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ian



VOL. IV, No. 14 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 May 1949


HOUSE DEFEATS PAY RAISE BILL TUESDAY

Action Catches Sponsors Of Bill Flat-footed: The Vote-227-163
The House of Representatives Tuesday defeated the $406,000,000 military pay raise bill which would have given a wage hike to every man and woman in the service except recruits. The vote of the House was 227-163 against the pay bill.
The action, which caught sponsors of the bill flat-footed, was based on the mounting congressional economy drive as well as reluctance to grant big salary increases to top-ranking officers and far less to the lower grades.
The House roll call vote came only a few hours after President Truman had sent a letter to Speaker Sam Rayburn urging passage of the bill as a "most important part" of the defense program. The Chief Executive said that the armed services were now having difficulty in getting high-type men under the present pay scales.
The defeat capped the many legislative setbacks given bills, supported by President Truman, and sent the bill back to the House Armed Services Committee which had spent many weeks drafting this bill. This in effect killed the bill for this session of congress.

HISTORY OF BASE TO BE
PUBLISHED

Beginning with next week's edition, the first of a two-week series giving the history of the Naval Operating Base from its establishment in 1903 until the present time will be published.
Written originally in book form at the request of the Historical Section, Office of the Secretary of the Navy, in 1945, the two installments to be printed by the Indian are considerably condensed and should prove interesting to all hands in every detail. It is intended to print this information in suitable form for removal from the paper and permanent retention by interested personnel.


THE GUIDING VOICE FOR PILOTS IN BAD WEATHER

GCA "Talks" Them Down
The basic idea of Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) was born in the Radiation Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its early development was due largly to the work of Dr. Louis Alvarez, physicist, antenna radiation expert and amateur pilot. Dr. Alvarez felt that if precision radar could be used to lay searchlights, direct anti-aircraft and shipborne guns, and perform other directional functions, it could be used to assist an aircraft in making a proper approach to a landing under adverse weather conditions.
The first experiments were conducted at the East Boston airport and at NAS, Quonset Point, R. I., in November and December 1941. The first Mark II GCA set was produced by the Radiation Laboratory of M.I.T. on 1 January 1944. The Navy contract was given to the
(Continued on Page Four)

Under the wide and starry sky
Dig a grave and let me lie;
Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.
This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be;
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the bill.
-Stevenson
Branch 100 of the Fleet
Reserve Association will again hold Memorial Day services to honor their departed shipmates at 1300, 30 May at the U.S. Naval Cemetery, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. A Marine firing squad, the Naval Base Band and two buglers will help with the services which will be of short
duration.
The members of the Reserve Association are expected to attend in dress whites, all others will be most welcome. Transportation will leave the Commissary Area at 1230 to take any who wish to attend the service.


HURRICANE IS DEFINED
BY NAS AEROLOGIST
Editors Note: At the request of the Indian Staff, LT Norman B. Boyles, Aerological Officer NAS has prepared the following brief explanation of the hurricane. Lt. Boyles stated that the Hurricane season is from June to November and that we may expect to hear of the first storm of the 1949 season very soon.
A hurricane is a tropical storm or cyclone which covers an extensive area and is accompanied by torrential rainfall, abnormal storm tides, and violent winds. The hurricane of the North Atlantic is identical to the typhoon of the north Pacific (known in the Phillipines as the (baguios), the willy-nilly of Australia and the cyclone of the Indian ocean. All are tropical cyclones.
Tropical cyclones originate in the doldrums (known to aviators as equatorial front). This is a belt of calm winds lying between the northeast and southeast trade winds. The belt circles the earth but does not coincide exactly with the geographical equator. Its position is determined by the intensity of
(Continued on Page Five)

NEED AN EXCUSE FOR SPECIAL LIBERTY???

San Diego White Hat Turns Up
With "New" Reason
The "Hoist", weekly publication of the Naval Training Center, San Diego, California, came up with this "dilly" in a regular column entitled "It Really Happened".
An officer attached to the Training Center called the Center's paper office and said:
"I've been an officer in the Navy for over twenty years and I thought I had seen every possible excuse for special liberty, but right here in front of me is a new one. It reads: 'I request special liberty to meet my one-armed uncle at the Santa Fe depot. He is traveling with two suitcases'!"
The reporter taking the call asked, "Did he get the liberty?"
"He surely did," replied the officer, "if the excuse is legitimate, he needs it, if it isn't he deserves it for thinking up the first new one I've read in the last ten years."








Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday 28 May 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W, K. Phillips, USN
Commander
A nCoer, SN -----------------~Editor
'P. H. Teeter, LCDR ---------Staff Advisor
S. F. Dodge, YNC-----------Staff Writer
R. A. Barchenger, YNC--..-Staff Writer Jesse Evans, SSGT -----------Staff Writer
C. B. Lufburrow, ALC- Staff Writer
J. G. McCarthy, YN1---------Staff Writer
B. J. Vandermeiden, SN.-- Staff Writer C. C. Arnott, DT3-----------Staff Writer
G. M. Rushing, AFC_.._Staff Photographer Cecil Pederson.---------Teen-Age Writer
"Skiddy" Masterson--Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN Is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS.
All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

ADVANCEMENTS FOR CHIEF PETTY OFFICER

Of local interest is the announcement in BuPers Circular Letter 64-49 (NDB, 15 April) of the men who were advanced to Chief Petty Officer, acting appointment, effective not earlier than 1 June 1949 nor later than 1 August 1949.
Below are the names of those stationed aboard the Naval Operating Base who successfully completed the Navy-wide examinations given December 1948.
The Naval Air Station led in the number of local men getting the coveted appointments. Of the seven men on the Base who were advanced to CPO, four were from the Air Station. These four were: R.M. Gochneaur and W.A. Hilles from RM1 to RMCA; J.S. Mox from AGI to AGCA and J.A. O'Shea. Jr., from ACI (AP) to ACCA (AP).
T.W. Birch of the Dental Clinic received his appointment from DT1 to DTCA. Louis (n) Manint of the NSD Disbursing Office was upped to DKCA from DK1. The remaining member of the seven was R.O. Brown of Fleet Training Group who was promoted from SO1 to SOCA.
An eighth man, R. L. Reed of Utility Squadron TEN will be hiked to ALCA from AL1 on June 1st. Reed was recently transferred to VU-10 from Corpus Christi, Texas.


STORK CLUB

SCOOPS: JeraSPIAL dean Emma
Rehm born 1
May to EMC and Mrs. G. F. Rehm.
CAPT and Mrs.
Robbins are enjoying a thirty- s. day leave in the
NOTE S States; Dr. and
Mrs. Spicer, too, are in the U. S. for a few weeks; LTJG Dutcher is taking a few days rest and relaxation preparatory to examination for promotion on June 1st.
R. E. Gaskill, HM3 and R. L. O'Brien, HM2 were paid off and shipped over last week. Welcome into the fold, boys-we feel sure you'll enjoy your full thirty years of service.
D. K. Igou has been advanced in rating from CSSN to CS3; the following men were advanced from HN to HM3; J. W. White, R. Minsky, R. J. Doyle, A. M. Edwards, W. R. Potteger, H. J. Manuel, C. E. Wallace, F. C. Darling, E. Kenniston, D. E. Zimmerman, E. A. Reardon, J. T. Huggins and D. Alves; the following were advanced from HM3 to HM2; R. E. Dunn, J. G. Livoti, and J. F. Ruscio.
LTJG V. M. McMahon, NC, USN, returned to duty last week after her marriage and honeymoon in Panama. The marraige was performed 4 May in the Navy Chapel at Coco Solo where the former Miss Joyce became the bride of LTJG I. J. McMahon, USN. The entire staff of the hospital extends their best wishes and congratulations.
Mrs. Marion Cronemiller and Mr. Budd Cronemiller of Philadelphia arrived Thursday for a visit of several weeks with Dr. Cronemiller and family.
NAVY SHIFTS BALANCE OF POWER TO ATLANTIC
Washington - (AFPS) - The Navy will keep 409 vessels in Atlantic waters during the coming fiscal year, and 285 in the Pacific, Navy officials announced recently.
To accomplish this ratio, 16 destroyers will be transferred from the Pacific to the Atlantic Fleet.
Disposition of the fleets will be as follows:
Aircraft carriers - six in the Atlantic and two in the Pacific.
Light Carriers and escorts eight in the Atlantic and three in the Pacific.
Battleships - one (The Missouri) in the Atlantic.
Destroyers and escorts -117 in the Atlantic and 53 in the Pacific.
Submarines -48 in the Atlantic and 32 in the Pacific.
Amphibious Craft-56 in the Atlantic and 28 in the Pacific.
Mine and Patrol ships - 61 in the Atlantic and 38 in the Pacific.
Auxiliaries -100 in the Atlantic and 12 in the Pacific.


Sunday, 29 May, 1949
CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


PROOF


"Religion may be all right, but you can't prove it."
The boy who said that in school, was quoting something he heard his father say. I knew his family quite well, and was aware how scornful that father is about "unscientific" faith.
"Now, take that problem on the board," the boy went on. "You can prove whether that formula is right or wrong." He was quite sure of himself.
"Do you love your parents?" I asked. All the children looked at me with amazed expressions.
"Why, certainly. That's a foolish question," the boy said.
"Not so foolish. Now tell me, do your parents love you?"
"Why of course," was the answer in a somewhat irritated voice.
"Then tell me this: How do you know you love your parents, and that they love you?"
"Well, I just know it's true. I can feel it," he replied.
"But you can't weigh love. You can't get so many pounds of love, or say love is round or square. There are no scientific tests. Yet love is as real as anything in the world."
"There is something greater than science," I went on. "What would the world be like without love, goodness, kindness, mercy, truth?"
"It would be an awful place," the boy answered thoughtfully.
"Certainly," I agreed. "Science deals with physical things. Our religion deals with things of the spirit. You can weigh and measure physical things, and be easily convinced they are real. Things of the spirit are equally real-perhaps far more so - but they are judged by different standards from those of science. Doesn't that seem reasonable ?"
"Well, yes, I guess it does .
Elmer E. Bosserman Chaplain, U. S. Navy


I,


AQW!11!W 0


Page Two


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN Pa o'o Three'


. TEENAGE ROUND-UP
Happy Birthday is to be extended
to a lot people. For some we have to say better late than never. To Dixie Adair, and Marie Grover both 13, Virginia Taylor, 16, Bill Barrett and Ann Sheppard both 14. Thanks to you and to your parents for those swell parties Ann and Bill. We all enjoyed them loads.
Hope we weren't too noisy!
Bob Gover has now left us after
many a year at "ole Gtmo.". The Junior class gave him a super splash party, after which everyone went to Skiddy's for supper. Bob was quite thrilled over his going away present-lures to help him catch some of those big fish! We're
going to miss you, Bob.
Four teen-agers conceived the
bright idea of seeing Bob off. So they all got up at the "crack of dawn" and trudged down to a ship.
When they arrived Bob was nowhere in sight. Come to find out they had come to the wrong ship at the wrong time, and he wasn't going away then anyway. Leave
us not mention any names!
Two people have gone from the
pigtail-set - Angela Asman and.
Georgette Sasser. We all miss them but know they'll have fun in the
U. S. A.
A new boy, Jack McDonald, 16
and a sophomore, has come into our midst from San Diego, California. It's awfully nice to have you
here, we know we'll like you.
Congrats, Jeaneen on catching
that ten-pound fish! Sorry yours was only 5 lbs., Clint. But after all
a fish is a fish!
The pigtailers were running
around school with mysterious looking dishes containing that wonderful food which accompanies one of their parties. All the faculty were invited and were required to braid their hair, but since Mr.
Ondrasik couldn't comply with this ruling, exceptions were made.
Everyone had a grand time.
Tonight the freshman-sophomore
class is having a party at Joan McNeal's. There is a lot of secrecy attached to it so let us know all
about it! It sounds like fun!
Everyone is looking forward to
the eighth grade graduation dance June first at Dennis Lanigan's.
All the High School has been invited by invitations written in
Spanish.

TICKETS FOR "LAURA"
AVAILABLE SOON

In the near future you will be
able to purchase for thirty-five cents, a ticket' to "Laura" to be presented at The Little Theatre, Marine Site III on June 14, 15 and 16. Look for them at the two Ship's
services and the Marine PX.
This is an ADULT play and NOT
recommended for children.


NEWS FROM SUPPLY

Commander William B. Willard, Supply Corps (Specialist), USNR, completed fourteen days. training duty at this command last Saturday and has returned to his family, who are residing at 3101 Woodland Drive, N. W., Washington, D. C.
In civilian life, CDR Willard is a member of the banking profession connected with the National Savings and Trust Company, Washington, D. C. During World War II, he served approximately two years with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, and later re-organized and re-established the Navy owned Bank of Guam, serving as Manager and Cashier.
The NSD picnic, held last week at the NAS Race Track was a great success, with an abundance of beer, coke, chicken dinners, and sports for all hands.
The day consisted of a large variety of contests in Which all hands participated; softball game, volleyball, races, horseshoes, chinups, pushups, etc. It was an afternoon thoroughly enjoyed by all hands who are sincerely looking forward to the next picnic, which it is hoped is not too far in the distant future.
The following were successful candidates in the recent fleet competitive examinations: Cohen, CS1; North, ET2; Greene, DK2; Fielding, SK2; Carter, BM3; Ellis, CM3; Murphy, SK3; Washington, SK3; Rubner, CS3. Congratulations are extended all hands and especially to Manint, DK1 who will be advanced to DKC on 1 June.

PROMOTION EXAMS TO BE HELD 1 JUNE 1949

On 1 June, 1949 navy-wide written professional exams will be held for promotion of officers to the ranks of LTJG, LT, and LCDR. The examinations announced by ALNav 41 (NDB, 15 April)
will be given in accordance with BuPers Circular Letter 18 - 49 (NDB, 31 January 1949) which outlines an interim plan for officer promotions.
Here in Guantanamo Bay, the following commands have listed the below named officers who will participate in the examiniations:
From Utility Squadron TEN, LT. W.J. Sloan will go up for Lieutenant Commander while Ensigns W.M. Hickman, J.F. Lee and 0. H. Oberg will take the Lieutenant (junior grade) exams.
No officers from the Naval Air Station will take the written examinations, however, three will go up from promotion on their records. The three are LTJGs P. H. Dalton, E. N. Fenton and J. C. Raines. Nine men will take the tests from the Naval Station. These men are: Ensigns W. K. Lampman and W. N. Yates for Lieutenant (junior grade); LTJG's T. P. Wesson, A.


VU-10 STILL LEADING IN
OFFICERS' LEAGUE
VU-10 made it three wins in a row without a setback Thursday night as they turned back the Training Group, 12-3 to maintain their position as pace setter in the Officers' Softball league.
* LTJG Wine hurled for the Training Group with LTJG Jones toeing the slab for VU-10. The contest was very close until the sixth when the roof caved in long enough to allow VU-10 to send eight runs across the plate.
Wednesday night the NavStaNOB combination ran up the largest margin of victory by any one team to date as they literally ran themselves out on the base paths in posting a 33-8 win over the Hospital-Dental combination. LTJG Shapard started for the Hospital on the mound and was the victim of poor support from the infield.
LTJG Ellestad came in to relieve him and fared no better as the winners scored in every inning but the seventh. LT Jackson, LTJG. Bonatta and LCDR Teeter all blasted homeruns for the winners.
LTJG Ware started hurling for the victors and allowed 4 runs in his three inning stint. LT Srebel hurled the next two and allowed 4 runs and LCDR Herold pitched the final frames and did not allow any runs.
It was the second straight win for the NavSta-NOB combo as they had previously defeated the Training Group 8-7 on Thursday, May 5.
A scheduled game between the NAS and Marine-NSD squads was postponed and will be played at a later date.
Officer Standing
Team W. L.
VU-10 ---------------- 3 0
NavSta-NOB ----------- 2 1
MarBrks-NSD ---------- 1 1
Training Group --------- 1 2
Hospital-Dental --------- 1 2 NAS ------------------- 0 2
E. Prevost, J. B. Fitzgerald, J. K. Pounders and R. D. Endorf for Lieutenant and LT R. M. Haglund who will take the test for Lieutenant Commander.
LTJG's Clinton H. Dutcher and Edwin R. Sha.pard, III are the only two officers from the Hospital who will take the promotional exams.
LTJG's G.A. Cookingham and W.B. Jones will take the written examination from the Naval Supply Depot while two others, LTJG W.L. Foster and LTJG John Cozy will go up for Lieutenant on their records.
From the Training Group LTJG's C.C. Smith, S.L. Rusk and I.E. Hansen will take the promotional examinations. Going up for promotion on their records will be LTJG's A.S. Wagner, T.E. Craig, W. 0. Wilson, L. R. Clary and W. B. Perry.


THE INDIAN


Page Three








Pafre Four TEIDA


THE GUIDING VOICE FOR PILOTS IN BAD WEATHER
(Continued from Page One)
Bendix Radio Division, Towsen, Maryland and the Navy received its first set in June 1944.
Officially Designated in 1946
This set was exhaustively tested by Naval Operational personnel and was finally accepted by the Chief of Naval Operations in August 1944. After thorough testing and the comparison of actual operating records of GCA units with those of other instrument approach aids, the Chief of Naval Operations designated GCA as the official Navy Instrument Low Approach System in May, 1946.
Basically, the GCA unit consists of radar scopes on which an aircraft's position is indicated, and radio equipment which is used to transmit information and instructions to its pilot. By means of a series of altitude and heading assignments, the pilot is "talked down" to a landing in conditions of reduced ceiling or visibility. Since the aircraft's position is accurately known at all times and the pilot can be immediately informed of any hazardous situation and directed to safety, the danger inherent in any "blind flight" approach to low altitude is reduced to a minimum by GCA.
Since the first unit went into operation at the Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington in December 1944, more than 192,423 successful landings have been made via Navy GCA units throughout the world. Of this total 8,067 were actual emergency landings where the plane was brought down under bad weather conditions.
The Navy operates a total of thirty-six GCA units, eight of which are located on fields outside the U. S. Three of the total are Marine Corps units.
GCA, most widely used instrument landing system in the services, has been a factor in the success and safety of "Operation Vittles" during bad weather in Germany.
Local GCA Unit
The local GCA Unit, No. 29, based at McCalla Field, has a personnel assignment of three officers and thirteen men, all graduates of the Ground Controlled Approach school-at NAS, Olathe, Kansas, and since graduation, most of the personnel have had considerable experience in other units throughout the world.
LT S. R. Wideberg, 0-in-C, of the local unit reports that since its installation here in September 1947, a total of 3,685 approaches have been made. Of this total, six were under actual emergency approaches where the plane was brought in under bad weather con(Continued on Page Five)


AN ADVENTURE IN
BROTHERHOOD
(Editor's note: The following is the unsolicited true story of EMi and Mrs. George Dobbs as told to Indian Staff Writer, J. G. McCarthy YN1) Your child's life for $1,425.00? Sure, you'd pay it - but how? Where can you get $1,425.00? You'd sell everything you own; borrow from everyone you know; pay it back penny by penny for the rest of your life. It's worth it, though just so long as there is the slimmest chance your baby's life will be spared.
So you pray, and pray, and borrow, and pray. For thirty-five days you watch the hospital bill soar and watch your baby breathe through a tube in his throat. What did they call it? "Acute laryngotracheo-bronchitis." Who cares ? All you know is, it almost strangled your 17-months-old boy. It almost robbed you of the greatest happiness you ever owned.
The cost be damned! You want your child. And for 12 hours a day you sit at his bedside and watch his every breath - watch the tube, there must be no obstructions. Twevle hours - twelve days twelve lifetimes. God! you're tired! Then your husband takes his watch for twelve hours. He watches and wonders about his emergency leave that is growing short, and about the doctor who said that this must go on for anywhere from six to eight months. He wants to shut his eyes and shake his head hoping he'll wake up and find he was dreaming, but there's Jerry, and there's the tube that makes a little whistle when he breathes through it, and you can't unfasten your eyes.
From the 19th of September until the 24th of October-35 days, you've watched and thought. It's a big risk but you've got to chance it. You've prayed and thought and you've got to risk it. Better to have your wife and Jerry near you where you can tend them than a thousand miles away where you can only guess how things are going. So, the three of you, HM1 and Mrs. George Dobbs, and son Gerald board a MATS plane for Guantanamo Bay. For the next seven hours you are helpless and God alone can attend your son. He will! He will!
And ... He did! You're in Guantanamo Bay. Everyone was wonderful. Mrs. Dobbs father loaned you the $1,425.00 for the Hospital bill at Americus, Ga., and now Captain Robbins, the Commanding Officer of the Naval Hospital, has declared Jerry an indigent - which you don't understand, except that it means there won't be any more hospital bills. Now it's all praying, watching and waiting. And the Medical-Officer-in-Command helps again. You are assigned full time duty on your son's case and two other HM's have volunteered to
(Continued on Page Five)


WGBY TO BROADCAST
SPANISH LESSONS

25 Minute Broadcast To Be Heard Twice Weekly At 1730

Beginning Tuesday afternoon, May 31, at 1730, WGBY will bring to the airwaves of Guantanamo Bay, the first in a series of 12 broadcasts designed primarily to enable American civilian supervisors to learn to speak the basic principles of the Spanish language. It is the purpose of these broadcasts to equip these supervisors with sufficient knowledge of the Spanish language to enable them to carry on an intelligent conversation in that language.
Although the broadcasts are primarily for American civilian personnel, any interested military personnel and their dependents may take advantage of this opportunity to learn a few basic phrases which will prove helpful to them later. The broadcasts will last approximately twenty to twenty-five minutes and will be on the air twice a week, on Tuesday and Friday afternoons at the same time 1730 for six weeks.
Mimeographed lesson sheets with both the English and Spanish translations on them have been prepared. Civilian personnel may obtain them through the Industrial Relations Office while interested military personnel may pick their copies up at the personnel office in the NOB Administration building.
The broadcast will give the English word or phrase and then the Spanish version of the particular word or phrase. After a light pause, during which the "student" is supposed to repeat the Spanish pronunciation, the Spanish word or phrase will be repeated again before moving on to the next word or phrase.

BUPERS GIVES DATA
ON ILLINOIS BONUS

For information of war veterans of the Naval Service who are citizens of the state of Illinois, the following excerpt is quoted from a letter from the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Washington.
"The Bureau is pleased to inform you that the officials of the Illinois State Bonus Board decided that it is not necessary for naval veterans to obtain documentary record data from the records maintained by the Navy Department in applying for the State Bonus.
"The Service Recognition Board of Illinois has provided affidavit forms which are to be executed by naval veterans attesting to the best of their ability of active domestic and/or foreign service. This affidavit is accepted in applying for the Illinois State Bonus."


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THE INDIAN


Page Four








THE INDIAN Pare Five


HURRICANE IS DEFINED
BY NAS AEROLOGIST
(Continued from Page One)
the trade winds on either side of the equator.
The movement of air about the center of a cyclone is counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere. This movement is initiated and maintained by the rotation of the earth. At the equator this force of rotation is zero; therefore hurricanes and other tropical cyclones never form there, nor do they ever cross the equator. It is only when the trade winds from the southern hemisphere push the doldrum belt ten to fifteen degrees north of the equator, or vice versa, that these storms form. There are more hurricanes by far in the summer and autumn because the doldrum belt extends farther north during these seasons.
An abundant amount of moisture is necessary in the formation of tropical cyclones; it is for this reason that they never originate over land, and they dissipate rapidly when they move inland.
In the south Atlantic there are no hurricanes because the doldrums never lie south of the equator in the Atlantic. In the north Atlantic the only areas of formation are in the expanses of water (1) between the north coast of Africa and the Cape Verde Islands and (2) the southwest Carribbean Sea. While hurricanes from either source region could effect this area, the ones from the latter area are the ones about which persons in the vicinity of Guantanamo Bay should be most concerned about.

TIE GUIDING VOICE FOR
PILOTS IN BAD WEATHER
(Continued from Page Four)
ditions. Naturally with the kind of weather normally obtained in Guantanamo Bay, there is very little need for emergency landings at McCalla Field.
Since Guantanamo is the advanced base training center for all Atlantic Fleet Squadrons, the primary purpose of the local GCA unit is to qualify pilots in GCA procedures. It is available within thirty minutes notice, twenty-four hours a day.

ANNIE OAKLEYS FOR
SERVICEMEN

The New York Giants Baseball Club has extended the privilege of free admission to servicemen in uniform for the 1949 season.
Admission will be uniform plus identification card and liberty or leave papers. A shore patrolman, stationed at the serviceman's entrance on 159th Street and 8th Avenue will check identification.


AN ADVENTURE IN
BROTHERHOOD
(Continued from Page Four)
each take an eight hour shift until Jerry is cured. Can a grown man cry.
Then things are going along fine. Jerry's almost well, you've been paying your father-in-law a little at a time, and now you get a call. "Chaplain Bosserman wants to see you at his office right away, Dobbs." Now what?
You've been sitting there for about ten minutes, and the Chaplain has been telling you that he's heard about all your trouble, and now you're half wondering when he's going to give you the "chit," but now he's asking, "How much do you still owe your father-in-law, George?"
"Oh, about $800.00, I guess. We've been paying him a little every month."
"Well," says the Chaplain, who looks a little embarrassed, "the Navy Relief Board of Directors has been considering your case, George and they have authorized me to make a grant from Navy Relief funds to cover the remainder of your indebtedness for Jerry's illness. That means that the Navy Relief Society is going to give you $800.00 with no strings attached."
Sometime later you think you must have fainted or stopped living or something; you float out of the Chaplain's office. You're still you and it's still the same world but, somehow, people seem different. Everyone seems like your brother or your sister and you wonder why you hadn't noticed it before.

TRAGROUP TRIVIALS

Commendation Ribbons Awarded TraGroupers
Authorization for the wearing of the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon were recently received by this command in behalf of LT F.E. Williams for his services while attached to the staff of Commander Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet, embarked in the U. S. S. Mt. Olympus (AGC -8) and LTJG T.E. Craig for acknowledgment of his services aboard the U. S. S. President Jackson (AP-18) and the U. S. S. Crescent City (APA - 21).
Handshakes With
Congratulations and three full salaams are extended to K. S. Masterson upon his recent appointment to the grade of Captain. It is assumed that sons "Skiddy" and "Butch" are watching their "Ps and Qs" closer these days now that a "four striper presides over their Marine Site III domicile."
A little boid has told us that an informal indoctrination luncheon will be served at high noon on 1 June at the CPO Club for all the new "hackies".


FLEET COMPETITIVE EXAM RESULTS TOLD

From Utility Squadron TEN, C. R. Stott and P. A. Liberty were advanced to YN3. R. F. Lang and W. J. Cason were hiked to AD2, L. C. High was promoted to PN2, C. L. Chapman to PR3, and F. S. Fyfe to AMI.
From the Naval Station, E. S. Hutchins was advanced to PN2, J. G. McCarthy to YN1, M. Soja to CS2, K. D. Igou to CS3, A. H. Dutch to FP1, A. G. DeBauche to EN3. From the Dental Clinic, R. R. Johnson and C. M. Roerke both were advanced to DT3.
From the Naval Air Station, J.L. Nelson and R. C. Gillespie were advanced to the rating of YN2, A. F. Hope to AF3, C. R. Wilcocks, H. H. Russel and H. G. Sampson were advanced to AD3, P. J. Smith to AG2, P. E. Ruest to AG3, M. D. Guida to AC2, W. W. Moss to AC3, M. T. Knulty to AF3, J. L. Daley to BM1, C. L. Trail and W. T. Holland to EN3. J. B. Gantnier to EM3, D. E. Miller to. HM3, A. R. Joiner to CS3 and E. M. Groves to ET3.

SPRING "OPPORTUNITY DRIVE" NOW UNDERWAY

The "Spring Opportunity Drive" of the U.S. Savings Bonds Division was launched May 16 and will continue through June 30. The drive is to increase the number of naval personnel and civilian workers who regularly invest in savings bonds.
Today approximately 58% of the naval civilian personnel and 40% of all the military personnel regularly invest in bonds. The goal on this base is to realize better than 75(% participation. Dates of the National campaign are 16 May to 30 June. An intensified drive here on the Naval Operating Base will be made from 30 May through 13 June. During that time each service man who does not regularly invest in savings bonds at present will be interviewed personally and asked to do so, by a savings bond representative.
Results of a recent survey show that savings bonds are retained in effect as of 1 May 1949 by 52% of Base enlisted, 57% of all officer personnel and 21% of all American civilian employees. A breakdown of the overall figures gives the following standings.
Participa- PercenCommand tion tage
Officer Enlisted FltTraGrp 58 74
VU -10 61 62
Hospital 46 56
NavSta 42 53
NAS 46 47
NSD 69 47
Marines 44 33
NOB Staff 22
Civilians 21


THE INDIAN


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PaL-e Six TEIDA to a-6My4-50


~t~wA ~tMgj- *LR


By Allen Collier, Sports Editor


VU-10 REPLACES AIR STATION AS LEAGUE LEADERS IN SOFTBALL

After rain or wet grounds forced postponement of all games during the two week period just ended, action resumed this week and after it was all over the boys from VU10 had again put in their bid for another base athletic crown. This time in softball.
After losing their first two games the "fly-boys" have come back to win six straight games. Their largest margin of victory to date was posted on Monday night of this week in their 22 to 2 route of the Supply Department crew. The victorious air squadron team blasted out base hit after base hit and threw in several extra base blows for good measure. Among these were home runs by "Stubby" Berriochoa, Joe Striechek, Hoppe and Dorsey.
Wednesday night, VU-10 won their sixth straight game as they defeated the Naval Station in a pitchers battle royal, 2-1. Matchett was the winning pitcher allowing but three hits over the route. Collins toed the slab for the losers and was touched for five safeties during the game. VU-10 drew first blood, scoring in the fourth inning. The Naval Station bounced right back and tied things up with a run in the fifth. In the sixth VU-10 came back to score the winning run when Berriochoa doubled scoring Striechek who had singled before him
A scheduled game between the Hospital and Fleet Training Group was not played Wednesday night.
Meanwhile, Monday night, the Naval Air Station, in action for the first time since their 3-2 setback by VU-10 on May 5, romped to a 12-2 triumph over the Training Group. It was the "airdales" fourth win against two defeats.
Thursday night the Marines overpowered the NSD nine by a 14-2 count. Robbins started on the mound for the winners and was relieved by Dukes in the fourth. Wilson hit for the circuit for the Marines.
Team W. L.
VU-10 6 2
Marines 5 2
NAS 4 2
Hospital 3 2
Training Group 2 4
NavSta 2 5
NSD 1 6
Above standings include all games played this week. The scheduled game between Training Group and Hospital was not played.


ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP GOLF TOURNEY NOW UNDERWAY ON BASE

The Annual Membership Golf tournament is now underway out at the Guantanamo Golf Club. Qualification in the all medal play affair was completed last Saturday with George Walker, HMI, leading the pack with a blazing 69, one under par.
In the first round of the tournament last Sunday, Walker was again the low man with a 72, two over par. There are six flights composed of nine men each and the championship flight.
The second round of the tournament was scheduled for today, the third tomorrow, and the fourth and final round on Monday, weather conditions permitting.
Monday afternoon at approximately 1430, RADM W.K. Phillips will .award the winners of all flights their hard earned trophies. Winners of all flights will be announced in next week's Indian.
It has also been announced by local Golf Club officials that on July 2 and 3 a golf match will be held to pick the four lowest shooting men for the Guantanamo entry in the Tenth Naval District golf tournament which will be held here the week of July 11.

MRS. SAM WIDEBERG WINS IN WOMEN'S GOLF

Mrs. Sam Wideberg, leader since the second round of the 72-hole Guantanamo Bay Women's Golf Championship tournament, after holding a four-stroke lead going into the final 18-hole round, nosed out Mrs. Hugh Miller by one stroke, for the championship.
After the final round had been played, both the first and second flights were deadlocked. Mrs. Ferris Washburne and Mrs. Roy Woodliff were tied for first in the first flight and Mrs. Kermit Strebel and Mrs. Charles Ransom were tied for top honors in the second flight. An 18-hole playoff round was scheduled for Friday to determine the winners of both flights. Results will be announced in next week's issue as The Indian had gone to press before the playoff was completed.
RADM W. K. Phillips will present the trophies to the winning ladies on Monday afternoon along with the winners of the men's tournament.

(SEA) -Of the dozens of frog species in the U.S., the spotted leopard frog, is the most common east of the Rockies.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sunday 29 May to Saturday 4 June
Sunday
WHIPLASH
Dane Clark Alexis Smith
Monday
THE FEATHERED SERPENT Roland Winters Keye Luke
Tuesday
THE ACCUSED
Loretta Young Robert Cummings
Wednesday
THE FIGHTING FOOLS
Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall
Thursday
SO DEAR TO MY HEART
Bobby Driscoll Beulah Bondi
Friday
RED RIVER
John Wayne Montgomery Clift
Saturday
NORTHWEST STAMPEDE
Joan Leslie James Craig

MARINE FLASHES

Last Friday night a smoker was held at the Marine Barracks Movie Lycem. The first bout was won by PFC C.E. Farmer by a decision over PFC M.J. Garcia, Jr. In the second bout, PFC O.D. Wilhelm took the decision over PFC S.R. Magdenic. The third fight of the evening was won by Cpl. W.J. Martinez over PFC E. E. Paulin, also by a decision. At this stage the pace of the drizzling rain stepped up and the intermission was cancelled. The fourth bout went to PFC J.G. Matomis who gained a EKO over PFC J. L. Hooper. PFC B.C. Pritchett then took a decision over PFC R.E. Miller. The sixth bout went to PFC L.M. Rotundo by a TKO over Cpl L. Hamby. The seventh bout, a comedy of errors (the ring was getting slippery), was won by PFC R.F. Parmentier by a decision over Cpl. D.N. Mills. The eighth and final bout of the evening between heavyweights PFC C.A. Just and PFC F.A. Critz was won by Just on a TKO.
With the second Annual All-Marine Corps Track Meet to be held at Quantico Va., on June 10 and 11, near at hand, the following men have qualified and will represent this post.
PFC's D.A. Calvagna, M.J. Garcia, Jr., and R.D. Wilson will participate in the 100 yard dash, 220 yard dash, 440 relay and sprint medley relay; PFC E.E. Robbins in the broadjump, PFC N.H. Dukes in the 440 relay race and Major R. "C" Rosacker in the 440 yd. relay race. Congratulations men and good luck in Quantico!


St


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THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-26 May 49-2500.


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VOL. IV, No. 14 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 May 1949 HOUSE DEFEATS PAY RAISE BILL TUESDAY Action Catches Sponsors Of Bill Flat-footed: The Vote-227-163 The House of Representatives Tuesday defeated the $406,000,000 military pay raise bill which would have given a wage hike to every man and woman in the service except recruits. The vote of the House was 227-163 against the pay bill. The action, which caught sponsors of the bill flat-footed, was based on the mounting congressional economy drive as well as reluctance to grant big salary increases to top-ranking officers and far less to the lower grades. The House roll call vote came only a few hours after President Truman had sent a letter to Speaker Sam Rayburn urging passage of the bill as a "most important part" of the defense program. The Chief Executive said that the armed services were now having difficulty in getting high-type men under the present pay scales. The defeat capped the many legislative setbacks given bills, supported by President Truman, and sent the bill back to the House Armed Services Committee which had spent many weeks drafting this bill. This in effect killed the bill for this session of congress. HISTORY OF BASE TO BE PUBLISHED Beginning with next week's edition, the first of a two-week series giving the history of the Naval Operating Base from its establishment in 1903 until the present time will be published. Written originally in book form at the request of the Historical Section, Office of the Secretary of the Navy, in 1945, the two installments to be printed by the Indian are considerably condensed and should prove interesting to all hands in every detail. It is intended to print this information in suitable form for removal from the paper and permanent retention by interested personnel. THE GUIDING VOICE FOR PILOTS IN BAD WEATHER GCA "Talks" Them Down The basic idea of Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) was born in the Radiation Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and its early development was due largly to the work of Dr. Louis Alvarez, physicist, antenna radiation expert and amateur pilot. Dr. Alvarez felt that if precision radar could be used to lay searchlights, direct anti-aircraft and shipborne guns, and perform other directional functions, it could be used to assist an aircraft in making a proper approach to a landing under adverse weather conditions. The first experiments were conducted at the East Boston airport and at NAS, Quonset Point, R. I., in November and December 1941. The first Mark II GCA set was produced by the Radiation Laboratory of M.I.T. on 1 January 1944. The Navy contract was given to the (Continued on Page Four) Under the wide and starry sky Dig a grave and let me lie; Glad did I live and gladly die, And I laid me down with a will. This be the verse you grave for me: Here he lies where he longed to be; Home is the sailor, home from the sea, And the hunter home from the hill. -Stevenson Branch 100 of the Fleet Reserve Association will again hold Memorial Day services to honor their departed shipmates at 1300, 30 May at the U.S. Naval Cemetery, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. A Marine firing squad, the Naval Base Band and two buglers will help with the services which will be of short duration. The members of the Reserve Association are expected to attend in dress whites, all others will be most welcome. Transportation will leave the Commissary Area at 1230 to take any who wish to attend the service. HURRICANE IS DEFINED BY NAS AEROLOGIST Editors Note: At the request of the Indian Staff, LT Norman B. Boyles, Aerological Officer, NAS has prepared the following brief explanation of the hurricane. Lt. Boyles stated that the Hurricane season is from June to November and that we may expect to hear of the first storm of the 1949 season very soon. A hurricane is a tropical storm or cyclone which covers an extensive area and is accompanied by torrential rainfall, abnormal storm tides, and violent winds. The hurricane of the North Atlantic is identical to the typhoon of the north Pacific (known in the Phillipines as the (baguios), the willy-nilly of Australia and the cyclone of the Indian ocean. All are tropical cyclones. Tropical cyclones originate in the doldrums (known to aviators as equatorial front). This is a belt of calm winds lying between the northeast and southeast trade winds. The belt circles the earth but does not coincide exactly with the geographical equator. Its position is determined by the intensity of (Continued on Page Five) NEED AN EXCUSE FOR SPECIAL LIBERTY??? San Diego White Hat Turns Up With "New" Reason The "Hoist", weekly publication of the Naval Training Center, San Diego, California, came "up with this "dilly" in a regular column entitled "It Really Happened". An officer attached to the Training Center called the Center's paper office and said: "I've been an officer in the Navy for over twenty years and I thought I had seen every possible excuse for special liberty, but right here in front of me is a new one. It reads: 'I request special liberty to meet my one-armed uncle at the Santa Fe depot. He is traveling with two suitcases'!" The reporter taking the call asked, "Did he get the liberty?" "He surely did," replied the officer, "if the excuse is legitimate, he needs it, if it isn't he deserves it for thinking up the first new one I've read in the last ten years."

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Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday 28 May 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W
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THE INDIAN Pap'e Three .TEENAGE ROUND-UP Happy Birthday is to be extended to a lot people. For some we have to say better late than never. To Dixie Adair, and Marie Grover both 13, Virginia Taylor, 16, Bill Barrett and Ann Sheppard both 14. Thanks to you and to your parents for those swell parties Ann and Bill. We all enjoyed them loads. Hope we weren't too noisy! Bob Gover has now left us after many a year at "ole Gtmo.". The Junior class gave him a super splash party, after which everyone went to Skiddy's for supper. Bob was quite thrilled over his going away present -lures to help him catch some of those big fish! We're going to miss you, Bob. Four teen-agers conceived the bright idea of seeing Bob off. So they all got up at the "crack of dawn" and trudged down to a ship. When they arrived Bob was nowhere in sight. Come to find out they had come to the wrong ship at the wrong time, and he wasn't going away then anyway. Leave us not mention any names! Two people have gone from the pigtail-set -Angela Asman and. Georgette Sasser. We all miss them but know they'll have fun in the U. S. A. A new boy, Jack McDonald, 16 and a sophomore, has come into our midst from San Diego, California. It's awfully nice to have you here, we know we'll like you. Congrats, Jeaneen on catching that ten-pound fish! Sorry yours was only 5 lbs., Clint. But after all a fish is a fish! The pigtailers were running around school with mysterious looking dishes containing that wonderful food which accompanies one of their parties. All the faculty were invited and were required to braid their hair, but since Mr. Ondrasik couldn't comply with this ruling, exceptions were made. Everyone had a grand time. Tonight the freshman-sophomore class is having a party at Joan McNeal's. There is a lot of secrecy attached to it so let us know all about it! It sounds like fun! Everyone is looking forward to the eighth grade graduation dance June first at Dennis Lanigan's. All the High School has been invited by invitations written in Spanish. TICKETS FOR "LAURA" AVAILABLE SOON In the near future you will be able to purchase for thirty-five cents, a ticket' to "Laura" to be presented at The Little Theatre, Marine Site III on June 14, 15 and 16. Look for them at the two Ship's services and the Marine PX. This is an ADULT play and NOT recommended for children. NEWS FROM SUPPLY Commander William B. Willard, Supply Corps (Specialist), USNR, completed fourteen days. training duty at this command last Saturday and has returned to his family, who are residing at 3101 Woodland Drive, N. W., Washington, D. C. In civilian life, CDR Willard is a member of the banking profession connected with the National Savings and Trust Company, Washington, D. C. During World War II, he served approximately two years with the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, and later re-organized and re-established the Navy owned Bank of Guam, serving as Manager and Cashier. The NSD picnic, held last week at the NAS Race Track was a great success, with an abundance of beer, coke, chicken dinners, and sports for all hands. The day consisted of a large variety of contests in which all hands participated; softball game, volleyball, races, horseshoes, chinups, pushups, etc. It was an afternoon thoroughly enjoyed by all hands who are sincerely looking forward to the next picnic, which it is hoped is not too far in the distant future. The following were successful candidates in the recent fleet competitive examinations: Cohen, CS1; North, ET2; Greene, DK2; Fielding, SK2; Carter, BM3; Ellis, CM3; Murphy, SK3; Washington, SK3; Rubner, CS3. Congratulations are extended all hands and especially to Manint, DK1 who will be advanced to DKC on 1 June. PROMOTION EXAMS TO BE HELD 1 JUNE 1949 On 1 June, 1949 navy-wide written professional exams will be held for promotion of officers to the ranks of LTJG, LT, and LCDR. The examinations announced by ALNav 41 (NDB, 15 April) will be given in accordance with BuPers Circular Letter 18 -49 (NDB, 31 January 1949) which outlines an interim plan for officer promotions. Here in Guantanamo Bay, the following commands have listed the below named officers who will participate in the examiniations: From Utility Squadron TEN, LT. W.J. Sloan will go up for Lieutenant Commander while Ensigns W.M. Hickman, J.F. Lee and 0. H. Oberg will take the Lieutenant (junior grade) exams. No officers from the Naval Air Station will take the written examinations, however, three will go up from promotion on their records. The three are LTJGs P. H. Dalton, E. N. Fenton and J. C. Raines. Nine men will take the tests from the Naval Station. These men are: Ensigns W. K. Lampman and W. N. Yates for Lieutenant (junior grade); LTJG's T. P. Wesson, A. VU-10 STILL LEADING IN OFFICERS' LEAGUE VU-10 made it three wins in a row without a setback Thursday night as they turned back the Training Group, 12-3 to maintain their position as pace setter in the Officers' Softball league. LTJG Wine hurled for the Training Group with LTJG Jones toeing the slab for VU-10. The contest was very close until the sixth when the roof caved in long enough to allow VU-10 to send eight runs across the plate. Wednesday night the NavStaNOB combination ran up the largest margin of victory by any one team to date as they literally ran themselves out on the base paths in posting a 33-8 win over the Hospital-Dental combination. LTJG Shapard started for the Hospital on the mound and was the victim of poor support from the infield. LTJG Ellestad came in to relieve him and fared no better as the winners scored in every inning but the seventh. LT Jackson, LTJG. Bonatta and LCDR Teeter all blasted homeruns for the winners. LTJG Ware started hurling for the victors and allowed 4 runs in his three inning stint. LT Srebel hurled the next two and allowed 4 runs and LCDR Herold pitched the final frames and did not allow any runs. It was the second straight win for the NavSta-NOB combo as they had previously defeated the Training Group 8-7 on Thursday, May 5. A scheduled game between the NAS and Marine-NSD squads was postponed and will be played at a later date. Officer Standing Team W. L. VU-10 ----------------3 0 NavSta-NOB -----------2 1 MarBrks-NSD ----------1 1 Training Group ---------1 2 Hospital-Dental ---------1 2 NAS -------------------0 2 E. Prevost, J. B. Fitzgerald, J. K. Pounders and R. D. Endorf for Lieutenant and LT R. M. Haglund who will take the test for Lieutenant Commander. LTJG's Clinton H. Dutcher and Edwin R. Shapard, III are the only two officers from the Hospital who will take the promotional exams. LTJG's G.A. Cookingham and W.B. Jones will take the written examination from the Naval Supply Depot while two others, LTJG W.L. Foster and LTJG John Cozy will go up for Lieutenant on their records. From the Training Group LTJG's C.C. Smith, S.L. Rusk and I.E. Hansen will take the promotional examinations. Going up for promotion on their records will be LTJG's A.S. Wagner, T.E. Craig, W. 0. Wilson, L. R. Clary and W. B. Perry. THE INDIAN Page Three

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Page Four TEIDA THE GUIDING VOICE FOR PILOTS IN BAD WEATHER (Continued from Page One) Bendix Radio Division, Towsen, Maryland and the Navy received its first set in June 1944. Officially Designated in 1946 This set was exhaustively tested by Naval Operational personnel and was finally accepted by the Chief of Naval Operations in August 1944. After thorough testing and the comparison of actual operating records of GCA units with those of other instrument approach aids, the Chief of Naval Operations designated GCA as the official Navy Instrument Low Approach System in May, 1946. Basically, the GCA unit consists of radar scopes on which an aircraft's position is indicated, and radio equipment which is used to transmit information and instructions to its pilot. By means of a series of altitude and heading assignments, the pilot is "talked down" to a landing in conditions of reduced ceiling or visibility. Since the aircraft's position is accurately known at all times and the pilot can be immediately informed of any hazardous situation and directed to safety, the danger inherent in any "blind flight" approach to low altitude is reduced to a minimum by GCA. Since the first unit went into operation at the Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington in December 1944, more than 192,423 successful landings have been made via Navy GCA units throughout the world. Of this total 8,067 were actual emergency landings where the plane was brought down under bad weather conditions. The Navy operates a total of thirty-six GCA units, eight of which are located on fields outside the U. S. Three of the total are Marine Corps units. GCA, most widely used instrument landing system in the services, has been a factor in the success and safety of "Operation Vittles" during bad weather in Germany. Local GCA Unit The local GCA Unit, No. 29, based at McCalla Field, has a personnel assignment of three officers and thirteen men, all graduates of the Ground Controlled Approach school-at NAS, Olathe, Kansas, and since graduation, most of the personnel have had considerable experience in other units throughout the world. LT S. R. Wideberg, 0-in-C, of the local unit reports that since its installation here in September 1947, a total of 3,685 approaches have been made. Of this total, six were under actual emergency approaches where the plane was brought in under bad weather con(Continued on Page Five) AN ADVENTURE IN BROTHERHOOD (Editor's note: The following is the unsolicited true story of HM1 and Mrs. George Dobbs as told to Indian Staff Writer, J. G. McCarthy YNl) Your child's life for $1,425.00? Sure, you'd pay it -but how? Where can you get $1,425.00? You'd sell everything you own; borrow from everyone you know; pay it back penny by penny for the rest of your life. It's worth it, though just so long as there is the slimmest chance your baby's life will be spared. So you pray, and pray, and borrow, and pray. For thirty-five days you watch the hospital bill soar and watch your baby breathe through a tube in his throat. What did they call it? "Acute laryngotracheo-bronchitis." Who cares ? All you know is, it almost strangled your 17-months-old boy. It almost robbed you of the greatest happiness you ever owned. The cost be damned! You want your child. And for 12 hours a day you sit at his bedside and watch his every. breath -watch the tube, there must be no obstructions. Twevle hours -twelve days twelve lifetimes. God! you're tired! Then your husband takes his watch for twelve hours. He watches and wonders about his emergency leave that is growing short, and about the doctor who said that this must go on for anywhere from six to eight months. He wants to shut his eyes and shake his head hoping he'll wake up and find he was dreaming, but there's Jerry, and there's the tube that makes a little whistle when he breathes through it, and you can't unfasten your eyes. From the 19th of September until the 24th of October -35 days, you've watched and thought. It's a big risk but you've got to chance it. You've prayed and thought and you've got to risk it. Better to have your wife and Jerry near you where you can tend them than a thousand miles away where you can only guess how things are going. So, the three of you, HM1 and Mrs. George Dobbs, and son Gerald board a MATS plane for Guantanamo Bay. For the next seven hours you are helpless and God alone can attend your son. He will! He will! And .He did! You're in Guantanamo Bay. Everyone was wonderful. Mrs. Dobbs father loaned you the $1,425.00 for the Hospital bill at Americus, Ga., and now Captain Robbins, the Commanding Officer of the Naval Hospital, has declared Jerry an indigent -which you don't understand, except that it means there won't be any more hospital bills. Now it's all praying, watching and waiting. And the Medical-Officer-in-Command helps again. You are assigned full time duty on your son's case and two other HM's have volunteered to (Continued on Page Five) WGBY TO BROADCAST SPANISH LESSONS 25 Minute Broadcast To Be Heard Twice Weekly At 1730 Beginning Tuesday afternoon, May 31, at 1730, WGBY will bring to the airwaves of Guantanamo Bay, the first in a series of 12 broadcasts designed primarily to enable American civilian supervisors to learn to speak the basic principles of the Spanish language. It is the purpose of these broadcasts to equip these supervisors with sufficient knowledge of the Spanish language to enable them to carry on an intelligent conversation in that language. Although the broadcasts are primarily for American civilian personnel, any interested military personnel and their dependents may take advantage of this opportunity to learn a few basic phrases which will prove helpful to them later. The broadcasts will last approximately twenty to twenty-five minutes and will be on the air twice a week, on Tuesday and Friday afternoons at the same time 1730 for six weeks. Mimeographed lesson sheets with both the English and Spanish translations on them have been prepared. Civilian personnel may obtain them through the Industrial Relations Office while interested military personnel may pick their copies up at the personnel office in the NOB Administration building. The broadcast will give the English word or phrase and then the Spanish version of the particular word or phrase. After a light pause, during which the "student" is supposed to repeat the Spanish pronunciation, the Spanish word or phrase will be repeated again before moving on to the next word or phrase. BUPERS GIVES DATA ON ILLINOIS BONUS For information of war veterans of the Naval Service who are citizens of the state of Illinois, the following excerpt is quoted from a letter from the Bureau of Naval Personnel in Washington. "The Bureau is pleased to inform you that the officials of the Illinois State Bonus Board decided that it is not necessary for naval veterans to obtain documentary record data from the records maintained by the Navy Department in applying for the State Bonus. "The Service Recognition Board of Illinois has provided affidavit forms which are to be executed by naval veterans attesting to the best of their ability of active domestic and/or foreign service. This affidavit is accepted in applying for the Illinois State Bonus." I I7 0 THE INDIAN Page Four

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THE INDIAN Pare Five HURRICANE IS DEFINED BY NAS AEROLOGIST (Continued from Page One) the trade winds on either side of the equator. The movement of air about the center of a cyclone is counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere. This movement is initiated and maintained by the rotation of the earth. At the equator this force of rotation is zero; therefore hurricanes and other tropical cyclones never form there, nor do they ever cross the equator. It is only when the trade winds from the southern hemisphere push the doldrum belt ten to fifteen degrees north of the equator, or vice versa, that these storms form. There are more hurricanes by far in the summer and autumn because the doldrum belt extends farther north during these seasons. An abundant amount of moisture is necessary in the formation of tropical cyclones; it is for this reason that they never originate over land, and they dissipate rapidly when they move inland. In the south Atlantic there are O no hurricanes because the doldrums never lie south of the equator in the Atlantic. In the north Atlantic the only areas of formation are in the expanses of water (1) between the north coast of Africa and the Cape Verde Islands and (2) the southwest Carribbean Sea. While hurricanes from either source region could effect this area, the ones from the latter area are the ones about which persons in the vicinity of Guantanamo Bay should be most concerned about. THE GUIDING VOICE FOR PILOTS IN BAD WEATHER (Continued from Page Four) ditions. Naturally with the kind of weather normally obtained in Guantanamo Bay, there is very little need for emergency landings at McCalla Field. Since Guantanamo is the advanced base training center for all Atlantic Fleet Squadrons, the primary purpose of the local GCA unit is to qualify pilots in GCA procedures. It is available within thirty minutes notice, twenty-four hours a day. ANNIE OAKLEYS FOR SERVICEMEN The New York Giants Baseball Club has extended the privilege of free admission to servicemen in uniform for the 1949 season. Admission will be uniform plus identification card and liberty or leave papers. A shore patrolman, stationed at the serviceman's entrance on 159th Street and 8th Avenue will check identification. AN ADVENTURE IN BROTHERHOOD (Continued from Page Four) each take an eight hour shift until Jerry is cured. Can a grown man cry. Then things are going along fine. Jerry's almost well, you've been paying your father-in-law a little at a time, and now you get a call. "Chaplain Bosserman wants to see you at his office right away, Dobbs." Now what? You've been sitting there for about ten minutes, and the Chaplain has been telling you that he's heard about all your trouble, and now you're half wondering when he's going to give you the "chit," but now he's asking, "How much do you still owe your father-in-law, George?" "Oh, about $800.00, I guess. We've been paying him a little every month." "Well," says the Chaplain, who looks a little embarrassed, "the Navy Relief Board of Directors has been considering your case, George and they have authorized me to make a grant from Navy Relief funds to cover the remainder of your indebtedness for Jerry's illness. That means that the Navy Relief Society is going to give you $800.00 with no strings attached." Sometime later you think you must have fainted or stopped living or something; you float out of the Chaplain's office. You're still you and it's still the same world but, somehow, people seem different. Everyone seems like your brother or your sister and you wonder why you hadn't noticed it before. TRAGROUP TRIVIALS Commendation Ribbons Awarded TraGroupers Authorization for the wearing of the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon were recently received by this command in behalf of LT F.E. Williams for his services while attached to the staff of Commander Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet, embarked in the U. S. S. Mt. Olympus (AGC -8) and LTJG T.E. Craig for acknowledgment of his services aboard the U. S. S. President Jackson (AP -18) and the U. S. S. Crescent City (APA -21). Handshakes With Congratulations and three full salaams are extended to K. S. Masterson upon his recent appointment to the grade of Captain. It is assumed that sons "Skiddy" and "Butch" are watching their "Ps and Qs" closer these days now that a "four striper presides over their Marine Site III domicile." A little boid has told us that an informal indoctrination luncheon will be served at high noon on 1 June at the CPO Club for all the new "hackies". FLEET COMPETITIVE EXAM RESULTS TOLD From Utility Squadron TEN, C. R. Stott and P. A. Liberty were advanced to YN3. R. F. Lang and W. J. Cason were hiked to AD2, L. C. High was promoted to PN2, C. L. Chapman to PR3, and F. S. Fyfe to AM1. From the Naval Station, E. S. Hutchins was advanced to PN2, J. G. McCarthy to YN1, M. Soja to CS2, K. D. Igou to CS3, A. H. Dutch to FP1, A. G. DeBauche to EN3. From the Dental Clinic, R. R. Johnson and C. M. Roerke both were advanced to DT3. From the Naval Air Station, J.L. Nelson and R. C. Gillespie were advanced to the rating of YN2, A. F. Hope to AF3, C. R. Wilcocks, H. H. Russel and H. G. Sampson were advanced to AD3, P. J. Smith to AG2, P. E. Ruest to AG3, M. D. Guida to AC2, W. W. Moss to AC3, M. T. Knulty to AF3, J. L. Daley to BM1, C. L. Trail and W. T. Holland to EN3. J. B. Gantnier to EM3, D. E. Miller to. HM3, A. R. Joiner to CS3 and E. M. Groves to ET3. SPRING "OPPORTUNITY DRIVE" NOW UNDERWAY The "Spring Opportunity Drive" of the U.S. Savings Bonds Division was launched May 16 and will continue through June 30. The drive is to increase the number of naval personnel and civilian workers who regularly invest in savings bonds. Today approximately 58% of the naval civilian personnel and 40% of all the military personnel regularly invest in bonds. The goal on this base is to realize better than 75% participation. Dates of the National campaign are 16 May to 30 June. An intensified drive here on the Naval Operating Base will be made from 30 May through 13 June. During that time each service man who does not regularly invest in savings bonds at present will be interviewed personally and asked to do so, by a savings bond representative. Results of a recent survey show that savings bonds are retained in effect as of 1 May 1949 by 52% of Base enlisted, 57% of all officer personnel and 21% of all American civilian employees. A breakdown of the overall figures gives the following standings. ParticipaPercenCommand tion tage Officer Enlisted FltTraGrp 58 74 VU -10 61 62 Hospital 46 56 NavSta 42 53 NAS 46 47 NSD 69 47 Marines 44 33 NOB Staff 22 Civilians 21 THE INDIAN Passe Five

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Pag~e Six TEIDA to a-6My4-50 i+ W4M W1aG VU-10 REPLACES AIR STATION AS LEAGUE LEADERS IN SOFTBALL After rain or wet grounds forced postponement of all games during the two week period just ended, action resumed this week and after it was all over the boys from VU10 had again put in their bid for another base athletic crown. This time in softball. After losing their first two games the "fly-boys" have come back to win six straight games. Their largest margin of victory to date was posted on Monday night of this week in their 22 to 2 route of the Supply Department crew. The victorious air squadron team blasted out base hit after base hit and threw in several extra base blows for good measure. Among these were home runs by "Stubby" Berriochoa, Joe Striechek, Hoppe and Dorsey. Wednesday night, VU-10 won their sixth straight game as they defeated the Naval Station in a pitchers battle royal, 2-1. Matchett was the winning pitcher allowing but three hits over the route. Collins toed the slab for the losers and was touched for five safeties during the game. VU-10 drew first blood, scoring in the fourth inning. The Naval Station bounced right back and tied things up with a run in the fifth. In the sixth VU-10 came back to score the winning run when Berriochoa doubled scoring Striechek who had singled before him. A scheduled game between the Hospital and Fleet Training Group was not played Wednesday night. Meanwhile, Monday night, the Naval Air Station, in action for the first time since their 3-2 setback by VU-10 on May 5, romped to a 12-2 triumph over the Training Group. It was the "airdales" fourth win against two defeats. Thursday night the Marines overpowered the NSD nine by a 14-2 count. Robbins started on the mound for the winners and was relieved by Dukes in the fourth. Wilson hit for the circuit for the Marines. Team W. L. VU-10 6 2 Marines 5 2 NAS 4 2 Hospital 3 2 Training Group 2 4 NavSta 2 5 NSD 1 6 Above standings include all games played this week. The scheduled game between Training Group and Hospital was not played. ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP GOLF TOURNEY NOW UNDERWAY ON BASE The Annual Membership Golf tournament is now underway out at the Guantanamo Golf Club. Qualification in the all medal play affair was completed last Saturday with George Walker, HM1, leading the pack with a blazing 69, one under par. In the first round of the tournament last Sunday, Walker was again the low man with a 72, two over par. There are six flights composed of nine men each and the championship flight. The second round of the tournament was scheduled for today, the third tomorrow, and the fourth and final round on Monday, weather conditions permitting. Monday afternoon at approximately 1430, RADM W.K. Phillips will .award the winners of all flights their hard earned trophies. Winners of all flights will be announced in next week's Indian. It has also been announced by local Golf Club officials that on July 2 and 3 a golf match will be held to pick the four lowest shooting men for the Guantanamo entry in the Tenth Naval District golf tournament which will be held here the week of July 11. MRS. SAM WIDEBERG WINS IN WOMEN'S GOLF Mrs. Sam Wideberg, leader since the second round of the 72-hole Guantanamo Bay Women's Golf Championship tournament, after holding a four-stroke lead going into the final 18-hole round, nosed out Mrs. Hugh Miller by one stroke, for the championship. After the final round had been played, both the first and second flights were deadlocked. Mrs. Ferris Washburne and Mrs. Roy Woodliff were tied for first in the first flight and Mrs. Kermit Strebel and Mrs. Charles Ransom were tied for top honors in the second flight. An 18-hole playoff round was scheduled for Friday to determine the winners of both flights. Results will be announced in next week's issue as The Indian had gone to press before the playoff was completed. RADM W. K. Phillips will present the trophies to the winning ladies on Monday afternoon along with the winners of the men's tournament. (SEA) -Of the dozens of frog species in the U.S., the spotted leopard frog, is the most common east of the Rockies. By Allen Collier, Sports Editor NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sunday 29 May to Saturday 4 June Sunday WHIPLASH Dane Clark Alexis Smith Monday THE FEATHERED SERPENT Roland Winters Keye Luke Tuesday THE ACCUSED Loretta Young Robert Cummings Wednesday THE FIGHTING FOOLS Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall Thursday SO DEAR TO MY HEART Bobby Driscoll Beulah Bondi Friday RED RIVER John Wayne Montgomery Clift Saturday NORTHWEST STAMPEDE Joan Leslie James Craig MARINE FLASHES Last Friday night a smoker was held at the Marine Barracks Movie Lycem. The first bout was won by PFC C.E. Farmer by a decision over PFC M.J. Garcia, Jr. In the second bout, PFC O.D. Wilhelm took the decision over PFC S.R. Magdenic. The third fight of the evening was won by Cpl. W.J. Martinez over PFC E. E. Paulin, also by a decision. At this stage the pace of the drizzling rain stepped up and the intermission was cancelled. The fourth bout went to PFC J.G. Matomis who gained a EKO over PFC J. L. Hooper. PFC B.C. Pritchett then took a decision over PFC R.E. Miller. The sixth bout went to PFC L.M. Rotundo by a TKO over Cpl L. Hamby. The seventh bout, a comedy of errors (the ring was getting slippery), was won by PFC R.F. Parmentier by a decision over Cpl. D.N. Mills. The eighth and final bout of the evening between heavyweights PFC C.A. Just and PFC F.A. Critz was won by Just on a TKO. With the second Annual All-Marine Corps Track Meet to be held at Quantico Va., on June 10 and 11, near at hand, the following. men have qualified and will represent this post. PFC's D.A. Calvagna, M.J. Garcia, Jr., and R.D. Wilson will participate in the 100 yard dash, 220 yard dash, 440 relay and sprint medley relay; PFC E.E. Robbins in the broadjump, PFC N.H. Dukes in the 440 relay race and Major R. "C" Rosacker in the 440 yd. relay race. Congratulations men and good luck in Quantico! I e 0 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-26 May 49-2500. Page Six


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