Adam would be the only man in the world who couldn't say, "Pardon me, haven't I seen you before?" An alibi is an excuse that's cooked up, but is always half-baked. "What is a delegate-at-large?" "A man who goes to a convention without his wife." In New York, people from Oshkosh look at people from Dubuque in the next theater seats and say, "Humph, these New Yorkers don't dress any better than we do." Breaking a mirror is a good sign -it means you're going to live at least another seven years. Tony dropped a piece of heavy metal on his foot. His foreman had to fill out a long blank under a workingmen's compensation plan. He filled everything out down to the last question, which simply read, "Remarks." He was stumped and went in and asked the boss, "What do they want in hereTony's remarks, or mine." Flying over the Bay of Naples, an air pilot turned to his passenger and asked: "Have you ever heard that phrase, 'See Naples and die.' "Yes," replied the passenger. "Well," said the pilot, "take a good look-the propeller's come off." Sylvia: "When I applied for a job the manager had the nerve to ask if my punctuation was good". Mildred: "What did you tell him ?" Sylvia: "I said I'd never been late for work in my life." U. S. TO JOIN WITH BRITISH AND FRENCH IN FALL MANEUVERS Heidelberg (AFPS)-American Army troops in Europe will be joined in training exercises by British and French troops from September 6 to 17, EUCOM headquarters has announced. Reciprocal participation by one battalion of an American regimental combat team with British units in the British Zone from September 15 to October 15, and an American cavalry unit with the French forces in the French Zone for a four-day period, begining about September 28, will round out the Three-nation exchange training program. This interchange of troops has been standard training policy in the EUCOM for the past two years. O Ut Page Four THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Five (Continued from Page Two) status. All other space is made available for persons in a leave status as a gratuitous gesture of the Navy, therefore it is not in good taste to complain about a gift service. The Naval Transportation Service makes every effort to provide all the comforts and conveniences to the passengers possible, however due to crowded conditions on the few ships allowed to remain active, there will be some unavoidable inconveniences. The General Mitchell recently arrived here on a trip with 135 Children five years of age or below. All personnel travelling on NTS ships are required to have all inoculations; and dependents, a physical examination, prior to embarkation. Women cannot travel beyond the sixth month of pregnancy, nor until a newborn child is two months of age. Persons desiring to transport a dog or cat must have 1.a health certificate showing the animal free from all diseases 2.a certificate indicating the animal has been inoculated for rabies 3..all animals must be transported in a cage provided by the owner. Alien personnel, dependents and relatives of service personnel must have a passport and visa from the American Vice Consul Santiago, Cuba. Automobiles are transported above the allowance for household effects and the Naval Transportation Service is not responsible for any damage to, or loss of a privately owned vehicle. It is recommended that all personnel investigate insurance rates prior to loading of an automobile. TEEN-AGE TOPICS Two weeks ago we welcomed Jill back into our midst, but a lot of us have been wondering how she did in Washington. The stateside life sounded just as exciting as ever as she told us about her stateside high school, the many dances and house parties. No, she didn't stay put in one place, but traveled in Florida, Virginia, and Maryland. It sounds mighty good! Guess who went fishing last Saturday, and caught exactly nothing. Jeanneen and Joan McNeal. Those two energetic girls got up at five in the morning toogee, they must eat their Wheaties! Charlene and Kay went to Gtmo. City the Saturday before last. We hear Kay had a hard time carrying all her packages-the rocking of the boat no doubt. What's happened to others of .oul ambitious teen-agers-Bab Hardy and Jack McDonough. Drop around the filling station and you'll undoubtedly find them at work (if you look under the right car). .IW1 Pfc Ellis (Frenchy) Bourque is now doing his daily chores as a Cook Striker under the guidance of Pfc Gus Young. We all know that Gus will share all his knowledge of the trade with Frenchy, helping him make good. Another flurry of fists, and close decisions by the referee is in the recreation officer's pending basket. The second smoker of the year is rumored to take place in the early part of August. Congratulations are extended to Pfc Charles Just, who received word last week that he is the father of a son. With a proud look and a broad smile the ole-man passed out the Phillies. Pfc's Harvey Box and Robert Lewis left us Tuesday, via MATS for discharge in the States. Lewis will get discharged the 3rd of next month, and Box will be discharged the following day. Best of luck to these men, in their return to civilian life. Player Of The Week ...This week the spot light shines on the outfield, toward the right field foul line. Covering ground there is Cpl Louis Mc Gilbra, better known to the N.A.S. ball club as, "Nothin' Stop Em Mac", and to us, "Big Friend". Mac was up six times and got on base each time. Two of the six were walks, two were hits, and he got on twice by errors. "Mac" is a real clutch hitter, and is leading the team in the RBI Department with four of the important tallies. AB HAVE O'connor ---------5 4 800 Calvagna --------4 2 800 Me Gilbra -------10 4 800 Carcelli --------9 3 333 De Simone -------6 2 333 Wilson ----------12 3 250 Rotundo ---------10 2 200 Dukes ----------10 2 200 Garcia ---------11 1 091 Dales ----------6 0 000 Ed's Note: The above standings are for the 1st two league games only .. IONOSPHERE ROCKET EXPECTED IN YEAR San Francisco, Calif. (AFPS) Scientific exploration of the ionosphere by means of rockets may be undertaken within a year, scientists have predicted. In a recent paper read before the membership of the American Rocket Society of Mechanical Engineers, K. F. Mundt, of the Aerojet Engineering Company, told of preliminary investigations into the ionosphere, the atmospheric layer that begins 50 miles above the earth. "YEARS AGO" OPENS FOUR DAY RUN The three act comedy, "Years Ago" opens a four day run at the Little Theatre on Tuesday night August 2 at 8:00. Final performance will given Friday night at 8:00. Tickets are now on sale and have been moving rapidly this week so don't get left out. You may obtain them at either of the Ship's Services or the Marine PX for the small sum of 35 cents. This week we introduce you to the final character of the coming production a n d the director. First we have Jeaneen Hummel who takes the part of Anna, one of the lik I girl-friends o f 11' Ruth Gordon Jones, the little girl who wishes to become an actor. She and Katherine, another friend of Ruth are inseparable. Last but not least we have Mrs. Nell Abernathy, who is the director of this production and a vary capable person as you will see, when you attend "Y e ar s Ago". Mrs. Abernathy is also secretary of the j Little Theatre Group. Photos of the actors in their "Years Ago" attire are on display where-ever tickets are being sold and may bear a strong resemblance to people you see when you get out the old family album. This is not an accident for the play centers around the year 1912. So if you want to have some fun come out an enjoy the antics of the Jones'. You won't regret a single moment of it. NAVY PAINT DEFIES FUEL TANK FIRES New York (AFPS) -A new fire-resistant paint developed for the Navy will protect airplane fuel tanks against fire, the Navy reports, following a demonstration at Floyd Bennett Field. In the demonstration, a selfsealing fuel tank was painted with the new substance and filled with gasoline. A torch was applied. The fuel inside the tank did not ignite and the tank showed little effect from the 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit flame. (SEA)-Texas is from the Indian word "Tejas" meaning friends of allies. Page Five THE INDIAN

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MARINES, HOSPITAL PLAY TODA Y.* GAME ORIGINALLY SLATED FOR MONDAY NIGHT TO BE PLAYED AT MARINE SITE AT 2:30; NAS, NAVSTA THREATEN HOSPITAL LEAD The scheduled game between the league leading Hospital and the Marine baseballers, slated for Monday night, will be played this afternoon at 2:30 at the Marine diamond located at Marine Site 2. Wet grounds forced the game to be postponed on Monday night. In other league action this week, the Naval Air Station maintained their steady pace by clouting Training Group 10-2 on Sunday and bowling over the Marines on Wednesday afternoon, 8-3. Eggebrecht who releived Bob Treamer in the second inning of the Training Group tilt was credited with the win. Wednesday afternoon, the Flyers grabbed a first inning 2-0 lead over the Marines, when Rodriguez left the mound in favor of Dick Lombard. Lombard came in with one man on, one out and a 3-1 count on Scotty Scott, Flyer first sacker. After giving Scott a fourth ball, he was greeted with a double by shortstop Ernie Faile to start the days scoring. The Marines plugged back and scored once in the third fourth and fifth to go ahead 3-2. The, Flyers countered in the last of the seventh with two out. Scott was put out after he overran third and failed to beat the throw back. The Flyers tallied three more in the eighth to ice the game. Johnny Werz again hurled a winning game for the Flyers yielding seven hits, fanning six and walking one. The Flyers scored their eight tallies on 12 hits, and seven walks, given up by leatherneck twirlers. Last Friday the Hospital put another feather in their cap by downing the vaunted Naval Station 7-3. Miller started on the mound but was relieved by Webster in the second. Clements hurled for the Hospital. Tuesday afternoon the Naval Station behind the effective hurling of Webster nosed out VU-10, 4-3 on the Marine Site diamond. Stever started on the mound for VU-10 and was relieved by Jack Vienna. Thursday night, the Naval Station and Training Group were slated to meet on the Recreation diamond and last night Hospital was to have met VU-10. The Hospital at presstime had played but two games with their toughest competition lying ahead of them after last night's game they still must play the Marines (this afternoon) and close out the first half of the league on Tuesday night against the Air Station. FORMER GTMO. GOLFER NOW PLAYING FOR NAS ATLANTIC CITY According to an article in the 15 July issue of NASACTIVITIES, the station newspaper of the Naval Air Station, Atlantic City, N. J., Wright North, AMC, formerly of VU-10 is representing his new command in the All-Navy individual elimination tournament. The veteran golfer placed second in a field of 46 enteries. He was slated to play against some of the top golfers of the First and Third Naval Districts last week for the honor of going to the finals of the All-Navy tournament to be held at Parris Island. South Carolina in August. Chief North was the 1948 Champion of Guantanamo Bay shooting a 66 in the annual golfers handicap tournament which ended last Thanksgiving Day. His record 29 for the front side of the local course still stands. THE STANDINGS Team W L Hospital ---------------2 0 NAS -----------------3 1 NavSta ---------------2 1 VU-10 ----------------1 2 Marines ---------------1 2 TraGrp ---------------0 3 Above standings include all league games played through Wednesday July 27. This Week's Schedule SundayMarines vs. NavSta. MondayVU-10 vs. TraGrp. Tuesday -Hospital vs. NAS. (End of Round One) WednesdayNavSta vs. TraGrp. Thursday-Hospital vs. Marines. Friday------NAS vs. VU-10. PARTIAL RESULTS OF NORFOLK TOURNAMENT Results of the first two rounds of the Mid-Atlantic Group golf tournament show T/Sgt A. E. Greer, USMC of Quantico out in front with a 144. Greer shot rounds of 71-73 for his 36 hole total. LT S. R. Wideberg and A. H. Neely, ADC, of Guantanamo were tied for sixth place with three others with identical rounds of 82-74 for 156 total. Further down in the standings was LT. C. H. Dutcher with rounds of 82-84 for a 166 total. Blotter -A small rectangular piece of porous substance you spend your -time looking for while the ink is drying. Baseball Facts DID YOU KNOW That in spite of invariable player flare ups at umpires' decisions there is absolutely no appeal from any decision of any umpire involving the accuracy of his judgement? (The manager or captain can protest a decision and seek a reversal if same is based soley on an interpretation of the rules). Did You Know: That the procedure used in designating a class baseball team is by the total population of the Cities represented in a league? Babe Ruth, home run king, played in forty one World Series in the major leagues. Do You Know: That the distance from home plate to second base is 127 feet, % inches? The pitching distance from home plate, to the pitchers mound is 60 feet 6 inches in the major league. Did You Know: That if a batter attempts to hinder a catcher, the batter is out. And if a catcher attempts to hinder a batter the batter gets a base? Did You Know: That all major league baseball parks have to be a certain size aside from the infield? An official major league baseball must not weigh less then five ounces and not more then 514 ounces. That at the close of the 1948 season Luke Appling extended his record of most games played by a shortstop to 2,057. That the first intercollegiate baseball game was played between Williams and Amherst colleges at Pittsfield, Mass. in 1859? (Amherst won the game 66 to 32). That there is a 20-second time limit for a pitcher to deliver the ball and that the umpire can call a ball in case of infringement? That on June 18, 1917, Ben Tincup pitching for the Little Rock Travelers against the Birmingham Barons hurled the ultimate in perfect games. Tincup kept all 27 men facing him from reaching first base. That umpire Bill Byron was known as the "Humming Bird" because he always broke into a song when confronted by protesting players. (SEA)-A dog is a short metal rod or bar fashioned to form a clamp for holding watertight doors and manholes. (SEA) -Crete is regarded as the world's first great sea power. Her warships in the Mediterranean centuries before Christ are the earliest on record. Page Six THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-27 July 49-2500


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