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Indian

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Indian
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The Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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English

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University of Florida
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Vol. IV, No. 14 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 May 1949


Evaluation Com mittee of Southern A ssociation

c redits Naval Operating Base School
Drs.. Crowe, Edwards,. Stone Give
Final Approva of icetationt

The Guantanamo Bay Naval
Operating Base School, which today
amply meets the standard educational requirements in the States,
U was recently awarded the certificate of accreditation by the
ern Association of Colleges, nd
Secondary Schools; it is thus entitled to all the privileges and
scholastic recognition resulting
therefrom. High School credits
IW earned at the NOB School will be
�J fully acceptable for college entrance in the States. Work com- �pleted at the NOB School - secondary and elementary-will be
accepted at its face value by any
public or .private school in the
United States.
Appraisers Evaluate School
Dr. Orin F. Crowe, Dean of the
School of Education at the Uni..versity of, South -Carolina, and Dr.
William T. Edwards and Dr. Mode
Stone, professors of education
k at . the Florida State University,
recently visited and appraised the
CERTIFICATE OF ACCREDITATION - This certificate was recently presented NOB School. The trio, all memto the -NOB' School for meeting standard educational requirements set by the bers of the Evqluation Committee Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. of the Southern Association of ColUleges and Secondary SchoolsCOSMOPOLITAN ATMOSPHERE ':ABOUNDS WITH NOB alsomembers of the South-Wide
SCHOOL PUPILS FROM FOUR POINTS'OF COMPASS Committee for visiting schools in the Caribbean and Sduth American
Ideas and Customs From the Seven Seas and Four Corners of the areas, were on a regular assignEarth Are Brought to NOB School by Widely Traveled Pupils ment to evaluate the NOB School
Children of the Naval Operating Base at Guantanamo Bay come to on February,15 to 19. They made
the NOB School, bringing with them ideas and customs from the four final reports concerning its acceptcorners of the World. They represent every state in the United States. ance as a member of and full acApproximately one-fourth of them have at some time resided in foreign creditation in the Southern Assolands or in countries outside the ciation of Colleges and Secondary
l n s o in c uti s oti e t eSchools.
continental limits of the United SCHOOL FACULT S c "Of the 31 high schools that I've States and Guantanamo Bay. SCHO O ULTY ISalOfte31 high schools tha N'v
Of the forty-eight States, school WELL-ROUNDED evaluated this past year, the NOB
systems of forty-two are repre- School enjoys the strongest comsented at the NOB School. The The NOB School has now one of munity support," stated Dr. Stone' pu M come trom every 1.ype xt q I L of a chairman of the evaluation comschool - progresive and trcl god school - an unusually capable Tttee A R
S(ogrss , strictly g 9
formal, large city and small town, fAculty. Its fifteen faculty mem- the NOB students than in any of public and parochial. From these bers - Supervising Principal John the other schools are satisfied with
schools, the children bring with A. Permenter and his fourteen their school program."
W them a wide diversity of view- teachers, representing all sections "Besides .having an unusually
points, scholastic standards, educa- of the U.S.A., have broad cultural competent faculty, it has the best
(Continued on Page Three) (Continued on Page Seven) (Continued on Page Nine)







Page Two THE INDIAN


SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL - Happy countenances displayed by the Senior High
School student body foretell a bright future. (At extreme left and right, back row: Miss Anita Feinstein and Miss Sadele Durham - home-room teachers, when
picture was taken.)

SENIOR CLASS OF '49 JUNIOR CLASS DISPLAYS
TO GRADUATE IN JUNE ALL-'ROUND INTERESTS

By Joan Harris By Thomas Beadling, Pete
The Class of '49, consisting of Broughton, William Harris
one senior-Miss Barbara Ellen "The Class of '50! They're Johnson- who has attended the ingenious, enthusiastic, fun. They NOB School since September 1947, have ability, looks, sophisticawill graduate with honors in June, tion, and ideas. All of this- plus," 1949. Prior to coming to Guan- their homeroom and mathematics tanamo Bay, Cuba, she completed teacher, Miss Anita Feinstein -a the tenth grade in Oakland, Calif. native of New York - with several
Barbara Johnson is Editor-in- years of high school teaching exChief of the "CORAL REEF," the perience, told reporters. "I like School's first yearbook; she is an them." outstanding girl athlete and the Juniors Have Traveled Widely "Star" participant in all Senior One-third of the Junior Class class events. Eunice Besse, Robert Gover, and
Qualified in Many Activities Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson - witActive in many types of activi- nessed the entry of the U.S.A. into ties on the Base, as well as at World War II. These Juniors, whose School, Miss Johnson has a well- fathers serve with the U.S. Navy, rounded program. Along with being lived on or near Naval Bases in a member of the Protestant NOB Hawaii when Pearl Harbor was Choir, she is Chaplain of the Ladies bombed in December 1941. Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve As- The Juniors, nine members sociation of Branch 100, Guantana- four girls and five boys, hold birth mo Bay, Cuba. Her father is presi- certificates from nine cities and six dent of the latter organization., states; they have lived in all secIn the line of sports, Miss John- tions of the U.S.A. Several memson is a qualified skipper -one of bers of the group have travelled the few women on the Naval Base extensively in one or more foreign who has a license to sail. She is countries: Canada, Hawaii, Mexialso active in swimming, horseback co, Panama, Trinidad, and West riding, and is captain of the "Sena- Indies - Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica. tors" in the Ladies Auxiliary Bowl- Diversified Schooling Noted ing League. The number of schools attended
Has Traveled Widely ranges from 5 to 28, the median
Being the daughter of a retired Junior has been enrolled in 10 Naval officer with twenty-seven different schools; Edward Groome, years service in the U, S. Navy, who was born in Washington, D.C., Barbara traveled extensively in tops the number of schools. AlNorth America. Born in Virginia, though they total school registrashe resided for the longest periods tion in 18 different states, the of time in California, Delaware, states listed most frequently are: New Jersey, and Washington. She Calif., Va., Fla. Eunice Besse, Robhas also toured in Mexico and Cuba. ert Gover, and Kleber Masterson
Miss Johnson, who has attended have attended sckQol in Hawaii. . -o JaneenHummel, who entered in five states, has a cosmopolitan the NOB School on the opening outlook on life. day in October 1945, and Jan Hiers
Plans For the Future are the only NOB June 1946 eighth
Having had previous experience grade graduates enrolled in the in the techniques of radio work, class today. Both girls returned
(Continued on Page Four) (Continued on Page Three)


FRESHMAN - SOPHOMORE
SCHOOL SPIRIT HIGH

By Ramona Sparks
"Of all the thirty-one high schools that I have visited this year, I've seen only two others that in any way compare with the work you are doing," Dr. Mode L. Stone, Chairman of the Southern Association Accreditation Committee, told the freshman-sophomore students after the three members of his committee had observed their classes and had interviewed them individually and in groups.
Backgrounds Are Varied
Holding birth certificates from sixteen different cities in twelve different states and one from Cuba, the freshmen and sophomores have lived in thirty-one different states and in two foreign countries.
Caesar Pina was born in Santa Cruz del Sur, Cuba; John Cozy has lived in Panama. Members of the class have visited Canada, Haiti. Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Virgin Islands, Venezuela.
The ninth-tenth graders have attended schools in twenty different states, led by Va., Fla., Cal. The number of schools attended by these students range from two to sixteen each; the median student has studied in seven schools.
Of the total enrollment of 19 students for the freshman-sophomore home room, today's attendance includes 17 students-8 boys and 9 girls.
Home Room Is Organized
The freshman - sophomore students are able to organize and conduct themselves with little help from their home room teacher. They were the first to elect class officers and to hold regular home room meetings.
Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, teacher of English and "Problems of Democracy," took over the freshmansophomore home room in December when Miss Sadele Durham resigned.
Versed in Many Activities
In addition to regular classwork, these students have been active in many extra-curricular activities.
On the Committee to draw up the "Constitution" for the first Student Council of the NOB JuniorSenior High School Association are: Ramona Sparks, sophomore, acting secretary; William Barrett, ninth grade representative; Dr. Nelson, faculty advisor.
On the varsity basketball team, three important players were Bill Barrett, Bill Harris, and Pete Broughton; the latter being one (A the. tapi -sthl~o ii'twm.,
Two of the four popular school cheerleaders are Phyllis Hummell and Joan McNeal.
In The Little Theatre's first performance, "Arsenic and Old Lace," Ramona Sparks, Susan Chaffin, and
(Continued on Page Four)


U



9


Page Two


THE INDIAN


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THE INDIAN Page Three


JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL - This student body and faculty constitute a cosmopolitan group.

COSMOPOLITAN ATMOSPHERE 4 - .------- JUNIOR CLASS DISPLAYS
ABOUNDS AT NOB SCHOOL ENROLLMENT KEEPS ALL-'ROUND INTERESTS ! GROWING
(Continued from Page One) R I(Continued from Page Two)
tional achievements, and social at- this year after spending one school
titudes. By John Cozy, Jr. year in the States.
Each pupil makes an important A total of 331 pupils-171 Juniors Hold High Records
contribution to the cosmopolitan boys and 160 girls -have Virginia Thylor, artistically talatmosphere of the NOB School: for been enrolled at the NOB ented, holds one of the highest here, all their background experi- School during the school year, scholastic records in the School; ences are brought together and ex- 1948-1949. The present at- Jeaneen Hummel and Eunice Besse, changed as the "Old World" cus- tendance is 286 pupils-148 both excellent students, are among toms were brought together and boys and 138 girls, the School's charming cheerleaders; exchanged in the "Melting Pot" of Up to date, 86 new pupils and Jan Hiers is one of the best ,i early Now York. I -39 boys and 47 girls-have High School athletes.
" Pupils Represent Many Places entered the school later than All the male members of the
Of the year's total enrollment, September 13, 1948; but only Junior class are good athletes; all
288 pupils hold birth certificates 45-23 boys and 22 girls- five boys played on the School basfrom 127 cities in 42 different j have withdrawn from the ketball team, which participated in states; 43 were born outside the school. the Base League. Edward Groome
continental limits of the United Today's enrollment is 41 served as captain.
States. Of the latter group, the j pupils more than when school In addition to being active in W majority were born in Cuba and opened in September 1948; almost all extra-curricular activiHawaii. Among other birth places and 76 pupils more than when ties of the High School, Kleber listed are: Argentina, Canada, President Truman visited the "Skiddy" Masterson holds one of China, Ecuador, France, Great School on February 25, 1948. the highest scholastic records of Britain, Panama Canal Zone, I Both the kindergarten and the School. "Skiddy" also holds the Philippines, Puerto Rico. th main building are now distinction of being Junior-Senior
Have Lived in Many Lands opera ing a11enol class president.
The pupils attending NOB School oertin at capacity enroa- Upon graduation from High
have lived in more than 30 cities mNt It apper ert School, practically all the Juniors or towns in more than 20 different classroom spacequireamore plan to attend a four-year college, clssoo sac ad dd- university, or military school. countries or islands outside the tional teachers when school Ang h educt ionl "itaitutions, continental limits of the United opens in September 1949. which thee scatns wins toutons,
....~wic : ... these students wish to enter,
These landudents; then .toAcadem in Annfrequency oresideice, are: Cuba, apolis, Maryland,_ Caif.,
Hawaii, Panama Canal Zone, Puer- Argentina, Australia, Chile, Ecua- U. of C., Berkeley. ,@ to Rico, China, Philippines, Cana- dor, Fiji Islands, Japan, Newfoundda, Mexico, Jamaica, British Isles, land, New Zealand, Samoa. The NOB School pupils range in France, Trinidad, Haiti. Among More than 20 pupils have lived in ages from five years - kindergarother countries in which one or Cuba; and 18 have resided in ten - to nineteen years - post
more pupils have lived are: Africa, Hawaii. graduate.


THE'INDIAN


Page Three







DageFourTHE INDIAN


EIGHTH GRADERS ARE SEASONED TRAVELERS

By Elsa Heimer and Bill Reinhold
Guantanamo Bay eighth graders,
sixteen pupils-seven boys and nine girls in the Junior High School section, have traveled extensively.
These adventure-loving pupils total residences in more than 60 different cities and towns in six countries -China, Cuba, Hawaii, Panama, Puerto Rico, and the U.S.A.; some have also traveled in Canada and Mexico. Having lived in a total of 36 different states, they represent all sections of the U.S.A. Carlita McLaren, born in California, has lived in the largest number of states. Miss Ada Schmidt, their home-room teacher and instructor of Spanish and girls' physical education, has lived in Colorado and
Nebraska.
Six of the eighth graders were
born in foreign countries. Dennis Lanigan was born in Shanghai, China. Ramon Alonso is a native of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Patrick Burke, Edwin Heimer, and Elsa Heimer hold birth certificates from Central Miranda, Cuba. Charles Kunz, who recently moved to Florida, was born in Preston, Cuba.
Eighth Graders Have Diversified
Backgrounds
The number of schools attended
by these Junior High School students ranges from two to fifteen; the . median eighth grader has studied
in eight different schools. These pupils total previous enrollment in school systems of 23 different states and Cuba. The states, in which the greatest numbers have been registered as pupils, are: Fla., Va., Mass., Calif., Pa., N. Y., N. J., Tex., N. H., N. C. Henry Crommelin, born in Annapolis, Mary- land, heads the number of schools attended in different states.

members can speak read, and write Spanish. The social studies are the preferred subjects of these young travelers and linguists. Baseball, swimming, and horseback riding are their favorite sports.
Collecting souvenirs and building


FRESHMAN - SOPHOMORE
SCHOOL SPIRIT HIGH
(Continued from Page Two)
Bill Harris played important roles.
On the staff of the "CORAL REEF," NOB's first year book, are Charlene Brown, Bill Harris, Kathryn Hollis, Caesar Pina, Ramona Sparks, and Pete Broughton.
The freshman - sophomore students were represented in all activities during the Mardi gras.
This issue of "The Indian" is largely the product of the leadership and hard work of the freshman-sophomore classes, under the direction of Dr. Nelson.
Plans For The Future
Most of the freshman-sophomore students plan to attend institutions of higher learning -universities, colleges, medical centers, business or technical schools. Among the institutions desired are: U. of Cal., Duke U., U. of Fla., Harvard U., Columbia U., Johns Hopkins U., and the U. S. Naval Academy.
Among the chosen occupations are: Business, Engineering, Law, Medicine, Navy, and Teaching.
William Barrett and Caesar Pina,
who both hold "A" scholastic records, are planning professional careers.

SENIOR CLASS OF '49
TO GRADUATE IN JUNE'

(Continued from Page Two)
Miss Johnson's after-graduation plans lean toward radio. Prior to her senior year at NOB School, she worked evenings for ten months as radio announcer of the Armed Forces Radio Service Station in Guantanamo Bay, where she conducted the request program, "Requestfully Yours."
model airplanes head the list of hobbies of this eighth grade class.
ix~h~ei-gro~upWish to enter the professions -medicine, dentistry, and law. Two boys desire to attend the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. Others hope to enter the fields of aviation, engineering, journalism, business, teaching.


JUNIOR HIGH, SCHOOL - The seventh and eighth graders, eager to pass through the portals of the Senior High School, are presented by Mrs. Lela Souders and Miss Ada Schmidt - home-room teachers. (Bill Barrett, Caesar Pina. and Bill Reinhold surveyed the group.)


SEVENTH GRADERS HAVE SEEN FOREIGN LANDS Y

By William Barrett and
Caesar Pina
"The seventh grade is a class of vigorous Americans," their home-room teacher, Mrs. Lela Cornett Souders-a native of Kentucky with several years of teaching experience in her home state, told school reporters, "But they're not all Sir Walter Raleighs."
The seventh graders, many of whom are already experienced travelers, have much to contribute to their class and extra-class activities. Totaling 28 pupils-13 boys and 15 girls--for the year, their present enrollment includes 23 pupils-10 boys and 13 girls. They range in ages from 10 to 14 years; the median NOB seventh grade pupil is 12 years old. Pupils Have Traveled Widely
Holding birth certificates from 23 different cities in 16 different states, they total former residences .n V forty-one states and in eight countries outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. - Canada, China, Cuba, Great Britain, Hawaii, Japan, Panama, Philippines. They have lived on 18 different U. S. Naval Bases in different parts of the world. Several have toured in Canada and Mexico.
Five of the seventh graders were residing on or near U. S. Naval Bases in Hawaii during the bombing attack of Pearl Harbor in 1941. These ,pupils, who also attended kindergarten or the first grade in Hawaii, are: Carolyn Bailey, Patricia Besse, Marshall Masterson, George Bowley, and Paul Smith.
Donald Sypek has lived in China, Japan, the Philippines, and the U.S.A.; he has seen Guam, Hawaii, Mexico, Panama Canal Zone.
George MacMichael and Neil
Horner, who have resided in Great U Britain and the U.S.A., have traveled in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales.
Born in Guantanamo City, Barbara Burke, has visited numerous cities in Cuba and in the States.
Have Varied Backgrounds
The seventh graders, who have attended from two to fifteen different schools each-the median being seven, have been enrolled in 28 different states. Listed according to frequency are Calif., Fla., N.Y., Pa., N.C., Mass., Md., S.C., Texas, and Maine. Margaret McCullough and Carolyn Bailey have attended the largest number of schools.
The seventh graders are well
-Mree dn csahooI clnii . . the r Y 1. "iLibrary Club, and the Mat:W'ence -Club Bennett Richards represents the
seventh grade on the Constitution it Committee for the Student Council. Marshall Masterson, a math. "genius," takes ninth grade general (Continued on Page Twelve)


Paze Four


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN Pag'e ivot


ENGLISH CLASS CARRIES 9OUT SURVEY

What special features of the
NOB School give it distinction?
The high school students in English and "Problems of Democracy,"
under the expert guidance of Dr.
Esther Marion Nelson, with the whole-hearted support of Supervising Principal John A. Permenter, recently carried out a comprehensive survey to answer this searching question.,
The active Freshmen and Sophomores, fired with intense curiosity, assumed the major responsibility for collecting, compiling, and preparing the materials for publication. This May issue of "The Indian," which is dedicated to the accreditation of the NOB School, presents the findings of the survey.
Students Compile and Prepare Data
Each Freshman and Sophomore,
under the direction of Dr. Nelson, was responsible for securing data on a definite part of the NOB school system. The students formulated inquiry sheets to obtain per tinent data about the different
school activities and personnel.
These questionnairs were mimeo' graphed, distributed throughout the school, and filled out.
Every grade-kindergarten
through 12th - was covered by a different member of the 9th and 10th grades, who visited the designated classroom and talked with the children and the teacher to
obtain information.
Preceded by interviews, inquiry
sheets were filled out by the children, faculty members, school board, maintenance staff, parents, and Naval officials directly connected with the NOB School. All information and data were tabulated and totaled on carefully prepared charts. Significant statistical factors were then organized and recorded for future use. The highlight of the data were selected and
prepared for publication.
Many Pupils Participate
Junior High School English . classes, under the direction of Dr.
Nelson, collected information and prepared articles on the school
clubs and organizations.
Joan Harris - post graduate
and Virginia Taylor- junior, both members of the class in "Problems of Democracy," and several other Juniors collaborated in the study by submitting articles on various topics. Fred Johnson, junior, served
*as "Sports" editor.
Articles published without "bylines" in this issue of "The Indian"
groups of students; then i ..... - . .. ew rlege during class periods.
Students Drilled in Journalism
This research study or survey,
which began in the "Problems of
Democracy" class, was completed "PROBLEMS OF DEMOCRACY" CLASS AT WORK - Students, under guidin Dr. Nelson's English classes. ance of Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, compile and prepare data for publication it
(Continued on Page Thirty-two) this May issue of "The Indian."


THE INDIAN


Paee Five







Pare Six THE INDIAN


Mr. John A. Permenter Dr. Esther Marion Nelson mr. war at unarasik I
During World War II, three faculty members served in Overseas Theatres of Operations: Supervising Principal John A. Permenter saw active duty with the U. S. Navy in the Caribbean and the Southeast lWeific areas; Dr. Esther Marion Nelson served with the Far East Air Forces in the Asiatic-Pacific; and Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik saw action with the Army Air Forces in Europe.

JOHN A. PERMENTER ESTHER MARION NELSON ---EDWARD JOHN ONDRASIK

Ninth Grade '~Z~ Served With FEAF in Pacific Honorably discharged as a First Tod s E r eion Nelson,teacher Lieutenant, Mr. Edward J. OndraToday's Enrollment: William lo~ece
Barrett; Thomas Harvey Beadling; By Phyllis' "Problems of De- sik -director of Physical EducaPhyllis Viola Hummell; Patricia W. The Junior-Sered first with the tion at NOB School - is entitled to McCrodden; Ramona Jean Moses; students have we'orces (FEAF) and wear the Presidential Unit Citation Joan Helen Parker; Caesar A. ers and fath- ir Far East Air Serv- with Bronze Cluster, the Air Medal Pina; William R. Reinhold. . ci.' Command (FEASC), in the and three clusters, and the E.T.O.
D . ay -- _.t on inac- Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Opera- Medal with four clusters for his NeI duty in June 1946. Between tions, during World War II. In 1944 service in the Army Air Corps 1942 and 1946, he saw four years of and 1945, she collaborated in mak- from May 2, 1942, to November active service in the U. S. Navy. ing geographical studies of Pacific 7, 1945. Mr. Permenter served as corn- Islands; she also wrote articles and Saw Active Duty In Europe
manding officer of a Navy V-5 edited the "FEASC Intelligence Mr. Ondrasik's tour of duty took (aviation) unit at the College of Bulletin." him to Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, Wooster, in Wooster, Ohio, for While serving with the Air Force and to England where he was ateighteen months in 1943 and 1944; in the Pacific, Dr. Nelson saw Aus- tached to the 448th Bomb Group. and later for eight months, in the tralia, Biak, Hawaii, New Cale- When his crew had completed only same capacity, of a Navy V-12 donia, New Guinea, Philippines, 24 of the required 30 missions, the engineering unit at Stevens Insti- and other Pacific Islands. She was Germans surrendered. This duty tute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. stationed in the Netherlands East was preceded by basic training at Saw Active Duty In Caribbean Indies for eight months. Miami Beach, Florida, and preHis duty as a Navy Armed Guard "Public Relations" being her spe- flight training as a bombardier at
gunnery officer of an Army Trans- cialty, her thirty-two months in Fenn College, Cleveland, Ohio. A port took him, for sixteen months, the Service were devoted largely Other Army Air Corps fields at N to the Caribbean and Southeast to activities dealing with public which he was stationed are: Moody Pacific areas. While on this tour of relations and "Intelligence" work. Field, Ga., Carlsbad AAF, N.M., duty, he saw something of Central Joining the Women's Army Corps Walla Walla AAF, Wash., and 448 and South America and crossed the (WAC) in September 1943, Dr. BG, Seething, England. equator fourteen times. Nelson completed several Army Highly Qualified For Teaching Entering the Navy as a LTJG. training courses: Basic-2nd WAC Mr. Ondrasik holds the B.S. dein June 1942, he was promoted to Training Center, Daytona Beach, gree in Economics from Roanoke LT. in July 1943 and to LCDR. in Fla.; Army Administration School College in Virginia, and the M.A. October 1945. -Richmond, Ky.; Extended Field degree in Physical Education from Held Positions in Florida Schools Service -Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.; Columbia University in New York. Immediately prior to being com- Overseas-Camp Stoneman, Calif. Prior to enlistment, Mr. Ondrasik missioned in the U. S. Navy, in Served on College Facdon Weatherson; Jane Livingston students desired to attend upon than one yea- On leaving the Service, Wilson.therson; ne l~lwngs~on high school graduation. epi �voi to i'h eturned to his Alma Mater and
' -ruction for the Florida State De- Sept. 1943, Dr. Nelson served on graduated in February 1947.
part n fdction fothe faculty of the New York State At Roanoke College, Mr. OndraOther educational positions, which Teachers College, Oneonta, N.Y. sik played on the Virginia All-State
he held in Florida, are: supervising She is still on leave from the New Basketball Team, served as presiprincipal of the Jupiter Elementary York State Teachers College, where dent of the Monogram Club, and
(Continued on Page Ten) (Continued on Page Fourteen) (Continued on Page Fourteen) (Coninue onpageTen


Page Six


THE INDIAN







TT-TT TNTIT A


SCHOOL FACULTY IS
WELL-ROUNDED

(Continued from Page One)
backgrounds and demonstrate high professional competence. The diversity of preparation and viewpoints of the teachers produce a well-rounded faculty, who work together efficiently for the good of
the pupils and the school.
Wide Educational Experiences
The teaching experiences of the
faculty range from two to fourteen years, and represent educational activities in twenty different states and Cuba. Three faculty members have taught in N. C.; two each in Calif., Fla., N.Y.; and one each in sixteen other states - located in all
sections of the United States.
The faculty members represent
a wide range of educational experiences and positions: teachers on the
elementary, secondary, and college levels; supervisors - elementary and college student-teaching; administrators - principal and supervising principal; educational
consultant; public relations work.
Faculty Is Well-Prepared
More than thirty different colleges and universities have been attended by the faculty. All the elementary and high school faculty members hold the Bachelor degree, which is the minimum requirement for teaching at the NOB School; four hold M.A. degrees, and one, the Ph.D. degree. In the field of nursing, three teachers have their
RN and one the MN.
Among the National honorary
and professional fraternities represented by the faculty are: Kappa Delta Pi (honorary educational), Phi Delta Kappa and Pi Lambda Theta (professional, educational) Pi Gamma Mu (social science), Mu e Omega Xi (scholastic), Alpha Xi
Omega (dramatic), and Tau Kappa Alpha (forensic). Most of the staff members hold membership in one or more professional organizations.
Faculty Has Traveled Widely
Holding birth certificates from
twelve different states, the fiteen faculty members claim former residence in thirty different states.
Some have traveled extensively in foreign countries or in lands outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. Among these lands are Africa, Australia, twenty European countries, Islands of the Pacific, West Indies, Central America, South America, and North America
-Alaska, Canada, Mexico.
Degrees Held by Faculty
The faculty members of the NOB
School hold degrees from the following institutions of higher learning:
Supervising Principal: John A.
Permenter - B.S., Berry College in Ga., A.B. and M.A., Florida Southern College, M.A., Columbia University, New York City.


FACULTY AT WORK - Teaching staff meets with supervising principal to discuss the "Evaluative Criteria," a prerequisite to the accreditation of the NOB School. Left to right: Mrs. Lucille Burke, Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Carolyn Yates, Miss Anita Feinstein, Miss Sadele Durham, Miss Ada Schmidt, Miss Gladys Maehtolff, Supervising Principal John A. Permenter, Mrs. Madlyn Newell, Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, Mrs. Alice Hayes, Mrs. Lela Souders, Mr. Edward Ondrasik. (Mrs. Ruth Metzger and Mrs. Nellie Walker are not in this picture.)


THE FACULTY -(Back -left to right): Mrs. Ruth Metzger, Mrs. Lucille
Burke, Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Alice Hayes, Supervising Principal John A.
Permenter, Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik, Mrs. Lela Souders.
(Front - left to right) : Miss Anita J. Feinstein, Mrs. Madlyn Newell, Mrs. Nellie Walker, Miss Ada Schmidt, Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, Mrs. Carolyn Yates, Mrs.
Edrie Marie Delgado.

Supervising Principal John A. Permenter preparing materials for the Accreditation Committee.

Junior-Senior High School: Dr. Esther Marion Nelson-B.S., Univ. of Oregon, M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia Univ.; Miss Anita FeinsteinB.A., New York State College for Teachers at Albany, M.A., Columbia Univ.; Mrs. Ruth Metzger B.S., Kutztown State Teachers College in Pa., R.N., in nursing, St. Luke's Medical Center in Philadelphia; Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik
(Continued on Page Ten)


THE INDIAN ID a








Pare Eight THE INDIAN


HISTORY OF NOB SCHOOL
AT GUANTANAMO BAY

By Jeaneen Hummel and
Ramona Moses
The Guantanamo Bay Naval Operating Base School has undergone constant changes in its unique history, but the progress has been a continuous upward trend. The school personnel, noted for its great annual turn-over, has gradually increased from 45 pupils and five faculty 'members in October 1945 to approximately 300 pupils and 15 faculty members in April 1949.
. NOB School in Pre-War Days
The first school for children at Guantanamo Bay, comprised of only a few boys and girls, was taught by the Protestant chaplain in his 'own Naval quarters. In 1931, when the enrollment totaled 30 pupils, school was held in'a small open-air building on Administration Hill. A wing of the Naval Hospital now occupies the site of the first school.
In 1932, because the number of pupils increased, the school was moved to a larger'building near the present tennis courts on Administration Hill. With a staff of five teachers, grammar school was held in the morning and high school in the afternoon.
In August 1941, the present NOB School edifice was dedicated and opened to children; it was in session from August to December. Because. of the entry of the U.S.A. into World War II in December 1941, all the children were evacuated from Guantanamo Bay shortly'after the Christmas holidays.
During the War years, 1942-1945, the main school structure was utilized by the Navy for Naval education classes, a library, and offices. NOB School in Post-War Years
'With the return of dependents after V-E Day, the NOB School for children re-opened on October 14, 1945. The 1945-1946 session opened with an enrollment of 45 pupils and five teachers. As a result of the enormous turn-over among the Naval personnel on the Base, the early post-war years were characterized by a constant change of pupils and teachers. Because of the acute teacher shortage in the
States, most of the teachers were the Wives of Naval personnel. When the husbands were transferred elsewhere, the wives resigned their teaching jobs.
In .1945-46, the first faculty included Miss Harriet Black, principal, Miss Hilda Anderson, Mrs. Wava L. Hummel, Miss Betty Lythe, -and Mrs. Simon Rottenberg. Mrs. V. E. Oppel later replaced Mrs. Rottenberg.
Shortly after school opened, the
kindergarten was organized and placed in charge of Mrs. Lillian Sage, wife of Captain G. E. Sage, Chief of Staff. Following the resignation of Mrs. Sage in December


I


OUR DISTINGUISHED VISITOR - President Harry S. Truman, 'on his visit to NOB School on Feb. 25th, 1948, shook hands with William Barrett, spokesman for the student body who presented to President Truman a colorful scrap book depicting the NOB School activities.


1945, the kindergarten had a series of different teachers; Mrs. E. W. Cleary and Mrs. E. T. Malstrom served for the longest periods of time. Among the short-time teachers were Mrs. Bates, Mrs. Clark, Mrs. Rogers, and Mrs. Stanmeyer.
The teaching staff increased to eight members in early 1946, when the School Board employed Mrs. Lucille Burke and Mrs. Laura Keyes.
Mrs. Wava L. Hummel took over the position as principal in April 1946, when Miss Black resigned.
In 1946-47, school opened with eight faculty members, namely: principal - Mrs. Wava Hummel; teachers - Miss Hilda Anderson, Mrs. Lucille Burke, Mrs. Mildred Byrd, Mrs. Dorothy Conway, ENS. D. O Conway, Mrs. Frances Dawson, Mrs. Laura Keyes, and Mrs. E. T. Malstrom.
Mrs. Lizzie Sherrill, Mrs. Sadele Mitchell, and Miss Irene Wilbur later replaced Mrs. Dawson, Mrs. Byrd, and ENS. Conway, respectively.
The faculty increased to ten members in December, when Mrs. Mary Moore and Miss Joyce Weaver were added to the teaching staff.
To have a complete faculty for the school year 1947-1948, extensive correspondence was carried out with colleges and universities dur-


PRESIDENT HIGHLIGHTS
1947 - 1948 EVENTS

Southern Association's Dr. Edwards
Inspects NOB School
President Harry S. Truman's visit to the NOB School on February 25, 1948, was a memorable event. Bill Barrett, spokesman for the stlident body of 210' pupils, presented to President Truman a colorful scrap book that the children had made about the NOB School activities.
Dr. William T. Edwards, representing the Sokthern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, made a three-day visit to the School on April 27-29 as a preliminary step to accreditation.

ing the spring and summer-of 1947.
The 1947-1948 school year opened with and maintained 15 faculty members: principal-Mrs. Wava L. Hummel; 14 teachers-Mrs. Lucille Burke, Miss Annabeth Cash, Miss Margaret Drummond, Miss Sadele Durham, Miss Katherine George, Miss Charlotte Jones, Miss Helen Mathews, Miss Elizabeth Rice, Miss Dorothy Roberts, Miss Ada Schmidt, Mr. Jack Staggs, Mrs. Janet Van Walkenten, Mrs. Nellie Walker, and Miss Shirley Walker.
(Continud on Page Twenty-seven)


P age Ei--ht


THE INDIAN


1-







THE INDIAN Pao. e Nin


ADMINISTRATIVE FORCE -Representatives of the Southern Association for Colleges and Secondary Schools meet with School Board and Supervising Principal John A. Permenter to report findings of their investigation and to sanction the accreditation of NOB School. Left to right: LCDR. E. E. Bosserman - Protestant Chaplain, Mr. Permenter, Dr. Mode L. Stone, Mr. H. P. McNeal. CAPT. J. H. Lewis, Dr. Orin F. Crowe, Dr. William T. Edwards CDR. L. P. Kimball, LCDR.
C. A. Herold - Catholic Chaplain, LCDR. F. W. Weatherson.


' SCHOOL BOARD AT GUANTANAMO BAY SERVES AS
STEERING COMMITTEE AND POLICY MAKING BODY

By Joan McNeal
Six of the Board Members Can Read and Converse In One or More
Foreign Languages; All Have Travelled Extensively
* Today's NOB School Board, consisting of seven members appointed in . 1948, by RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN, acts as a policy making body,
Headed by CAPT. J. H. Lewis, senior member, the Board formulates the over-all policies and determines the general judicial functions of the School. The Board members, in joint session with Mr. John A. Permenter -supervising principal, hold regular meetings at stated times to promote efficient school administration and to coordinate all elements of
he school system.
The School Board, a well-rounded group landed, are: the Carolinas,
group in which wide ranges of Guadalcanal, Guam, Hawaii, Japan, opinions and viewpoints are pre- Marianas, New Caledonia, New sented, includes the following mem- Guinea, New Zealand, Palau, Philhers: CAPT. J. H. LewiS, CDR. L. ippines, Ryukyus, Saipan, Somoa, P. Kimball, LCDR. E. E. Bosserman Solomons; several visited ports in -Protestant Chaplain, LCDR. C. Australia; Chaplain Herold sailed A. Herold - Catholic Chaplain, on the South China Sea along the
LCDR. F. W. Weatherson, TEC coast of China, also.
L. A. Lawrence, and Mr. H. P. The seven Board members, born e McNeal. They represent the lay- in seven different states, total resiman and the clergy, the enlisted dences in 30 different states. In adman and the officer, the civilian dition to Cuba and the U.S.A., and the Naval personnel. CAPT. Lewis has resided in PanaMr. H. P. McNeal, Industrial Re- ma, Italy, and Sicily.
lations Officer of NOB, held the Varied Cultural Interests Noted
rank of Lieutenant Commander in Six of the Board members can the U. S. Navy during World read and converse in one or more War II. foreign languages - French, GerMembers Are World Travelers man, and Spanish. Chaplains Bos"The four corners of the World" serman and Herold have command
have been traversed by these men, of Greek and Latin also.
who total travelling experiences in Among the institutions of higher more than 30 countries on five con- learning attended by the various tinents - Asia, Australia, Europe, Board members are: Annapolis North America, South America. Naval Academy and other U. S.
CAPT. Lewis, CDR. Kimball, and Naval schools, Harvard University, Mr. McNeal have toured in Eu- Chicago Theological Seminary, St.
ropean countries - Belgium, Den- Mary's College in Ky., St. Meinrads mark, France, Germany, Italy, Nor- Seminary in Ind., Fordham U. in way, Portugal, Switzerland, and the N. Y., U. of Fla., U. of La., U. of British Isles. CAPT. Lewis and Miss., Colleges - Grinnel, LawTEC Lawrence have journeyed in rence, Miss. State, Wittenberg.
Asia - China and Japan. During Among the honorary fraterniWorld War II, five of these men - ties represented by the School . '1 Naval personnel - served with Board are: Lambda Mu (honorary
the U. S. Navy in the Asiatic-Pa- Greek), Tau Kappa Alpha (Nat'l cific areas. Among the Pacific Forensic), Phi Delta Theta (Nat'l Islands, on which members of the Social), Delta Kappa Epsilon, Sig-


EVALUATION COMMITTEE ACCREDITS NOB SCHOOL

(Continued from Page One)
high school student-body and the most cooperative school board that I've ever met," praised Dr. Crowe.
Investigators Report Findings
The visiting professors interviewed the principal, teachers, students, parents, patrons, and School Board members. They reviewed in great detail and appraised the school plant and its site, he Staff
- faculty and maintenance, the curriculum, the administration, and finance. After careful investigation and study, they made official reports to the faculty and to the School Board in which they reviewed the findings and gave recommendations. In conclusion, they made an official summary report to RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN.
Prior to the official investigation, the high school faculty devoted many hours to filling out long, comprehensive "Evaluative Criteria," final prerequisites for accreditation. Summary conclusions, which represented composite ratings by
(Continued on Page Ten)

ma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Delta Chi.
Mr. McNeal, a former newspaper editor with broad travelling experiences, has written numerous articles for publication in popular magazines - Country Gentleman, Outdoor Life, Sports Afield, Field and Stream, Outdoorsman.
Golf, fishing, and swimming are the favorite sports of these travellers and linguists.
Among the recommendations for improvement of the NOB School set forth by Board members are: erection of an auditorium, more permanent teaching staff, uniformity of salaries for equal preparation, more school publicity.


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Pare Ten THE INDIAN


JOHN A. PERMENTER

(Continued from Page Six)
and High School, Palm Beach County, 1939-41; principal of the Griffin Elementary School near Lakeland, 1936-39; and between 1933 and 1936, teacher of English and social studies in Florida high schools.
Has Degree in Administration
From September 1946 to August 1948, Mr. Permenter attended Teachers College, Columbia University, where he obtained his M.A. degree in School Administration in 1947; he has now completed all the requirements except the dissertation for the Ed.D. (Doctor of Education) degree in the same field. He was graduated from Berry College, Mount Berry, Georgia, with the B.S. degree in 1933; and later, procured A.B. and M.A. degrees from Florida Southern College in Lakeland, Florida.
Mr. Permenter's doctoral dissertation, now in process, is entitled, "The Citizens' Committee Approach to the Improvement of Education
-A Study of Florida." It deals with the three year educational survey and the legislative program of the Florida Citizens Committee on Education, a program which led to many basic and long-time improvements in all phases of the state's provision for education.
Represents Many Fraternities
Among the national honorary and professional fraternities, to which Mr. Permenter belongs, are: Kappa Delta Pi (Honorary Educ.), Phi Delta Kappa (Prof. Educ.), Pi Gamma Mu (Social Science), Mu Omega Xi (Scholastic), Alpha Xi Omega (Dramatics), Tau Kappa Alpha (Debating). A life member of the National Education Association, he also belongs to several other educational organizations.
Has Connections in the South
Born in Macon, Georgia, and reared in Florida, Mr. Permenter lived for short periods of time in several other states during and before the War--Ill., Ohio, N. J., N. Y., and Va. Among the foreign lands that he has seen are: Canada, Cuba, the Central American countries, Ecuador and Peru in South America, and the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific.
Mr. Permenter is the father of two boys, John Fletcher, four years old, and Robert Lee, two and a half. His wife, the former Dorothy Louise Fletcher, of West Palm Beach, Florida, was also a teacher for several years in the schools of Palm Beach County. She holds the Master's degree from Columbia University and the A.B. degree from Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga.
Mr. Permenter thinks Guantanamo Bay is a very interesting and picturesque place, and believes that it offers many practical advantages over living in the States today.


Mr. John A. Permenter
PRINCIPAL ATTENDS AASA CONVENTION

Supervising Principal John A. Permenter returned to the Base on April 5th, after having spent ten days in Philadelphia and New York. Mr. Permenter was 'sent to Philadelphia by the NOB School Board to attend the annual convention of the American Association of School Administrators, of which he is a member.
In addition to attending the convention sessions and getting first hand information on the latest trends and developments in school administration and supervision, Mr. Permenter examined the latest in school supplies and equipment; he also made some purchases for use in the 1949-1950 school program.
In New York, Mr. Permenter interviewed prospective teachers for next year; he examined the records


j ACCREDITATION WAS GOAL OF PRINCIPAL
By Joan McNeal
"My top ambition for the
School this year was to see it accredited," Mr. John Permenter - Supervising Principal of the Naval Operating Base School at Guantanamo Bay-told school reporters in a recent interview. "Now that this basic goal has been . reached, the School is ready
to make real progress in I many important lines."
"The NOB School is an
excellent school," he continued. "But, I do not hesitate to point out that it has some
serious weaknesses."
Mr. Permenter has already witnessed great strides of progress this year in the
School's academic and extraI curricular activities.


EVALUATION COMMITTEE ACCREDITS NOB SCHOOL

(Continued from Page Nine)
the faculty, were used as the basis for interviews and evaluations.
In 1947-48, Mrs. Wava Hummel
-the former principal- and her Staff worked hard to bring the school up to the required standards. In April 1948, Dr. Edwards made a preliminary three-day investigation of the School to determine whether or not it could be accredited by the Southern Association. At that time, he highly praised the local physical and educational facilities; then he set forth recommendations necessary for accreditation.
"The School Board and other officials deserve the highest commendation for carrying out the recommendations set forth on my previous visit in 1948," complimented Dr. Edwards. "The expansion of the student activities has been very gratifying and impressive since my last visit."
"To insure stability, the NOB School must have teachers of continuity in service," recommended Dr., Stone. "Until the teachers are more permanent, the School cannot be any better than it is."
"I hope everyone will continue to work together to keep the school accredited and to strive for continuous progress," concluded Dr. Stone as he boarded the plane for the States.

SCHOOL FACULTY IS
WELL-ROUNDED

(Continued from rage Seven)
B.S., Roanoke College in Va., M.A., Columbia Univ.; Miss Ada Schmidt
-B.A., Midland College in Nebr.; Mrs. Lela Cornett Souders-B.S., Eastern State Teachers College in Ky., R.N., in nursing, Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Md.
Elementary Grades: Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado - B.A., Aurora College in Ill.; Mrs. Alice Feehan Hayes - B.S.E., . Fitchburg State Teachers College in Mass.; Mrs. Gladys Braun Machtolff -B.S., University of Alabama; Mrs. Geneva Hunt McCollum-B.S., Asheville Teachers College, N.C.; Mrs. Madlyn Barnes Newell - A.B., East Carolina State Teachers College, N.C.; Mrs. Carolyn Stone Yates A.B., Woman's College, Univ. of North Carolina.
Kindergarten: Mrs. Lucille Burke
- Elementary Teacher Certificates from Colorado and California; Mrs. Nellie Walker - B.S;, Northwestern Univ. in Evanston, Ill., R.N. and M.N., in nursing, Chicago.

of a number of other teachers, who indicated an interest in coming to Guantanamo Bay to teach.


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4


FIRST GRADE - Mrs. Alice Hayes, teacher, proudly presents her forty-six little scholars - happy, alert, and ready to be taught the fundamentals of reading, writing, and arithmetic.


CLASS WORK ADJUSTED
TO NEEDS OF PUPILS

In the first grade, there are actually two grades - the children with previous kindergarten training and those with none. In social adjustments and in ability to do school work, most of the children who have had nursery and kindergarten experiences show marked progress over those pupils with no
previous school backgrounds.
To provide opportunities for
maximum growth of all the first graders, Mrs. Hayes teaches reading on four different group levels.
Each reading class is organized according to the abilities and achievements of the pupils. The 12 boys and girls in the upper section do excellent work; the 15 children in . the second group do very good
work; but the others need considerable individual attention and help.
Pupils Learn English
Four Spanish speaking Cuban
children - Rylma Boan, Amelia Pubillones, Ursula Teagle, and Edith Pamias - could not speak or understand English at the beginning of the year. All class instructions, as well as everything that the pupils said to them, had to be translated from English to Spanish by interpreters. Elizabeth Abbott and Emil Kloske, two firstgrade children Who could speak both Spanish and English, acted as interpreters. Under the expert guidance of Mrs. Hayes, these four Spanish speaking natives of Cuba have made rapid progress; today
they no longer need interpreters.


STARTING WITH FORTY BOYS AND GIRLS, THE FIRST
GRADE NOW HAS FORTY-SIX CHILDREN
Twenty-three Different States and Thirty-six Different Cities and Towns
Are Represented By The First Grade Children Now Enrolled By Ramona Sparks
"What a well-behaved and courteous first grade!" comment Navy officials who visit the NOB School. "That's one of the finest first grades I've ever seen. How does Mrs. Hayes 'manage that many little children so well ?"
When school opened in September 1948, forty eager little boys and girls scurried into the spacious first grade room. Although two rooms were converted into a large one,
the enlarged classroom was filled
MRS. HAYES ADHERES TO to capacity. By February 1949, the
GUIDING PRINCIPLES first grade registration totalled 50 pupils; the present enrollment is
Former principal of the West 46 first-graders.
Acton Elementary School in Mas- Mrs. Alice Hayes, our highly sachusetts, Mrs. Alice Feehan competent first grade teacher with Hayes taught in the Public Schools ten years teaching experience in of Waltham-"The Watch City" of Massachusetts, faced many unusual Massachusetts-immediately prior problems in bringing about the to coming to Guantanamo Bay. desired grade adjustments. Today
In her teaching at the NOB the 46 first graders, who were born School, Mrs. Hayes- adheres to the in 36 different cities or towns following guiding principles set representing 23 different states in forth in "A Curriculum Guide for the U.S.A. and several foreign Primary Grade Teachers," pub- countries, live and work happily lished by the Mass. State Dept. of together like one well-organized Ed.: (1) Provide conditions that family. foster growth in democratic living; School Is Exciting to First Graders '(2) Realize that the child is a To the boys and girls of the first "total person" and recognize the grade, school is a series of exciting value and need of integrating ex- and interesting, experiences. At periences in the school; (3) Recog- 8:30 A.M., school begins with mornnize and provide for individual dif- ing exercises - Bible readings, the ferences; (4) Arouse and foster a Lord's Prayer, salute to the U.S.A. desire for learning; (5) Conserve, flag, singing. The morning classes advance, and establish the physical consist of phonetic exercises, arithand mental health of each child; metic, seat work assignments, pre(6) Provide for acquisition of the paration for reading -word and basic skills and knowledges; (7) phrase study, and reading. The Emphasize desirable character afternoon sessions include reading, growth. writing, drawing, social studies.


. THE INDIAN


Pa~re Eleven







Page Twelve THE INDIAN


HOW THE FACULTY WAS
APPOINTED THIS YEAR

How were the teachers of the NOB School employed for the year 1948-1949 ?
Supervising Principal John A. Permenter was employed by the NOB School Board through the cooperation of Dr. W. T. Edwards of the Florida State University and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools.
Mrs. Lucille Burke, Miss Sadele Durham, Miss Ada Schmidt, and Mrs. Nellie Walker were reappointed after having taught here in 1947-48.
Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Ruth Metzger, Mrs. Madlyn Newell, and Mrs. Carolyn Yates were employed locally. Their husbands, all Naval personnel, were stationed at the Naval Operating Base when these teachers were elected.
Mrs. Alice Hayes, Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, and Mrs. Lela Souders were employed through a cooperative arrangement between the NOB School Board and the Navy Department. The Navy transferred their husbands to Guantanamo Bay so that the wives could teach in the NOB School.
Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, Miss Anita Feinstein, and Mr. Edward Ondrasik were employed by the NOB School Board through Supervising Principal Permenter.
Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado was employed by the School Board through a contact with the American Consul in Santiago de Cuba.

SEVENTH GRADERS HAVE
SEEN FOREIGN LANDS
(Continued from Page Four)
mathematics in addition to the regular work of the 7th grade.
The class officers are: Marshall Masterson - president, Norman Huddy - vice president, Barbara Burke - secretary, Dixie Adairtreasurer.

Spanish is taught as a regular subject in the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grades; but as an elective in high school.


SECOND GRADERS STRESS
DEMOCRATIC LIVING
By Phyllis Hummell
"This class of thirty - twenty boys and ten girls- is one of the most alert, active, 'and lovable groups I've ever met," Mrs. Madlyn Barnes Newell, second grade teacher with ten years teaching experience in Virginia and in her home state - North Carolina, told school reporters. "Throughout the year, we stressed democratic living."
Backgrounds Are Varied
Of the total registration for the second grade, 35 pupils -22 boys and 13 girls, the median pupil is, seven years of age.
Born in sixteen states and Cuba, these children have lived on ten different U. S. Naval Bases and in thirty-one different states- led by Cal., Va., Mass., Fla., N. Y., Tex.
Mona Bailey was born in Hawaii; Helga Heimer, in Cuba. Thomas Bosserman has lived in Hawaii; William Price, in Canada.
In addition to wide travel in the U.S.A., different pupils have seen Canada, Cuba, Hawaii, Mexico. Richard Machtolff has traveled in all of these countries.
The second graders have attended school in twenty different states, led by Cal., Va., Fla., Tex., Mass. The number of schools attended ranges from two to six for each child; the median pupil has attended two schools. Two pupils speak Spanish as fluently as English.
Class Project Enjoyed
The most enjoyable unit of the school year was one on "Navajo Indians." A frieze was made of the hogans (homes) and of the work the Navajos do. Many interesting stories were written.
Democratic Living
To promote growth in democratic living, a unit on "Neighbors Who Help Us" was completed. This project included many pictures, posters, and interesting stories. Play periods also helped to show the second graders how dependent they are on one another in their everyday life.


SECOND AND THIRD GRADES- Happy, beaming children of the 2nd and 3rd grades pose with their teachers, Mrs. Madlyn Newell and Mrs. Carolyn Yates. (Charlene Brown and Phyllis Hummell - center back in picture - collected the data about this group.)


THIRD GRADERS ENJOY
CREATIVE ACTIVITIES

By Charlene Brown
"The third graders are a very well-behaved group," Mrs. Carolyn Stone Yates, the third grade teacher, with teaching experience in her home state - North Carolina, told reporters. "They have developed very good work habits." Of the year's total registration of 27 pupils, today's enrollment is 23-14 boys and 9 girls. Their ages range from 8 to 10- the median girl is 8 years, the median boy is 9 years of age.
Varied Backgrounds Noted
Born in ten different states and Cuba, the third graders have resided in thirty-two cities in twenty-seven states, with Cal. leading.
Cuba was the birthplace of four of these pupils. Ignacio and Nancy Avila were born in Havana; Bertil Heimer, in Bayate, Oriente; and Carl Heimer, at Guantanamo Bay.
David. Earl Leidle..livedt on Argentia Naval Air Base in Newfoundland, where he attended school in 1946. Members of the class have lived on 10 U. S. Naval Bases.
The third graders have previously attended schools in twenty-four states, led by Va., Calif., N.Y., Mass., Fla., Md. The number of schools attended ranges from two to six for each pupil, the median is four schools.
Creative Work Emphasized
Arithmetic is one of their preferred subjects. Other than the fundamentals, this third grade has emphasized creative work and individual initiative.
Creative work has centered around dramatics, story-writing, and story-telling. The pupils enjoyed dramatics so they gave their own versions of a Halloween play, and later presented a playlet on Washington's Birthday. After producing each of these plays and commemorating other important holidays in some way, the pupils wrote stories about them. These were compiled in individual story booklets for the children to keep.
Individuality Stressed
Individual initiative has been developed through classroom jobs and health inspections. Every pupil has a chore which he or she has selected -watering plants, leading opening exercises, getting reading books, etc., and each takes pride in performing his or her job well. The daily health inspection has become highly important with most favorable results. Seeing shoes that shine like mirrors, and husky boys with immaculate nails and hands, inspire the group to high health standards. Checks are given daily; the neatest boy and the neatest girl are chosen each Friday.


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FIFTH GRADERS ARE
WELL-TRAVELED

By John Cozy, Jr.
"My boys and girls have made
the greatest progress in arithmetic of any fifth grade that I've ever taught," Mrs. Gladys Braun Machtolff, the fifth grade teacher told reporters. "I'm really proud of them. They can apply what they ,have learned to real life situations."
The fifth graders, who at the
beginning of the year could not understand the value of long division, now list arithmetic as their preferred subject. After Mrs. Machtolff showed them the close tie-up between sports and math-how batting averages in baseball are computed through long divisionthe children developed keen interest in arithmetic that led to real
achievement.
Mrs. Machtolff -a native of
Mass., who has lived at some time in twelve different states from Calvfornia to New York and from Florida to Mass., has taught in
several fine school systems.
Pupils Have Seen Many Lands
The fifth graders, who total 23
pupils-li boys and 12 girls-for the year, constitute an interesting cosmopolitan group. More than half of these pupils have resided in countries outside the continental limits
of the U.S.A.
Bruce Milford Kendall, born in
Manilla, Philippines, has lived in Australia and the U.S.A. Among other Pacific Islands he has seen are Hawaii, New Zealand, Samoa, in the Americas; he has traveled
in Canada, Mexico, Panama.
Born in Ecuador, Leslie Lindsay
has lived in Chile, England, and the U.S.A.; he has traveled in Cuba,
Panama, and Peru.
Gloria McKuin and Charles Yelvington were residing at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, when the Japs bombed it in December 1941. Charles Yelvington and Edward P. Heimer
were born in Cuba.
Raymond Cummings has lived in .Shanghai, China; Petie Lee Davis
and Annette Marie Gebhart, in
Puerto- Rico.
Charles Leslie Hardin has traveled in Mexico and the Panama Canal Zone, and William Foster has
visited in Mexico.
Varied Backgrounds Noted
Born in 16 different states, the
fifth graders have resided in 37 different states, the leading ones
being Va., Calif., Fla.
The fifth graders, having attended from two to fifteen schools each- the median being five, have been enrolled in schools in twenty different states. The greatest number have studied in Va., Fla., Calif., N.Y., Mass., and Pa. Thomas Groome tops the number of schools
attended - fifteen.
The median pupil in the fifth
(Continued on Page Seventeen)


INTERMEDIATE GRADES - Home-ro
Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, and Mrs. Edrie
the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. (Kath,
surveyed the intermediate section.)

FOURTH GRADE NOTED FOR ATTRACTIVE ROOM

By Kathryn Hollis
The fourth grade, one of the most orderly groups of children in the NOB School, maintains at all times one of the most attractive classrooms. Mrs. Geneva McCollum, fourth grade teacher with seven years of teaching experience in her home state - North Carolina, takes great pride in the high achievement and progress of her pupils.
Having traveled widely, the fourth graders have much to contribute to their school activities. Of a total of 24 pupils - 12 boys and 12 girls - seven were born outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. Patricia Spahr was born in Honolulu, Hawaii; Thomas Greenwood, in Canada; Elizabeth Robertson (withdrawn), in Le Havre, France. Cuba was the birthplace of Eunice Avila, Magnhilde Berge (withdrawn), Grace Yelvington, and Irma Pina. Their Cuban birthplaces are Havana, Miranda, Guantanamo Bay, and Santa Cruz del Sur, respectively. Robert Keehn, Constance Ruppert, Richard Ruppert, and Patricia Spahr have lived in Hawaii; Grace Yelvington in Panama; Patrick Shue (withdrawn), in Puerto Rico and Trinidad.
The fourth graders have been enrolled in more than 60 different schools in 25 states- led by Va., Calif., Fla., Pa., N.Y. The number of schools ranges from two to eight each; the median pupil has attended four schools and is 9 years old.
Social Studies Rate Tops
The social studies are the preferred subjects of the fourth graders, who have enjoyed the units on Pre-Revolution, Revolution, and Civil War periods in history. Among their favorite projects have been the "Pueblo Indians," the early colonists, and citizenship.
"Lincoln," by Nancy Byrd Turner, is the favorite poem of these fourth graders, 20 pupils-- 12 girls and
8 boys -today's enrollment.


om teachers - Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Marie Delgado - present the pupils of yn Hollis. John Cozy, and Joan Parker


SIXTH GRADE PREPARES
FOR JUNIOR HIGH

By Joan Parker
"The nineteen sixth graders-12 boys and 7 girls are eagerly anticipating their entrance into Junior High School," Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado, their sixth grade teacher, told school reporters. Born in New York, Mrs. Delgado has had eleven years of teaching experience in the United States and Cuba. The total enrollment for the year has been 23 students-13 boys and 10 girls.
Holding birth certificates from fourteen states, the sixth graders have lived in twenty-nine different states. Several members of the group have lived or traveled abroad
- Canada, Cuba, France, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Trinidad.
James Cozy has lived in Panama; Richard Davis, in Puerto Rico; Charles Greenwood, in Canada, Alexander Chaffin (withdrawn), in Puerto Rico and Trinidad; Ian FitzGerald (withdrawn) claimed former residence in France, Japan, and the Philippines.
The sixth graders have attended schools in twenty-three states, led by Cal., Va., N.Y., Fla., and Mass. The number of schools ranges from three to thirteen; the median child, 11 years of age, has been enrolled in five different schools.
"Seniors" Study Feudalism
The social studies are the prefered subjects of the sixth graders. Units in Ancient civilizationEgyptian, Grecian, and Romanwere carried out during the first part of the year. At present, the "Middle Ages" hold their undivided attention. Mural displays designed and made by pupils to show life in the Middle Ages, catch the eye of visitors entering the room. The customs of the feudal system.lords and serfs, castles and huts, costumes of silk and sackclothare exhibited on walls and table.
A miniature feudal castle, with its moat and drawbridge, has also been made by the sixth graders.


THE INDIAN


Paee Thirteen








Page Fourteen TEIDA


ESTHER MARION NELSON
(Continued from Page Six)
she worked first as "Supervisor of Student Teaching" and later as college teacher of English and "Director of Public Relations."
For three summers, she taught courses in "Education" at the Michigan State Normal College, Ypsilanti, Michigan. Holds Three University Degrees The holder of three University degrees, Dr. Nelson obtained her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University in New York; her B.S. from University of Oregon.
Her doctor's dissertation, "The Content of Student Teaching in State Teachers Colleges," 331 printed pages, published in 1939 as a prerequisite to her Ph.D. degree, is still used extensively in Schools of Education.
Worked on National Surveys
Dr. Nelson has visited, for research purposes, seventy-five state teachers colleges and schools of education in forty-one states. In 1940-1941, she was granted a leave of absence from the New York State Teachers College to study trends in "Education" in the U.S.A.
As an associate member of the' nation-wide survey, "National Survey of Education of Teachers in the United States," sponsored by the U. S. Department of Education, Washington, D. C., Dr. Nelson played an important role in the research work and publication of six volumes.
During the summers of 1940 and 1941, she worked on problems of "Inter-state Migration" with the Farm Security Administration (FSA); her research studies took her to migrant camps in Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington.
Has Traveled Widely'
Her traveling experiences include tours in Africa, Australia, seventeen European countries, North America-Alaska, Canada, Mexico, every state in the U.S.A.--and the Pacific Islands.
Has Won Numerous Honors
Dr. Nelson was a delegate to the C. E. World Convention held in Budapest, Hungary, in 1935; and in 1939, she won recognition at Geneva, Switzerland, for her work in "Education."
"Who's Who in American Education," has contained biographical sketches of Dr. Nelson for the years 1939-1940, 1941-1942, 1943-1944; she has reiently been requested to appear in the 1949-1950 volume.
Among the honorary fraternities and organizations, which she represents,are: Kappa Delta Pi,Pi Lambda Theta, Alpha Sigma Omicron, American Ass'n of University Women, Women's Overseas Service League, Life Member of NEA.
Came South to Regain Health
While on a tour of duty in the tropical islands of the Pacific, Dr.


FACULTY AIMS TOWARD WELL-ROUNDED PUPIL
Fundamentals Are Emphasized The NOB School places most emphasis upon helping pupils to make adjustments to meet changing conditions, not only for changes in present social and personal needs, but also for leadership and intelligent followership needs of the future.
Although the offerings of the curriculum are organized in terms of conventional subject matter and grade classifications, provisions are made for correlation of subjects to provide for consideration of the total experiences of each pupil.
The students are given part in determining, the content and activities which constitute their school experiences; and, therefore, any project which has promise of contributing to pupil growth is encouraged. However, fundamentals or the so-called "tool" subjects are emphasized rather than neglected.
Problems of Living Stressed
Much emphasis is placed on promoting the pupils' understanding of social and personal problems at home and abroad. The work in English and the social studies are closely interrelated; the Science and Mathematics Departments cooperate closely; and all high school students are trained to solve problems requiring elementary research procedures.
Within the classrooms, the teachers strive to teach each pupil as an individual and to assist him in achieving the maximum development of which he is capable in any given field; while at the same time, teaching him to look for ways to become a better member of a democratic group. Thus the School seeks to make every pupil himself a part of the total school life, and to make each one feel responsible for the welfare of the School.
The School especially seeks to develop traits and attitudes of citizenship - loyalty to causes which he feels right after analytic thinking, followership and leadership, and the spirit of cooperation without which democratic civilization cannot long exist.
"I CAN HEAR IT NOW"
By Carlita McLaren
The junior and senior high school classes have recently relived the "13-Year period" from 1933-1946, by listening to the records, "I Can Hear It Now," produced by E. R. Murrow and F. W. Friendly.

Nelson contracted sub-tertian malaria- a recurrent malaria. After several New York doctors had ordered her to spend an indefinite period of time in the sunny South, Dr. Nelson came to Guantanamo Bay to teach.


MRS. WALKER SERVED IN ARMY NURSE CORPS
Honorably discharged with the rank of Captain, Mrs. Nellie Walker, kindergarten teacher at NOB School, served in the Army Nurse Corps for three years. Throughout her period of service, she was stationed at the Presidio Army Hospital - Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Cal.
Mrs. Walker, who obtained her R.N. and M.N. in nursing, has also completed post graduate work in surgery, in Chicago.
She has served in the capacity of surgical nurse, floor supervisor, and superintendent of nurses. As a civilian, she has nursed in the Loretto Hospital, Chicago, Ill., Victory Hospital, Napa, Cal., and Lee Memorial Hospital, Norfolk, Va.
Mrs. Walker, who holds a B.S. degree from Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., has had two years extension work in pre-school education and child psychology at San Diego State College in California. For two years, she taught nursery children at the Washington Elementary School, San Diego, Cal.
Born in Bonne Terre, Mo., and reared in Springfield, Ill., Mrs. Walker has also resided in Cal., N.Y., and Va. She has toured in the British West Indies, Cuba, Canada, Mexico, and the U.S.A.

EDWARD JOHN ONDRASIK

(Continued from Page Six)
was active in Y.M.C.A. work. He was listed in "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."
Graduating from Roanoke College in mid-year afforded Mr. Ondrasik an opportunity to attend graduate school immediately. Accepted in the Physical Education Department of Columbia University, he took the maximum curriculum load. In September of 1947, he was employed by the Anne Arundel County (Maryland) Board of Education as director of Athletics at Linthicum Heights High School.
In the Summer Session, 1948, Mr. Ondrasik completed his work for the Master's degree. He was subsequently employed to direct the Physical Education program for the NOB School, Guantanamo Bay. Mr. Ondrasik Has Travelled Widely
Mr. Ondrasik, who was born in Guttenberg, N. J., has lived in numerous states- Calif., Fla., Ga., Ohio, Md., N. J., N. M., Va., Wash. He has travelled in Belgium, England, Germany, Holland, and Newfoundland.
Mr. Ondrasik has held membership in Paterson Crescents Professional Basketball Team (American League) and Eastern Lawn Tennis Association - North Hudson Tennis Club.


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Pa e Fourteen


THE INDIAN







THlE INDIAN Pr ite


KINDERGARTEN IS A
BUSY WORKSHOP

"Our kindergarten is a little work shop where we try to set the machinery in motion and keep everything running smoothly throughout the year," Mrs. Lucille Burke - kindergarten teacher, who has taught at the NOB School since January 1946, told reporters.
"Emphasis is placed on the development of coordination - to play together, to share, to follow directions, and to respect the wishes and desires of others," said Mrs. Nellie Walker -kindergarten teacher, who has taught at the NOB School since September 1947.
During September 1948, Mrs. Walker taught the entire kindergarten class. Upon completion of the new addition to the kindergarten building, the class was divided
- Mrs. Burke was given the older half of the group and Mrs. Walker, who is especially trained for preschool education, took over the younger half.
Kindergarten Activities
Quoting Mrs. Burke and Mrs. Walker, "The children are taught good work and fair play habits, and to follow directions. Their imaginations are stimulated through stories and pictures. Number work, taught through the medium of games, becomes fun. The children are eager to count and write numbers used in the games." The majority of the class now read and write numbers up to 100, and also count by 5's and 10's to 100.
Among the interesting activities carried on in the kindergarten classes are scrap and alphabet books to teach the children how to cut and paste neatly, finger-painting, clay-modeling, drawing, stringing wooden beads, coloring, looking at picture books, story-telling, and the rhythm band. Instruments used in the rhythm band are chimes, drums, tamborines, bells, xylophones, sticks, piano.
The children are taught responsibility for the care of their own and school property- crayons, scissors, seatwork, colorbooks; they are also trained to keep their workrooms neat and orderly. Pride in their work is developed through praise of duties and work well done.
Largest Group in School
A total of 77 children - 47 boys and 30 girls -have been enrolled in the kindergarten since September 15, 1948. Today's enrollment, the maximum number of pupils that can be accommodated in the kindergarten, totals 60 children - 33 boys and 27 girls. Up to date, 17 children-14 boys and 3 girlshave withdrawn; but as soon as one child is withdrawn, another enters.
The ages of the kindergarten children range from five to six years, the median age being about


51/2 years. Last September about half of these children were between the ages of 4-8 and 5-0 years.
The kindergarteners, who represent every section of the U.S.A., were born in fifty different cities in twenty-two states. The states listed according to -frequency of births are: Cal., Va., N.Y., Mass., Pa., Tex., N.J., FI., Wash., La., D.C., R.I., Okla., Me., S.C,., Md., Ill., Kan., Mo., Ind., N.C., Ga.
Hawaii, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Cuba were the birthplaces of five Kindergarteners.


Students Assist
During recess periods each day, two Junior High School girls assist the kindergarten teachers to care for the large number of children on the playground and in the rest rooms.

TWO CHILDREN IN FAMILY
The number of children for each family represented at the NOB School ranges from one to six; the median family has two childrena boy and a girl.


SIESTA TIME - The kindergarten, under the supervision of Mrs. Lucille Burke and Mrs. Nellie Walker, takes time out from their school session for a morning nap.


SMILES FROM THE KINDERGARTEN - Mrs. Lucille Burke and Mrs. Nellie Walker, teachers, and Jill Hiers beam down upon NOB School's youngest citizens.


THE INDIAN


Pa~re Fifteen







Page Sixteen THE INDIAN


JANITORS KEEP SCHOOL CLEAN AND ATTRACTIVE
By Thomas Beadling
During' inspection tours, Naval officers usually rate the NOB School "Superior" in appearance and cleanliness. The janitors, having been carefully selected for their particular jobs, work diligently to keep the NOB school premises in top condition. These highly efficient janitors are James Foster, Augustus Grizzle, Andrew Winters (parttime), and George Robinson (parttime).
Janitors Deserve Praise
James Foster, janitor at NOB school for the past two years, has been employed on the U. S. Naval Base since 1929 and has received numerous commendations for superior work. During the War, he served as chief cook at the officers' mess on Evans Point for which he got a much valued War service pin. Mr. Foster, a native of Jamaica, who now resides with his wife and son in Caimanera, speaks both English and Spanish fluently. His 21year-old son, Lincoln Foster, drives one of the NOB School buses.
Augustus Grizzle, born in Guantanamo City of Jamaican parents, has served as janitor at the NOB school since 1946. Mr. Grizzle, who speaks both English and Spanish and who greets everyone with a pleasant smile, helps to support his large family - his mother, six sisters, and four brothers. His father died recently. Augustus, who is now 19 years old and a prolific worker, wants to become a doctor of medicine.
Andrew Winters, who lives in Guantanamo City with his wife and six children, has worked on the U. S. Naval Base since 1941. At present, he works as janitor at


MR. ABEL MOSQUEDA
CULTIVATES FLORA
By Thomas Beadling
"The flowers and lawns look very attractive and well-kept," recently commented a visiting Captain while inspecting the NOB School, "Who is your landscape gardner?"
Abel Mosqueda, a native of Cuba who is a landscape gardner and floriculturist by trade, gives full time to beautifying the campus. He keeps the floral vegetation flourishing, but trim.
Mr. Mosqueda, who has been employed by the U. S. Naval Base since 1943, knows the Spanish names for every tree, shrub, and flower on the campus. Having always been a lover of flowers and ornamental plants, he studied floriculture in Preston, Cuba.

"What pleases me most is what the students have been led to do for themselves and for the School," said Dr. William T. Edwards on his recent visit to help evaluate the NOB School.

the NOB school in the morning and at the Naval Base library in the afternoon. Mr. Winters, the son of English speaking Jamaican parents, early became a linguist. Today he can speak and understand five languages-English, French, Spanish, Syrian, and Chinese.
George Robinson, who worked as substitute janitor during the recent illness of James Foster, is a native of Jamaica who now resides in Guantanamo City with his wife and two children-Rita and Alfred. Mr. Robinson, who speaks both English and Spanish fluently, has been employed by the U. S. Naval Base since 1942.


TROPICAL FLORA TENDS TO BEAUTIFY CAMPUS

Floral Landscaping Lends Beauty
To School Grounds
"Tropical beauty" typifies the landscaping of the NOB School campus adjoining the Naval Chapel on Massip Hill. The landscape scheme gives careful attention to the arrangement of trees, shrubbery, foliage, flowers, and lawn in relation to the architectural details and proportions of the main building. Tropical plants, set to conform with the natural lay-out of the grounds, follow stepped formations that produce displays of varied depth and' outline.
Tropical trees with broad spreading branches shade the, smaller plants from the hot sun. Flowering trees and shrubbery predominate; but palms and masses of luxuriant foliage, including rare species, are harmoniously blended. Planted to create clever combinations of forms, they enhance the beauty and attractiveness of the campus.
Palms and bougainvillia shrubs, with myriads of brilliant red floral bracts, border the ascending drive to the school. Near the entrance to the campus, datiles (date palms) and yaraguan trees frame the winding drive. On the campus, picturesque palms - areca, corojo, and coconut trees - produce a tropical atmosphere; fig (higo), lime,. papaya, and wild grape-fruit trees attract added interest.
Two dignified cactus century plants, Spanish maguey, guard the entrance to the center front walk. Royal poincianas or colorful flamboyant trees, displaying long spreading branches, shade the left and right front wings of the school edifice; while Australian pine, jaguey (banyan), and guacima trees shade the rear section.
Marpacificos (hibiscus), adelfas (oleanders), amapolas, paquitas, poinsettias, and rhododendrons add brilliantly colored blooms to the campus flora; while lechero shrubs, exposing silvery limbs with white flowers, produce delightful contrasts.
Oleanders and hibiscus cover the center front of the building, while crotons and other shrubs line the open veranda. The numerous oleanders, large ornamental shrub-like trees with leathery leaves and profuse clusters of deep-pink or white blooms, and the hibiscus, bearing five-petal red flowers with yellow centers, definitely predominate along the east and west ends of the building.
Crotons - alcalifas and periquitas, displaying leaves of many vivid colors - yellow, orange, red, green, mixed - brighten the front of the veranda; well-kept aurelia hedges blanket the lower wall spaces; and almeja and rare species of cacti
(Continued on Page Thirty-two)


SCHOOL CUSTODIANS- Maintenance staff keeps school premises in top condition. (Left to right - Andrew Winters - part time, Augustus Grizzle, George Robinson -- substitute janitor during recent illness of James Foster.)


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Page Sixteen


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN Page Seventeen


_ SCHOOL FLIES AMERICAN FLAG

The thirty-foot flagpole in front
of the NOB School was supplied by Public Works and flies the official Naval Station American flag. Colors are raised at 0800 daily and lowered at sunset in keeping with Navy custom and tradition. The flagpole was placed on the campus in December 1948.
The American flag which flies at
the Naval Operating Base Administration Building is the official flag of the Naval Operating Base. The Naval Station, one of the eight commands entitled to fly an American flag, flies no flag other than the one flown at Naval Operating
Base School.
FIRE PRECAUTIONS ARE CAREFULLY OBSERVED
By Patricia McCrodden
In order to meet all safety standards and requirements, the school fire fighting equipment is examined regularly and kept in good working condition at all times. The fire box, to be used to summon the fire department, is located in plain sight on the outside corner of the sixth grade room. The broad red stripe and the red light, which are characteristic of all Base fire alarm boxes, are plainly visible. The school children know where the fire
box is located and how to use it.
When either the school or the
chapel Base fire alarm sounds, the school bell fire signal is sounded from the office; both school buildings are emptied immediately, in keeping with plans worked out in cooperation with the Base Fire
Department.
Fire drills are held monthly. During these drills, both buildings have been emptied in as little as thirty. five seconds, the immediate grounds
have been cleared within sixty seconds, and the entire area vacated
within less than two minutes.
FIFTH GRADERS ARE
WELL-TRAVELED
*'( (continued From Page Thirteen)
grade is 10 years of age.
Social Studies Rate High
An activity program, centered
about Colonial life, has created lively interest and has 'produced colorful displays. In the first unit, "Early Settlements in North America," Barbara Aten won first place on map work. In the second unit, "Early Indian Settlements," the children arranged a sandbox showing life of the Colonial period. In their third unit, "Virginia Plantations," their sandbox contained life of the early Virginia settlers and
their plantations.
"Health Camps," with major interest centering around personal health problems, is their present
key unit.


SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION- Navy buses convey pupils to and from NOB
School at regularly scheduled time. (Insert - left to right: Stephanie Fenton, Sylvia Cavanaugh, Joan Parker, Charlene Brown, Joan McNeal, Susan Chaffin,
and Jeaneen Hummel.)

PUBLIC WORKS AND BASE POLICE COOPERATE TO
INSURE SAFE SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION

Naval Operating Base School Children Have Special Buses Transporting
Them to and From School; Marked "Stop! School Bus"
By Bill Barrett and Bill Reinhold
"How are the children transported to and from school?" newcomers to Guantanamo Bay frequently ask. Approximately 97 per cent of the pupils are conveyed to and from the NOB School in school buses, which are controlled by the Naval Operating Base transportation system at Guantanamo Bay.
Best Buses Transport Pupils Perez, A. Pupo, and Lincoln Foster.
As the NOB School bus trans- The bus drivers, having been speportation is an integral part of the cifically trained and of proven cornNaval Base transportation system, petence, can be depended upon to the most suitable vehicles and the observe all traffic rules and to give best Naval equipment are dis- careful attention to the safety of patched to cover special routes at the children. They help the children regularly scheduled times to con- to obey all traffic rules and to convey the pupils, duct themselves satisfactorily in
Every vehicle utilized-four large the vicinity of the buses.
buses and a station wagon-is Children, Are Safeguarded clearly labelled in bold black letters, The Guantanamo Bay Transpor"SCHOOL BUS." To make them tation Center inspects the school even more easily identified, parts buses daily, and strives to keep of the four large school buses - them in top condition at all times. two trailers and two Base convey- A service truck carrying all 'necance types - have recently been essary equipment is always ready brightened up with new paint, to proceed to any point on the Base
The school bus routes are or- to meet emergencies, such as reganized so as to secure a high pairing engines or changing tires. degree of efficiency and economy in On the main roads, the Base* service without sacrificing the wel- Police work in close co-operation fare of the individual pupils. with the school transportation.
Drivers Are Efficient When the school buses stop at reguExperienced drivers, who are lar stations along the main roads, properly licensed and carefully se- the Base Police jeep patrols halt lected for their particular jobs, traffic to insure children's safety. operate the school buses. Every In each trailer bus, a conductor driver must pass rigid physical stands at the entrance to prevent examinations and technical tests. any child from entering or leaving
The staff of drivers - all Cubans the vehicle prior to full stop. In or Jamaicans who speak English - these trailers, buzzers flash off and include Cyril Scott, Lino Cambron, on to inform the drivers when to Vincent Dyce, Ignacio Sell, Rafael stop or go.


THE INDIAN


Pasre Seventeen







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THE INDIAN Page Nineteen


GIRLS' SPORTS FOR 1948-1949

By Joan Harris
Because of the ideal climate and
the use of Base recreation facilities, the NOB School offers a greater variety of physical training activities for girls than most other schools of its size. The girls' physical education activities, under the direction of Miss Ada Schmidt, have included swimming, basketball, bowling, softball, riding, volley
ball, and tennis.
Even in this tropical climate the
sports are seasonal. Swimming is 'best during early fall and late spring; basketball, the most strenuous sport, during the winter months; the others in the in-between seasons.
Basketball
Basketball was one of the favor' ite sports among the girls. After
weeks of practice, four teams were chosen. Barbara Johnson and Jill Hiers were captains of the senior high teams; Anne Sheppard and Betty Parks were captains of the junior high teams. Jill Hier's team won three out of three games; Betty Parks' team won two out of three. Joan Harris was high scorer
for the senior team.
Experienced senior high players
refereed the junior high games.
These younger girls learned the game rapidly and played good basketball at the end of the season.
Bowling
During the weeks of basketball
practice, eight girls took turns bowling. They used two alleysone of ten pins and one of duck pins. Some insisted the alleys were lopsided, the balls had chicken pox, and the gutters were magnetized; 'but all in all, it was a lot of fun.
Ramona Sparks had high score, 126, with the ten pins; Sharon eBrown had high score, 79, with the
duck pins
Volleyball and Tennis
The current sports are volleyball
and tennis. A volleyball tournament is in progress now with three teams participating. Captains are: Jeaneen Hummel, Joan Harris, and Charlene Brown. Two games are played every physical education period. Ramona Moses is high, with
twenty-two points to her credit.
While the two teams are playing
volleyball, the third is on the tennis courts. Most of the girls are beginners, so the game appears to be a track meet between players and balls. The girls show promise, and before, the end of the season should be able to hit the ball inside the
white lines.
"This School has the best school
spirit that I've ever seen," Dr. Orin F. Crowe, a member of the Accreditation Committee of the Southern Association, told Base School
students.


NOB SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM' HAS
DIVERSIFIED SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES

A diversity of sports, games, and activities characterizes the NOB Physical Education Program under the competent direction of Mr. Edward Ondrasik - holder of a Master's degree in Physical Education from Columbia University-and his assistant, Miss Ada Schmidt, teacher of Girls' Physical Education.
The major emphasis is given to those sports and physical activities that have the greatest carry-over value for the individual pupil. Health, however, dictates the amount and nature of activity for each pupil.
A GALAXY OF SPORTS Considerable provision is made for activities involving team play.
Left Column-top to bottom: The physical education program
1. The Basketball Team. encourages good sportsmanship, 2. Mr. Ondrasik and Mr. Mach- not only on the part of the players,
tolIff, of Recreation, show the boys but also on the part of the spectathe "bows" of football.
3. Scrimmage. tors toward contests.
4. Just Before the Whistle.
5-6. Views of 5th-6th Grade Soft- H. S. BASKETBALL TEAM
ball-Mr. Ondrasik Umpiring. ENTERS BASE LEAGUE
Right Column- top to bottom:
1. The Cheerleaders-left to right By Fred Johnson and
-Joan McNeal, Eunice Besse, Phyllis Hummell, Jeaneen Hummel. Edward Groome
2. Swimming Class Lines Up for In 1948-1949, for the first time
Inspection. in its history, the NOB High School
3. The Big SPLASH. has a basketball team and the per4. Watching the "Experts." mission to participate in League 5. It's Recess - First Grade. competition. This year, it has
Center Column- top to bottom: played in the Base Basketball
1. Girls' Basketball. League' with teams representing 2. It's Going Inl Two Points! the various activities of the Base.
Although small in number, and
Bottom - left to right: F. Johnson, lacking their opponents' size and
P. Broughton, P. Burke, R. Gover, experience, the team entered the E. Groome - Captain, W. Barrett, League in the greatest of spirits.
C. Dutcher, K. Masterson. Even though they failed to gain I the "win column" a single time in thirteen encounters, the presence
GRIDIRON GRUNTS of the High School gave the League an added spark.
By Fred Johnson Team Well Trained
The "touch" football season, Beginning practice in mid-Nowhich opened with fundamentals, vember, Mr. Ondrasik, former colwas climaxed at NOB School by an legiate star, found himself faced Inter-squad game, in which the with a group of boys who had never team coached by the school's ath- played basketball; some who didn't letics director, Edward Ondrasik, know the first fundamentals of the topped the squad tutored by "Jack" game. The boys, willing and eager Machtolff, former star for Ala- to learn, practiced many long bama's Crimson Tide and the Chi- weeks. How to dribble, pass the cago Bears. Displaying a tight ball, and the correct offensive and defense, which kept Machtolff's defensive positions were taught. team behind their own twenty-yard Eddie Groome was elected, by line except on one occasion, Ondra- his teammates, to captain the NOB sik's charges scored a safety, which High cagers on the court. Ramon gave them the game - 2-0. Alonso was the team manager.
The inter-squad game came at With the aid of player-coach, the end of long weeks of practice. Edward Ondrasik, the team gave a Under their two respective coaches, good account of themselves against the boys had learned the funda- every team they met. They had the mentals they were to use in the distinction of carrying one of th6 game-how to block, run plays, last games into an extra period. and the correct offensive and de- This was the only League game fensive positions. Some of these that had to go into an overtime boys had had no previous football period. experiences. Cheerleaders Add Vim Pete Broughton was chosen to Meanwhile, the remainder of the lead Machtolff's team. Fred John- student body was not sitting around. son was the field general for On- Cheerleaders were elected and it drasik's squad members. The teams was this colorful attraction which are listed below, caught the fancy of the fans. The Machtolff, Coach: Broughton, girls, who turned out, really put Pete; Barrett, Bill; Cozy, John; their hearts into cheerleading. JeaDutcher, Clinton; Harris, Bill; neen Hummel, Joan McNeal, PhylHeimer, Edwin; Huddy, Norman; lis Hummell, and Eunice Besse are (Continued on Page Twenty) (Continued on Page Twenty)


THE INDIAN


Page Nineteen







Page Twenty THE INDIAN


YEA! CHEERLEADERS!
RAH! RAH! RAH !

By Joan Parker, Joan Harris, Cecil Pederson, Virginia Taylor
Four peppy cheerleaders,
Put on the courts,
Root for Hi' School
'Cause they're good sports.
Toss me the iodine,
These cart-wheels kill us.
So, yea! Eunice, Joan, Jeaneen, and Phyllis.
Did you notice that NOB School always had the largest cheering section at the League basketball games? The reason was plain to see. Four charming young ladies Eunice Besse, Jeaneen Hummel, Phyllis Hummell, and Joan McNeal
-appeared on the courts two or three times a week to lead the yells. They not only added life and pep to the grandstand, but spurred the teams on to greater effort.
The trim cheerleaders, with little previous cheerleading experiences, practiced long hours to perfect their cheers and techniques. They dug up or created catchy yells, which they mimeographed and taught the High School students.
The cheering was not all confined to the Recreation basketball courts. At the start of the season and at the beginning of the second half, the students held "Pep" rallies at the school. At the first rally, which was introduced by a snake dance through halls and across lawns, the basketball team was presented to the Junior and Senior High School.. At the second rally, a pantomime skit was staged; Betty Parks and Lois Parker, with their nursesJoan Harris and Barbara Johnson, demonstrated how Baby High School would take the ball away from Baby NAS.
This vivacious quartet, who put boundless energy and vim into the job of cheerleading, helped to stimulate and maintain continuous interest in the League basketball games in which the boys played.

LETTERS "G" AWARDED
At a banquet given by the School Board in honor of the High School basketball team and cheerleaders, CAPT J. H. Lewis presented the green and white "varsity" letters.
Players on the basketball team awarded letters were: William Barrett, Pete Broughton, Patrick Burke, Clinton Dutcher, Robert Gover, Edward Groome, William Harris, Fred Johnson,. "Skiddy" Masterson, and Ramon Alonso (manager).
Cheerleaders awarded letters were: Eunice Besse, Jeaneen Hummel, Phyllis Hummell, and Joan McNeal.
Salt tablets from dispensers have recently been made available to NOB pupils and faculty.


MACHTOLFF COACHES
SCHOOL FOOTBALL
By William Barrett
"Jack" Machtolff, FP2, who came to Guantanamo Bay in mid-1948, was assistant football instructor and coach for a team of high school boys during the football season. He explained the fundamentals of football afid demonstrated plays.
His team lost a thriller, 2-0, on the gridiron to the team coached by Mr. Edward Ondrasik, boys' physical education director.
Named All-Southern
Machtolff's experiences in sports have been studded with football highlights. From 1936-1938, he played center at the University of Alabama.. He reached his pinnacle of football stardom when the University of Alabama met the University of California in the Rose Bowl in 1938; that same year he was named "All-Southern." Machtolff played professional football for the Chicago Bears in 1939 and 1940, and for the San Diego Bombers, a Service team, in 1945 upon returning from Naval duty overseas.

H. S. BASKETBALL TEAM ENTERS BASE LEAGUE
(Continued from Page Nineteen)
to be highly commended for their work.
Players Score High
Starting most of the games for the Green and White quintet were Coach Ondrasik, Groome, Broughton, Johnson, and Harris. Clinton Dutcher, who replaced Harris, became one of the bright spots for the High School team. His fight and ability to mix it up were unsurpassed by anyone.
High School reserves were Bill Barrett, Bob Gover, "Skiddy" Masterson, and Patrick Burke. Patrick Burke, was always the crowd pleaser. On one occasion, he was second high scorer for his team.
Individual Scorers
B'kts F'ls Pts.
Broughton, Pete --- 49 5 103 Johnson, Fred ---- 11 6 28 Groome, Edward --- 11 0 22 Burke, Patrick --- 10 0 20 Barrett, Bill ------- 8 2 18 Gover, Bob -------- 8 2 18Dutcher, Clinton --- 5 5 15 Masterson, "Skiddy" 3 0 6 Harris, Bill (4 games) 1 3 5

GIRLS' SPORTS AT
NOB SCHOOL
By Janet Leckenby
The NOB School offers a wellrounded physical training program for the girls. Scheduled for the year were the following sports: swimming, basketball, bowling, tennis, volley-ball, horseback riding, kickball, speed ball, softball, dodge ball, and golf.


MINOR SPORTS,,

By Dennis Lanigan
In addition to the major sportsswimming, football, and basketball
- the boys' physical education classes have participated in the following sports: soccer, softball, tennis, and bowling.
Two teams, captained by Bill Harris and Edward Groome, were organized after the fundamentals and rules of the game of soccer had been learned. Harris's team won the climaxing game with a score of two.
Next on the schedule was softball. The class was again divided into two teams, captained by Bob Gover and "Skiddy" Masterson. The majority of the games were won by Gover's team.
Sports that will be fitted into the schedule for the remaing sixweeks period include: tennis, bowling, golf, and horseback riding.

MINOR SPORTS ARE NOT
FORGOTTEN

By Dennis Lanigan
For each individual, the minor sport has more carry-over value than many major sports.
When you're an adult, you don't play baseball or football after a hard day's work, it is too tiring. You, however, can always enjoy a good game of tennis or bowl a few lines with a friend.
"You don't think it's fun to bowl or play tennis?" Then you've been missing something! The thrill of seeing your ball hit in the pocket for a strike, an affectionate slap on the back from your friends, outmaneuvering your opponent on the tennis court and then slamming a perfect replacement in the corner just out of your lunging adversary's reach are nothing short of thrilling.
As a result at NOB School, we are not only taught major sports, but also many of the minor sports. As we grow up, we will know the rules and fundamentals of all types of sports.

GRIDIRON GRUNTS

(Continued from Page Nineteen)
Lanigan, Dennis; Masterson, Kleber "Skiddy"; Pina, Caesar; Richards, Bennett; Richards, Fred; Weatherson, Gordon.
Ondrasik, Coach: Johnson, Fred; Alonzo, Ramon; Bowley; George; Burke, Patrick; Gover, Bob; Groome, Edward; Homer, Neil; Kunz, Charles; Masterson, Marshall; Reinhold, Bill; Rizzo, Robert; Sheppard, Furman; Smith, Paul; Sypek, Donald.

Bulletins and mounting boards for educational and communication purposes are located in the corridors, office, and class rooms.


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THE INDIAN Page Twenty-one


SWIMMING IS TOPS OF
* SCHOOL SPORTS
Splash! Splash! Splash!
By Fred Johnson and Robert Gover
Swimming tops the sports enjoyed by the high school students, according to a recent survey made ,by the sophomores. Physical education started out with a big splash this year, when the boys and girls of the NOB High School took a mighty leap into the recreation pool. In a six-weeks swimming course, ably coached by Mr. Ondrasik and his two assistants-Miss Ada Schmidt and Miss Salome Mergen, the non-swimmers learned to swim and the others perfected their
techniques.
Students from the seventh
through the twelfth grades participated 'in the swimming course, which was set up to teach.them how.
to swim the maximum distance with minimum effort. They practiced proper swimming techniques -breathing, kicks, strokes, relaxed
positions.
The swimmers had to swim for
various distances ranging from 40 to 80 meters, depending upon the group in which they were placed. . The eleventh and twelfth grades
were required to swim 80 meters; the ninth and tenth grades, 60 meters; and the seventh and eighth
grades, 40 meters.
Boys Compete in Swimming
The boys were organized into
:-three groups, according to their grades: (1) ninth, tenth, and eleventh grades, headed by Pete Broughton; (2) eighth grade, led by Pat Burke; and (3) the seventh grade, with Furman Sheppard the
top swimmer.
At the conclusion 'of the six
weeks, the best swimmers were picked. The boys chosen, according to their efficiency in the various strokes and diving, were: free style -Pete Broughton, Pat Burke; and Furman Sheppard; back strokePete Broughton, Pat Burke, and Bob Gover; breast stroke - Fred Johnson and Pat Burke. Top divers . were listed as Pete Broughton,
Clinton Dutcher, and Skiddy Masterson.

HORSEBACK RIDING IS A
FAVORITE SPORT'

By Janet Leckenby and Elsa Heimer
With fiery hoof-beats and clouds
of dust, the girls of Guantanamo Bay ride again. The riding classes, under the direction of Mrs. Lela Souders, were recently organized into four orderly groups. On Tuesday and Thursday for two weeks, the girls had instructions in riding.
Horseback riding is the favorite
sport of many girls, who wish to extend their thanks and appreciation to Mrs. Souders and to the
* members of the NOB Corral ......


GIRLS' GYM CLASSES ARE
ACTIVE IN SOFTBALL
By Joan Harris
The girls' Junior and Senior High School gym classes, under the direction of Miss Ada Schmidt, enjoyed the- softball season. Finding softball top second on the list of best-liked sports, the girls took an active part in the school teams.
After a few warm-up sessions of lively playing, teams were chosen with Ramona Sparks and Jan Hiers acting as captains. As the softball teams were equally balanced, a wholesome competitive, spirit prevailed throughout the season.
Ramona Sparks' team won two out of three games. Eunice Besse topped the hits- a total of eight. Barbara Gould and Jeaneen Hummel scored the most runs- six.
SWIMMERS' SAFETY WAS
PROTECTED BY JONES
Eldon Eugene Jones, SN, life guard at the recreation pool, was always at hand during swimming classes to insure the safety of all the high school swimmers. When the boys and girls were learning to swim, or were practicing new techniques, Jones watched every swimmer.

PALMER TAUGHT DIVERS

Harry Palmer, EPI, USN, champion diver and swimmer, demonstrated diving to the high school boys. He taught new techniques and good form for diving to the best swimmers, who practiced to compete in the spring "meet."


MISS SALOME MERGEN TRAINS SWIMMERS
By Jeaneen Hummel
Miss Salome Mergen, who has swum in seven aquacades and directed two other water ballets, has been training the best high school swimmers to take part in an aquacade at NOB recreation, pool in May. She prepared these teenagers for a swimming "meet" to be held on January 21; but because of chilly afternoons, the parents requested that the "meet" be postponed until spring.
For high school students who have not yet learned to swim, Miss Mergen has conducted special classes on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Prior to coming to Guantanamo Bay, she completed junior, senior, and instructors' courses in swimming under the American National Red Cross; also junior and senior courses at the YMCA in Pittsburgh, Pa.
Miss Mergen, who has swum in 25 races and. won 20 swimming medals - including two first-place medals and two first-place ribbons for relay, has given unstintingly of her time .nd talent to help the boys and girls to develop right swimming techniques.
For her valued services, the high school students wish to extend a vote of thanks.

THANKS TO COLLIER
The "Sports" writers wish to extend thanks to Allen Collier, regular editor of "The Indian," for giving them many valuable pointers ..on .how- to_ write_ "!spol;'r r ti .....


AT THE "REC" POOL - Clinton Dutcher demonstrates his favorite stroke to a group of High School swimmers.


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Pawe Twenty-two THE INDIAN
IN and OUT of NOB SCHOOL
1948- 1949




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"CORAL REEF" IS NOB'S
FIRST YEARBOOK

By Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson
There have been many "firsts"
at the NOB School this year, not the least of which is the "Coral Reef," the School's first yearbook.
The staff, consisting of representatives from the fourth grade through the Senior High School, has spent much of its after school time writing articles for the publication.
Yearbook Staff Works Hard
Headed by the editor-in-chief
Barbara Johnson, the Senior editors have spent many evenings with Miss Anita Feinstein -faculty advisor for the yearbook, editing articles, cutting montages, setting up the pages, and doing many other prerequisites for a good publication.
"Coral Reef" Sets Precedence
The "Coral Reef" is the result of
the combined efforts of the entire school, and is not, as are most yearbooks, the efforts of the Senior class only. This makes it of almost as much interest to the undergraduates as to the Senior; it sets . a precedent for future yearbooks
at NOB School.
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman's assistance to the yearbook staff has contributed greatly to the successful completion of the "Coral Reef."

MATH-SCIENCE CLUB
WORKS IN LABORATORY

By Gordon Weatherson and
Bennett Richards
The Math-Science Club, composed of junior high school pupils and sponsored by Mrs. Lela Souders, has been organized into
* two sections-biology and chemistry. Science experiments, which require the use of laboratory apparatus, are being undertaken by the
boys and girls.
Several of the Math-Science . Club members, who concentrate on
the topics in which they are particularly interested, show marked scientific aptitudes. The pupils in the "biology" section include Marshall Masterson, Margaret McCullough, Bennett Richards, Georgette Sasser, Furman Sheppard, Paul Smith, Donald Sypek, and Gordon Weatherson. Club members performing chemistry experiments are Dixie Adair, Phyllis Aten, George Bowley, Marie Grover, Neil Horner, Norman Huddy, George MacMichael, and Fred Richards.
The Club officers are Bennett
Richards, president; Norman Huddy, vice-president; Dixie Adair, sec. retary; and Neil Horner, reporter.
The purpose of the Club is to promote keener interest in modern
science.


CONSTITUTION DRAWN FOR STUDENT COUNCIL

By Virginia Taylor and
Jeaneen Hummel
At the suggestion of the two Senior High School home rooms, it was decided to organize the Junior-Senior High School into a Student Association, which would aid in governing the school through a Student Council. A committee consisting of six students and four faculty members was formed to write a "Constitution." Committee Writes Constitution This Constitution Committee has been working steadily since February, and will present the completed Constitution to the entire JuniorSenior High School for ratification this week. It is expected that several weeks will be spent in discussion of it, and that changes suggested by the student body will be incorporated into the accepted "Constitution."
The members of the committee are: Students-Bennett Richards, 7th grade; Henry Crommelin, 8th grade; William Barrett, 9th grade; Ramona Sparks, 10th grade; Jeaneen Hummel and Kleber Masterson, 11th and 12th grades homeroom; Faculty-Miss Anita J. Feinstein, ..Mrs. Ruth Metzger, Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, and Mrs. Lela Souders.
ATTENDED SCHOOL ABROAD
More than 40 pupils have at some time attended schools outside the United States and Guantanamo Bay.
One can hear occasional remarks, which begin, "When we lived in Shanghai . .. "; "In Japan, I saw ; . . "; "When I went to school in Hawaii . ." "In Newfoundland . ."


LIBRARY CLUB GIRLS
HELP LIBRARIAN

By Janet Poe
The Library Club, organized in November 1948 with an enrollment of 15 junior high school girls, has worked zealously in library activities. The members, under the skilled direction of Mrs. Ruth Metzger, serve as assistant librarians checking books in and out, and returning materials to their proper places. They have processed more than 2Q0 library books and filed approximately 2,000 catalogue cards.
In processing library books, the girls paste in bobk pockets, prepare library cards, letter books, shellac the book backs, select and exhibit new books, and arrange bulletin board displays.
The Library Club officers are Marie Grover, president, and Janet Poe, secretary.

SCHOOL CLUB WORKS IN
BASE HOBBY SHOP
By Ramon E. Alonso
The Hobby Club members, composed of 14 junior high school boys, work in the NOB Hobby Shop on Friday afternoons from 2:15 to 3:40. The shop's modern electrical appliances and machinery- saws, jig-saws, drills, planes, edgers, sharpeners, sanders, designersare at the disposal of the boys. All materials, except mahogany wood, are furnished free.
The boys in the Hobby Club, under the supervision of skilled workmen at the shop, have made numerous articles - tables, shelves, book-ends, sewing kits, ornaments, toys, and miniature houses.
More than one-half of the NOB School children are enrolled in the kindergarten and first three grades.


"CORAL REEF" STAFF AND J. H. S. CLUBS - Co-curricular activities are enjoyed at the NOB School. Top- left to right: Hobby Club and "Coral Reef" staff. Bottom: Math-Science Club and Library Club.


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Pa e Twenty-three







0 ,r - THlE INDIAN


"SWEET SIXTEEN"
By Charlene Brown
A wonderful time was had by all who attended Kathryn Hollis's birthday party. First prize, for finding a series of articles in a scavenger hunt, was awarded to


Jeaneen Hummel and' John Cozy. Lois Parker and Fred Johnson were given the consolation prize.
Eats, games, and dancing highlighted' the evening. Piano solos, played by Lee Messa, a member of the Base Band, brought the evening to a grand climax.


CHRISTMAS PAGEANT
WAS IMPRESSIVE

Christmas made its debut at the Naval Station Lyceum on December 22, 1948, when the NOB School beautifully presented the "Nativity." This Christmas pageant, produced under the capable leadership of Mrs. Geneva McCollum and Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, was acclaimed a big success by the hundreds of spectators who enjoyed the performance. Biblical stories of Bethlehem, Mary and Joseph, King Herod, the three wise men, the shepherds, the angels, and the "Christ Child in the Manger" were realistically portrayed.
Christmas Carols marked the highlight of the production. Under the able direction of Mrs. Machtolff and Mrs. McCollum, the carols were sung by the Junior and Senior High School Glee Club and the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades.
The candlelight procession, in which all the choristers held white lighted candles in their right hands as they marched in slow cadence down the long aisles of the lyceum, created an impressive opening scene. Singing "Oh, Come All Ye Faithful," they proceeded to their respective places on the large outdoor stage.
The principal roles of the "Nativity" were enacted by the following pupils: Narrator-Skiddy Masterson; Prologue-Fred Johnson; Christ - Jan Hiers; Mary - Patricia Frances Spahr; Joseph Robert Keehn; King Herod Charles Greenwood; Shepherds
(Continued on Page Thirty-one)
THIRD GRADE PRESENTS WASHINGTON PLAYLET
On February 21st, in honor of George Washington's birthday, a group of third graders presented a colonial playlet, "The Little Cook," to the members of their class, their parents, and the second grade.
The idea of giving a play had originated two weeks earlier, when the group was reading a story by the same title. Inspired by the proximity of Washington's Birthday and the desire to adapt the story to a play, the children began to write their own versions. From the combination of these papers, the finished dialogue emerged. Tryouts were held and character parts awarded to those who read them best. Lines were memorized, costumes made, properties assembled, and the play was produced.
Judy McLellen 'played the part of Betsy Chase, the little girl who cooked breakfast for General Washington (Dennis Carliss). The parts of Mr. and Mrs. Chase and Brother Ben were played by Bertil Heimer, Mary Wawizyniak, and Robert Pendleton, respectively.


CHRISTMAS PAGEANT - A truly fine performance depicting the "Nativity," was presented by the NOB Junior-Senior High School Glee Club and Intermediate Grades.


YOUNG PATRIOTS - Top: The fourth grade and Mrs. Geneva McCollum, teacher, display their Washington birthday projcct - bulletin board with patriotic motto, Mount Vernon in miniature, and early period costumes. Bottom: Cast for George Washington play ly third grade, directed by Mrs. Carolyn Yates. Left to right: Mr. Chase - Bertil Heimer, Mrs. Chase - Mary Gail Wawizyniak, Brother Ben - Robert Pendleton, Betsy Chase - Judy MeLellen, George Washington - Dennis Carliss.


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THE INDIAN Pg wnyfv


SENIOR BANQUET WAS A
GALA AFFAIR
By Jeaneen Hummel and
Ramona Sparks
Honoring Miss Barbara Johnson,
senior, the Junior Class gave a banquet at Marine Site II restaurant on the evening of April 9th.
The long banquet table, covered
with white linen, was adorned with lovely purple and white flowers. A sumptuous five course dinner was served. Miss Johnson, wearing black with rhinestone jewelry, was seated at the head. Before dinner, Miss Johnson was presented an orchid from Miss Feinstein, the junior-senior home-room teacher.
The presentation was made by Joan Harris. After the banquet, Miss Johnson addressed the future
seniors.
Entire Senior Class Attends
'The guest list included Miss
Johnson's parents and guest-SGT.
Gil Simmons; faculty members and guests - Mr. and Mrs. Permenter; LT. and Mrs. Metzger; Mr. and Mrs. Souders, Miss Feinstein, Dr. Nelson, Miss Schmidt, and Mr. Ondrasik; Juniors and guests -Jan Hiers, PFC. Butcher; S Eunice Besse, PFC. Theriot; Joan
Harris, CPL. Christiansen; Clinton Dutcher, Jeaneen Hummel; "Skiddy" Masterson, Joan McNeal; Fred Johnson, Ramona Sparks; Edward
Groome.

HIGH SCHOOL BALL WAS
A GREAT SUCCESS

By Joan Harris
* The Holiday Ball, NOB High School's first annual Christmas dance held at The Little Theater on December 28, 1948, was a delightful function. A buffet dinner, catered by the Marine Restaurant, preceded the formal , dance. In' formal skits, presented by high
school students, and the serving of punch interspersed dance numbers.
Dance music, amply furnished by the Naval Base Orchestra, produced a gay atmosphere.
Honored Guests
Among the guests were RADM.
and Mrs. W. K. Phillips, USN, CAPT. and Mrs. Henry Crommelin, USN, School Board members and their wives, faculty, and parents.
Everyone, guests and students,
thoroughly enjoyed the event.
The student dance committee included Eunice Besse, Charlene Brown, Susan Chaffin, Joan Harris,
Phyllis Hummell, Fred Johnson.
Base personnel and faculty members who worked to make the dance successful were LCDR. E. E. Bosserman, Protestant Chaplain; CDR.
and Mrs. K. S. Masterson; 1st LT.
B. G. Cass, USMC; LT. W. C.
Keehn; LT. and Mrs. J. K. Metzger, ENC and Mrs. C. R. Souders, Miss Anita Feinstein, and members
of Recreation.


NOB SCHOOL TAKES PART
IN MARDI GRAS

By Eunice Besse, Joan Harris, Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson
The NOB School was well tepresented in the recent Mardi gras, which was held for the first time this year.
Mardi Gras Queens
Two high school girls won the titles of queens-Jeaneen Hummel and Joan McNeal. Jeaneen Hummel, Junior, was elected queen of the Civilian Group. In addition to her appearance with the group of queens, Jeaneen held court in the parade of floats on a large pink shell. Ramona Moses, freshman, and Ramona Sparks, sophomore, were members of her court. Dressed in yellow formals, they rode on the beautifully decorated civilian float.
Joan McNeal, sophomore, was elected Miss NAS, Queen of the Naval Air Station. Joan, who rode on a picturesque float in the parade, played the part of a beautiful maiden who attempted to entice a downed flyer to her island.
The whole tropical setting was enhanced by the beautiful day.
Took Part in Costume Parade
Children of the kindergarten, the elementary grades, and Junior high school took part in the costume parade. They appeared dressed as fairy tale characters and in their own imaginative inspirations.
For three evenings, from February 16 to February 19, the Base personnel parked their cars in the student-protected parking lot and bought novelties at the students' novelty booth.
The students operated the parking lot and novelty booth, under the direction of a committee-Clinton Dutcher, Edward Groome, Kleber Masterson - with Mrs. Lela Souders as faculty representative. The boys spent several days building the novelty booth and planning the parking lot. The Base Police gave helpful advice on this project. The proceeds for this enterprise started a fund for the newly organized Student Association.


SCHOOL BOARD SPONSORS
VARSITY BANQUET
Admiral Phillips Attends Dinner
For Awarding Letters

NOB School's basketball team and cheerleaders were honored at a banquet given by the NOB School Board, on the evening of April 21st, at the Marine Site Restaurant. Among the forty-five guests were: RADM W. K. Phillips, USN, and Mrs. Phillips; School Board members and their wives; Coach E. J. Ondrasik and Miss Ada Schmidt; Supervising Principal and Mrs. John A. Permenter; LT and Mrs. Walter Keehn; BMC J. A. Ohotnicky; team and guests; cheerleaders and guests.
The restaurant was decorated with green and white streamers in keeping with the school colors. Edward Groome, toastmaster, thanked all who had been associated with the team. He then introduced RADM. Phillips, whose well chosen words were enjoyed by all. Mr. Permenter gave a short talk on school spirit, after which the toastmaster directed words towards the team's capable coach, Mr. Ondrasik.
Play the Game Fair and Clean A gift from the team members, with a hearty "thank-you" of the team's appreciation, was presented to Mr. Ondrasik. In his response, Mr. Ondrasik expressed gratitude for the team's hard work and concluded by saying, "Remember to play the game fair and clean."
Climaxing the after-dinner speeches was the awarding of the varsity letters by CAPT. J. H. Lewis, senior school board member.
The letter was the regular varsity 8-inch "G" for Guantanamo, on a back-ground of white with green predominating. Small white basketballs and megaphones on the letters indicated why they were awarded.
After the presentation, a feature movie was shown to the enjoyment of all. The evening's affair established the first foot-hold on varsity athletic tradition for NOB School. It will be long remembered by all who attended.


~a -


GLEE CLUB - The core of the Christmas Pageant was trained and directed by Mrs. Gladys Machtolff.


THE INDIAN


Paze Twenty-five








Page Twenty-six THE INDIAN


YOUNG LINGUISTS - Fifth and sixi
tion of Mrs. Lucille Burke during the
THE U.S.S. MISSOURI
IMPRESSES STUDENTS
By John Cozy, Jr.
A group of 25 students-8th, 9th, and 10th graders - visited the famous U.S.S. Missouri, while it was anchored in Guantanamo Bay on January 17th. When the boys and girls embarked on the "Surrender" deck of the famous battleship, they were heartily greeted by several members of the ship's personnel. A Navy Commander gave each visitor a souvenir-a replica of the historic plaque depicting the surrender of Japan on V-J Day.
Pupils See Surrender Plaque
The students observed, the famous "Surrender Plaque" on the deck, where the peace treaty with Japan was signed; they read the plaques on the deck and bulkhead of the ship. Henry Crommelin, eighth grader, was permitted to take several pictures of these plaques.
Students Tour Ship
In order to give the students the opportunity to see various sections of the immense warship, they were divided into two groups - each group under the direction of a Naval officer.
Among the interesting things shown and explained to the pupils were the bridge, radar screens, electric navigator's scope, officer's mess, 16-inch deck guns, huge anchors, life boats, and the "Surrender" deck.
Dr. Esther Marion Nelson and Mrs. Alice Hayes, faculty members, accompanied the High School students. The group was conveyed to and from the U.S.S. Missouri in a landing craft.
ARRIVED.FROM MANY STATES
The pupils arrived at Guantanamo Bay directly from 70 different places - cities, towns, or naval stations -in 32 different states, with Va., Fla., Cal., Mass., N. Y., leading. Many of the children have lived in Washington, D. C.


th graders studied Spanish under the direcfirst-half of this school year.


PUPILS CONTRIBUTE TO 'MARCH OF DIMES' DRIVE

By Henry Crommelin
In the Nation-wide "March of Dimes" drive, the NOB School contributed a total of $104.70. The third graders, who donated $23.76, stood first among the contributing grades; the fifth graders, who gave $15.00, held second place. Drive Sponsored by Eighth Grade
Sponsored by the eighth grade, the school "March of Dimes" Committee- Patrick Burke, Lois Parker, and Anne Sheppardworked diligently to make the "drive" a success. These eighth graders designed and made posters, displayed circulars on bulletin boards, distributed illustrative materials to all the grades, talked to all the pupils about the purpose of the "drive," and collected money.

7th GRADERS DISPLAYED
ORIGINAL DESIGNS

By Holly Jackson
During the second six-weeks period, the seventh graders undertook an interesting unit in elementary geometry. From simple geometric designs- the hexagon, the octagon, and the pentagon- they proceeded to the more difficult ones. They colored their drawings, and exhibited them on the bulletin board in Room 1.
Practical Use of Geometry
After the students had completed a unit in symmetrical designs, they attacked assymmetrical arrangements. Some of their creations resembled modernistic art. Among the assymmetrical sketches displayed were: "My Confusing Concerto," "Nightmare Alley, "Summer Drizzle, "Escape," and the "Death March." These titles, originated by the seventh graders, truly described their respective geometric designs.
Miss Anita Feinstein, teacher of Mathematics, directed the project.


SCHOOL PERSONNEL ARE ACTIVE IN DRAMATICS

By Joan McNeal
Several Faculty members and students of the NOB School have participated in the various activities of the Base Little Theatre Group.
Mrs. Ruth Metzger, of the faculty, starred in both "Arsenic and Old Lace," the first production of this Group, and in "The Show Off," their second production. High School Students Play Roles
Susan Chaffin and Ramona Sparks played the leading roles in "Arsenic and Old Lace"; William Harris, Fred Johnson, and "Skiddy" Masterson held supporting roles. Clinton Dutcher played the part of "Joe" in "The Show Off."
Behind the Scenes
Mrs. Lela Cornett Souders, faculty, has been in charge of make-up for all The Little Theatre productions. High school students--Eu. nice Besse, Joan Harris, Jeaneen Hummel, Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson, and Joan McNeal-have been active members. of the Group. Eunice and Jeaneen were the prompters for the last production.
Miss Anita Feinstein, faculty, and Fred Johnson, junior, were on the Constitution Committee of the Little Theatre.

HAYRIDE-BEACH PARTY PROVIDES MUCH FUN

By Barbara Gould
The hayless-hayride and beach party, recently sponsored by Chaplain E. E. Bosserman, was greatly enjoyed by the junior and senior high school students. The group rode to Windmill Beach, where fun promptly began.
The curiosity seekers explored the coral rock formations and climbed cliffs along the beach, while the sport fans organized and played a game of soft ball.
An ample picnic supper was relished by all the teen-agers, who had their fill of good food - hot dogs, rolls, salads, olives, cookies, marshmallows, coca colas. As nightfall approached, everyone joined in singing their favorite songs.
"What a grand time!" agreed everyone as they rode home shortly after dark. "Let's have another hayride-beach party soon."

A HAPPY BIRTHDAY

By Holly Jackson
Barbara Burke's birthday party, attended by her many friends and classmates, was a happy affair. Refreshments, games, and dancing made a perfect evening for everyone present. A beautiful cake with twelve candles, and lovely presents made Barbara's day complete.
"A wonderful party!" exclaimed everyone. "A truly happy birthday."


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Page Twenty-six


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THE INDIAN Page Twenty-seven


EDUCATION A LIFELONG TASK
By Chaplain C. A. Herold, USN
Education of a child involves the
closest cooperation of the home (parents), the school and the Church. The education of a child is primarily the duty of the parents, which obligation is imposed upon them by the natural law and the divine positive law of God. Discipline and order are to be brought, into the life of the child by the parents -the school supplements this obligation and assists the
parents.
Education demands a lifetime of
learning. We are ever in pursuit of knowledge. Education demands a lifetime of discipline for we are never ever masters of ourself. Education demands a lifetime seeking after God and conforming our lives
according to His principles.
We are never finished here in
this world, with the job of education, it is a lifelong task we all
must be prepared to endure.

SIGNIFICANT -TRENDS IN
SCHOOL POPULATION
'According to the Metropolitan
Life Insurance Company and other groups that study population trends, about 400,000 or 11 per cent more first grade children will be enrolled in the schools of the United States in Sept. 1949 than
in Sept. 1948.
By 1957, when elementary enrollment reaches its expected peak, there will be eight million or 46 per cent more children in grades
1-8 than in 1947.
Expansion to Continue Until 1960
High school enrollment, now in
a period of slight decline, is expected to start a rapid upward movement by 1951. It will continue to increase until 1960, at which time it is expected to reach an alltime high of over eight million.
This increase will represent about two million or 29 per cent more than present high school enrollments.
These figures are significant, not
only to the NOB School, but to the entire Base. They mean that if the NOB School population continues to follow national trends, and if the population statisticians are correct, the NOB School will be continually expanding until 1960. At that time the high school enrollment may have increased by as much as onethird, and the already large elementary enrollment by almost
one-half.
If these predictions and conditions hold for NOB School during the neit decade, the total school population in 1960 will be over the 400 mark. If the Navy continues to expandd the Base, a prospect not
even considered in this article, there is no predicting what the situation
may be.


1 JUNE FIRST SET AS 1 i GRADUATION DATE

Graduation exercises for the! I NOB School will be held
Wednesday evening, June 1
first, at 8:00 P.M., in The i Little Theatre building, according to an announcement made by Supervising Principal John A. Permenter.
Sixteen candidates - one
Senior High School and fif- i teen eighth grade students-
are scheduled to graduate. A
faculty committee-Mrs. i
Ruth Metzger, Miss Anita Feinstein, and Miss Ada
Schmidt -is in charge of all .
arrangements. The complete I j program will be announced at
a later date.
I T

HISTORY OF NOB SCHOOL
(Continued from Page Eight)
The June 1946 graduation exercises, in which eighth- graders eight girls - received diplomas, were the first graduation ceremonies held in the Naval Chapel.
Juanita Kunz, the first senior to complete high school requirements at the new NOB School, graduated with honors in June 1947. In June 1948, Diana Ramirez and Linna Miller graduated from the NOB High School. Impressive graduation exercises, which combined the high school and eighth grade ceremonies, were held in the Naval Chapel.
In 1947, nine pupils - 8 boys and 1 girl graduated from eighth grade; in 1948, the eighth grade graduates included 10 pupils-5 boys and 5 girls.

SCHOOL PERSONNEL SING
IN CHAPEL CHOIRS
By Kathryn Hollis
Among the active members of the Protestant NOB Chapel Choir are: teachers-Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado and Mrs. Geneva Hunt McCollum; high school students-Joan McNeal, Barbara Johnson, Jeaneen Hummel, and Kathryn Hollis.
In the Catholic Choir are: Eunice Besse and Joan Harris - organist.
SCHOOL LIBRARY HAS
NEW EQUIPMENT

By Thomas Beadling
'The NOB School library has the
following new equipment: a new light-oak card catalog cabinet with nine drawers; a large display case with glass, doors; a display rack.
College catalogs and bulletins, from more than 100 institutions of higher learning, are on file in the School library. These materials are accessible to students, faculty, and all Base personnel.


NOB SCHOOL LIBRARY HAS MANY NEW BOOKS

By Marie Grover and
Cecil Pederson
The NOB School library, pleasantly located in the Center of the main building, plays an important educational role in the lives of the students. The library, organized by Miss Annabeth Cash in 1947, has been greatly expanded under the direction of Mrs. Ruth Metzgerpresent librarian, who has done
much to promote interest in books.
The school library, opened in 1947 with a small number of books obtained from the Naval Base Library, has expanded until it now contains 1,775 volumes. About 400 new publications have been added this year. Two sets of encyclopedias have been ordered in addition to the present three complete sets. Every book is catalogued to help locate in minimum of time, and to insure against loss.
Material Well Arranged
The lay-out plan of the library is arranged to accommodate everyone. On entering the library, the center view includes the librarian's desk, the newest books, the current paper rack with numerous current and weekly newspapers; to the right are the fiction and non-fiction books, the elementary references, and the popular magazine rack displaying a wide assortment of popular magazines; to the left are all types of general reference books, including encyclopedias and dictionaries.
In order to keep everyone posted on the new books and materials, book jackets are displayed on the bulletin boards in the main hallway.

ANNUAL FIELD DAY WAS ACCLAIMED A SUCCESS

By Ramon Alonso,
Kleber Masterson, Ramona Sparks
The third annual NOB School picnic and field day, held on April 30th at the Racetrack, was acclaimed a great success by the more than 500 persons in attendance. This Recreation sponsored annual event, which is fast becoming a Base and School tradition, marked a new high this year.
The field day program was skillfully planned and carried out by a joint committee: faculty-Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik, Miss Ada Schmidt, Mrs. Geneva McCollum; parents-LCDR Fred W. Weatherson, and BMC J. A. Ohotnicky; students - Barbara Johnson and Fred Johnson.
The principal events of the morning included: races - lollypop, marshmallow, potato, sack, threelegged, back to back, relay; the dashes-30, 50, 70, and 100 yards; chinning; broad jump, girls' basketball throw, tug-of-war. The boys and girls from kindergarten through the sixth grade competed
(Continued on Page Thirty-two)


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Pao'A TwPntv-eivht TEIDA


PUPILS ENROLLED IN
1948-1949

Post Graduates
Today's Enrollment: Joan Ethel
Harris.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
George Graham Abernathy, Jr.
Twelfth Grade
Today's Enrollment: Barbara Ellen Johnson.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
Shirley May Benton.
Eleventh Grade
Today's Enrollment: Eunice Mary
Besse; Clinton Harvey Dutcher, Jr; Robert Christian Gover; Edward , Ward Groome, Jr.; Janet Hiers;
Myrna Jeaneen Hummel; Alfredo Bandini Johnson, Jr.; Kleber Sanlin Masterson, Jr.; Virginia Ashby
Taylor.
Tenth Grade
Today's Enrollment: Pete E.
Broughton; Charlene Brown; John J. Cozy, Jr.; William L. Harris; Kathryn Bennett Hollis; Joan Louise McNeal; Cecil Aileen Pederson; Ramona Rose Sparks.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
Jill Hiers.
Ninth Grade
Today's Enrollment: William
Barrett; Thomas Harvey Beadling; Phyllis Viola Hummell; Patricia W.
McCrodden; Ramona Jean Moses; Joan Helen Parker; Caesar A.
Pina; William R. Reinhold.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
Susan Pendleton Chaffin.
Eighth Grade
Today's Enrollment: Ramon Alonso; Patrick Burke; Henry Crommelin, Jr.; Barbara Jean Gould; Edwin C. Heimer; Elsa Eva Heimer; John Dennis Lanigan; Janet Carol Leckenby; Carlita Maria McLaren; Damaris Moses; Lois R. Parker; Betty Parks; Janet M. Poe; Robert Anthony Rizzo; Anne Elizabeth
Sheppard.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
Charles Albert Kunz.
Seventh Grade
Today's Enrollment: Dixie Adair;
Angela Asman; Phyllis Aten; Carolyn Jean Bailey; Patricia Ann Besse; Sharon Brown; Barbara Ann Burke; Mary Ann Carliss; Marie A. Grover; Neil Horner; Norman W. Huddy; "Holly" Jackson; George Robert MacMichael; Clhrence Marshall Masterson; Margaret McCullough; Bennett W. Richards; Georgette Sasser; Furman L., Sheppard; Donald W. Sypek; Gordon Weatherson; Jane Livingston
Wilson.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
Robert C. Bessette; Thomas Louis Boucher; George A. Bowley; Shannon Marie Brown; Fred Richards;
Paul Smith.


THE SCHOOL POPULATION
1948-1949
A. The High School - en todo.
B. The Junior High School Smiles
Proudly.
C. Upper Elementary - 4th, 5th,
and 6th Grades.
D. 2nd and 3rd Grades on the
Lawn.
E. 1st Grade in a Formal Arrangement.
F. "Our Babies" - the Kindergarten.
G. Time out of Class for a Picture - Ist Grade.
H. Worktime in the Kindergarten.
I. 1st and 2nd Grades - Boys
Lined Up.
J. Mid-morning Naps in the Kindergarten.
K. Our Alma Mater: Next to the
School is the Chapel (airview).
L. The Faculty - Under the Trees.
M. "Problems of Democracy" Class
- Typing Copy.
N. A Discussion on the Problems
of Publication.
0. Constitution Committee of The
Student Council.
P. "Problems of Democracy" Class
in Action.
Q. Conversational Spanish - ls Semester (Elementary School with
Mrs. Burke).

PARENTS' EDUCATION IS
ABOVE AVERAGE
By Phyllis Hummell
The Junior-Senior High School students have well-educated mothers and fathers. Their parents' educational backgrounds are far above average in comparison with those in the U.S.A., according to a recent survey made by the students. More than three-fourths of the parents are high school graduates; many have attended Naval academies and other schools of higher learninguniversities, colleges, b u si ness school, or technical institutions; and some hold one or more college degrees. A considerable number of the Naval officers are graduates of the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland.

COLLEGE CATALOGS ARE
FILED IN LIBRARY

By Kathryn Hollis
College catalogs and bulletins from more than one-hundred institutions of higher learning universities, colleges, technical and business schools -are on file in the NOB School Library.
As an English project, the freshman-sophomore class recently made a survey to find out what schools the junior and senior high school students desired to attend upon high school graduation.
The English class next wrote letters to leading educational institutions requesting catalogs and requirements. Of the seventy-five schools contacted, one hundred per cent responded.


BROUGHTON IS VETERAN
STUDENT AT SCHOOL

By John Cozy, Jr.
Pete Broughton, sophomore, is the only pupil in the NOB School who attended school on the Naval Base prior to August 1941. Since 1939, with the exception of a threeyear period during World War II, Pete has lived on the Naval Operating Base.
Pete completed the first three grades in the old Base School, when it was located in a two-story building on Administration Hill.
With the entry of the U.S.A. into World War II, all families were evacuated from the Base. Pete thus completed the fourth grade in Portsmouth, Va., and the fifth and sixth grades in Miami, Florida.
After V-E Day, when the Broughton family returned to the Base, Pete entered the seventh grade. Of the forty-five pupils registered in October 1945, Pete Broughton is the only remaining male student of the four who are still enrolled at the NOB School.

HOME ROOMS PROMOTE GOOD MORALE

All the pupils, in every gradeelementary and high school, are assigned to definite home rooms. In each home room, under the guidance of a competent teacher, every pupil is given opportunity to contribute to its activities and to share in its responsibility. Time is provided in the weekly schedule for at least one class period (or its equivalent) for group discussions or conferences.
During home room periods, pupils are afforded opportunity to discuss and to evaluate the various school conditions and problems, and to seek their improvement or correction.
Each home room plays a definite part in stimulating and developing desirable school morale, thus reducing disciplinary difficulties to' a minimum.

LARGE PUPIL TURN-OVER
AT NOB SCHOOL

By Caesar Pifia
More than one-half of the pupils are enrolled this year for the first time at the NOB School; they entered on or after September 13, 1948. The majority of the pupils, especially in the primary grades, have been with the school for less than one year.
Of the pupils who entered the NOB School on the opening day in October 1945, only four are still in attendance, namely: Jeaneen Hummel, Junior; Pete Broughton, Sophomore; Ramona Moses, Freshman; and Damaris Moses, 8th Grade.


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Poo Tlhiiri THE~ INDIAN


PUPILS ENROLLED IN 1948-1949

Sixth Grade
Today's Enrollment: Sally Elaine Brown; Stephanie M. Brownell; Dempsey Bailey Bruton; James Vernon Cavanaugh; James Stanley Cozy; Richard Davis; Roger Fitzgerald; Charles T. Greenwood; Richard Harlan; Franklin H. Hummell; Richard F. Jessing; Dorothy Lee Kimball; Michael A. Lanigan; Robert Lindenborn; Robert vcCullough; Edith Christine Metzger; Donni Pederson; Virginia Lee Reed; Jean Christine 'Reinhold.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: William C. Bessette; Alexander N. Chaffin, Jr.; Shirley Ann Foster; Ian FitzGerald; June Richards; Carol Ann Stanley.
Fifth Grade
Today's Enrollment: Bar bar a Aten; Barbara Dianna Avery; Judith Carter; Sally H. Crommelin; Paul Raymond Cummings; Petie Lee Davis; Billy Foster; Thomas James Groome; Charlie Leslie Hardin; Edgar P. Heimer; Bruce Milford Kendall; Gloria Ann McKuin; Eleanor Howard Million; Kenneth G. Perry; Sylvia Poe; Anita G. Sierra; Bobby Smith; Donald Weatherson; Charles Henry Yelvington.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Annette Marie Gebhart; Leslie G. Lindsay; Sandra Martin.
Fourth Grade
Today's Enrollment: Eunice Avila, Richard A. Bailey, Sylvia Lee Cavanaugh, Thomas D. Greenwood, Ruth Edith Hollis, Robert Treffle Keehn, Lois McCrodden, Patrick McCullough, William Fleming McLaren, Peggy Marilyn McOwen, Julia Carol Parnell, Irma Pina, Carolyn E. Reese, Constance Ruppert, Richard E. Ruppert, Renee S. Skinner, Patricia Spahr, Luther Phillip Stroud, Jr., Thomas Carroll Wesson, Grace Lavinia Yelvington.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Magnhilde Berge, Howard Boillot, Walter N. Foster, Jr., Elizabeth C. Robertson, Patrick Shue.
Third Grade
Today's Enrollment: Ignacio Avila, Nancy Avila, Diane Jean Bowman, Dennis Michael Carliss, David Martin Connelly, Charles Francis Costello, Mary Louise Esders, Bertil Abelardo Heimer, Carl Heimer, David A. Jessing, David Earle Leidle, Andrea Lynnhe Lewis, Joan Lindenborn, Judith Carlena McLellen, Verna Marie Nordine, Robert Morris Pendleton, James Piel, Barbara Ann Roy William Leland Roy, Michael Thomas Smith, Sandra Beryl Sparks, John Anthony Thomas, Allen Keith Wine.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948:
onna Marie Boucher, Patricia Ann Boucher, Oleta Richards, Mary Gail Wawizyniak.


Second Grade
Today's Enrollment: Jan Mark Anthony, Mona Elizabeth Bailey, Richard Murray Bergman, Thomas Lee Bosserman, Sandra Carter, Norma Jean Cassity, Faye Ann Carliss, Richard Joseph Croker, Gwendolyn (Wendy) Gould, Ralph Perry Hardin, Paul Kenneth Healey, Helga E. Heimer, Patrick Timothy Lanigan, Richard Stephan Machtolff, David McAuliffe, Julianne Christine McLellen, Ana Marie Pendleton, Michael Piel, Joseph Marion Pitt, William Leonard Price, Jay Radcliff, Edgar Davis Reinhold, Roger Charles Reinhold, James A. (Jimmy) Sasser, Dolores Sierra, Robert H. Smith, Michael Spahr, George W. Swallow, Sandra Rae Wideberg, John Ray (Ray) Wine.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Kenneth J. Bessette, Betsy Gallery, Georgia Kay Mitchell, William D. Stanley.
First Grade
Today's Enrollment: Elizabeth Jean Abbott, Rylma Mercedes Boan, N. David Boyden, Ronald Brown, Thomas Leonard Carcelli, Carolyn Jean Combs, George Arthur Cookinham, Sandra Ann
*Craig, Charles Ray Dalton, Gloria Patricia Egbert, Judith-Dee Elton, Stephanie Elaine Fenton, Gary ,Fitzgerald, Kathleen Gallagher, Astrid Heimer, Jeannette C. Jessing, Gerald S. Johnston, Priscilla Ann Jones, Isabel Norean Keehn, Emil Franz Kloske, Ray Donald Nordine, Edith Pamias, Patricia L. Paresi, Edward Pechy, Madeline Piel, Robert Pitt, George M. Pritchard, Amelia Pubillones, Arthur Fields Richardson, Thomas Allan Rose, Roger Ramon Rushing, Regina Scanlon, J. Peter Sheppard, Ralph Sierra, Jr., Walter Sheridan Stull, III, Richard J. Swallow, Marvin Scott Tausch, Ursula Maria Teagle, Buddy Harold Troutman, Patricia Faith Troutman, Joyce Tyner, Susan Ann Wagner, George Merritt Wilson, Arthur Eugene Wine, John K. Wood, Malcolm L. Wood, Jr.


Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Frank Edgar Anglin, Lee Gallery, Barbara Lillian North, Anthony Martha Raymond, Joyce Ann Venczel.
Kindergarten
Today's Enrollment: Anabella Abbott, David Bruce Allen, Philip A. Bailey, Daniel Charles Bergman, Rita May Birch, Carol Ann Bosserman, Sandra Kay Boyles, Forrest Edward (Eddie) Bratton, Michael Robert Brown, Dorinda Brownell, Lucinda Brownell, Bevan Gillet Cass, Jr., John D. Clarke, Jr., Melvin Pace Crissey, Jr., Judith Rose Dallas, Karlene deLeon, Raydene Davis, Misse Dunn, Joseph A. Fite, Jr., Michael Wayne Gibbons, Mary Lou Gugliemo, Julienne Marie Hardesty, Paulette Harpster, John Dennis Huddy, Arthur P. Jessing, Lynwyn Diane Jones, Arlene Kowalchyk, Lloyd Arthur Lawrence, Joan Malone, Louis Manint, Jr., Paulette Miller, Michael McCullough, Edward M6Auliffe, Jr., John Andrew (Buddy) Ohotnicky, Steven Phelps, Raymond J. Price, Jr., Frances Grace Reinhold, Pamela Ann Reis, William Blount V. Rodman, Eric LeRoy (Rickey) Rushing, Laura Lee Ryan, Betty Jo Sack, Anna Jean Slocum, William Turnbull Sneddon, Susan Elaine Snyder, Carol Ann Spielman, Juan LeRoy Stull, John F. Swallow, Richard A. Sypek, Sandra J'Nelle Tausch, John Thomas Teagle, Walter Eugene Thomas, Benjamin Rudolph Turner, Jr., Francis J. Wade, III, Carolynne Ware, Randel Ferris Washburne, Clarence Williams.
Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Ward A. Bessette, Jr., Charles Conway, I, J. Thomas Conway, William Henry Foulk, Jr., Nelson Joseph Greene, Jr., Orley T. Mitchell, Sidney James (Skipper) McAnulty, John Wright North, Jr., Harry James Palmer, James Lee Patterson, Suzanne Helen Pitts, Rodney Jennings Sparks, John Venczel, III, Carole Wawizyniak, Edmund Eugene Yoworski.


FROM THE FOUR CORNERS OF THE WORLD, THEY COME - These smiling boys and girls, who have lived in many different countries, make an important contribution to the cosmopolitan atmosphere of the NOB School.


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THE INDIAN PfeTit-n


SCHOOL PROJECT GETS . COMMUNITY SUPPORT
Approval of this publication by
RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN, assured the students of his confidence in their project and spurred them
on to its completion.
CDR. L. M. Davis, sanctioning
the printing of the materials at the Public Works Print Shop, made possible this edition of "The Indian." CDR. Davis and the NOB Transportation system contributed
reliable data.
Supervising Principal John A.
Permenter and the School Board members gave their wholehearted support and assistance to the study.
The faculty, the maintenance
staff, parents, Naval and civilian personnel on the Base, and all the pupils cooperated beautifully by
supplying essential data.
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman's highly valued assistance contributed greatly to the success of the publication.
Dr. Nelson Directed Research
Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, who
directed the whole Tesearch study and the preparation of materials for publication, has expended end. less time and energy directing and
guiding the pupils to carry, this project to the present conclusion.
Most of the work was done outside
of scheduled working hours.
Mrs. Alice F. Hayes has been
an indefatigable worker, rendering invaluable help by assisting Dr.
Nelson in editing and typing
articles.
The Naval Air Station Photo
Laboratory, working in close cooperation with the NOB School, took numerous pictures of the School activities. The photographers, who gave generously of their time and effort to produce the pictures for cuts, deserve high commendations. Our sincere thanks go to AFC. G. M. Rushing and
his Staff.

1948-1949 IS A YEAR
MARKED BY "FIRSTS"

By Patricia MeCrodden
The school year 1948-1949 will
be remembered in the history of the NOB School as a year of
"firsts."
This year marks the first full
accreditation of the NOB School; the first basketball team; the first time the school participated in the Base league games; the first school cheerleaders; the first school athletic banquet; first time high school students were awarded "Varsity"
letters for athletic achievements; the first school issue of "The Indian"; the first school annual; the first holiday ball; first school flagpole; the first post-graduate; the first year teachers have been on
Civil Service.


EDITORIAL
This special issue of "The Indian" is the culminating achievement of a class project. For several months the ninth-tenth grade English and "Problems of Democracy" classes have worked, intermittently, on many phases of this unit: planning, setting goals, gathering data, conducting interviews, verifying 'vidence, constructing charts and graphs, interpreting findings, writing, and rewriting. This edition reflects life at the NOB School in its entirety; and, in so doing, reflects also much of the general spirit and atmosphere of the entire Base.
Neither this project nor this issue of "The Indian" would have been possible without the leadership, skill, and hard work of Dr. Esther Marion Nelson and the interest, cooperation, and diligence of the Freshman-Sophomore students.
This school-life experience which started as a class unit, developed into a cooperative schoolcommunity undertaking - every teacher, every non-instructional worker connected with the school, every student, and many parents have been involved in this study at one time or another. In addition, many other American and Cuban citizens and practically every activity of the Naval Operating Base have also contributed to and been influenced in some way by this project.
The entire experience represents sound, modern school-community education at its best. All those who participated deserve credit and thanks.
John A. Permenter,
Supervising Principal

CHRISTMAS PAGEANT
WAS IMPRESSIVE

(Continued From Page Twenty-four) Alexander Chaffin, Michael Lanigan, Robert Lindenborn; Three Wise Men- William Barrett, Clinton Dutcher, Edward Groome. . Costumes of Biblical times, designed by Mrs. McC6llum, were amply provided by the children's parents. The high school choristers wore long black or white choir robes, while the elementary school singers wore long white robes of similar design.
Make-up, artistically administered by Mrs. Lela Souders, enhanced the reality of the Biblical characters.
Skillfully made scenery-King Herod's throne, the guiding star, the manger-added to the dignity of -the -pageant. The stage equipment and the public address system, furnished by the Recreation Department and efficiently managed by its Naval personnel, were vital contributing, factors to the success of the program.


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 21 May 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
SCHOOL EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor-in-Chief ------------- Joan McNeal
Ass't Editors
William Barrett, Caesar Pina Feature Writers
Joan Harris, Jeaneen Hummel Ramona Sparks, Virginia Taylor Boys' Sports --------------- Fred Johnson
Girls' Sports ----------------- Joan Harris
Artist ------------------ Virginia Taylor
Photography ------------- Pete Broughton
Staff Writers
Thomas Beadling, Charlene Brown, John Cozy, William Harris, Kathryn HoUis, Phyllis Hummell, Patricia McCrodden, Ramona Moses, Joan Parker, Cecil Pederson,
William Reinhold.
Typists
John Cozy, Kathryn Hollis, Patricia McCrodden, Joan Parker, Ramona Sparks.
Faculty Advisor__Dr. Esther Marion Nelson S upervising rrincipal-ooann a. rermener
TIHE LLNDIAN is puousned weeiy, nnanced by appropriated tunas, printed on government equipment, for tree distriaution on the U. S. 1'4aval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-85 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFFS.
All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

WHY YOU DIDN'T GET AN INDIAN LAST SATURDAY

The Indian like most things in and of the Navy is governed by regulations. To enable us to publish this special edition we had to use two-thirds of our allotment for special editions, we now are able to publish but one more special edition this year.
All the photo-engravings (pictures) were furnished by the Recreation Department, so that we might have an illustrated paper to celebrate the accreditation of the Naval Operating Base School.
NOTE OF THANKS

The School Editorial Staff wishes to extend its deepest appreciation and sincerest thanks to all School and Base personnel who have made this edition of 'The Indian" possible. -School Editorial Staff


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PHYSICAL SET-UP IS OF
TROPICAL DESIGN

By Virginia Taylor
NOB School stands at the top of Massip Hill, adjoining the Naval Chapel, near the center of the Base. The building itself, constructed to form a capital "E", has two "L" shaped wings one room deep for teaching purposes; and a central section two rooms deep for housing offices, library, teachers lounge, and storerooms.
Around the inside edge of these wings, and through the center of the inner section, there is a continuous collonade that serves as a hall way. It is used by all the children, as well as the faculty, so the grounds can be kept neat and fresh looking.
The school building is well ventilated, screened, and is of appropriate architectural design for the tropical setting. The soft and restful scheme employed grants a certain sense of beauty to young minds
Indoors Ready for Work
Each room in the School is equip ed with a sufficient number of desks, chairs, and blackboards. The laboratory is well equipped with tables, cabinets, electric outlets, sinks; also with laboratory instruments and supplies.
The school lockers are placed in such a way that they cannot interfere with the changing of classes. There are convenient electric drinking fountains at both ends of the building for the satisfaction of students and faculty.
Beautiful, Safe Setting
The grounds, which are kept in near perfect condition by the gardner, are appreciated and cared for by the students also. The varying and deepening shades of the green lawn in spring and summer hint of a false coolness, even in the tropical sunshine.
There is no traffic problem near the school, as virtually the only vehicles that climb the hill during school hours are church workers and school buses, or other school transportation.

NOB VISITED BY BOARD FROM ROOSEVELT ROADS
CAPT R. G. Armstrong, USN,
C.O. of Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station in Puerto Rico and Chairman of its School Board, and five other members of the Roosevelt Roads School Board visited the NOB School last December to study its administration and general organization with a view of expanding and reorganizing their own School. Captain Armstrong and his party spent most of two days studying NOB School and conferring with our school board.


SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
IS PRIME NECESSITY

An Auditorium is School's
Greatest Physical Need
For want of an 'auditorium
or some protected, accessible place to assemble, the entire school program of the NOB School has suffered immeasurably this year, according to Supervising Principal John A. Permenter. "As student body and school program expand, thio need will become progressively greater," he
stated.
According to the ninthtenth grade survey, practically everyone on the Base wants to see the school acquire an auditorium or the use of one: students, parents, school board members, and
Naval officials. An overwhelming majority of all these persons believe that an auditorium is the school's greatest single physical need.


ENGLISH CLASS CARRIES
OUT SURVEY
(Continued from Page Five)
Before research findings could be prepared for publication, several months had to be devoted to drill on technical grammar and on learning the fundamentals of journalism. In attempting to write articles, the students became aware of their English deficiencies; they thus desired intensive drill on the fundamentals of good written English and journalism. Some students wrote and rewrote their articles many times before Dr. Nelson accepted them for final editing.
Research Study Was Renewed
The research study, which was originally started in October, was brought up to date in March and April. The students thus had an opportunity to see the unit as a whole, and to see continuous growth in the school.


TROPICAL FLORA TENDS TO BEAUTIFY CAMPUS
(Continued From Page Sixteen) deck areas around tree trunks.
On both sides of the center walk, directly in front of the main building, beds of rosebushes produce gorgeous varieties of roses with showy masses of alluring colors. Bushy plants seem to hide under dramatic clusters of blooms - roses of rare beauty.
Santo Domingo Jasmins - decorative vines with fragrant white flowers, gardenias, margaritas (periwinkles), and sparkling daisies with yellow centers give airy touches to flower border edges. In the fall, smaller flower gardens contain zinnias in a riot of colors
- scarlet, pink, apricot, yellow, orange, mixed.

ANNUAL FIELD DAY WAS ACCLAIMED A SUCCESS
(Continued from Page Twenty-seven) according to grades; from seventh grade through high school, according to weight.
The afternoon highlights included games between the parents and their sons and daughters. In softball and volleyball, the boys lost to their fathers. Mothers won the game of volleyball, but lost to their daughters in softball.
Appropriate prizes or medals were awarded to the winners of the different events. Bennett Richards held the record for the day with 16 chin-ups; Clinton Dutcher with a 15' 8 " broad jump.
Recreation furnished ample picnic refreshments-sandwiches, soft drinks, ice cream; also the sports equipment for the events and prizes for the winners.
Among the many Base personnel, who rendered invaluable services, were LCDR Weatherson, the coordinator between the School and the Naval personnel; LT Walter Keehn, head of Recreation, who announced the events and winners over the public address system; "Jack" Machtolff of Recreation, who judged the winners of the races and dashes.


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Full Text

PAGE 1

Vol. IV, No. 14 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 21 May 1949 Evaluation Committee of Southern Association credits Naval 0erating Base School tt'M' -Drs. Crowe, Edwards, Stone Final Approval of Accredit The Guantanamo Bay Operating Base School, which amply meets the standard tional requirements in the was recently awarded the cate of accreditation by the ern Association of College Secondary Schools; it is th titled to all the privilege scholastic recognition res therefrom. High School earned at the NOB School fully acceptable for college trance in the States. Work ~t pleted at the NOB School ondary and elementary accepted at its face value b public or private school i United States. Appraisers Evaluate Sch Dr. Orin F. Crowe, Dean School of Education at the versity of South Carolina, a William T. Edwards and Dr. L. Stone, professors of edu at the Florida State Univ recently visited and apprais CERTIFICATE OF ACCREDITATION -This certificate was recently presented NOB School. The trio, all to the NOB School for meeting standard educational requirements set by the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. COSMOPOLITAN ATMOSPHERE ABOUNDS WITH NOB SCHOOL PUPILS FROM FOUR POINTS OF COMPASS Ideas and Customs From the Seven Seas and Four Corners of the Earth Are Brought to NOB School by Widely Traveled Pupils Children of the Naval Operating Base at Guantanamo Bay come to the NOB School, bringing with them ideas and customs from the four corners of the World. They represent every state in the United States. Approximately one-fourth of them have at some time resided in foreign lands or in countries outside the continental limits of the United SCHOOL FACULTY IS States and Guantanamo Bay. Of the forty-eight States, school WELL-ROUNDED systems of forty-two are repre_sented at the NOB School. The The NOB School has now one of puilsi come romwevery typ .f tyi~e 7t of a school -progressive and strictly good school -an unusually capable formal, large city and small town, faculty. Its fifteen faculty mempublic and parochial. From these bers -Supervising Principal John schools, the children bring with A. Permenter and his fourteen them a wide diversity of viewteachers, representing all sections points, scholastic standards, educaof the U.S.A., have broad cultural (Continued on Page Three) (Continued on Page Seven) Give nation Naval today educaStates, certifiSouths and is ens and ulting credits will be e encom-secill be y any n the ool of the Unind Dr. Mode cation ersity, ed the members of the Evaluation Committee of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools also members of the South-Wide Committee for visiting schools in the Caribbean and South American areas, were on a regular assignment to evaluate the NOB School on February 15 to 19. They made final reports concerning its acceptance as a member of and full accreditation in the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. "Of the 31 high schools that I've evaluated this past year, the NOB School enjoys the strongest community support," stated Dr. Stone, chairman of the evaluation com-mttee A gret -pelc'tnhae ~ -"' the NOB students than in any of the other schools are satisfied with their school program." "Besides having an unusually competent faculty, it has the best (Continued on Page Nine)

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Page Two THE INDIAN SENIOR CLASS OF '49 TO GRADUATE IN JUNE By Joan Harris The Class of '49, consisting of one senior -Miss Barbara Ellen Johnson -who has attended the NOB School since September 1947, will graduate with honors in June, 1949. Prior to coming to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, she completed the tenth grade in Oakland, Calif. Barbara Johnson is Editor-inChief of the "CORAL REEF," the School's first yearbook; she is an outstanding girl athlete and the "Star" participant in all Senior class events. Qualified in Many Activities Active in many types of activities on the Base, as well as at School, Miss Johnson has a wellrounded program. Along with being a member of the Protestant NOB Choir, she is Chaplain of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Fleet Reserve Association of Branch 100, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Her father is president of the latter organization. In the line of sports, Miss Johnson is a qualified skipper -one of the few women on the Naval Base who has a license to sail. She is also active in swimming, horseback riding, and is captain of the "Senators" in the Ladies Auxiliary Bowling League. Has Traveled Widely Being the daughter of a retired Naval officer with twenty-seven years service in the U. S. Navy, Barbara traveled extensively in North America. Born in Virginia, she resided for the longest periods of time in California, Delaware, New Jersey, and Washington. She has also toured in Mexico and Cuba. Miss ohnson, who has attended --more-thiartiteen $Wrerent elioo'l in five states, has a cosmopolitan outlook on life. Plans For the Future Having had previous experience in the techniques of radio work, (Continued on Page Four) JUNIOR CLASS DISPLAYS ALL-'ROUND INTERESTS By Thomas Beadling, Pete Broughton, William Harris "The Class of '50! They're ingenious, enthusiastic, fun. They have ability, looks, sophistication, and ideas. All of this -plus," their homeroom and mathematics teacher, Miss Anita Feinstein -a native of New York -with several years of high school teaching experience, told reporters. "I like them." Juniors Have Traveled Widely One-third of the Junior Class Eunice Besse, Robert Gover, and Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson -witnessed the entry of the U.S.A. into World War II. These Juniors, whose fathers serve with the U.S. Navy, lived on or near Naval Bases in Hawaii when Pearl Harbor was bombed in December 1941. The Juniors, nine members four girls and five boys, hold birth certificates from nine cities and six states; they have lived in all sections of the U.S.A. Several members of the group have travelled extensively in one or more foreign countries: Canada, Hawaii, Mexico, Panama, Trinidad, and West Indies -Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica. Diversified Schooling Noted The number of schools attended ranges from 5 to 28, the median Junior has been enrolled in 10 different schools; Edward Groome, who was born in Washington, D.C., tops the number of schools. Although they total school registration in 18 different states, the states listed most frequently are: Calif., Va., Fla. Eunice Besse, Robert Gover, and Kleber Masterson have attended school in Hawaii. Jeaneen Hummel, who entered the NOB School on the opening day in October 1945, and Jan Hiers are the only NOB June 1946 eighth grade graduates enrolled in the class today. Both girls returned (Continued on Page Three) FRESHMAN -SOPHOMORE SCHOOL SPIRIT HIGH By Ramona Sparks "Of all the thirty-one high schools that I have visited this year, I've seen only two others that in any way compare with the work you are doing," Dr. Mode L. Stone, Chairman of the Southern Association Accreditation Committee, told the freshman-sophomore students after the three members of his committee had observed their classes and had interviewed them individually and in groups. Backgrounds Are Varied Holding birth certificates from sixteen different cities in twelve different states and one from Cuba, the freshmen and sophomores have lived in thirty-one different states and in two foreign countries. Caesar Pina was born in Santa Cruz del Sur, Cuba; John Cozy has lived in Panama. Members of the class have visited Canada, Hai;i Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Virgin Islands, Venezuela. The ninth-tenth graders have attended schools in twenty different states, led by Va., Fla., Cal. The number of schools attended by these students range from two to sixteen each; the median student has studied in seven schools. Of the total enrollment of 19 students for the freshman-sophomore home room, today's attendance includes 17 students -8 boys and 9 girls. Home Room Is Organized The freshman -sophomore students are able to organize and conduct themselves with little help from their home room teacher. They were the first to elect class officers and to hold regular home room meetings. Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, teacher of English and "Problems of Democracy," took over the freshmansophomore home room in December when Miss Sadele Durham resigned. Versed in Many Activities In addition to regular classwork, these students have been active in many extra-curricular activities. On the Committee to draw up the "Constitution" for the first Student Council of the NOB JuniorSenior High School Association are: Ramona Sparks, sophomore, acting secretary; William Barrett, ninth grade representative; Dr. Nelson, faculty advisor. On the varsity basketball team, three important players were Bill Barrett, Bill Harris, and Pete Broughton; the latter being one of the top school athletes. Two of the four popular school cheerleaders are Phyllis Hummell and Joan McNeal. In The Little Theatre's first performance, "Arsenic and Old Lace," Ramona Sparks, Susan Chaffin, and (Continued on Page Four) SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL -Happy countenances displayed by the Senior High School student body foretell a bright future. (At extreme left and right, back row: Miss Anita Feinstein and Miss Sadele Durham -home-room teachers, when picture was taken.) Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Three JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCH COSMOPOLITAN ATMOSPHERE ABOUNDS AT NOB SCHOOL I (Continued from Page One) tional achievements, and social attitudes. Each pupil makes an important contribution to the cosmopolitan i atmosphere of the NOB School: for here, all their background experiences are brought together and exchanged as the "Old World" customs were brought together and exchanged in the "Melting Pot" of early New York. Pupils Represent Many Places Of the. year's total enrollment, 288 pupils hold birth certificates from 127 cities in 42 different states;. 43 were born outside the i continental limits of the United States. Of the latter group, the majority were born in Cuba and Hawaii. Among other birth places listed are: Argentina, Canada, China, Ecuador, France, Great Britain, Panama Canal Zone, Philippines, Puerto Rico. Have Lived in Many Lands The pupils attending NOB School have lived in more than 30 cities or towns in more than 20 different countries or islands outside the continental limits of the United _states._-I These landudents; then _r"; to *' frequency of residefice, are: Cuba, Hawaii, Panama Canal Zone, PuerAr to Rico, China, Philippines, Canador da, Mexico, Jamaica, British Isles, lan France, Trinidad, Haiti. Among other countries in which one or Cub more pupils have lived are: Africa, Haw OOL -This student body and faculty constitute a cosmopolitan group. ENROLLMENT KEEPS GROWING By John Cozy, Jr. A total of 331 pupils-171 boys and 160 girls -have been enrolled at the NOB School during the school year, .948-1949. The present atendance is 286 pupils-148 boys and 138 girls. Up to date, 86 new pupils -39 boys and 47 girls-have entered the school later than September 13, 1948; but only 5-23 boys and 22 girlshave withdrawn from the chool. Today's enrollment is 41 pupils more than when school Y opened in September 1948; and 76 pupils more than when President Truman visited the School on February 25, 1948. Both the kindergarten and the main building are now operating at capacity enrollnents. It appears certain that NOB School will require more classroom space and additional teachers when school opens in September 1949. gentina, Australia, Chile, EcuaFiji Islands, Japan, Newfoundd, New Zealand, Samoa. lore than 20 pupils have lived in a; and 18 have resided in waii. JUNIOR CLASS DISPLAYS ALL-'ROUND INTERESTS (Continued from Page Two) this year after spending one school year in the States. Juniors Hold High Records Virginia Taylor, artistically talented, holds one of the highest scholastic records in the School; Jeaneen Hummel and Eunice Besse, both excellent students, are among the School's charming cheerleaders; and Jan Hiers is one of the best High School athletes. All the male members of the Junior class are good athletes; all five boys played on the School basketball team, which participated in the Base League. Edward Groome served as captain. In addition to being active in almost all extra-curricular activities of the High School, Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson holds one of the highest scholastic records of the School. "Skiddy" also holds the distinction of being Junior-Senior class president. Upon graduation from High School, practically all the Juniors plan to attend a four-year college, university, or military school. Among the educational institutions, which these students wish to enter, -a "a?-~yi Academy in Ann apolis, Maryland, USC in Calif., U. of C., Berkeley. The NOB School pupils range in ages from five years -kindergarten -to nineteen years -post graduate. THE INDIAN Page Three

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Page Four THE INDIAN EIGHTH GRADERS ARE SEASONED TRAVELERS By Elsa Heimer and Bill Reinhold Guantanamo Bay eighth graders, sixteen pupils -seven boys and nine girls in the Junior High School section, have traveled extensively. These adventure-loving pupils total residences in more than 60 different cities and towns in six countries -China, Cuba, Hawaii, Panama, Puerto Rico, and the U.S.A.; some have also traveled in Canada and Mexico. Having lived in a total of 36 different states, they represent all sections of the U.S.A. Carlita McLaren, born in California, has lived in the largest number of states. Miss Ada Schmidt, their home-room teacher and instructor of Spanish and girls' physical education, has lived in Colorado and Nebraska. Six of the eighth graders were born in foreign countries. Dennis Lanigan was born in Shanghai, China. Ramon Alonso is a native of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Patrick Burke, Edwin Heimer, and Elsa Heimer hold birth certificates from Central Miranda, Cuba. Charles Kunz, who recently moved to Florida, was born in Preston, Cuba. Eighth Graders Have Diversified Backgrounds The number of schools attended by these Junior High School students ranges from two to fifteen; the median eighth grader has studied in eight different schools. These pupils total previous enrollment in school systems of 23 different states and Cuba. The states, in which the greatest numbers have been registered as pupils, are: Fla., Va., Mass., Calif., Pa., N. Y., N. J., Tex., N. H., N. C. Henry Crommelin, born in Annapolis, Maryland, heads the number of schools attended in different states. nA .A~lhnut n-hrl re members can speak, read, and write Spanish. The social studies are the preferred subjects of these young travelers and linguists. Baseball, swimming, and horseback riding are their favorite sports. -Collecting souvenirs and building FRESHMAN -SOPHOMORE SCHOOL SPIRIT HIGH (Continued from Page Two) Bill Harris played important roles. On the staff of the "CORAL REEF," NOB's first year book, are Charlene Brown, Bill Harris, Kathryn Hollis, Caesar Pina, Ramona Sparks, and Pete Broughton. The freshman -sophomore students were represented in all activities during the Mardi gras. This issue of "The Indian" is largely the product of the leadership and hard work of the freshman-sophomore classes, under the direction of Dr. Nelson. Plans For The Future Most of the freshman-sophomore students plan to attend institutions of higher learning -universities, colleges, medical centers, business or technical schools. Among the institutions desired are: U. of Cal., Duke U., U. of Fla., Harvard U., Columbia U., Johns Hopkins U., and the U. S. Naval Academy. Among the chosen occupations are: Business, Engineering, Law, Medicine, Navy, and Teaching. William Barrett and Caesar Pina, who both hold "A" scholastic records, are planning professional careers. SENIOR CLASS OF '49 TO GRADUATE IN JUNE (Continued from Page Two) Miss Johnson's after-graduation plans lean toward radio. Prior to her senior year at NOB School, she worked evenings for ten months as radio announcer of the Armed Forces Radio Service Station in Guantanamo Bay, where she conducted the request program, "Requestfully Yours." model airplanes head the list of hobbies of this eighth grade class. fix memioers 01 the group wish to enter the professions -medicine, dentistry, and law. Two boys desire to attend the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland. Others hope to enter the fields of aviation, engineering, journalism, business, teaching. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL -The seventh and eighth graders, eager to pass through the portals of the Senior High School, are presented by Mrs. Lela Souders and Miss Ada Schmidt -home-room teachers. (Bill Barrett, Caesar Pins, and Bill Reinhold surveyed the group.) SEVENTH GRADERS HAVE SEEN FOREIGN LANDS By William Barrett and Caesar Pina "The seventh grade is a class of vigorous Americans," their home-room teacher, Mrs. Lela Cornett Souders-a native of Kentucky with several years of teaching experience in her home state, told school reporters, "But they're not all Sir Walter Raleighs." The seventh graders, many of whom are already experienced travelers, have much to contribute to their class and extra-class activities. Totaling 28 pupils-13 boys and 15 girls-for the year, their present enrollment includes 23 pupils-10 boys and 13 girls. They range in ages from 10 to 14 years; the median NOB seventh grade pupil is 12 years old. Pupils Have Traveled Widely Holding birth certificates from 23 different cities in 16 different states, they total former residences in forty-one states and in eight countries outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. -Canada, China, Cuba, Great Britain, Hawaii, Japan, Panama, Philippines. They have lived on 18 different U. S. Naval Bases in different parts of the world. Several have toured in Canada and Mexico. Five of the seventh graders were residing on or near U. S. Naval Bases in Hawaii during the bombing attack of Pearl Harbor in 1941. These pupils, who also attended 'kindergarten or the first grade in Hawaii, are: Carolyn Bailey, Patricia Besse, Marshall Masterson, George Bowley, and Paul Smith. Donald Sypek has lived in China, Japan, the Philippines, and the U.S.A.; he has seen Guam, Hawaii, Mexico, Panama Canal Zone. George MacMichael and Neil Horner, who have resided in Great Britain and the U.S.A., have traveled in England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Born in Guantanamo City, Barbara Burke, has visited numerous cities in Cuba and in the States. Have Varied Backgrounds The seventh graders, who have attended from two to fifteen different schools each-the median being seven, have been enrolled in 28 different states. Listed according to frequency are Calif., Fla., N.Y., Pa., N.C., Mass., Md., S.C., Texas, and Maine. Margaret McCullough and Carolyn Bailey have attended the largest number of schools. The seventh graders are well -.,represented in tpe school clubs: the e, Jr., rley ~1.NlLibrary Club, and the Math c:ence Club Bennett Richards represents the seventh grade on the Constitution Committee for the Student Council. Marshall Masterson, a math. "genius," takes ninth grade general (Continued on Page Twelve) Page Four THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Five ENGLISH CLASS CARRIES OUT SURVEY What special features of the NOB School give it distinction? The high school students in English and "Problems of Democracy," under the expert guidance of Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, with the whole-hearted support of Supervising Principal John A. Permenter, recently carried out a comprehensive survey to answer this searching question. The active Freshmen and Sophomores, fired with intense curiosity, assumed the major responsibility for collecting, compiling, and preparing the materials for publication. This May issue of "The Indian," which is dedicated to the accreditation of the NOB School, presents the findings of the survey. Students Compile and Prepare Data Each Freshman and Sophomore, under the direction of Dr. Nelson, was responsible for securing data on a definite part of the NOB school system. The students formulated inquiry sheets to obtain pertinent data about the different school activities and personnel. These questionnairs were mimeographed, distributed throughout the school, and filled out. Every grade-kindergarten through 12th -was covered by a different member of the 9th and 10th grades, who visited the designated classroom and talked with the children and the teacher to obtain information. Preceded by interviews, inquiry sheets were filled out by the children, faculty members, school board, maintenance staff, parents, and Naval officials directly connected with the NOB School. All information and data were tabulated and totaled on carefully preG pared charts. Significant statistical factors were then organized and recorded for future use. The highlight of the data were selected and prepared for publication. Many Pupils Participate Junior High School English classes, under the direction of Dr. Nelson, collected information and prepared articles on the school clubs and organizations. Joan Harris -post graduate and Virginia Taylor -junior, both members of the class in "Problems of Democracy," and several other Juniors collaborated in the study by submitting articles on various topics. Fred Johnson, junior, served as "Sports" editor. Articles published without "bylines" in this issue of "The Indian" groups of students; then ; -_xo during class periods. Students Drilled in Journalism This research study or survey, which began in the "Problems of Democracy" class, was completed in Dr. Nelson's English classes. (Continued on Page Thirty-two) by 9 "PROBLEMS OF DEMOCRACY" CLASS AT WORK -Students, under guidance of Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, compile and prepare data for publication in this May issue of "The Indian." THE INDIAN Page Five

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Pag Sx HEINIA N Mr. John A. Permenter Dr. Esther Marion Nelson ir. jEowaro unorasik During World War II, three faculty members served in Overseas Theatres of Operations: Supervising Principal John A. Permenter saw active duty with the U. S. Navy in the Caribbean and the Southeast Pacific areas; Dr. Esther Marion Nelson served with the Far East Air Forces in the Asiatic-Pacific; and Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik saw action with the Army Air Forces in Europe. JOHN A. PERMENTER Ninth Grade Today's Enrollment: William Barrett; Thomas Harvey Beadling; Phyllis Viola Hummell; Patricia W. McCrodden; Ramona Jean Moses; Joan Helen Parker; Caesar A. Pina; William R. Reinhold. :. y -a.it on maci duty in June 1946. Between 1942 and 1946, he saw four years of active service in the U. S. Navy. Mr. Permenter served as commanding officer of a Navy V-5 (aviation) unit at the College of Wooster, in Wooster, Ohio, for eighteen months in 1943 and 1944; and later for eight months, in the same capacity, of a Navy V-12 engineering unit at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. Saw Active Duty In Caribbean His duty as a Navy Armed Guard gunnery officer of an Army Transport took him, for sixteen months, to the Caribbean and Southeast Pacific areas. While on this tour of duty, he saw something of Central and South America and crossed the equator fourteen times. Entering the Navy as a LTJG. in June 1942, he was promoted to LT. in July 1943 and to LCDR. in October 1945. Held Positions in Florida Schools Immediately prior to being commissioned in the U. S. Navy, in Sheppard; D6 iknciv: Syp9; Gordon Weatherson; Jane Livingston Wilson. struction for the Florida State I partment of Education. Other educational positions, wh he held in Florida, are: supervis principal of the Jupiter Element (Continued on Page Ten) ESTHER MARION NELSON Served With FEAF in Pacific ~-'Brion Nelson,teacher By Phyllis "Problems of DeThe Junior-Sered first with the students have we orces (FEAF) and ers and fath-;1ie Far East Air Servcat; Command (FEASC), in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations, during World War II. In 1944 and 1945, she collaborated in making geographical studies of Pacific Islands; she also wrote articles and edited the "FEASC Intelligence Bulletin." While serving with the Air Force in the Pacific, Dr. Nelson saw Australia, Biak, Hawaii, New Caledonia, New Guinea, Philippines, and other Pacific Islands. She was stationed in the Netherlands East Indies for eight months. "Public Relations" being her specialty, her thirty-two months in the Service were devoted largely to activities dealing with public relations and "Intelligence" work. Joining the Women's Army Corps (WAC) in September 1943, Dr. Nelson completed several Army training courses: Basic-2nd WAC Training Center, Daytona Beach, Fla.; Army Administration School -Richmond, Ky.; Extended Field Service -Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.; Overseas-Camp Stoneman, Calif. Served on College Faculty. students desired to attend upon high school graduation. )eSept. 1943, Dr. Nelson served o' the faculty of the New York Stat ich Teachers College, Oneonta, N. Z ing She is still on leave from the Ne, ary York State Teachers College, whet (Continued onl Page Fourteen) EDWARD JOHN ONDRASIK Honorably discharged as a First Lieutenant, Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik -director of Physical Education at NOB School -is entitled to wear the Presidential Unit Citation with Bronze Cluster, the Air Medal and three clusters, and the E.T.O. Medal with four clusters for his service in the Army Air Corps from May 2, 1942, to November 7, 1945. Saw Active Duty In Europe Mr. Ondrasik's tour of duty took him to Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, and to England where he was attached to the 448th Bomb Group. When his crew had completed only 24 of the required 30 missions, the Germans surrendered. This duty was preceded by basic training at Miami Beach, Florida, and preflight training as a bombardier at Fenn College, Cleveland, Ohio. Other Army Air Corps fields at which he was stationed are: Moody Field, Ga., Carlsbad AAF, N.M., Walla Walla AAF, Wash., and 448 BG, Seething, England. Highly Qualified For Teaching Mr. Ondrasik holds the B.S. degree in Economics from Roanoke College in Virginia, and the M.A. degree in Physical Education from Columbia University in New York. Prior to enlistment, Mr. Ondrasik than one yeaOn leaving the Service, o he returned to his Alma Mater and n graduated in February 1947. e At Roanoke College, Mr. Ondra.sik played on the Virginia All-State w Basketball Team, served as presie dent of the Monogram Club, and (Continued on Page Fourteen) 'I" Pare Six THE INDIAN

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THTE INDIANage even SCHOOL FACULTY IS WELL-ROUNDED (Continued from Page One) backgrounds and demonstrate high professional competence. The diversity of preparation and viewpoints of the teachers produce a well-rounded faculty, who work together efficiently for the good of the pupils and the school. Wide Educational Experiences The teaching experiences of the faculty range from two to fourteen years, and represent educational activities in twenty different states and Cuba. Three faculty members have taught in N. C.; two each in Calif., Fla., N.Y.; and one each in sixteen other states -located in all sections of the United States. The faculty members represent a wide range of educational experi'ences and positions: teachers on the elementary, secondary, and college levels; supervisors -elementary and college student-teaching; administrators -principal and supervising principal; educational consultant; public relations work. Faculty Is Well-Prepared More than thirty different colleges and universities have been attended by the faculty. All the elementary and high school faculty members hold the Bachelor degree, which is the minimum requirement for teaching at the NOB School; four hold M.A. degrees, and one, the Ph.D. degree. In the field of nursing, three teachers have their RN and one the MN. Among the National honorary and professional fraternities represented by the faculty are: Kappa Delta Pi (honorary educational), Phi Delta Kappa and Pi Lambda Theta (professional, educational) Pi Gamma Mu (social science), Mu Omega Xi (scholastic), Alpha Xi Omega (dramatic), and Tau Kappa Alpha (forensic). Most of the staff members hold membership in one or more professional organizations. Faculty Has Traveled Widely Holding birth certificates from twelve different states, the fiteen faculty members claim former residence in thirty different states. Some have traveled extensively in foreign countries or in lands outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. Among these lands are Africa, Australia, twenty European countries, Islands of the Pacific, West Indies, Central America, South America, and North America -Alaska, Canada, Mexico. Degrees Held by Faculty The faculty members of the NOB School hold degrees from the following institutions of higher learning: Supervising Principal: John A. Permenter -B.S., Berry College in Ga., A.B. and M.A., Florida Southern College, M.A., Columbia University, New York City. FACULTY AT WORK -Teaching staff meets with supervising principal to discuss the "Evaluative Criteria," a prerequisite to the accreditation of the NOB School. Left to right: Mrs. Lucille Burke, Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Carolyn Yates, Miss Anita Feinstein, Miss Sadele Durham, Miss Ada Schmidt, Miss Gladys Machtolff, Supervising Principal John A. Permenter, Mrs. Madlyn Newell, Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, Mrs. Alice Hayes, Mrs. Lela Souders, Mr. Edward Ondrasik. (Mrs. Ruth Metzger and Mrs. Nellie Walker are not in this picture.) THE FACULTY -(Back -left to right): Mrs. Ruth Metzger, Mrs. Lucille Burke, Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Alice Hayes, Supervising Principal John A. Permenter, Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik, Mrs. Lela Souders. (Front -left to right) : Miss Anita J. Feinstein, Mrs. Madlyn Newell, Mrs. Nellie Walker, Miss Ada Schmidt, Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, Mrs. Carolyn Yates, Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado. Supervising Principal John A. Permenter preparing materials for the Accreditation Committee. Junior-Senior High School: Dr. Esther Marion Nelson-B.S., Univ. of Oregon, M.A. and Ph.D., Columbia Univ.; Miss Anita Feinstein B.A., New York State College for Teachers at Albany, M.A., Columbia Univ.; Mrs. Ruth Metzger B.S., Kutztown State Teachers College in Pa., R.N., in nursing, St. Luke's Medical Center in Philadelphia; Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik (Continued on Page Ten) THE INDIAN P S

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Pare Eight THE INDIAN HISTORY OF NOB SCHOOL AT GUANTANAMO BAY By Jeaneen Hummel and Ramona Moses The Guantanamo Bay Naval Operating Base School has undergone constant changes in its unique history, but the progress has been a continuous upward trend. The school personnel, noted for its great annual turn-over, has gradually increased from 45 pupils and five faculty members in October 1945 to approximately 300 pupils and 15 faculty members in April 1949. NOB School in Pre-War Days The first school for children at Guantanamo Bay, comprised of only a few boys and girls, was taught by the Protestant chaplain in his own Naval quarters. In 1931, when the enrollment totaled 30 pupils, school was held in a small open-air building on Administration Hill. A wing of the Naval Hospital now occupies the site of the first school. In 1932, because the number of pupils increased, the school was moved to a larger building near the present tennis courts on Administration Hill. With a staff of five teachers, grammar school was held in the morning and high school in the afternoon. In August 1941, the present NOB School edifice was dedicated and opened to children; it was in session from August to December. Because of the entry of the U.S.A. into World War II in December 1941, all the children were evacuated from Guantanamo Bay shortly after the Christmas holidays. During the War years, 1942-1945, the main school structure was utilized by the Navy for Naval education classes, a library, and offices. NOB School in Post-War Years With the return of dependents after V-E Day, the NOB School for children re-opened on October 14, 1945. The 1945-1946 session opened with an enrollment of 45 pupils and five teachers. As a result of the enormous turn-over among the Naval personnel on the Base, the early post-war years were characterized by a constant change of pupils and teachers. Because of the acute teacher shortage in the States, most of the teachers were the wives of Naval personnel. When the husbands were transferred elsewhere, the wives resigned their teaching jobs. In 1945-46, the first faculty included Miss Harriet Black, principal, Miss Hilda Anderson, Mrs. Wava L. Hummel, Miss Betty Lythe, and Mrs. Simon Rottenberg. Mrs. V. E. Oppel later replaced Mrs. Rottenberg. Shortly after school opened, the kindergarten was organized and placed in charge of Mrs. Lillian Sage, wife of Captain G. E. Sage, Chief of Staff. Following the resignation of Mrs. Sage in December 1945, the kindergarten had a series of different teachers; Mrs. E. W. Cleary and Mrs. E. T. Malstrom served for the longest periods of time. Among the short-time teachers were Mrs. Bates, Mrs. Clark, Mrs. Rogers, and Mrs. Stanmeyer. The teaching staff increased to eight members in early 1946, when the School Board employed Mrs. Lucille Burke and Mrs. Laura Keyes. Mrs. Wava L. Hummel took over the position as principal in April 1946, when Miss Black resigned. In 1946-47, school opened with eight faculty members, namely: principal -Mrs. Wava Hummel; teachers -Miss Hilda Anderson, Mrs. Lucille Burke, Mrs. Mildred Byrd, Mrs. Dorothy Conway, ENS. D. O. Conway, Mrs. Frances Dawson, Mrs. Laura Keyes, and Mrs. E. T. Malstrom. Mrs. Lizzie Sherrill, Mrs. Sadele Mitchell, and Miss Irene Wilbur later replaced Mrs. Dawson, Mrs. Byrd, and ENS. Conway, respectively. The faculty increased to ten members in December, when Mrs. Mary Moore and Miss Joyce Weaver were added to the teaching staff. To have a complete faculty for the school year 1947-1948, extensive correspondence was carried out with colleges and universities durPRESIDENT HIGHLIGHTS 1947 -1948 EVENTS Southern Association's Dr. Edwards Inspects NOB School President Harry S. Truman's visit to the NOB School on February 25, 1948, was a memorable event. Bill Barrett, spokesman for the student body of 210 pupils, presented to President Truman a colorful scrap book that the children had made about the NOB School activities. Dr. William T. Edwards, representing the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, made a three-day visit to the School on April 27-29 as a preliminary step to accreditation. ing the spring and summer of 1947. The 1947-1948 school year opened with and maintained 15 faculty members: principal-Mrs. Wava L. Hummel; 14 teachers-Mrs. Lucille Burke, Miss Annabeth Cash, Miss Margaret Drummond, Mis ; Sadele Durham, Miss Katherine George, Miss Charlotte Jones, Miss Helen Mathews, Miss Elizabeth Rice, Miss Dorothy Roberts, Miss Ada Schmidt, Mr. Jack Staggs, Mrs. Janet Van Walkenten, Mrs. Nellie Walker, and Miss Shirley Walker. (Continud on Page Twenty-seven) OUR DISTINGUISHED VISITOR -President Harry S. Truman, 'on his visit to NOB School on Feb. 25th, 1948, shook hands with William Barrett, spokesman for the student body who presented to President Truman a colorful scrap book depicting the NOB School activities. 9 0 Paze .Eizht THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page NJing ADMINISTRATIVE FORCE -Representatives of the Southern Association for Colleges and Secondary Schools meet with School Board and Supervising Principal John A. Permenter to report findings of their investigation and to sanction the accreditation of NOB School. Left to right: LCDR. E. E. Bosserman -Protestant Chaplain, Mr. Permenter, Dr. Mode L. Stone, Mr. H. P. McNeal. CAPT. J. H. Lewis, Dr. Orin F. Crowe, Dr. William T. Evards CDR. L. P. Kimball, LCDR. C. A. Herold -Catholic Chaplain, LCDR. F. W. Weatherson. SCHOOL BOARD AT GUANTANAMO BAY SERVES AS STEERING COMMITTEE AND POLICY MAKING BODY By Joan McNeal Six of the Board Members Can Read and Converse In One or M1ore Foreign Languages; All Have Travelled Extensively Today's NOB School Board, consisting of seven members appointed in 1948, by RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN, acts as a policy making body. Headed by CAPT. J. H. Lewis, senior member, the Board formulates the over-all policies and determines the general judicial functions of the School. The Board members, in joint session with Mr. John A. Permenter -supervising principal, hold regular meetings at stated times to promote efficient school administration and to coordinate 9ll elements of The school system. The School Board, a well-rounded group landed, are: the Carolinas, group in which wide ranges of Guadalcanal, Guam, Hawaii, Japan, opinions and viewpoints are preMarianas, New Caledonia, New seated, includes the following memGuinea, New Zealand, Palau, Philbers: CAPT. J. H. Lewis, CDR. L. ippines, Ryukyus, Saipan, Somoa, P. Kimball, LCDR. E. E. Bosserman Solomons; several visited ports in -Protestant Chaplain, LCDR. C. Australia; Chaplain Herold sailed A. Herold -Catholic Chaplain, on the South China Sea along the LCDR. F. W. Weatherson, TEC coast of China, also. L. A. Lawrence, and Mr. H. P. The seven Board members, born McNeal. They represent the layin seven different states, total resiman and the clergy, the enlisted dances in 30 different states. In adman and the officer, the civilian edition to Cuba and the U.S.A., and the Naval personnel. CAPT. Lewis has resided in PanaMr. H. P. McNeal, Industrial Rema, Italy, and Sicily. lations Officer of NOB, held the Varied Cultural Interests Noted rank of Lieutenant Commander in .Six of the Board members can the U. S. Navy during World read and converse in one or more War II. foreign languages -French, GerMembers Are World Travelers man, and Spanish. Chaplains Bos"The four corners of the World" sermon and Herold have command have been traversed by these men, of Greek and Latin also. who total travelling experiences in Among the institutions of higher more than 30 countries on five conlearning attended by the various tinents -Asia, Australia, Europe, Board members are: Annapolis North America, South America. Naval Academy and other U. S. CAPT. Lewis, CDR. Kimball, and Naval schools, Harvard University, Mr. McNeal have toured in EuChicago Theological Seminary, St. ropean countries -Belgium, DenMary's College in Ky., St. Meinrads mark, France, Germany, Italy, NorSeminary in Id., Fordham U. in way, Portugal, Switzerland, and the N. Y., U. of Fla., U. of La., U. of British Isles. CAPT. Lewis and Miss., Colleges -Grinnel, LawTEC Lawrence have journeyed in rence, Miss. State, Wittenberg. Asia -China and Japan. During Among the honorary fraterniWorld War II, five of these menties represented by the School aIl Naval personnel -served with Board are: Lambda Mu (honorary the U. S. Navy in the Asiatic-PaGreek), Tan Kappa Alpha (Nat'l cific areas. Among the Pacific Forensic), Phi Delta Theta (Nat'l Islands, on which members of the Social), Delta Kappa Epsilon, SigEVALUATION COMMITTEE ACCREDITS NOB SCHOOL (Continued from Page One) high school student body and the most cooperative school board that I've ever met," praised Dr. Crowe. Investigators Report Findings The visiting professors interviewed the principal, teachers, students, parents, patrons, and School Board members. They reviewed in great detail and appraised the school plant and its site, the Staff -faculty and maintenance, the curriculum, the administration, and finance. After careful investigation and study, they made official reports to the faculty and to the School Board in which they reviewed the findings and gave recommendations. In conclusion, they made an official summary report to RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN. Prior to the official investigation, the high school faculty devoted many hours to filling out long, comprehensive "Evaluative Criteria," final prerequisites for accreditation. Summary conclusions, which represented composite ratings by (Continued on Page Ten) ma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Delta Chi. Mr. McNeal, a former newspaper editor with broad travelling experiences, has written numerous articles for publication in popular magazines -Country Gentleman, Outdoor Life, Sports Afield, Field and Stream, Outdoorsman. Golf, fishing, and swimming are the favorite sports of these travellers and linguists. Among the recommendations for improvement of the NOB School set forth by Board members are: erection of an auditorium, more permanent teaching staff, uniformity of salaries for equal preparation, more school publicity. THE INDIAN Pa e Nine f. /13 D

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Pare Ten THE INDIAN JOHN A. PERMENTER (Continued from Page Six) and High School, Palm Beach County, 1939-41; principal of the Griffin Elementary School near Lakeland, 1936-39; and between 1933 and 1936, teacher of English and social studies in Florida high schools. i t Has Degree in Administration From September 1946 to August 1948, Mr. Permenter attended Teachers College, Columbia University, where he obtained his M.A. degree in School Administration in 1947; he has now completed all the requirements except the dissertation for the Ed.D. (Doctor of Education) degree in the same field. He was graduated from Berry College, Mount Berry, Georgia, with the B.S. degree in 1933; and later, procured A.B. and M.A. degrees from Florida Southern College in Lakeland, Florida. Mr. Permenter's doctoral dissertation, now in process, is entitled, "The Citizens' Committee Approach to the Improvement of Education -A Study of Florida." It deals with the three year educational survey and the legislative program of the Florida Citizens Committee on Education, a program which led to many basic and long-time improvements in all phases of the state's provision for education. Represents Many Fraternities Among the national honorary and professional fraternities, to which Mr. Permenter belongs, are: Kappa Delta Pi (Honorary Educ.), Phi Delta Kappa (Prof. Edue.), Pi Gamma Mu (Social Science), Mu Omega Xi (Scholastic), Alpha Xi Omega (Dramatics), Tau Kappa Alpha (Debating). A life member of the National Education Association, he also belongs to several other educational organizations. Has Connections in the South Born in Macon, Georgia, and reared in Florida, Mr. Permenter lived for short periods of time in several other states during and before the War-Ill., Ohio, N. J., N. Y., and Va. Among the foreign lands that he has seen are: Canada, Cuba, the Central American countries, Ecuador and Peru in South America, and the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific. Mr. Permenter is the father of two boys, John Fletcher, four years old, and Robert Lee, two and a half. His wife, the former Dorothy Louise Fletcher, of West Palm Beach, Florida, was also a teacher for several years in the schools of Palm Beach County. She holds the Master's degree from Columbia University and the A.B. degree from Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga. Mr. Permenter thinks Guantanamo Bay is a very interesting and picturesque place, and believes that it offers many practical advantages over living in the States today. Mr. John A. Permenter PRINCIPAL ATTENDS AASA CONVENTION Supervising Principal John A. Permenter returned to the Base on April 5th, after having spent ten days in Philadelphia and New York. Mr. Permenter was 'sent to Philadelphia by the NOB School Board to attend the annual convention of the American Association of School Administrators, of which he is a member. In addition to attending the convention sessions and getting first hand information on the latest trends and developments in school administration and supervision, Mr. Permenter examined the latest in school supplies and equipment; he also made some purchases for use in the 1949-1950 school program. In New York, Mr. Permenter interviewed prospective teachers for next year; he examined the records ACCREDITATION WAS GOAL OF PRINCIPAL By Joan McNeal "My top ambition for the School this year was to see it accredited," Mr. John Permenter -Supervising Principal of the Naval Operating Base School at Guantanamo Bay -told school reporters in a recent interview. "Now that this basic goal has been reached, the School is ready to make real progress in many important lines." "The NOB School is an excellent school," he continued. "But, I do not hesitate A to point out that it has some serious weaknesses." Mr. Permenter has already witnessed great strides of progress this year in the School's academic and extracurricular activities. EVALUATION COMMITTEE ACCREDITS NOB SCHOOL (Continued from Page Nine) the faculty, were used as the basis for interviews and evaluations. In 1947-48, Mrs. Wava Hummel -the former principal -and her Staff worked hard to bring the school up to the required standards. In April 1948, Dr. Edwards made a preliminary three-day investigation of the School to determine whether or not it could be accredited by the Southern Association. At that time, he highly praised the local physical and educational facilities; then he set forth recommendations necessary for accreditation. "The School Board and other officials deserve the highest commendation for carrying out the recommendations set forth on my previous visit in 1948," complimented Dr. Edwards. "The expansion of the student activities has been very gratifying and impressive since my last visit." "To insure stability, the NOB School must have teachers of continuity in service," recommended Dr. Stone. "Until the teachers are more permanent, the School cannot be any better than it is." "I hope everyone will continue to work together to keep the school accredited and to strive for continuous progress," concluded Dr. Stone as he boarded the plane for the States. SCHOOL FACULTY IS WELL-ROUNDED (Continued from rage Seven) B.S., Roanoke College in Va., M.A., Columbia Univ.; Miss Ada Schmidt -B.A., Midland College in Nebr.; Mrs. Lela Cornett Souders -B.S., Eastern State Teachers College in Ky., R.N., in nursing, Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Md. Elementary Grades: Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado -B.A., Aurora College in Ill.; Mrs. Alice Feehan Hayes -B.S.E., Fitchburg State Teachers College in Mass.; Mrs. Gladys Braun Machtolff -B.S., University of Alabama; Mrs. Geneva Hunt McCollum-B.S., Asheville Teachers College, N.C.; Mrs. Madlyn Barnes Newell -A.B., East Carolina State Teachers College, N.C.; Mrs. Carolyn Stone Yates A.B., Woman's College, Univ. of North Carolina. Kindergarten: Mrs. Lucille Burke -Elementary Teacher Certificates from Colorado and California; Mrs. Nellie Walker -B.S., Northwestern Univ. in Evanston, Ill., R.N. and M.N., in nursing, Chicago. of a number of other teachers, who indicated an interest in coming to Guantanamo Bay to teach. Of THE INDIAN Page Ten

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THE INDIAN Pare Eleven Sj~' FIRST GRADE -Mrs. Alice Hayes, teacher, proudly presents her forty-six little scholars -happy, alert, and ready to be taught the fundamentals of reading, writing, and arithmetic. O CLASS WORK ADJUSTED TO NEEDS OF PUPILS In the first grade, there are actually two grades -the children with previous kindergarten training and those with none. In social adjustments and in ability to do school work, most of the children who have had nursery and kindergarten experiences show marked progress over those pupils with no previous school backgrounds. To provide opportunities for maximum growth of all the first graders, Mrs. Hayes teaches reading on four different group levels. Each reading class is organized according to the abilities and achievements of the pupils. The 12 boys and girls in the upper section do excellent work; the 15 children in the second group do very good work; but the others need considerable individual attention and help. Pupils Learn English Four Spanish speaking Cuban children -Rylma Boan, Amelia Pubillones, Ursula Teagle, and Edith Pamias -could not speak or understand English at the beginning of the year. All class instructions, as well as everything that the pupils said to them, had to be translated from English to Spanish by interpreters. Elizabeth Abbott and Emil Kloske, two firstgrade children who could speak both Spanish and English, acted as interpreters. Under the expert guidance of Mrs. Hayes, these four Spanish speaking natives of Cuba have made rapid progress; today they no longer need interpreters. STARTING WITH FORTY BOYS AND GIRLS, THE FIRST GRADE NOW HAS FORTY-SIX CHILDREN Twenty-three Different States and Thirty-six Different Cities and Towns Are Represented By The First Grade Children Now Enrolled By Ramona Sparks "What a well-behaved and courteous first grade!" comment Navy officials who visit the NOB School. "That's one of the finest first grades I've ever seen. How does Mrs. Hayes'manage that many little children so well?" When school opened in September 1948, forty eager little boys and girls scurried into the spacious first grade room. Although two rooms were converted into a large one, MRS. HAYES ADHERES TO the enlarged classroom was filled to capacity. By February 1949, the GUIDING PRINCIPLES first grade registration totalled 50 pupils; the present enrollment is Former principal of the West 46 first-graders. Acton Elementary School in MasMrs. Alice Hayes, our highly sachusetts, Mrs. Alice Feehan competent first grade teacher with Hayes taught in the Public Schools ten years teaching experience in of Waltham-"The Watch City" of Massachusetts, faced many unusual Massachusetts-immediately prior problems in bringing about the to coming to Guantanamo Bay. desired grade adjustments. Today In her teaching at the NOB the 46 first graders, who were born School, Mrs. Hayes adheres to the in 36 different cities or towns following guiding principles set representing 23 different states in forth in "A Curriculum Guide for the U.S.A. and several foreign Primary Grade Teachers," pubcountries, live and work happily lished by the Mass. State Dept. of together like one well-organized Ed.: (1) Provide conditions that family. foster growth in democratic living; School Is Exciting to First Graders (2) Realize that the child is a To the boys and girls of the first "total person" and recognize the grade, school is a series of exciting value and need of integrating exand interesting experiences. At periences in the school; (3) Recog8:30 A.M., school begins with mornnize and provide for individual difing exercises -Bible readings, the ferences; (4) Arouse and foster a Lord's Prayer, salute to the U.S.A. desire for learning; (5) Conserve, flag, singing. The morning classes advance, and establish the physical consist of phonetic exercises, arithand mental health of each child; metic, seat work assignments, pre(6) Provide for acquisition of the paration for reading-word and basic skills and knowledges; (7) phrase study, and reading. The Emphasize desirable character afternoon sessions include reading, growth. writing, drawing, social studies. THE INDIAN Pace Eleven

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Page Twelve ~THE INDIAN HOW THE FACULTY WAS APPOINTED THIS YEAR How were the teachers of the NOB School employed for the year 1948-1949? Supervising Principal John A. Permenter was employed by the NOB School Board through the cooperation of Dr. W. T. Edwards of the Florida State University and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Mrs. Lucille Burke, Miss Sadele Durham, Miss Ada Schmidt, and Mrs. Nellie Walker were reappointed after having taught here in 1947-48. Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Ruth Metzger, Mrs. Madlyn Newell, and Mrs. Carolyn Yates were employed locally. Their husbands, all Naval personnel, were stationed at the Naval Operating Base when these teachers were elected. Mrs. Alice Hayes, Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, and Mrs. Lela Souders were employed through a cooperative arrangement between the NOB School Board and the Navy Department. The Navy transferred their husbands to Guantanamo Bay so that the wives could teach in the NOB School. Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, Miss Anita Feinstein, and Mr. Edward Ondrasik were employed by the NOB School Board through Supervising Principal Permenter. Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado was employed by the School Board through a contact with the American Consul in Santiago de Cuba. SEVENTH GRADERS HAVE SEEN FOREIGN LANDS (Continued from Page Four) mathematics in addition to the regular work of the 7th grade. The class officers are: Marshall Masterson -president, Norman Huddy -vice president, Barbara Burke -secretary, Dixie Adair treasurer. Spanish is taught as a regular subject in the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grades; but as an elective in high school. SECOND GRADERS STRESS DEMOCRATIC LIVING By Phyllis Hummell "This class of thirty -twenty boys and ten girls -is one of the most alert, active, knd lovable groups I've ever met," Mrs. Madlyn Barnes Newell, second grade teacher with ten years teaching experience in Virginia and in her home state -North Carolina, told school reporters. "Throughout the year, we stressed democratic living." Backgrounds Are Varied Of the total registration for the second grade, 35 pupils -22 boys and 13 girls, the median pupil is seven years of age. Born in sixteen states and Cuba, these children have lived on ten different U. S. Naval Bases and in thirty-one different states -led by Cal., Va., Mass., Fla., N. Y., Tex. Mona Bailey was born in Hawaii; Helga Heimer, in Cuba. Thomas Bosserman has lived in Hawaii; William Price, in Canada. In addition to wide travel in the U.S.A., different pupils have seen Canada, Cuba, Hawaii, Mexico. Richard Machtolff has traveled in all of these countries. The second graders have attended school in twenty different states, led by Cal., Va., Fla., Tex., Mass. The number of schools attended ranges from two to six for each child; the median pupil has attended two schools. Two pupils speak Spanish as fluently as English. Class Project Enjoyed The most enjoyable unit of the school year was one on "Navajo Indians." A frieze was made of the hogans (homes) and of the work the Navajos do. Many interesting stories were written. Democratic Living To promote growth in democratic living, a unit on "Neighbors Who Help Us" was completed. This project included many pictures, posters, and interesting stories. Play periods also helped to show the second graders how dependent they are on one another in their everyday life. SECOND AND THIRD GRADES -Happy, beaming children of the 2nd and 3rd grades pose with their teachers, Mrs. Madlyn Newell and Mrs. Carolyn Yates. (Charlene Brown and Phyllis Hummell -center back in picture -collected the data about this group.) THIRD GRADERS ENJOY CREATIVE ACTIVITIES By Charlene Brown "The third graders are a very well-behaved group," Mrs. Carolyn Stone Yates, the third grade teacher, with teaching experience in her home state-North Carolina, told reporters. "They have developed very good work habits." Of the year's total registration of 27 pupils, today's enrollment is 23-14 boys and 9 girls. Their ages range from 8 to 10 -the median girl is 8 years, the median boy is 9 years of age. Varied Backgrounds Noted Born in ten different states and Cuba, the third graders have resided in thirty-two cities in twenty-seven states, with Cal. leading. Cuba was the birthplace of four of these pupils. Ignacio and Nancy Avila were born in Havana; Bertil Heimer, in Bayate, Oriente; and Carl Heimer, at Guantanamo Bay. David. Earl Leidle .ived on Argentia Naval Air Base in Newfoundland, where he attended school in 1946. Members of the class have lived on 10 U. S. Naval Bases. The third graders have previously attended schools in twenty-four states, led by Va., Calif., N.Y., Mass., Fla., Md. The number of schools attended ranges from two to six for each pupil, the median is four schools. Creative Work Emphasized Arithmetic is one of their preferred subjects. Other than the fundamentals, this third grade has emphasized creative work and individual initiative. Creative work has centered around dramatics, story-writing, and story-telling. The pupils enjoyed dramatics so they gave their own versions of a Halloween play, and later presented a playlet on Washington's Birthday. After producing each of these plays and commemorating other important holidays in some way, the pupils wrote stories about them. These were compiled in individual story booklets for the children to keep. Individuality Stressed Individual initiative has been developed through classroom jobs and health inspections. Every pupil has a chore which he or she has selected -watering plants, leading opening exercises, getting reading books, etc., and each takes pride in performing his or her job well. The daily health inspection has become highly important with most favorable results. Seeing shoes that shine like mirrors, and husky boys with immaculate nails and hands, inspire the group to high health standards. Checks are given daily; the neatest boy and the neatest girl are chosen each Friday. .9 Page Twelve THE INDIAN*

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THE INDIAN Pare Thirteen FIFTH GRADERS ARE WELL-TRAVELED By John Cozy, Jr. "My boys and girls have made the greatest progress in arithmetic of any fifth grade that I've ever taught," Mrs. Gladys Braun Machtolff, the fifth grade teacher told reporters. "I'm really proud of them. They can apply what they ,have learned to real life situations." The fifth graders, who at the beginning of the year could not understand the value of long division, now list arithmetic as their preferred subject. After Mrs. Machtolff showed them the close tie-up between sports and math -how batting averages in baseball are computed through long division the children developed keen interest in arithmetic that led to real achievement. Mrs. Machtolff -a native of Mass., who has lived at some time in twelve different states from Calffornia to New York and from Florida to Mass., has taught in several fine school systems. Pupils Have Seen Many Lands The fifth graders, who total 23 pupils-11 boys and 12 girls-for the year, constitute an interesting cosmopolitan group. More than half of these pupils have resided in countries outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. Bruce Milford Kendall, born in Manilla, Philippines, has lived in Australia and the U.S.A. Among other Pacific Islands he has seen are Hawaii, New Zealand, Samoa, in the Americas; he has traveled in Canada, Mexico, Panama. Born in Ecuador, Leslie Lindsay has lived in Chile, England, and the U.S.A.; he has traveled in Cuba, Panama, and Peru. Gloria McKuin and Charles Yelvington were residing at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, when the Japs bombed it in December 1941. Charles Yelvington and Edward P. Heimer were born in Cuba. Raymond Cummings has lived in .Shanghai, China; Petie Lee Davis and Annette Marie Gebhart, in Puerto Rico. Charles Leslie Hardin has traveled in Mexico and the Panama Canal Zone, and William Foster has visited in Mexico. Varied Backgrounds Noted Born in 16 different states, the fifth graders have resided in 37 different states, the leading ones being Va., Calif., Fla. The fifth graders, having attended from two to fifteen schools each -the median being five, have been enrolled in schools in twenty different states. The greatest number have studied in Va., Fla., Calif., N.Y., Mass., and Pa. Thomas Groome tops the number of schools attended -fifteen. The median pupil in the fifth (Continued on Page Seventeen) *~: INTERMEDIATE GRADES -Home-room teachers -Mrs. Geneva McCollum, Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, and Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado -present the pupils of the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. (Kathryn Hollis. John Cozy, and Joan Parker surveyed the intermediate section.) FOURTH GRADE NOTED FOR ATTRACTIVE ROOM By Kathryn Hollis The fourth grade, one of the most orderly groups of children in the NOB School, maintains at all times one of the most attractive classrooms. Mrs. Geneva McCollum, fourth grade teacher with seven years of teaching experience in her home state -North Carolina, takes great pride in the high achievement and progress of her pupils. Having traveled widely, the fourth graders have much to contribute to their school activities. Of a total of 24 pupils -12 boys and 12 girls -seven were born outside the continental limits of the U.S.A. Patricia Spahr was born in Honolulu, Hawaii; Thomas Greenwood, in Canada; Elizabeth Robertson (withdrawn), in Le Havre, France. Cuba was the birthplace of Eunice Avila, Magnhilde Berge (withdrawn), Grace Yelvington, and Irma Pina. Their Cuban birthplaces are Havana, Miranda, Guantanamo Bay, and Santa Cruz del Sur, respectively. Robert Keehn, Constance Ruppert, Richard Ruppert, and Patricia Spahr have lived in Hawaii; Grace Yelvington in Panama; Patrick Shue (withdrawn), in Puerto Rico and Trinidad. The fourth graders have been enrolled in more than 60 different schools in 25 states -led by Va., Calif., Fla., Pa., N.Y. The number of schools ranges from two to eight each; the median pupil has attended four schools and is 9 years old. Social Studies Rate Tops The social studies are the preferred subjects of the fourth graders, who have enjoyed the units on Pre-Revolution, Revolution, and Civil War periods in history. Among their favorite projects have been the "Pueblo Indians," the early colonists, and citizenship. "Lincoln," by Nancy Byrd Turner, is the favorite poem of these fourth graders, 20 pupils-12 girls and 8 boys -today's enrollment. SIXTH GRADE PREPARES FOR JUNIOR HIGH By Joan Parker "The nineteen sixth graders-12 boys and 7 girls are eagerly anticipating their entrance into Junior High School," Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado, their sixth grade teacher, told school reporters. Born in New York, Mrs. Delgado has had eleven years of teaching experience in the United States and Cuba. The total enrollment for the year has been 23 students-13 boys and 10 girls. Holding birth certificates from fourteen states, the sixth graders have lived in twenty-nine different states. Several members of the group have lived or traveled abroad -Canada, Cuba, France, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Trinidad. James Cozy has lived in Panama; Richard Davis, in Puerto Rico; Charles Greenwood, in Canada, Alexander Chaffin (withdrawn), in Puerto Rico and Trinidad; Ian FitzGerald (withdrawn) claimed former residence in France, Japan, and the Philippines. The sixth graders have attended schools in twenty-three states, led by Cal., Va., N.Y., Fla., and Mass. The number of schools ranges from three to thirteen; the median child, 11 years of age, has been enrolled in five different schools. "Seniors" Study Feudalism The social studies are the prefered subjects of the sixth graders. Units in Ancient civilization Egyptian, Grecian, and Romanwere carried out during the first part of the year. At present, the "Middle Ages" hold their undivided attention. Mural displays designed and made by pupils to show life in the Middle Ages, catch the eye of visitors entering the room. The customs of the feudal system lords and serfs, castles and huts, costumes of silk and sackcloth are exhibited on walls and table. A miniature feudal castle, with its moat and drawbridge, has also been made by the sixth graders. THE INDIAN Paee Thirteen

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Pane Fourteen THE INDIAN ESTHER MARION NELSON (Continued from Page Six) she worked first as "Supervisor of Student Teaching" and later as college teacher of English and "Director of Public Relations." For three summers, she taught courses in "Education" at the Michigan State Normal College, Ypsilanti, Michigan. Holds Three University Degrees The holder of three University degrees, Dr. Nelson obtained her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University in New York; her B.S. from University of Oregon. Her doctor's dissertation, "The Content of Student Teaching in State Teachers Colleges," 331 printed pages, published in 1939 as a prerequisite to her Ph.D. degree, is still used extensively in Schools of Education. Worked on National Surveys Dr. Nelson has visited, for research purposes, seventy-five state teachers colleges and schools of education in forty-one states. In 1940-1941, she was granted a leave of absence from the New York State Teachers College to study trends in "Education" in the U.S.A. As an associate member of the* nation-wide survey, "National Survey of Education of Teachers in the United States," sponsored by the U. S. Department of Education, Washington, D. C., Dr. Nelson played an important role in the research work and publication of six volumes. During the summers of 1940 and 1941, she worked on problems of "Inter-state Migration" with the Farm Security Administration (FSA); her research studies took her to migrant camps in Arizona, California, Oregon, Washington. Has Traveled Widely Her traveling experiences include tours in Africa, Australia, seventeen European countries, North America-Alaska, Canada, Mexico, every state in the U.S.A.-and the Pacific Islands. Has Won Numerous Honors Dr. Nelson was a delegate to the C. E. World Convention held in Budapest, Hungary, in 1935; and in 1939, she won recognition at Geneva, Switzerland, for her work in "Education." "Who's Who in American Education," has contained biographical sketches of Dr. Nelson for the years 1939-1940, 1941-1942, 1943-1944; she has recently been requested to appear in the 1949-1950 volume. Among the honorary fraternities and organizations, which she represents,are: Kappa Delta Pi, Pi Lambda Theta, Alpha Sigma Omicron, American Ass'n of University Women, Women's Overseas Service League, Life Member of NEA. Came South to Regain Health While on a tour of duty in the tropical islands of the Pacific, Dr. FACULTY AIMS TOWARD WELL-ROUNDED PUPIL Fundamentals Are Emphasized The NOB School places most emphasis upon helping pupils to make adjustments to meet changing conditions, not only for changes in present social and personal needs, but also for leadership and intelligent followership needs of the future. Although the offerings of the curriculum are organized in terms of conventional subject matter and grade classifications, provisions are made for correlation of subjects to provide for consideration of the total experiences of each pupil. The students are given part in determining, the content and activities which constitute their school experiences; and, therefore, any project which has promise of contributing to pupil growth is encouraged. However, fundamentals or the so-called "tool" subjects are emphasized rather than neglected. Problems of Living Stressed Much emphasis is placed on promoting the pupils' understanding of social and personal problems at home and abroad. The work in English and the social studies are closely interrelated; the Science and Mathematics Departments cooperate closely; and all high school students are trained to solve problems requiring elementary research procedures. Within the classrooms, the teachers strive to teach each pupil as an individual and to assist him in achieving the maximum development of which he is capable in any given field; while at the same time, teaching him to look for ways to become a better member of a democratic group. Thus the School seeks to make every pupil himself a part of the total school life, and to make each one feel responsible for the welfare of the School. The School especially seeks to develop traits and attitudes of citizenship -loyalty to causes which he feels right after analytic thinking, followership and leadership, and the spirit of cooperation without which democratic civilization cannot long exist. "I CAN HEAR IT NOW" By Carlita McLaren The junior and senior high school classes have recently relived the "13-Year period" from 1933-1946, by listening to the records, "I Can Hear It Now," produced by E. R. Murrow and F. W. Friendly. Nelson contracted sub-tertian malaria -a recurrent malaria. After several New York doctors had ordered her to spend an indefinite period of time in the sunny South, Dr. Nelson came to Guantanamo Bay to teach. MRS. WALKER SERVED IN ARMY NURSE CORPS Honorably discharged with the rank of Captain, Mrs. Nellie Walker, kindergarten teacher at NOB School, served in the Army Nurse Corps for three years. Throughout her period of service, she was stationed at the Presidio Army Hospital -Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. Mrs. Walker, who obtained her R.N. and M.N. in nursing, has also completed post graduate work in surgery, in Chicago. She has served in the capacity of surgical nurse, floor supervisor, and superintendent of nurses. As a civilian, she has nursed in the Loretto Hospital, Chicago, Ill., Victory Hospital, Napa, Cal., and Lee Memorial Hospital, Norfolk, Va. Mrs. Walker, who holds a B.S. degree from Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill., has had two years extension work in pre-school education and child psychology at San Diego State College in California. For two years, she taught nrsery children at the Washington Elementary School, San Diego, Cal. Born in Bonne Terre, Mo., and reared in Springfield, Ill., Mrs. Walker has also resided in Cal., N.Y., and Va. She has toured in the British West Indies, Cuba, Canada, Mexico, and the U.S.A. EDWARD JOHN ONDRASIK (Continued from Page Six) was active in Y.M.C.A. work. He was listed in "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities." Graduating from Roanoke College in mid-year afforded Mr. Ondrasik an opportunity to attend graduate school immediately. Accepted in the Physical Education Department of Columbia University, he took the maximum curriculum load. In September of 1947, he was employed by the Anne Arundel County (Maryland) Board of Education as director of Athletics at Linthicum Heights High School. In the Summer Session, 1948, Mr. Ondrasik completed his work for the Master's degree. He was subsequently employed to direct the Physical Education program for the NOB School, Guantanamo Bay. Mr. Ondrasik Has Travelled Widely Mr. Ondrasik, who was born in Guttenberg, N. J., has lived in numerous states -Calif., Fla., Ga., Ohio, Md., N. J., N. M., Va., Wash. He has travelled in Belgium, England, Germany, Holland, and Newfoundland. Mr. Ondrasik has held membership in Paterson Crescents Professional Basketball Team (American League) and Eastern Lawn Tennis Association -North Hudson Tennis Club. I S Page Fourteen THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Fifteen KINDERGARTEN IS A BUSY WORKSHOP "Our kindergarten is a little work shop where we try to set the machinery in motion and keep everything running smoothly throughout the year," Mrs. Lucille Burke -kindergarten teacher, who has taught at the NOB School since January 1946, told reporters. "Emphasis is placed on the development of coordination -to play together, to share, to follow directions, and to respect the wishes and desires of others," said Mrs. Nellie Wal ker-kindergarten teacher, who has taught at the NOB School since September 1947. During September 1948, Mrs. Walker taught the entire kindergarten class. Upon completion of the new addition to the kindergarten building, the class was divided -Mrs. Burke was given the older half of the group and Mrs. Walker, who is especially trained for preschool education, took over the younger half. Kindergarten Activities Quoting Mrs. Burke and Mrs. Walker, "The children are taught good work and fair play habits, and to follow directions. Their imaginations are stimulated through stories and pictures. Number work, taught through the medium of games, becomes fun. The children are eager to count and write numbers used in the games." The majority of the class now read and write numbers up to 100, and also count by 5's and 10's to 100. Among the interesting activities carried on in the kindergarten classes are scrap and alphabet books to teach the children how to cut and paste neatly, finger-painting, clay-modeling, drawing, stringing wooden beads, coloring, looking at picture books, story-telling, and the rhythm band. Instruments used in the rhythm band are chimes, drums, tamborines, bells, xylophones, sticks, piano. The children are taught responsibility for the care of their own and school property -crayons, scissors, seatwork, colorbooks; they are also trained to keep their workrooms neat and orderly. Pride in their work is developed through praise of duties and work well done. Largest Group in School A total of 77 children -47 boys and 30 girls -have been enrolled in the kindergarten since September 15, 1948. Today's enrollment, the maximum number of pupils that can be accommodated in the kindergarten, totals 60 children -33 boys and 27 girls. Up to date, 17 children -14 boys and 3 girls have withdrawn; but as soon as one child is withdrawn, another enters. The ages of the kindergarten children range from five to six years, the median age being about 5% years. Last September about half of these children were between the ages of 4-8 and 5-0 years. The kindergarteners, who represent every section of the U.S.A., were born in fifty different cities in twenty-two states. The states listed according to frequency of births are: Cal., Va., N.Y., Mass., Pa., Tex., N.J., Fla., Wash., La., D.C., R.I., Okla., Me., S.C,., Md., Ill., Kan., Mo., Ind., N.C., Ga. Hawaii, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Cuba were the birthplaces of five Kindergarteners. Students Assist During recess periods each day, two Junior High School girls assist the kindergarten teachers to care for the large number of children on the playground and in the rest rooms. TWO CHILDREN IN FAMILY The number of children for each family represented at the NOB School ranges from one to six; the median family has two children a boy and a girl. SIESTA TIME -The kindergarten, under the supervision of Mrs. Lucille Burke and Mrs. Nellie Walker, takes time out from their school session for a morning nap. SMILES FROM THE KINDERGARTEN -Mrs. Lucille Burke and Mrs. Nellie Walker, teachers, and Jill Hiers beam down upon NOB School's youngest citizens. THE INDIAN Page Fifteen

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Page Sixteen THE INDIAN JANITORS KEEP SCHOOL CLEAN AND ATTRACTIVE By Thomas Beadling During inspection tours, Naval officers usually rate the NOB School "Superior" in appearance and cleanliness. The janitors, having been carefully selected for their particular jobs, work diligently to keep the NOB school premises in top condition. These highly efficient janitors are James Foster, Augustus Grizzle, Andrew Winters (parttime), and George Robinson (parttime). Janitors Deserve Praise James Foster, janitor at NOB school for the past two years, has been employed on the U. S. Naval Base since 1929 and has received numerous commendations for superior work. During the War, he served as chief cook at the officers' mess on Evans Point for which he got a much valued War service pin. Mr. Foster, a native of Jamaica, who now resides with his wife and son in Caimanera, speaks both English and Spanish fluently. His 21year-old son, Lincoln Foster, drives one of the NOB School buses. Augustus Grizzle, born in Guantanamo City of Jamaican parents, has served as janitor at the NOB school since 1946. Mr. Grizzle, who speaks both English and Spanish and who greets everyone with a pleasant smile, helps to support his large family -his mother, six sisters, and four brothers. His father died recently. Augustus, who is now 19 years old and a prolific worker, wants to become a doctor of medicine. Andrew Winters, who lives in Guantanamo City with his wife and six children, has worked on the U. S. Naval Base since 1941. At present, he works as janitor at MR. ABEL MOSQUEDA CULTIVATES FLORA By Thomas Beadling "The flowers and lawns look very attractive and well-kept," recently commented a visiting Captain while inspecting the NOB School. "Who is your landscape gardner?" Abel Mosqueda, a native of Cuba who is a landscape gardner and floriculturist by trade, gives full time to beautifying the campus. He keeps the floral vegetation flourishing, but trim. Mr. Mosqueda, who has been employed by the U. S. Naval Base since 1943, knows the Spanish names for every tree, shrub, and flower on the campus. Having always been a lover of flowers and ornamental plants, he studied floriculture in Preston, Cuba. "What pleases me most is what the students have been led to do for themselves and for the School," said Dr. William T. Edwards on his recent visit to help evaluate the NOB School. the NOB school in the morning and at the Naval Base library in the afternoon. Mr. Winters, the son of English speaking Jamaican parents, early became a linguist. Today he can speak and understand five languages-English, French, Spanish, Syrian, and Chinese. George Robinson, who worked as substitute janitor during the recent illness of James Foster, is a native of Jamaica who now resides in Guantanamo City with his wife and two children-Rita and Alfred. Mr. Robinson, who speaks both English and Spanish fluently, has been employed by the U. S. Naval Base since 1942. TROPICAL FLORA TENDS TO BEAUTIFY CAMPUS Floral Landscaping Lends Beauty To School Grounds "Tropical beauty" typifies the landscaping of the NOB School campus adjoining the Naval Chapel on Massip Hill. The landscape scheme gives careful attention to the arrangement of trees, shrubbery, foliage, flowers, and lawn in relation to the architectural details and proportions of the main building. Tropical plants,.set to conform with the natural lay-out of the grounds, follow stepped formations that produce displays of varied depth and outline. Tropical trees with broad spreading branches shade the smaller plants from the hot sun. Flowering trees and shrubbery predominate; but palms and masses of luxuriant foliage, including rare species, are harmoniously blended. Planted to create clever combinations of forms, they enhance the beauty and attractiveness of the campus. Palms and bougainvillia shrubs, with myriads of brilliant red floral bracts, border the ascending drive to the school. Near the entrance to the campus, datiles (date palms) and yaraguan trees frame the winding drive. On the campus, picturesque palms -areca, corojo, and coconut trees -produce a tropical atmosphere; fig (higo), lime, papaya, and wild grape-fruit trees attract added interest. Two dignified cactus century plants, Spanish maguey, guard the entrance to the center front walk. Royal poincianas or colorful flamboyant trees, displaying long spreading branches, shade the left and right front wings of the school edifice; while Australian pine, jaguey (banyan), and guacima trees shade the rear section. Marpacificos (hibiscus), adelfas (oleanders), amapolas, paquitas, poinsettias, and rhododendrons add brilliantly colored blooms to the campus flora; while lechero shrubs, exposing silvery limbs with white flowers, produce delightful contrasts. Oleanders and hibiscus cover the center front of the building, while crotons and other shrubs line the open veranda. The numerous oleanders, large ornamental shrub-like trees with leathery leaves and profuse clusters of deep-pink or white blooms, and the hibiscus, bearing five-petal red flowers with yellow centers, definitely predominate along the east and west ends of the building. Crotons -alcalifas and periquitas, displaying leaves of many vivid colors -yellow, orange, red, green, mixed -brighten the front of the veranda; well-kept aurelia hedges blanket the lower wall spaces; and almeja and rare species of cacti (Continued on Page Thirty-two) SCHOOL CUSTODIANS -Maintenance staff keeps school premises in top condition. (Left to right -Andrew Winters -part time, Augustus Grizzle, George Robinson -substitute janitor during recent illness of James Foster.) I S Page Sixteen THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Seventeen SCHOOL FLIES AMERICAN FLAG The thirty-foot flagpole in front of the NOB School was supplied by Public Works and flies the official Naval Station American flag. Colors are raised at 0800 daily and lowered at sunset in keeping with Navy custom and tradition. The flagpole was placed on the campus in December 1948. The American flag which flies at the Naval Operating Base Administration Building is the official flag of the Naval Operating Base. The Naval Station, one of the eight commands entitled to fly an American flag, flies no flag other than the one flown at Naval Operating Base School. FIRE PRECAUTIONS ARE CAREFULLY OBSERVED By Patricia McCrodden In order to meet all safety standards and requirements, the school fire fighting equipment is examined regularly and kept in good working condition at all times. The fire box, to be used to summon the fire department, is located in plain sight on the outside corner of the sixth grade room. The broad red stripe and the red light, which are characteristic of all Base fire alarm boxes, are plainly visible. The school children know where the fire box is located and how to use it. When either the school or the chapel Base fire alarm sounds, the school bell fire signal is sounded from the office; both school buildings are emptied immediately, in keeping with plans worked out in cooperation with the Base Fire Department. Fire drills are held monthly. During these drills, both buildings have been emptied in as little as thirtyfive seconds, the immediate grounds have been cleared within sixty seconds, and the entire area vacated within less than two minutes. FIFTH GRADERS ARE WELL-TRAVELED *C(Continued From Page Thirteen) grade is 10 years of age. Social Studies Rate High An activity program, centered about Colonial life, has created lively interest and has produced colorful displays. In the first unit, "Early Settlements in North America," Barbara Aten won first place on map work. In the second unit, "Early Indian Settlements," the children arranged a sandbox showing life of the Colonial period. In their third unit, "Virginia Plantations," their sandbox contained life of the early Virginia settlers and their plantations. "Health Camps," with major interest centering around personal health problems, is their present key unit. ,~ Uy~ SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION -Navy buses convey pupils to and from NOB School at regularly scheduled time. (Insert -left to right: Stephanie Fenton, Sylvia Cavanaugh, Joan Parker, Charlene Brown, Joan McNeal, Susan Chaffin, and Jeancen Hummel.) PUBLIC WORKS AND BASE POLICE COOPERATE TO INSURE SAFE SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION Naval Operating Base School Children Have Special Buses Transporting Them to and From School; Marked "Stop! School Bus" By Bill Barrett and Bill Reinhold "How are the children transported to and from school?" newcomers to Guantanamo Bay frequently ask. Approximately 97 per cent of the pupils are conveyed to and from the NOB School in school buses, which are controlled by the Naval Operating Base transportation system at Guantanamo Bay. ___ Best Buses Transport Pupils Perez, A. Pupo, and Lincoln Foster. As the NOB School bus transThe bus drivers, having been speportation is an integral part of the cifically trained and of proven comNaval Base transportation system, petence, can be depended upon to the most suitable vehicles and the observe all traffic rules and to give best Naval equipment are discareful attention to the safety of patched to cover special routes at the children. They help the children regularly scheduled times to conto obey all traffic rules and to convey the pupils. duct themselves satisfactorily in Every vehicle utilized-four large the vicinity of the buses. buses and a station wagon -is Children Are Safeguarded clearly labelled in bold black letters The Guantanamo Bay Transpor"SCHOOL BUS." To make them station Center inspects the school even more easily identified, parts buses daily, and strives to keep of the four large school buses -them in top condition at all times. two trailers and two Base conveyA service truck carrying all necance types -have recently been essay equipment is always ready brightened up with new paint. to proceed to any point on the Base The school bus routes are orto meet emergencies, such as reganized so as to secure a high pairing engines or changing tires. degree of efficiency and economy in On the main roads, the Base service without sacrificing the welPolice work in close co-operation fare of the individual pupils. with the school transportation. Drivers Are Efficient When the school buses stop at reguExperienced drivers, who are lar stations along the main roads, properly licensed and carefully sethe Base Police jeep patrols halt lected for their particular jobs, traffic to insure children's safety. operate the school buses. Every In each trailer bus, a conductor driver must pass rigid physical stands at the entrance to prevent examinations and technical tests. any child from entering or leaving The staff of drivers -all Cubans the vehicle prior to full stop. In or Jamaicans who speak English -these trailers, buzzers flash off and include Cyril Scott, Lino Cambron, on to inform the drivers when to Vincent Dyce, Ignacio Sell, Rafael stop or go. THE INDIAN Page Seventeen

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THE INDIAN Page Nineteen GIRLS' SPORTS FOR 1948-1949 By Joan Harris Because of the ideal climate and the use of Base recreation facilities, the NOB School offers a greater variety of physical training activities for girls than most other schools of its size. The girls' physical education activities, under the direction of Miss Ada Schmidt, have included swimming, basketball, bowling, softball, riding, volley ball, and tennis. Even in this tropical climate the sports are seasonal. Swimming is best during early fall and late spring; basketball, the most strenuous sport, during the winter months; the others in the in-between seasons. Basketball Basketball was one of the favorite sports among the girls. After weeks of practice, four teams were chosen. Barbara Johnson and Jill Hiers were captains of the senior high teams; Anne Sheppard and Betty Parks were captains of the junior high teams. Jill Hier's team won three out of three games; Betty Parks' team won two out of three. Joan Harris was high scorer for the senior team. Experienced senior high players refereed the junior high games. These younger girls learned the game rapidly and played good basketball at the end of the season. Bowling During the weeks of basketball practice, eight girls took turns bowling. They used two alleys one of ten pins and one of duck pins. Some insisted the alleys were lopsided, the balls had chicken pox, and the gutters were magnetized; but all in all, it was a lot of fun. Ramona Sparks had high score, 126, with the ten pins; Sharon Brown had high score, 79, with the duck pins. Volleyball and Tennis The current sports are volleyball and tennis. A volleyball tournament is in progress now with three teams participating. Captains are: Jeaneen Hummel, Joan Harris, and Charlene Brown. Two games are played every physical education period. Ramona Moses is high, with twenty-two points to her credit. While the two teams are playing volleyball, the third is on the tennis courts. Most of the girls are beginners, so the game appears to be a track meet between players and balls. The girls show promise, and before the end of the season should be able to hit the ball inside the white lines. "This School has the best school spirit that I've ever seen," Dr. Orin F. Crowe, a member of the Accreditation Committee of the Southern Association, told Base School students. NOB SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM HAS DIVERSIFIED SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES A diversity of sports, games, and activities characterizes the NOB Physical Education Program under the competent direction of Mr. Edward Ondrasik -holder of a Master's degree in Physical Education from Columbia University -and his assistant, Miss Ada Schmidt, teacher of Girls' Physical Education. The major emphasis is given to those sports and physical activities that have the greatest carry-over value for the individual pupil. Health, however, dictates the amount and nature of activity for each pupil. A GALAXY OF SPORTS Considerable provision is made for activities involving team play. Left Column -top to bottom: The physical education program 1. The Basketball Team. encourages good sportsmanship, 2. Mr. Ondrasik and Mr. Machnot only on the part of the players, tolff, of Recreation, show the boys hut also on the part of the spectathe "howi" of football. 3. Scrimmage. tors toward contests. 4. Just Before the Whistle. 5-6. Views of 5th-6th Grade SoftH. S. BASKETBALL TEAM ball -Mr. Ondrasik Umpiring. ENTERS BASE LEAGUE Right Column -top to bottom: 1. The Cheerleaders-left to right By Fred Johnson and -Joan McNeal, Eunice Besse, Phyllis Hummell, Jeaneen Hummel. 2. Swimming Class Lines Up for Ia 1948-1949, for the first time Inspection. in its history, the NOB High School 3. The Big SPLASH. has a basketball team and the per4. Watching the "Experts." mission to participate in League 5. It's Recess -First Grade. competition. This year, it has Center Column -top to bottom: played in the Base Basketball 1. Girls' Basketball. League with teams representing 2. It's Going In! Two Points! the various activities of the Base. Although small in number, and Bottom -left to right: F. Johnson, lacking their opponents' size and P. Broughton, P. Burke, R. Gover, experience, the team entered the E. Groome -Captain, W. Barrett, League in the greatest of spirits. C. Dutcher, K. Masterson. Even though they failed to gain ____________________________ the "win column" a single time in thirteen encounters, the presence GRIDIRON GRUNTS of the High School gave the League an added spark. By Fred Johnson Team Well Trained The "touch" football season, Beginning practice in mid-Nowhich opened with fundamentals, member, Mr. Ondrasik, former colwas climaxed at NOB School by an legiate star, found himself faced Inter-squad game, in which the with a group of boys who had never team coached by the school's athplayed basketball; some who didn't letics director, Edward Ondrasik, know the first fundamentals of the topped the squad tutored by "Jack" game. The boys, willing and eager Machtolff, former star for Alato learn, practiced many long bama's Crimson Tide and the Chiweeks. How to dribble, pass the cago Bears. Displaying a tight ball, and the correct offensive and defense, which kept Machtolff's defensive positions were taught. team behind their own twenty-yard Eddie Groome was elected, by line except on one occasion, Ondrahis teammates, to captain the NOB sik's charges scored a safety, which High cagers on the court. Ramon gave them the game -2-0. Alonso was the team manager. The inter-squad game came at With the aid of player-coach, the end of long weeks of practice. Edward Ondrasik, the team gave a Under their two respective coaches, good account of themselves against the boys had learned the fundaevery team they met. They had the mentals they were to use in the distinction of carrying one of the game -how to block, run plays, last games into an extra period. and the correct offensive and deThis was the only League game fensive positions. Some of these that had to go into an overtime boys had had no previous football period. experiences. Cheerleaders Add Vim Pete Broughton was chosen to Meanwhile, the remainder of the lead Machtolff's team. Fred Johnstudent body was not sitting around. son was the field general for OnCheerleaders were elected and it drasik's squad members. The teams was this colorful attraction which are listed below. caught the fancy of the fans. The Machtolff, Coach: Broughton, girls, who turned out, really put Pete; Barrett, Bill; Cozy, John; their hearts into cheerleading. JeaDutcher, Clinton; Harris, Bill; neen Hummel, Joan McNeal, PhylHeimer, Edwin; Huddy, Norman; lis Hummell, and Eunice Besse are (Continued on Page Twenty) (Continued on Page Twenty) THE INDIAN Page Nineteen

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Page Twenty THE INDIAN YEA! CHEERLEADERS! RAH! RAH! RAH! By Joan Parker, Joan Harris, Cecil Pederson, Virginia Taylor Four peppy cheerleaders, Put on the courts, Root for Hi' School 'Cause they're good sports. Toss me the iodine, These cart-wheels kill us. So, yea! Eunice, Joan, Jeaneen, and Phyllis. Did you notice that NOB School always had the largest cheering section at the League basketball games? The reason was plain to see. Four charming young ladies Eunice Besse, Jeaneen Hummel, Phyllis Hummell, and Joan McNeal -appeared on the courts two or three times a week to lead the yells. They not only added life and pep to the grandstand, but spurred the teams on to greater effort. The trim cheerleaders, with little previous cheerleading experiences, practiced long hours to perfect their cheers and techniques. They dug up or created catchy yells, which they mimeographed and taught the High School students. The cheering was not all confined to the Recreation basketball courts. At the start of the season and at the beginning of the second half, the students held "Pep" rallies at the school. At the first rally, which was introduced by a snake dance through halls and across lawns, the basketball team was presented to the Junior and Senior High School. At the second rally, a pantomime skit was staged; Betty Parks and Lois Parker, with their nurses Joan Harris and Barbara Johnson, demonstrated how Baby High School would take the ball away from Baby NAS. This vivacious quartet, who put boundless energy and vim into the job of cheerleading, helped to stimulate and maintain continuous interest in the League basketball games in which the boys played. LETTERS "G" AWARDED At a banquet given by the School Board in honor of the High School basketball team and cheerleaders, CAPT J. H. Lewis presented the green and white "varsity" letters. Players on the basketball team awarded letters were: William Barrett, Pete Broughton, Patrick Burke, Clinton Dutcher, Robert Gover, Edward Groome, William Harris, Fred Johnson, "Skiddy" Masterson, and Ramon Alonso (manager). Cheerleaders awarded letters were: Eunice Besse, Jeaneen Hummel, Phyllis Hummell, and Joan McNeal. Salt tablets from dispensers have recently been made available to NOB pupils and faculty. MACHTOLFF COACHES SCHOOL FOOTBALL By William Barrett "Jack" Machtolff, FP2, who came to Guantanamo Bay in mid-1948, was assistant football instructor and coach for a team of high school boys during the football season. He explained the fundamentals of football afid demonstrated plays. His team lost a thriller, 2-0, on the gridiron to the team coached by Mr. Edward Ondrasik, boys' physical education director. Named All-Southern Machtolff's experiences in sports have been studded with football highlights. From 1936-1938, he played center at the University of Alabama. He reached his pinnacle of football stardom when the University of Alabama met the University of California in the Rose Bowl in 1938; that same year he was named "All-Southern." Machtolff played professional football for the Chicago Bears in 1939 and 1940, and for the San Diego Bombers, a Service team, in 1945 upon returning from Naval duty overseas. H. S. BASKETBALL TEAM ENTERS BASE LEAGUE (Continued from Page Nineteen) to be highly commended for their work. Players Score High Starting most of the games for the Green and White quintet were Coach Ondrasik, Groome, Broughton, Johnson, and Harris. Clinton Dutcher, who replaced Harris, became one of the bright spots for the High School team. His fight and ability to mix it up were unsurpassed by anyone. High School reserves were Bill Barrett, Bob Gover, "Skiddy" Masterson, and Patrick Burke. Patrick Burke, was always the crowd pleaser. On one occasion, he was second high scorer for his team. Individual Scorers B'kts F'ls Pts. Broughton, Pete 49 5 103 Johnson, Fred 11 6 28 Groome, Edward 11 0 22 Burke, Patrick 10 0 20 Barrett, Bill -------8 2 18 Gover, Bob --------8 2 18 Dutcher, Clinton 5 5 15 Masterson, "Skiddy" 3 0 6 Harris, Bill (4 games) 1 3 5 GIRLS' SPORTS AT NOB SCHOOL By Janet Leckenby The NOB School offers a wellrounded physical training program for the girls. Scheduled for the year were the following sports: swimming, basketball, bowling, tennis, volley-ball, horseback riding, kickball, speed ball, softball, dodge ball, and golf. MINOR SPORTS By Dennis Lanigan In addition to the major sportsswimming, football, and basketball -the boys' physical education classes have participated in the following sports: soccer, softball, tennis, and bowling. Two teams, captained by Bill Harris and Edward Groome, were organized after the fundamentals and rules of the game of soccer had been learned. Harris's team won the climaxing game with a score of two. Next on the schedule was softball. The class was again divided into two teams, captained by Bob Gover and "Skiddy" Masterson. The majority of the games were won by Gover's team. Sports that will be fitted into the schedule for the remaing sixweeks period include: tennis, bowling, golf, and horseback riding. MINOR SPORTS ARE NOT FORGOTTEN By Dennis Lanigan For each individual, the minor sport has more carry-over value than many major sports. When you're an adult, you don't play baseball or football after a hard day's work, it is too tiring. You, however, can always enjoy a good game of tennis or bowl a few lines with a friend. "You don't think it's fun to bowl or play tennis?" Then you've been missing something! The thrill of seeing your ball hit in the pocket for a strike, an affectionate slap on the back from your friends, outmaneuvering your opponent on the tennis court and then slamming a perfect replacement in the corner just out of your lunging adversary's reach are nothing short of thrilling. As a result at NOB School, we are not only taught major sports, but also many of the minor sports. As we grow up, we will know the rules and fundamentals of all types of sports. GRIDIRON GRUNTS (Continued from Page Nineteen) Lanigan, Dennis; Masterson, Kleber "Skiddy"; Pina, Caesar; Richards, Bennett; Richards, Fred; Weatherson, Gordon. Ondrasik, Coach: Johnson, Fred; Alonzo, Ramon; Bowley; George; Burke, Patrick; Gover, Bob; Groome, Edward; Horner, Neil; Kunz, Charles; Masterson, Marshall; Reinhold, Bill; Rizzo, Robert; Sheppard, Furman; Smith, Paul; Sypek, Donald. Bulletins and mounting boards for educational and communication purposes are located in the corridors, office, and class rooms. I 0 Page Twenty THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Twenty-one SWIMMING IS TOPS OF SCHOOL SPORTS Splash! Splash! Splash! By Fred Johnson and Robert Gover Swimming tops the sports enjoyed by the high school students, according to a recent survey made by the sophomores. Physical education started out with a big splash this year, when the boys and girls of the NOB High School took a mighty leap into the recreation pool. In a six-weeks swimming course, ably coached by Mr. Ondrasik and his two assistants -Miss Ada Schmidt and Miss Salome Mergen, the non-swimmers learned to swim and the others perfected their techniques. Students from the seventh through the twelfth grades participated in the swimming course, which was set up to teach them how to swim the maximum distance with minimum effort. They practiced proper swimming techniques -breathing, kicks, strokes, relaxed positions. The swimmers had to swim for various distances ranging from 40 to 80 meters, depending upon the group in which they were placed. The eleventh and twelfth grades were required to swim 80 meters; the ninth and tenth grades, 60 meters; and the seventh and eighth grades, 40 meters. Boys Compete in Swimming The boys were organized into three groups, according to their grades: (1) ninth, tenth, and eleventh grades, headed by Pete Broughton; (2) eighth grade, led by Pat Burke; and (3) the seventh grade, with Furman Sheppard the top swimmer. At the conclusion of the six weeks, the best swimmers were picked. The boys chosen, according to their efficiency in the various strokes and diving, were: free style -Pete Broughton, Pat Burke, and Furman Sheppard; back strokePete Broughton, Pat Burke, and Bob Gover; breast stroke -Fred Johnson and Pat Burke. Top divers were listed as Pete Broughton, Clinton Dutcher, and Skiddy Masterson. HORSEBACK RIDING IS A FAVORITE SPORT By Janet Leckenby and Elsa Heimer With fiery hoof-beats and clouds of dust, the girls of Guantanamo Bay ride again. The riding classes, under the direction of Mrs. Lela Souders, were recently organized into four orderly groups. On Tuesday and Thursday for two weeks, the girls had instructions in riding. Horseback riding is the favorite sport of many girls, who wish to extend their thanks and appreciation to Mrs. Souders and to the members of the NOB Corral. GIRLS' GYM CLASSES ARE ACTIVE IN SOFTBALL By Joan Harris The girls' Junior and Senior High School gym classes, under the direction of Miss Ada Schmidt, enjoyed the softball season. Finding softball top second on the list of best-liked sports, the girls took an active part in the school teams. After a few warm-up sessions of lively playing, teams were chosen with Ramona Sparks and Jan Hiers acting as captains. As the softball teams were equally balanced, a wholesome competitive, spirit prevailed throughout the season. Ramona Sparks' team won two out of three games. Eunice Besse topped the hits -a total of eight. Barbara Gould and Jeaneen Hummel scored the most runs -six. SWIMMERS' SAFETY WAS PROTECTED BY JONES Eldon Eugene Jones, SN, life guard at the recreation pool, was always at hand during swimming classes to insure the safety of all the high school swimmers. When the boys and girls were learning to swim, or were practicing new techniques, Jones watched every swimmer. PALMER TAUGHT DIVERS Harry Palmer, EP1, USN, champion diver and swimmer, demonstrated diving to the high school boys. He taught new techniques and good form for diving to the best swimmers, who practiced to compete in the spring "meet." MISS SALOME MERGEN TRAINS SWIMMERS By Jeaneen Hummel Miss Salome Mergen, who has swum in seven aquacades and directed two other water ballets, has been training the best high school swimmers to take part in an aquacade at NOB recreation. pool in May. She prepared these teenagers for a swimming "meet" to be held on January 21; but because of chilly afternoons, the parents requested that the "meet" be postponed until spring. For high school students who have not yet learned to swim, Miss Mergen has conducted special classes on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Prior to coming to Guantanamo Bay, she completed junior, senior, and instructors' courses in swimming under the American National Red Cross; also junior and senior courses at the YMCA in Pittsburgh, Pa. Miss Mergen, who has swum in 25 races and won 20 swimming medals -including two first-place medals and two first-place ribbons for relay, has given unstintingly of her time and talent to help the boys and girls to develop right swimming techniques. For her valued services, the high school students wish to extend a vote of thanks. THANKS TO COLLIER The "Sports" writers wish to extend thanks to Allen Collier, regular editor of "The Indian," for giving them many valuable pointers on how to write_ 'sports" articles. AT THE "REC" POOL -Clinton Dutcher demonstrates his favorite stroke to a group of High School swimmers. THE INDIAN Page Twenty-onte

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Page Twenty-two THE INDIAN IN and OUT of NOB SCHOOL 1948 -1949 Vw 410 a

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THE INDIAN Pare Twenty-three "CORAL REEF" IS NOB'S FIRST YEARBOOK By Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson There have been many "firsts" at the NOB School this year, not the least of which is the "Coral Reef," the School's first yearbook. The staff, consisting of representatives from the fourth grade through the Senior High School, has spent much of its after school time writing articles for the publication. Yearbook Staff Works Hard Headed by the editor-in-chief Barbara Johnson, the Senior editors have spent many evenings with Miss Anita Feinstein -faculty advisor for the yearbook, editing articles, cutting montages, setting up the pages, and doing many other prerequisites for a good publication. "Coral Reef" Sets Precedence The "Coral Reef" is the result of the combined efforts of the entire school, and is not, as are most yearbooks, the efforts of the Senior class only. This makes it of almost as much interest to the undergraduates as to the Senior; it sets a precedent for future yearbooks at NOB School. Chaplain E. E. Bosserman's assistance to the yearbook staff has contributed greatly to the successful completion of the "Coral Reef." MATH-SCIENCE CLUB WORKS IN LABORATORY By Gordon Weatherson and Bennett Richards The Math-Science Club, composed of junior high school pupils and sponsored by Mrs. Lela Souders, has been organized into two sections-biology and chemistry. Science experiments, which require the use of laboratory apparatus, are being undertaken by the boys and girls. Several of the Math-Science Club members, who concentrate on the topics in which they are particularly interested, show marked scientific aptitudes. The pupils in the "biology" section include Marshall Masterson, Margaret McCullough, Bennett Richards, Georgette Sasser, Furman Sheppard, Paul Smith, Donald Sypek, and Gordon Weatherson. Club members performing chemistry experiments are Dixie Adair, Phyllis Aten, George Bowley, Marie Grover, Neil Horner, Norman Huddy, George MacMichael, and Fred Richards. The Club officers are Bennett Richards, president; Norman Huddy, vice-president; Dixie Adair, secretary; and Neil Horner, reporter. The purpose of the Club is to promote keener interest in modern science. CONSTITUTION DRAWN FOR STUDENT COUNCIL By Virginia Taylor and Jeaneen Hummel At the suggestion of the two Senior High School home rooms, it was decided to organize the Junior-Senior High School into a Student Association, which would aid in governing the school through a Student Council. A committee consisting of six students and four faculty members was formed to write a "Constitution." Committee Writes Constitution This Constitution Committee has been working steadily since February, and will present the completed Constitution to the entire JuniorSenior High School for ratification this week. It is expected that several weeks will be spent in discussion of it, and that changes suggested by the student body will be incorporated into the accepted "Constitution." The members of the committee are: Students-Bennett Richards, 7th grade; Henry Crommelin, 8th grade; William Barrett, 9th grade; Ramona Sparks, 10th grade; Jeaneen Hummel and Kleber Masterson, 11th and 12th grades homeroom; Faculty-Miss Anita J. Feinstein, Mrs. Ruth Metzger, Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, and Mrs. Lela Souders. ATTENDED SCHOOL ABROAD More than 40 pupils have at some time attended schools outside the United States and Guantanamo Bay. One can hear occasional remarks, which begin, "When we lived in Shanghai ..."; "In Japan, I saw "; "When I went to school in Hawaii .."; "In Newfoundland ...". LIBRARY CLUB GIRLS HELP LIBRARIAN By Janet Poe The Library Club, organized in November 1948 with an enrollment of 15 junior high school girls, has worked zealously in library activities. The members, under the skilled direction of Mrs. Ruth Metzger, serve as assistant librarians checking books in and out, and returning materials to their proper places. They have processed more than 200 library books and filed approximately 2,000 catalogue cards. In processing library books, the girls paste in book pockets, prepare library cards, letter books, shellac the book backs, select and exhibit new books, and arrange bulletin board displays. The Library Club officers are Marie Grover, president, and Janet Poe, secretary. SCHOOL CLUB WORKS IN BASE HOBBY SHOP By Ramon E. Alonso The Hobby Club members, composed of 14 junior high school boys, work in the NOB Hobby Shop on Friday afternoons from 2:15 to 3:40. The shop's modern electrical appliances and machinery -saws, jig-saws, drills, planes, edgers, sharpeners, sanders, designers are at the disposal of the boys. All materials, except mahogany wood, are furnished free. The boys in the Hobby Club, under the supervision of skilled workmen at the shop, have made numerous articles -tables, shelves, book-ends, sewing kits, ornaments, toys, and miniature houses. More than one-half of the NOB School children are enrolled in the kindergarten and first three grades. "CORAL REEF" STAFF AND J. H. S. CLUBS -Co-curricular activities are enjoyed at the NOB School. Top -left to right: Hobby Club and "Coral Reef" staff. Bottom: Math-Science Club and Library Club. THE INDIAN Page Twenty-three

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a e wenTy-E INDIAN "SWEET SIXTEEN" By Charlene Brown A wonderful time was had by all who attended Kathryn Hollis's birthday party. First prize, for finding a series of articles in a scavenger hunt, was awarded to Jeaneen Hummel and John Cozy. Lois Parker and Fred Johnson were given the consolation prize. Eats, games, and dancing highlighted, the evening. Piano solos, played by Lee Messa, a member of the Base Band, brought the evening to a grand climax. CHRISTMAS PAGEANT WAS IMPRESSIVE Christmas made its debut at the Naval Station Lyceum on December 22, 1948, when the NOB School beautifully presented the "Nativity." This Christmas pageant, produced under the capable leadership of Mrs. Geneva McCollum and Mrs. Gladys Machtolff, was acclaimed a big success by the hundreds of spectators who enjoyed the performance. Biblical stories of Bethlehem, Mary and Joseph, King Herod, the three wise men, the shepherds, the angels, and the "Christ Child in the Manger" were realistically portrayed. Christmas Carols marked the highlight of the production. Under the able direction of Mrs. Machtolff and Mrs. McCollum, the carols were sung by the Junior and Senior High School Glee Club and the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades. The candlelight procession, in which all the choristers held white lighted candles in their right hands as they marched in slow cadence down the long aisles of the lyceum, created an impressive opening scene. Singing "Oh, Come All Ye Faithful," they proceeded to their respective places on the large outdoor stage. The principal roles of the "Nativity" were enacted by the following pupils: Narrator-Skiddy Masterson; Prologue-Fred Johnson; Christ -Jan Hiers; Mary -Patricia Frances Spahr; Joseph Robert Keehn; King Herod Charles Greenwood; Shepherds (Continued on Page Thirty-one) THIRD GRADE PRESENTS WASHINGTON PLAYLET On February 21st, in honor of George Washington's birthday, a group of third graders presented a colonial playlet, "The Little Cook," to the members of their class, their parents, and the second grade. The idea of giving a play had originated two weeks earlier, when the group was reading a story by the same title. Inspired by the proximity of Washington's Birthday and the desire to adapt the story to a play, the children began to write their own versions. From the combination of these papers, the finished dialogue emerged. Tryouts were held and character parts awarded to those who read them best. Lines were memorized, costumes made, properties assembled, and the play was produced. Judy McLellen 'played the part of Betsy Chase, the little girl who cooked breakfast for General Washington (Dennis Carliss). The parts of Mr. and Mrs. Chase and Brother Ben were played by Bertil Heimer, Mary Wawizyniak, and Robert Pendleton, respectively. .9 CHRISTMAS PAGEANT -A truly fine performance depicting the "Nativity," was presented by the NOB Junior-Senior High School Glee Club and Intermediate Grades. YOUNG PATRIOTS -Top: The fourth grade and Mrs. Geneva McCollum, teacher, display their Washington birthday project -bulletin board with patriotic motto, Mount Vernon in miniature, and early period costumes. Bottom: Cast for George Washington play by third grade, directed by Mrs. Carolyn Yates. Left to right: Mr. Chase -Bertil Heimer, Mrs. Chase -Mary Gail Wawizyniak, Brother Ben -Robert Pendleton, Betsy Chase -Judy McLellen, George Washington -Dennis Carliss. P n T t f THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Twenty-five SENIOR BANQUET WAS A GALA AFFAIR By Jeaneen Hummel and Ramona Sparks Honoring Miss Barbara Johnson, senior, the Junior Class gave a banquet at Marine Site II restaurant on the evening of April 9th. The long banquet table, covered with white linen, was adorned with lovely purple and white flowers. A sumptuous five course dinner was served. Miss Johnson, wearing black with rhinestone jewelry, was seated at the head. Before dinner, Miss Johnson was presented an orchid from Miss Feinstein, the junior-senior home-room teacher. The presentation was made by Joan Harris. After the banquet, Miss Johnson addressed the future seniors. Entire Senior Class Attends The guest list included Miss Johnson's parents and guest-SGT. Gil Simmons; faculty members and guests -Mr. and Mrs. Permenter; LT. and Mrs. Metzger; Mr. and Mrs. Souders, Miss Feinstein, Dr. Nelson, Miss Schmidt, and Mr. Ondrasik; Juniors and guests -Jan Hiers, PFC. Butcher; Eunice Besse, PFC. Theriot; Joan Harris, CPL. Christiansen; Clinton Dutcher, Jeaneen Hummel; "Skiddy" Masterson, Joan McNeal; Fred Johnson, Ramona Sparks; Edward Groome. HIGH SCHOOL BALL WAS A GREAT SUCCESS By Joan Harris The Holiday Ball, NOB High School's first annual Christmas dance held at The Little Theater on December 28, 1948, was a delightful function. A buffet dinner, catered by the Marine Restaurant, preceded the formal dance. Informal skits, presented by high school students, and the serving of punch interspersed dance numbers. Dance music, amply furnished by the Naval Base Orchestra, produced a gay atmosphere. Honored Guests Among the guests were RADM. and Mrs. W. K. Phillips, USN, CAPT. and Mrs. Henry Crommelin, USN, School Board members and their wives, faculty, and parents. Everyone, guests and students, thoroughly enjoyed the event. The student dance committee included Eunice Besse, Charlene Brown, Susan Chaffin, Joan Harris, Phyllis Hummell, Fred Johnson. Base personnel and faculty members who worked to make the dance successful were LCDR. E. E. Bosserman, Protestant Chaplain; CDR. and Mrs. K. S. Masterson; 1st LT. B. G. Cass, USMC; LT. W. C. Keehn; LT. and Mrs. J. K. Metzger, ENC and Mrs. C. R. Souders, Miss Anita Feinstein, and members of Recreation. NOB SCHOOL TAKES PART IN MARDI GRAS By Eunice Besse, Joan Harris, Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson The NOB School was well represented in the recent Mardi gras, which was held for the first time this year. Mardi Gras Queens Two high school girls won the titles of queens-Jeaneen Hummel and Joan McNeal. Jeaneen Hummel, Junior, was elected queen of the Civilian Group. In addition to her appearance with the group of queens, Jeaneen held court in the parade of floats on a large pink shell. Ramona Moses, freshman, and Ramona Sparks, sophomore, were members of her court. Dressed in yellow formals, they rode on the beautifully decorated civilian float. Joan McNeal, sophomore, was elected Miss NAS, Queen of the Naval Air Station. Joan, who rode on a picturesque float in the parade, played the part of a beautiful maiden who attempted to entice a downed flyer to her island. The whole tropical setting was enhanced by the beautiful day. Took Part in Costume Parade Children of the kindergarten, the elementary grades, and Junior high school took part in the costume parade. They appeared dressed as fairy tale characters and in their own imaginative inspirations. For three evenings, from February 16 to February 19, the Base personnel parked their cars in the student-protected parking lot and bought novelties at the students' novelty booth. The students operated the parking lot and novelty booth, under the direction of a committee-Clinton Dutcher, Edward Groome, Kleher Masterson -with Mrs. Lela Souders as faculty representative. The boys spent several days building the novelty booth and planning the parking lot. The Base Police gave helpful advice on this project. The proceeds for this enterprise started a fund for the newly organized Student Association. SCHOOL BOARD SPONSORS VARSITY BANQUET Admiral Phillips Attends Dinner For Awarding Letters NOB School's basketball team and cheerleaders were honored at a banquet given by the NOB School Board, on the evening of April 21st, at the Marine Site Restaurant. Among the forty-five guests were: RADM W. K. Phillips, USN, and Mrs. Phillips; School Board members and their wives; Coach E. J. Ondrasik and Miss Ada Schmidt; Supervising Principal and Mrs. John A. Permenter; LT and Mrs. Walter Keehn; BMC J. A. Ohotnicky; team and guests; cheerleaders and guests. The restaurant was decorated with green and white streamers in keeping with the school colors. Edward Groome, toastmaster, thanked all who had been associated with the team. He then introduced RADM. Phillips, whose well chosen words were enjoyed by all. Mr. Permenter gave a short talk on school spirit, after which the toastmaster directed words towards the team's capable coach, Mr. Ondrasik. Play the Game Fair and Clean A gift from the team members, with a hearty "thank-you" of the team's appreciation, was presented to Mr. Ondrasik. In his response, Mr. Ondrasik expressed gratitude for the team's hard work and concluded by saying, "Remember to play the game fair and clean." Climaxing the after-dinner speeches was the awarding of the varsity letters by CAPT. J. H. Lewis, senior school board member. The letter was the regular varsity 8-inch "G" for Guantanamo, on a back-ground of white with green predominating. Small white basketballs and megaphones on the letters indicated why they were awarded. After the presentation, a feature movie was shown to the enjoyment of all. The evening's affair established the first foot-hold on varsity athletic tradition for NOB School. It will be long remembered by all who attended. GLEE CLUB -The core of the Christmas Pageant was trained and directed by Mrs. Gladys Machtolff. A ML THE INDIAN Pare Twenty-five

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Page Twenty-six THE INDIAN YOUNG LINGUISTS -Fifth and six tion of Mrs. Lucille Burke during the THE U.S.S. MISSOURI IMPRESSES STUDENTS By John Cozy, Jr. A group of 25 students-8th, 9th, and 10th graders -visited the famous U.S.S. Missouri, while it was anchored in Guantanamo Bay on January 17th. When the boys and girls embarked on the "Surrender" deck of the famous battleship, they were heartily greeted by several members of the ship's personnel. A Navy Commander gave each visitor a souvenir-a replica of the historic plaque depicting the surrender of Japan on V-J Day. Pupils See Surrender Plaque The students observed the famous "Surrender Plaque" on the deck, where the peace treaty with Japan was signed; they read the plaques on the deck and bulkhead of the ship. Henry Crommelin, eighth grader, was permitted to take several pictures of these plaques. Students Tour Ship. In order to give the students the opportunity to see various sections of the immense warship, they were divided into two groups -each group under the direction of a Naval officer. Among the interesting things shown and explained to the pupils were the bridge, radar screens, electric navigator's scope, officer's mess, 16-inch deck guns, huge anchors, life boats, and the "Surrender" deck. Dr. Esther Marion Nelson and Mrs. Alice Hayes, faculty members, accompanied the. High School students. The group was conveyed to and from the U.S.S. Missouri in a landing craft. ARRIVED FROM MANY STATES The pupils arrived at Guantanamo Bay directly from 70 different places -cities, towns, or naval stations -in 32 different states, with Va., Fla., Cal., Mass., N. Y., leading. Many of the children have lived in Washington, D. C. th graders studied Spanish under the direcfirst-half of this school year. PUPILS CONTRIBUTE TO 'MARCH OF DIMES' DRIVE By Henry Crommelin In the Nation-wide "March of Dimes" drive, the NOB School contributed a total of $104.70. The third graders, who donated $23.76, stood first among the contributing grades; the fifth graders, who gave $15.00, held second place. Drive Sponsored by Eighth Grade Sponsored by the eighth grade, the school "March of Dimes" Committee -Patrick Burke, Lois Parker, and Anne Sheppard worked diligently to make the "drive" a success. These eighth graders designed and made posters, displayed circulars on bulletin boards, distributed illustrative materials to all the grades, talked to all the pupils about the purpose of the "drive," and collected money. 7th GRADERS DISPLAYED ORIGINAL DESIGNS By Holly Jackson During the second six-weeks period, the seventh graders undertook an interesting unit in elementary geometry. From simple geometric designs -the hexagon, the octagon, and the pentagon -they proceeded to the more difficult ones. They colored their drawings, and exhibited them on the bulletin board in Room 1. Practical Use of Geometry After the students had completed a unit in symmetrical designs, they attacked assymmetrical arrangements. Some of their creations resembled modernistic art. Among the assymmetrical sketches displayed were: "My Confusing Concerto," "Nightmare Alley," "Summer Drizzle," "Escape," and the "Death March." These titles, originated by the seventh graders, truly described their respective geometric designs. Miss Anita Feinstein, teacher of Mathematics, directed the project. SCHOOL PERSONNEL ARE ACTIVE IN DRAMATICS By Joan McNeal Several Faculty members and students of the NOB School have participated in the various activities of the Base Little Theatre Group. Mrs. Ruth Metzger, of the faculty, starred in both "Arsenic and Old Lace," the first production of this Group, and in "The Show Off," their second production. High School Students Play Roles Susan Chaffin and Ramona Sparks played the leading roles in "Arsenic and Old Lace"; William Harris, Fred Johnson, and "Skiddy" Masterson held supporting roles. Clinton Dutcher played the part of "Joe" in "The Show Off." Behind the Scenes Mrs. Lela Cornett Souders, faculty, has been in charge of make-up for all The Little Theatre productions. High school students-Eunice Besse, Joan Harris, Jeaneen Hummel, Kleber "Skiddy" Masterson, and Joan McNeal-have been active members of the Group. Eunice and Jeaneen were the prompters for the last production. Miss Anita Feinstein, faculty, and Fred Johnson, junior, were on the Constitution Committee of the Little Theatre. HAYRIDE-BEACH PARTY PROVIDES MUCH FUN By Barbara Gould The hayless-hayride and beach party, recently sponsored by Chaplain E. E. Bosserman, was greatly enjoyed by the junior and senior high school students. The group rode to Windmill Beach, where fun promptly began. The curiosity seekers explored the coral rock formations and climbed cliffs along the beach, while the sport fans organized and played a game of soft ball. An ample picnic supper was relished by all the teen-agers, who had their fill of good food -hot dogs, rolls, salads, olives, cookies, marshmallows, coca colas. As nightfall approached, everyone joined in singing their favorite songs. "What a grand time!" agreed everyone as they rode home shortly after dark. "Let's have another hayride-beach party soon." A HAPPY BIRTHDAY By Holly Jackson Barbara Burke's birthday party, attended by her many friends and classmates, was a happy affair. Refreshments, games, and dancing made a perfect evening for everyone present. A beautiful cake with twelve candles, and lovely presents made Barbara's day complete. "A wonderful party!" exclaimed everyone. "A truly happy birthday." 0 Page Twenty-six THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Twenty-seven EDUCATION A LIFELONG TASK By Chaplain C. A. Herold, USN Education of a child involves the closest cooperation of the home (parents), the school and the Church. The education of a child is primarily the duty of the parents, which obligation is imposed upon them by the natural law and the divine positive law of God. Discipline and order are to be brought into the life of the child by the parents -the school supplements this obligation and assists the parents. Education demands a lifetime of learning. We are ever in pursuit of knowledge. Education demands a lifetime of discipline for we are never ever masters of ourself. Education demands a lifetime seeking after God and conforming our lives according to His principles. We are never finished here in this world, with the job of education, it is a lifelong task we all must be prepared to endure. SIGNIFICANT TRENDS IN SCHOOL POPULATION According to the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company and other groups that study population trends, about 400,000 or 11 per cent more first grade children will be enrolled in the schools of the United States in Sept. 1949 than in Sept. 1948. By 1957, when elementary enrollment reaches its expected peak, there will be eight million or 46 per cent more children in grades 1-8 than in 1947. Expansion to Continue Until 1960 High school enrollment, now in a period of slight decline, is expected to start a rapid upward movement by 1951. It will continue to increase until 1960, at which time it is expected to reach an alltime high of over eight million. This increase will represent about two million or 29 per cent more than present high school enrollments. These figures are significant, not only to the NOB School, but to the entire Base. They mean that if the NOB School population continues to follow national trends, and if the population statisticians are correct, the NOB School will be continually expanding until 1960. At that time the high school enrollment may have increased by as much as onethird, and the already large elementary enrollment by almost one-half. If these predictions and conditions hold for NOB School during the next decade, the total school population in 1960 will be over the 400 mark. If the Navy continues to expand the Base, a prospect not even considered in this article, there is no predicting what the situation may be. j JUNE FIRST SET AS GRADUATION DATE Graduation exercises for the I NOB School will be held Wednesday evening, June first, at 8:00 P.M., in The I Little Theatre building, according to an announcement = made by Supervising Principal John A. Permenter. Sixteen candidates -one Senior High School and fifteen eighth grade students are scheduled to graduate. A faculty committee-Mrs. = Ruth Metzger, Miss Anita Feinstein, and Miss Ada Schmidt -is in charge of all arrangements. The complete program will be announced at a later date. HISTORY OF NOB SCHOOL (Continued from Page Eight) The June 1946 graduation exercises, in which eighthgraders eight girls -received diplomas, were the first graduation ceremonies held in the Naval Chapel. Juanita Kunz, the first senior to complete high school requirements at the new NOB School, graduated with honors in June 1947. In June 1948, Diana Ramirez and Linna Miller graduated from the NOB High School. Impressive graduation exercises, which combined the high school and eighth grade ceremonies, were held in the Naval Chapel. In 1947, nine pupils -8 boys and 1 girl graduated from eighth grade; in 1948, the eighth grade graduates included 10 pupils -5 boys and 5 girls. SCHOOL PERSONNEL SING IN CHAPEL CHOIRS By Kathryn Hollis Among the active members of the Protestant NOB Chapel Choir are: teachers-Mrs. Edrie Marie Delgado and Mrs. Geneva Hunt McCollum; high school students-Joan McNeal, Barbara Johnson, Jeaneen Hummel, and Kathryn Hollis. In the Catholic Choir are: Eunice Besse and Joan Harris -organist. SCHOOL LIBRARY HAS NEW EQUIPMENT By Thomas Beadling 'The NOB School library has the following new equipment: a new light-oak card catalog cabinet with nine drawers; a large display case with glass doors; a display rack. College catalogs and bulletins, from more than 100 institutions of higher learning, are on file in the School library. These materials are accessible to students, faculty, and all Base personnel. NOB SCHOOL LIBRARY HAS MANY NEW BOOKS By Marie Grover and Cecil Pederson The NOB School library, pleasantly located in the center of the main building, plays an important educational role in the lives of the students. The library, organized by Miss Annabeth Cash in 1947, has been greatly expanded under the direction of Mrs. Ruth Metzgerpresent librarian, who has done much to promote interest in books. The school library, opened in 1947 with a small number of books obtained from the Naval Base Library, has expanded until it now contains 1,775 volumes. About 400 new publications have been added this year. Two sets of encyclopedias have been ordered in addition to the present three complete sets. Every book is catalogued to help locate in minimum of time, and to insure against loss. Material Well Arranged The lay-out plan of the library is arranged to accommodate everyone. On entering the library, the center view includes the librarian's desk, the newest books, the current paper rack with numerous current and weekly newspapers; to the right are the fiction and non-fiction books, the elementary references, and the popular magazine rack displaying a wide assortment of popular magazines; to the left are all types of general reference books, including encyclopedias and dictionaries. In order to keep everyone posted on the new books and materials, book jackets are displayed on the bulletin boards in the main hallway. ANNUAL FIELD DAY WAS ACCLAIMED A SUCCESS By Ramon Alonso, Kleber Masterson, Ramona Sparks The third annual NOB School picnic and field day, held on April 30th at the Racetrack, was acclaimed a great success by the more than 500 persons in attendance. This Recreation sponsored annual event, which is fast becoming a Base and School tradition, marked a new high this year. The field day program was skillfully planned and carried out by a joint committee: faculty-Mr. Edward J. Ondrasik, Miss Ada Schmidt, Mrs. Geneva McCollum; parents-LCDR Fred W. Weatherson, and BMC J. A. Ohotnicky; students -Barbara Johnson and Fred Johnson. The principal events of the morning included: races -lollypop, marshmallow, potato, sack, threelegged, back to back, relay; the dashes-30, 50, 70, and 100 yards; chinning; broad jump, girls' basketball throw, tug-of-war. The boys and girls from kindergarten through the sixth grade competed (Continued on Page Thirty-two) THE INDIAN Page Twenty-seven

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Pag'e Twe~ntv-eight TEIDA PUPILS ENROLLED IN 1948-1949 Post Graduates Today's Enrollment: Joan Ethel Harris. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: George Graham Abernathy, Jr. Twelfth Grade Today's Enrollment: Barbara Ellen Johnson. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Shirley May Benton. Eleventh Grade Today's Enrollment: Eunice Mary Besse; Clinton Harvey Dutcher, Jr; Robert Christian Gover; Edward .Ward Groome, Jr.; Janet Hiers; Myrna Jeaneen Hummel; Alfredo Bandini Johnson, Jr.; Kleber Sanlin Masterson, Jr.; Virginia Ashby Taylor. Tenth Grade Today's Enrollment: Pete E. Broughton; Charlene Brown; John J. Cozy, Jr.; William L. Harris; Kathryn Bennett Hollis; Joan Louise McNeal; Cecil Aileen Pederson; Ramona Rose Sparks. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Jill Hiers. Ninth Grade Today's Enrollment: William Barrett; Thomas Harvey Beadling; Phyllis Viola Hummell; Patricia W. McCrodden; Ramona Jean Moses; Joan Helen Parker; Caesar A. Pina; William R. Reinhold. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Susan Pendleton Chaffin. Eighth Grade Today's Enrollment: Ramon Alonso; Patrick Burke; Henry Crommelin, Jr.; Barbara Jean Gould; Edwin C. Heimer; Elsa Eva Heimer; John Dennis Lanigan; Janet Carol Leckenby; Carlita Maria McLaren; Damaris Moses; Lois R. Parker; Betty Parks; Janet M. Poe; Robert Anthony Rizzo; Anne Elizabeth Sheppard. Withdrawals Since Sept 1948: Charles Albert Kunz. Seventh Grade Today's Enrollment: Dixie Adair; Angela Asman; Phyllis Aten; Carolyn Jean Bailey; Patricia Ann Besse; Sharon Brown; Barbara Ann Burke; Mary Ann Carliss; Marie A. Grover; Neil Horner; Norman W. Huddy; "Holly" Jackson; George Robert MacMichael; Clarence Marshall Masterson; Margaret McCullough; Bennett W. Richards; Georgette Sasser; Furman L. Sheppard; Donald W. Sypek; Gordon Weatherson; Jane Livingston Wilson. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Robert C. Bessette; Thomas Louis Boucher; George A. Bowley; Shannon Marie Brown; Fred Richards; Paul Smith. THE SCHOOL POPULATION 1948 -1949 A. The High School -en todo. B. The Junior High School Smiles Proudly. C. Upper Elementary -4th, 5th, and 6th Grades. D. 2nd and 3rd Grades on the Lawn. E. 1st Grade in a Formal Arrangement. F. "Our Babies" -the Kindergarten. G. Time out of Class for a Picture -1st Grade. H. Worktime in the Kindergarten. 1. 1st and 2nd Grades -Boys Lined Up. J. Mid-morning Naps in the Kindergarten. K. Our Alma Mater: Next to the School is the Chapel (airview). L. The Faculty -Under the Trees. M. "Problems of Democracy" Class -Typing Copy. N. A Discussion on the Problems of Publication. 0. Constitution Committee of The Student Council. P. "Problems of Democracy" Class in Action. Q. Conversational Spanish -1st Semester (Elementary School with Mrs. Burke). PARENTS' EDUCATION IS ABOVE AVERAGE By Phyllis Hummell The Junior-Senior High School students have well-educated mothers and fathers. Their parents' educational backgrounds are far above average in comparison with those in the U.S.A., according to a recent survey made by the students. More than three-fourths of the parents are high school graduates; many have attended Naval academies and other schools of higher learning universities, colleges, business school, or technical institutions; and some hold one or more college degrees. A considerable number of the Naval officers are graduates of the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland. COLLEGE CATALOGS ARE FILED IN LIBRARY By Kathryn Hollis College catalogs and bulletins from more than one-hundred institutions of higher learning universities, colleges, technical and business schools -are on file in the NOB School Library. As an English project, the freshman-sophomore class recently made a survey to find out what schools the junior and senior high school students desired to attend upon high school graduation. The English class next wrote letters to leading educational institutions requesting catalogs and requirements. Of the seventy-five schools contacted, one hundred per cent responded. BROUGHTON IS VETERAN STUDENT AT SCHOOL By John Cozy, Jr. Pete Broughton, sophomore, is the only pupil in the NOB School who attended school on the Naval Base prior to August 1941. Since 1939, with the exception of a threeyear period during World War II, Pete has lived on the Naval Operating Base. Pete completed the first three grades in the old Base School, when it was located in a two-story building on Administration Hill. With the entry of the U.S.A. into World War II, all families were evacuated from the Base. Pete thus completed the fourth grade in Portsmouth, Va., and the fifth and sixth grades in Miami, Florida. After V-E Day, when the Broughton family returned to the Base, Pete entered the seventh grade. Of the forty-five pupils registered in October 1945, Pete Broughton is the only remaining male student of the four who are still enrolled at the NOB School. HOME ROOMS PROMOTE GOOD MORALE All the pupils, in every grade elementary and high school, are assigned to definite home rooms. In each home room, under the guidance of a competent teacher, every pupil is given opportunity to contribute to its activities and to share in its responsibility. Time is provided in the weekly schedule for at least one class period (or its equivalent) for group discussions or conferences. During home room periods, pupils are afforded opportunity to discuss and to evaluate the various school conditions and problems, and to seek their improvement or correction. Each home room plays a definite part in stimulating and developing desirable school morale, thus reducing disciplinary difficulties to' a minimum. LARGE PUPIL TURN-OVER AT NOB SCHOOL By Caesar Pifia More than one-half of the pupils are enrolled this year for the first time at the NOB School; they entered on or after September 13, 1948. The majority of the pupils, especially in the primary grades, have been with the school for less than one year. Of the pupils who entered the NOB School on the opening day in October 1945, only four are still in attendance, namely: Jeaneen Hummel, Junior; Pete Broughton, Sophomore; Ramona Moses, Freshman; and Damaris Moses, 8th Grade. 01 THE INDIAN Page Twenty-eight

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THE INDIAN Page Twenty-nine

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Pae Thirty TE INDIAN PUPILS ENROLLED IN 1948-1949 Sixth Grade Today's Enrollment: Sally Elaine Brown; Stephanie M. Brownell; Dempsey Bailey Bruton; James Vernon Cavanaugh; James Stanley Cozy; Richard Davis; Roger Fitzgerald; Charles T. Greenwood; Richard Harlan; Franklin H. Hummell; Richard F. Jessing; Dorothy Lee Kimball; Michael A. Lanigan; Robert Lindenborn; Robert McCullough; Edith Christine Metzger; Donni Pederson; Virginia Lee Reed; Jean Christine Reinhold. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: William C. Bessette; Alexander N. Chaffin, Jr.; Shirley Ann Foster; Ian FitzGerald; June Richards; Carol Ann Stanley. Fifth Grade Today's Enrollment: Bar bara Aten; Barbara Dianna Avery; Judith Carter; Sally H. Crommelin; Paul Raymond Cummings; Petie Lee Davis; Billy Foster; Thomas James Groome; Charlie Leslie Hardin; Edgar P. Heimer; Bruce Milford Kendall; Gloria Ann McKuin; Eleanor Howard Million; Kenneth G. Perry; Sylvia Poe; Anita G. Sierra; Bobby Smith; Donald Weatherson; Charles Henry Yelvington. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Annette Marie Gebhart; Leslie G. Lindsay; Sandra Martin. Fourth Grade Today's Enrollment: Eunice Avila, Richard A. Bailey, Sylvia Lee Cavanaugh, Thomas D. Greenwood, Ruth Edith Hollis, Robert Treffle Keehn, Lois McCrodden, Patrick McCullough, William Fleming McLaren, Peggy Marilyn McOwen, Julia Carol Parnell, Irma Pina, Carolyn E. Reese, Constance Ruppert, Richard E. Ruppert, Renee S. Skinner, Patricia Spahr, Luther Phillip Stroud, Jr., Thomas Carroll Wesson, Grace Lavinia Yelvington. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Magnhilde Berge, Howard Boillot, Walter N. Foster, Jr., Elizabeth C. Robertson, Patrick Shue. Third Grade Today's Enrollment: Ignacio Avila, Nancy Avila, Diane Jean Bowman, Dennis Michael Carliss, David Martin Connelly, Charles Francis Costello, Mary Louise Esders, Bertil Abelardo Heimer, Carl Heimer, David A. Jessing, David Earle Leidle, Andrea Lynnhe Lewis, Joan Lindenborn, Judith Carlena McLellen, Verna Marie Nordine, Robert Morris Pendleton, James Piel, Barbara Ann Roy William Leland Roy, Michael Thomas Smith, Sandra Ber y l Sparks, John Anthony Thomas, Allen Keith Wine. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Donna Marie Boucher, Patricia Ann Boucher, Oleta Richards, Mary Gail Wawizyniak. Second Grade Today's Enrollment: Jan Mark Anthony, Mona Elizabeth Bailey, Richard Murray Bergman, Thomas Lee Bosserman, Sandra Carter, Norma Jean Cassity, Faye Ann Carliss, Richard Joseph Croker, Gwendolyn (Wendy) Gould, Ralph Perry Hardin, Paul Kenneth Healey, Helga E. Heimer, Patrick Timothy Lanigan, Richard Stephan Machtolff, David McAuliffe, Julianne Christine McLellen, Ana Marie Pendleton, Michael Piel, Joseph Marion Pitt, William Leonard Price, Jay Radcliff, Edgar Davis Reinhold, Roger Charles Reinhold, James A. (Jimmy) Sasser, Dolores Sierra, Robert H. Smith, Michael Spahr, George W. Swallow, Sandra Rae Wideberg, John Ray (Ray) Wine. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Kenneth J. Bessette, Betsy Gallery, Georgia Kay Mitchell, William D. Stanley. First Grade Today's Enrollment: Elizabeth Jean Abbott, Rylma Mercedes Boan, N. David Boyden, Ronald Brown, Thomas Leonard Carcelli, Carolyn Jean Combs, George Arthur Cookinham, Sandra Ann Craig, Charles Ray Dalton, Gloria Patricia Egbert, Judith Dee Elton, Stephanie Elaine Fenton, Gary Fitzgerald, Kathleen Gallagher, Astrid Heimer, Jeannette C. Jessing, Gerald S. Johnston, Priscilla Ann Jones, Isabel Norean Keehn, Emil Franz Kloske, Ray Donald Nordine, Edith Pamias, Patricia L. Paresi, Edward Pechy, Madeline Piel, Robert Pitt, George M. Pritchard, Amelia Pubillones, Arthur Fields Richardson, Thomas Allan Rose, Roger Ramon Rushing, Regina Scanlon, J. Peter Sheppard, Ralph Sierra, Jr., Walter Sheridan Stull, III, Richard J. Swallow, Marvin Scott Tausch, Ursula Maria Teagle, Buddy Harold Troutman, Patricia Faith Troutman, Joyce Tyner, Susan Ann Wagner, George Merritt Wilson, Arthur Eugene Wine, John K. Wood, Malcolm L. Wood, Jr. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Frank Edgar Anglin, Lee Gallery, Barbara Lillian North, Anthony Martha Raymond, Joyce Ann Venczel. Kindergarten Today's Enrollment: Anabella Abbott, David Bruce Allen, Philip A. Bailey, Daniel Charles Bergman, Rita May Birch, Carol Ann Bosserman, Sandra Kay Boyles, Forrest Edward (Eddie) Bratton, Michael Robert Brown, Dorinda Brownell, Lucinda Brownell, Bevan Gillet Cass, Jr., John D. Clarke, Jr., Melvin Pace Crissey, Jr., Judith Rose Dallas, Karlene deLeon, Raydene Davis, Misse Dunn, Joseph A. Fite, Jr., Michael Wayne Gibbons, Mary Lou Gugliemo, Julienne Marie Hardesty, Paulette Harpster, John Dennis Huddy, Arthur P. Jessing, Lynwyn Diane Jones, Arlene Kowalchyk, Lloyd Arthur Lawrence, Joan Malone, Louis Manint, Jr., Paulette Miller, Michael McCullough, Edward McAuliffe, Jr., John Andrew (Buddy) Ohotnicky, Steven Phelps, Raymond J. Price, Jr., Frances Grace Reinhold, Pamela Ann Reis, William Blount V. Rodman, Eric LeRoy (Rickey) Rushing, Laura Lee Ryan, Betty Jo Sack, Anna Jean Slocum, William Turnbull Sneddon, Susan Elaine Snyder, Carol Ann Spielman, Juan LeRoy Stull, John F. Swallow, Richard A. Sypek, Sandra J'Nelle Tausch, John Thomas Teagle, Walter Eugene Thomas, Benjamin Rudolph Turner, Jr., Francis J. Wade, III, Carolynne Ware, Randel Ferris Washburne, Clarence Williams. Withdrawals Since Sept. 1948: Ward A. Bessette, Jr., Charles Conway, I, J. Thomas Conway, William Henry Foulk, Jr., Nelson Joseph Greene, Jr., Orley T. Mitchell, Sidney James (Skipper) McAnulty, John Wright North, Jr., Harry James Palmer, James Lee Patterson, Suzanne Helen Pitts, Rodney Jennings Sparks, John Venczel, III, Carole Wawizyniak, Edmund Eugene Yoworski. FROM THE FOUR CORNERS OF THE WORLD, THEY COME -These smiling boys and girls, who have lived in many different countries, make an important contribution to the cosmopolitan atmosphere of the NOB School. I 0 0 Pa e Thirt THE INDIAN

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THE INDIANPaeTit-n SCHOOL PROJECT GETS .COMMUNITY SUPPORT Approval of this publication by RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN, assured the students of his confidence in their project and spurred them on to its completion. CDR. L. M. Davis, sanctioning the printing of the materials at the Fublic Works Print Shop, made possible this edition of "The Indian." CDR. Davis and the NOB Transportation system contributed reliable data. Supervising Principal John A. Permenter and the School Board members gave their wholehearted support and assistance to the study. The faculty, the maintenance staff, parents, Naval and civilian personnel on the Base, and all the pupils cooperated beautifully by supplying essential data. Chaplain E. E. Bosserman's highly valued assistance contributed greatly to the success of the publication. Dr. Nelson Directed Research Dr. Esther Marion Nelson, who directed the whole research study and the preparation of materials for publication, has expended endless time and energy directing and guiding the pupils to carry this project to the present conclusion. Most of the work was done outside of scheduled working hours. Mrs. Alice F. Hayes has been an indefatigable worker, rendering invaluable help by assisting Dr. Nelson in editing and typing articles. The Naval. Air Station Photo Laboratory, working in close cooperation with the NOB School, took numerous pictures of the School activities. The photographers, who gave generously of their time and effort to produce the pictures for cuts, deserve high commendations. Our sincere thanks go to AFC. G. M. Rushing and his Staff. 1948-1949 IS A YEAR MARKED BY "FIRSTS" By Patricia McCrodden The school year 1948-1949 will be remembered in the history of the NOB School as a year of "firsts." This year marks the first full accreditation of the NOB School; the first basketball team; the first time the school participated in the Base league games; the first school cheerleaders; the first school athletic banquet; first time high school students were awarded "Varsity" letters for athletic achievements; the first school issue of "The Indian"; the first school annual; the first holiday ball; first school flagpole; the first post-graduate; the first year teachers have been on Civil Service. EDITORIAL This special issue of "The Indian" is the culminating achievement of a class project. For several months the ninth-tenth grade English and "Problems of Democracy" classes have worked, intermittently, on many phases of this unit: planning, setting goals, gathering data, conducting interviews, verifying evidence, constructing charts and graphs, interpreting findings, writing, and rewriting. This edition reflects life at the NOB School in its entirety; and, in so doing, reflects also much of the general spirit and atmosphere of the entire Base. Neither this project nor this issue of "The Indian" would have been possible without the leadership, skill, and hard work of Dr. Esther Marion Nelson and the interest, cooperation, and diligence of the Freshman-Sophomore students. This school-life experience which started as a class unit, developed into a cooperative schoolcommunity undertaking -eve ry teacher, every non-instructional worker connected with the school, every student, and many parents have been involved in this study at one time or another. In addition, many other American and Cuban citizens and practically every activity of the Naval Operating Base have also contributed to and been influenced in some way by this project. The entire experience represents sound, modern school-community education at its best. All those who participated deserve credit and thanks. John A. Permenter, Supervising Principal CHRISTMAS PAGEANT WAS IMPRESSIVE (Continued From Page Twenty-four) Alexander Chaffin, Michael Lanigan, Robert Lindenborn; Three Wise Men -William Barrett, Clinton Dutcher, Edward Groome. Costumes of Biblical times, designed by Mrs. McCollum, were amply provided by the children's parents. The high school choristers wore long black or white choir robes, while the elementary school singers wore long white robes of similar design. Make-up, artistically administered by Mrs. Lela Souders, enhanced the reality of the Biblical characters. Skillfully made scenery -King Herod's throne, the guiding star, the manger -added to the dignity of the pageant. The stage equipment and the public address system, furnished by the Recreation Department and efficiently managed by its Naval personnel, were vital contributing' factors to the success of the program. Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 21 May 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander SCHOOL EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief-----------Joan McNeal Ass't Editors William Barrett, Caesar Pina Feature Writers Joan Harris, Jeaneen Hummel Ramona Sparks, Virginia Taylor Boys' Sports--------------Fred Johnson Girls' Sports----------------Joan Harris Artist-----------------Virginia Taylor Photography------------Pete Broughton Staff Writers Thomas Beadling, Charlene Brown, John Cozy, William Harris, Kathryn Hollis, Phyllis Hummell, Patricia McCrodden, Ramona Moses, Joan Parker, Cecil Pederson, William Reinhold. Typists John Cozy, Kathryn Hollis, Patricia McCrodden, Joan Parker, Ramona Sparks. Faculty Advisor-Dr. Esther Marion Nelson Supervising rrmcipal.-onn A. rermenter THIE 1DIAIN is puoisned weeaiy, nuanced by appropriated tunas, printed on government equipment, for tree distriution on the U. S. Naval Operating base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to. the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. WHY YOU DIDN'T GET AN INDIAN LAST SATURDAY The Indian like most things in and of the Navy is governed by regulations. To enable us to publish this special edition we had to use two-thirds of our allotment for special editions, we now are able to publish but one more special edition this year. All the photo-engravings (pictures) were furnished by the Recreation Department, so that we might have an illustrated paper to celebrate the accreditation of the Naval Operating Base School. NOTE OF THANKS The School Editorial Staff wishes to extend its deepest appreciation and sincerest thanks to all School and Base personnel who have made this edition of "'The Indian" possible. -School Editorial Staff THE INDIAN Palre Thirty-one

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Pare Thirty-two THE INDIAN Ctmo. Bay-9 May 49-3250 PHYSICAL SET-UP IS OF TROPICAL DESIGN By Virginia Taylor NOB School stands at the top of Massip Hill, adjoining the Naval Chapel, near the center of the Base. The building itself, constructed to form a capital "E", has two "L" shaped wings one room deep for teaching purposes; and a central section two rooms deep for housing offices, library, teachers lounge, and storerooms. Around the inside edge of these wings, and through the center of the inner section, there is a continuous collonade that serves as a hall way. It is used by all the children, as well as the faculty, so the grounds can be kept neat and fresh looking. The school building is well ventilated, screened, and is of appropriate architectural design for the tropical setting. The soft and restful scheme employed grants a certain sense of beauty to young minds Indoors Ready for Work Each room in the School is equipped with a sufficient number of desks, chairs, and blackboards. The laboratory is well equipped with tables, cabinets, electric outlets, sinks; also with laboratory instruments and supplies. The school lockers are placed in such a way that they cannot interfere with the changing of classes. There are convenient electric drinking fountains at both ends of the building for the satisfaction of students and faculty. Beautiful, Safe Setting The grounds, which are kept in near perfect condition by the gardner, are appreciated and cared for by the students also. The varying and deepening shades of the green lawn in spring and summer hint of a false coolness, even in the tropical sunshine. There is no traffic problem near the school, as virtually the only vehicles that climb the hill during school hours are church workers and school buses, or other school transportation. NOB VISITED BY BOARD FROM ROOSEVELT ROADS CAPT R. G. Armstrong, USN, C.O. of Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station in Puerto Rico and Chairman of its School Board, and five other members of the Roosevelt Roads School Board visited the NOB School last December to study its administration and general organization with a view of expanding and reorganizing their own school. Captain Armstrong and his party spent most of two days studying NOB School and conferring with our school board. SCHOOL AUDITORIUM IS PRIME NECESSITY An Auditorium is School's j Greatest Physical Need i For want of an auditorium or some protected, accessible place to assemble, the entire school program of the NOB School has suffered immeasurably this year, according to Supervising Principal John A. Permenter. "As student body and school program expand, thi., need will become progressively greater," he stated. According to the ninthtenth grade survey, practicSally everyone on the Base wants to see the school acquire an auditorium or the use of one: students, parents, school board members, and Naval officials. An overwhelming majority of all I these persons believe that an auditorium is the school's greatest single physical need. ENGLISH CLASS CARRIES OUT SURVEY (Continued from Page Five) Before research findings could be prepared for publication, several months had to be devoted to drill on technical grammar and on learning the fundamentals of journalism. In attempting to write articles, the students became aware of their English deficiencies; they thus desired intensive drill on the fundamentals of good written English and journalism. Some students wrote and rewrote their articles many times before Dr. Nelson accepted them for final editing. Research Study Was Renewed The research study, which was originally started in October, was brought up to date in March and April. The students thus had an opportunity to see the unit as a whole, and. to see continuous growth in the school. TROPICAL FLORA TENDS TO BEAUTIFY CAMPUS (Continued From Page Sixteen) deck areas around tree trunks. On both sides of the center walk, directly in front of the main building, beds of rosebushes produce gorgeous varieties of roses with showy masses of alluring colors. Bushy plants seem to hide under dramatic clusters of blooms -roses of rare beauty. Santo Domingo Jasmins -decorative vines with fragrant white flowers, gardenias, margaritas (periwinkles), and sparkling daisies with yellow centers give airy touches to flower border edges. In the fall, smaller flower gardens contain zinnias in a riot of colors -scarlet, pink, apricot, yellow, orange, mixed. ANNUAL FIELD DAY WAS ACCLAIMED A SUCCESS (Continued from Page Twenty-seven) according to grades; from seventh grade through high school, according to weight. The afternoon highlights included games between the parents and their sons and daughters. In softball and volleyball, the boys lost to their fathers. Mothers won the game of volleyball, but lost to their daughters in softball. Appropriate prizes or medals were awarded to the winners of the different events. Bennett Richards held the record for the day with 16 chin-ups; Clinton Dutcher with a 15' 82" broad jump. Recreation furnished ample picnic refreshments-sandwiches, soft drinks, ice cream; also the sports equipment for the events and prizes for the winners. Among the many Base personnel, who rendered invaluable services, were LCDR Weatherson, the coordinator between the School and the Naval personnel; LT Walter Keehn, head of Recreation, who announced the events and winners over the public address system; "Jack" Machtolff of Recreation, who judged the winners of the races and dashes. t U Page Thirty-two THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-9 May 49-3250


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