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Indian
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Vol. IV, No. 9 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 23 April 1949


SA AT IT f""D" ""D r"T" "" TO


AIDED BY HELICOPTER

Yacht "Hurricane" Runs Aground
Off Kittery Beach
Last Saturday afternoon at approximately 4:09 p.m., the Naval Station duty officer notified the N.O.B. duty officer that he had been informed by the Marine sentry on duty near Kittery Beach, that the Recreation Department's Yacht "Hurricane" was aground and
floundering off Kittery Beach.
A crash boat was dispatched
from the NAS boatshed to the scene to make a preliminary investigation. Upon completion, it was to return to the boatshed because of heavy seas and a southwest wind.
Approximately thirty minutes later
the crash boat returned.
After a hurried conference between NAS OOD, LT J. F. Pringle, and the C.O., Naval Station, CAPT.
E. A. Taylor, a helicopter from the carrier Coral Sea was dispatched to the scene to obtain more information in view that darkness was rapidly approaching and lack of information was holding back positive action. Effective communications were maintained between the helicopter and the control tower at
all times.
Helicopter Saves Time
The helicopter, piloted by LT.
Little, dropped a line to the YTB as soon as the tug approached the scene - this line was used to carry a tow line to the "Hurricane" and enabled the tug to free the yacht without delay. If this had not been accomplished by LT. Little, it would have been long past darkness by the time the tug could have sent a line over to the grounded ship in a smaller boat over some 100 yards of shoal water. Salvage operations at night would have been extremely difficult plus the
possibility of danger to the tug.
As was pointed out in a report
to the Commander, Naval Operating Base by the NOB Duty Officer, LCDR. Watson, that the excellent spirit and cooperation of the Naval S Air Station duty officer, together
with the outstanding display of ability, sound judgement and quick thinking on the part of LT. Little, piloting the helicopter expedited


ANNUAL OUTING TO
BE HELD

Third Annual NOB School
Outing to Be Held 30 April
The third annual NOB
School picnic and field day is being planned for Saturday, April 30th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Racetrack. This affair, which is fast becoming a Base and School tradition,j promises to be bigger and
better than ever this year.
The Committee in Charge .
has declared that this will be a closed picnic, restricted to pupils, teachers, and parents.
The only compulsion is that every pupil from kindergarten through the third grade must be accompanied by at least one parent'or other responsible adult, or by a brother or sister of high school age. Parents in every case are urged to come with
their children.
School buses, to transport
everyone who does not come by private car, will make their usual rounds beginning
at about 9:30 a.m.

LT. W. H. LOONEY IS NAS EDUCATIONAL OFFICER

LT. William H. Looney reported aboard as the Educational Services officer for the Naval Air Station on 12 April. His office is the Training Office, NAS Administration building, with Charles R. Burns, PNSN, as Educational Services yeoman.
LT. Looney entered the Navy in May 1942 and graduated from Flight School in June 1943. He saw action in the Pacific, participating in the battle of the Philippine Sea.
Prior to coming to Guantanamo, LT. Looney, a native Californian, was flight instructor in PBM aircraft at the Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas.
the salvage operations under difficult conditions and contributed to the successful recovery of what was left of the "Hurricane."


COMMISSARY TO DELIVER
BEER AND COKES

Effective Monday, 25 April, the Commissary will have available for retail purchase the following items: Hatuey Beer, Stateside Beer, (limited quantity), Coca Cola, Soda Water and soft drinks.
Sales will be made in case or carton lots only. Individual bottles will not be available. Deliveries will be made at all points on regular delivery days. It is requested however, that those families who have transportation and normally transport their own groceries, do the same for bottled goods. A deposit will be required on all returnable bottles and cases. Upon return of the bottles, (in case or carton) the refund will be made. Refunds where original purchases were at cash register will be made at cash register with credit refunds being taken care of at the credit register.

NOB FINDS NAVY RELIEF
BIG ASSET

The Naval Operating Base has found that the Guantanamo Aux. iliary of the Navy Relief Society is a big asset to our community life. Since last November 16th this Auxiliary has loaned out $6,075.00 to servicemen and their dependents. One gratuity (gift) has been made to a serviceman and his family for $800.00.
The Navy Relief Society seeks to serve all Navy and Marine service personnel in every financial emergency.

NAVY FILM WINS OSCAR

"The Secret Land," a film of Admiral Byrd's expedition to the Antarctic Region was awarded an Oscar by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
The film, which was recently shown here in Guantanamo Bay, was filmed almost entirely by Navy cameramen on the 1946-47 Antarctic expedieon. Simultaneous premieres of the M-G-M release were held throughout the United States coinciding with Navy Day, 1948.







Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254
Saturday, 23 April 1949

U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, SN-------------------Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR_----------Staff Advisor
S. F. Dodge, YNC-------------Staff writer
R. A. Barchenger, YNC_---Staff Writer Jesse Evans, SSGT------------Staff Writer
C. B. Lufburrow, ALC ----Staff Writer B. J. Vandermeiden, SN_--Staff Writer C. C. Arnott, DT3-------------Staff Writer
G. M. Rushing, AFC --Staff Photographer Cecil Pederson ----------- Teen-Age Writer
"Skiddy" Masterson-....-Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander.
THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All. Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.


TEENAGE ROUND-UP

That long awaited hay ride lived up to expectations and more. It was really fun. From the time we climbed aboard the truck at Chapel Hill until we were dropped off at our homes or the movies, tired but happy, not a thought was given to anything except the wonderful fun, food and games. Thanks ever so much, Chaplain Bosserman.
We boys, handsome, but not at all at home in our semi-formal attire, and girls happy to get a chance to wear our new formals, reached the climax of a swell week at the dance given by Chaplain and Mrs. Bosserman at their home. As with all the Chaplain's parties, everyone had a wonderful time, and we are very grateful to them for giving it.
Happy birthday, Ramona Sparks, and congratulations on becoming "sweet sixteen and never been . . ." well, "sweet sixteen," anyway. By the way, Eunice Besse has been pulling a little red wagon full of books which she claims the "Easter bunny" gave her, around the school. Anyway, we think it's a very convenient way of transporting books.
There are six sunburned boys around in the high school this week after a two-day camping trip at Blue Beach. From all we can gather it was worth it though.


C HAP KS CO RTIER
THE MARKS REMAIN

The horses were loping easily along Yellow Creek trail. Jim Wescott was letting them get their wind after pulling the hill from Canyon City. Jim was the parson. He earned extra money driving the stage because in 1887 the church in Canyon City wasn't big enough to support him full-time. I rode as lookout.
Yesterday Jim had preached about God's love and forgiveness of sin, but one thing bothered me and I asked him:
"If God loves his people so much, why does He say He'll visit the iniquities of the fathers upon the children? Why should a youngster be blamed for the things his parents did? It doesn't seem to fit in with the idea of love and forgiveness."
Jim thought for a while. Then he said, "Watch the horses."
They continued their easy trot until we approached Badman Cut, then suddenly lit out like there were sand burrs under the harness. When we were through the cut they slowed down.
"Why do they do it?" I asked. "Sins of the fathers," Jim drawled. "There were lots of holdups back there 20 years ago and the drivers always whipped up the team to get through as soon as possible. After a while the horses learned to break into a run without any signal."
"But these horses weren't on the line 20 years ago," I reminded him.
"No," he allowed, "these horses weren't even in harness 20 years ago, but we never changed the whole team at once. The old horses taught it to the new ones as they were broken in.
"You see," he went on, "these are the results of what happened years ago. The danger has passed ... the need for running isn't here anymore, but the evidence of those holdups remains."
Then I understood. God will forgive our sins if we repent, but sometimes the consequences of our acts - the outward signs - remain in our lives for a long time . . . can even be transmitted to those who come after us.
Elmer E. Bosserman, Chaplain, U. S. Navy

(SEA)-Bilge blocks are built up wooden blocks upon which a vessel's bilge rests when it is in drydock.
* * *
Procastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.


Sunday, 24 April 1949
CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

STORK CLUB
SCOOPS: James Boyd Bowman born 15 April to
, ADC and Mrs. L.
G. Bowman.
Last Saturday,
CAPT. Wilson
was declared the
N T S Iwinner of the
0 T E first monthly fishing contest and presented with a prize of $20 worth of fishing gear and $5 in cash. CAPT. Robbins was so impressed with the prizes that he went out Sunday afternoon and caught a 14 -pounder. to get things started on the new contest. The present contest will be run on a little different basis; two prizes instead of one, identical prizes going for the largest fish caught frdm a boat and the largest caught from shore.
CAPT. T. H. Taber, MC, USN, District Medical Officer and his Administrative Assistant, LT. F. H. Belknap, MSC, USN, inspected the hospital on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. CAPT. Taber in a statement to this reporter said that he had found the hospital in a most satisfactory state of cleanliness, and readiness for any emergency. When asked about the possibility of a new hospital at Guantanamo Bay, CAPT Taber stated that all he knows is that it is being worked on; every one realizes the need and wants a new hospital, it only remains for the money to be made available.

IN CLARIFICATION

In the Indian's April 9th edition, a story concerning two Public Works civilians earning $20 by a suggestion, was printed. Just so there won't be any domestic misunderstanding, Messers' Thomas and Mustelier were awarded jointly, not individually.


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THE INDIAN


Page Two







THE INDIAN Pr he


PUREST WATER ON BASE S IN SWIMMING POOLS

Continuous Purification Process Is
Carried on 24 Hours a Day
Warmer weather has inevitably
restored the urge to take a dip in the "ole swimmin' holes" around the Base. Of course, the most popular bathing spots are the pools at the Fleet Recreation Center, Marine Site No. 2, and the Officers' Club, and Guantanamo is fortunate, indeed, to be endowed with three
such fine pools.
From time to time the Base authorities are belabored for not directing more frequent draining and refilling of the pools "for sanitary reasons". Possibly seeing a culprit sneak into the pool without taking a shower causes a certain amount of this concern, but he will temporarily contaminate the water
regardless of how clean it is.
Actually, the water in all the
pools is purer than the water you drink here or elsewhere, even though there may not have been a complete change of water for many months. This startling fact is the result of the recirculating process through which pool water is carried 24 hours per day. This process involves pumping the water over and over again through a hair trap and filters. Prescribed amount of chlorine and ammonia are introduced as disinfectants into the water between the hair trap and the pump.
Then, alum and soda ash are introduced as "coagulators" to pick up bacteria and foreign matter for depositing in the filters where they
are regularly disposed of.
Other Purification Methods
In addition to the automatic process, daily, 7 days per week, the water level in the pools is raised sufficiently to flood water into the scum gutters to take off any surface dust and floating debris. In addition, a special, under-water vacuum cleaner is used to remove from the bottom or sides any leaves or other debris which have settled
. but not yet entered the drains.
Naturally, fresh air and sunshine do their part to help in
purification.
With this type of water treatment it is not normally necessary to refill the pool completely, except after an interval of approximately 6 months, at which time the sole reason is to remove harmless algae, caulk leaking joints,
and repaint bottom guide lines.
Prescribed checks for bacteria
are also made at frequent intervals as a further safeguard. This is another "behind the scenes" job which is scrupulously followed, but apparently not taken for granted.
The moral to this story is, when
you use the Gtmo. pools, relax and enjoy yourself. Follow the pool
regulations and have fun!!!


SHIPS REPAIR DOES IT
ONCE MORE!

The Commandant, Eighth Naval District, in a dispatch addressed to the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, commended the Ships Repair Department for the assistance rendered by that facility to the PCE 870 while that ship was engaged on Reserve Training exercises in this vicinity.
The PCE 870 was operating out of New Orleans, La., with naval reserves on a two week's training cruise and developed mechanical trouble of such a nature that correction was considered essential for the safe completion of the voyage. In addition to these mechanical difficulties which, by themselves presented repair problems which could have delayed the ship for days, there was the added hazard that the reserve cruise would necessarily be extended beyond the date for which money and orders had been allotted. But, with the combined technical knowledge, skill and patience of Chief Engineman O'Bryan, EMI Norgard and civilian Vincent Sinclair, the job was accomplished in record time and the ship was able to return to its home port without serious delay.
In commending the Ships Repair Department, ComEIGHT dispatched the following message: "Your assistance to the PCE 870 enabled that ship to return to New Orleans to disembark Reservists on time and is greatly appreciated by all concerned."

Departing this
past week for the U. S. were SGTS. H. L.
Wagner, C. C.
Faulkner; PFCs
* sW. H. Ray and
M. C. Taylor of this Command,
\ and SGT. R.
Rentz of the
Marine Barracks, NOB, Trinidad, B.W.I., after being selected to represent the 10th Naval District in the Southeastern Division Rifle Matches to be held at the Marine Barracks, Camp Lejeune, North Caroline. Congratulations men and good shooting.
Bowling
The final winner in the bowling league is the 1st Platoon who took three straight games in the playoff against Headquarters Supply with a total pinfall of 2840 to 2490. High single with handicap was won hy PFC. R. D. Shield with 283. High triple handicap was won by SGT. C. C. Faulkner with 633. High average without handicap and high average with handicap were both won by SSGT. K. L. Nordine with 172 and 176.


LITTLE THEATRE NOTES

Those amateur carpenters and painters are at it again. Last Monday night, at the first rehearsal of "Laura", notes were compared and mysterious sources of lumber, paint, and excess furniture revealed. The stage crew is approaching the chore of tearing down and rebuilding a stage set with alacrity.
Just how would you go about setting up a modernistic penthouse apartment such as Laura Hunt's with the limited facilities Gtmo. offers? Ingenuity is the answer to this problem and the Metzgers and Seiglers, veterans of "The Show Off," have that with more to spare. They also have the aid of several newcomers to The Little Theatre Group, including Laura's real-life husband, LT. Bill Lampman of the NAS Ship's Service. Bill Feeback is still with us to handle the lights and sound effects in his own very adequate manner.
Cast Change
There is a change in the cast as it was printed here in last week's "Indian." Unfortunately, Nell Abernathy, secretary of the group, who had been given the role of Mrs. Dorgan, a rather frustrated mother, will be heading for the States sometime in May to accompany her husband on leave. To'replace her, Chief Richardson, director, has chosen Evelyn Perdue, also with the group during the production of "The Show Off."
Rehearsals have gone fairly well to date, although the expected stumbling over feet and lines is much in evidence as the cast assumes its new character. It appears that another wonderful job of casting has again been done. The early part of June, at which time Chief Richardson expects to present "Laura" to the public, will tell. We hope your applause will be every bit as enthusiastic as it has been previously.

"UNCOVERED" OFFICERS WILL RETURN SALUTES

(SEA)-When not wearing hats, Navy officers now may return hand salutes tendered by Army and Air Force officers. The new regulation thus modifies for the first time a Navy custom as old as the U. S. itself.
The new order was authorized by the Chief of Naval Personnel. It intends to eliminate any "embarrassment or misunderstanding" which might result from failure by naval officers to salute uncovered while in close contact with Army and Air Force officers. All Army and Air Force personnel must salute, even though uncovered. Navy enlisted personnel are not affected by the new regulation.


THE INDIAN


Page Three







Page Pour THE INDIAN Otnic. Hny-21 Apr 49-2500



rJ __ _______


By Allen Collier,
COUNCIL OUTLINES NEW
RECREATION POLICY

Work On All-Time Base Athletic
Policy Begun
At a meeting Tuesday afternoon, 29 March, the Base Recreation Council, with Captain E. A. Taylor, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, as Senior Member, convened to discuss and draw up a complete recreation policy for the Naval Operating Base. Such a policy would replace the piece-meal adjustments which heretofore have been dominant in the Recreation policy.
The committee met, and made recommendations which were to be submitted to the Commander Naval Operating Base for approval. Listed below are the recommendations submitted for approval.
1. That a team trophy, in the form of a suitable plaque, be procured for each recognized sport.
That these plaques be awarded to and remain in the custody of the commands winning the respective competitions until the end of the next competitive season in- the sport, when they will be returned to the Base Recreation Officer for re-award.
That the name of the winning command and the season be suitably inscribed on the plaque.
Individual Trophies
2. That, in addition to the team trophies, appropriate individual trophies be procured each year and given to the commands winning the respective team competitions.
That the number of these individual trophies for any team sport be equal to the number of persons authorized to form the squad for that sport.
That the command award those individual trophies to those persons which it considers to have contributed most to the winning of the competition.
3. That similar appropriate individual trophies be procured each year and awarded to the winners of individual competitions.
Another recommendation submitted was "that the Base Athletic Officers of the various commands constitute a Working Committee to formulate a set of rules governing inter-command athletic competitions. These rules would cover such items as length and appropriate time of year for the various competitions, the handling of protests, the eligibility of officials, etc."
Thus, the first step has been taken to provide the Naval Operating Base with its first complete, competent athletic policy, something which has long been lacking.


Sports Editor
RAIN HALTS PLAY IN
SOFTBALL LEAGUE

After a full week of competition, the rains came and turned the recreation softball diamonds into a quagmire, thus forcing a halt of all games scheduled for the past week.
As the teams await starting time Monday evening, with fingers crossed, hoping the weatherman will let them play, the standings remain almost unchanged. The only change came as a reult of the Marine-VU-10 game played last Thursday night with the Marines dropping the "fly-boys" 5-3.
Still deadlocked in the number one spot are Naval Station and the Naval Air Station. Training Group is next with one win and no losses with the Marines following with a one-one record. The hospital is currently in the number five slot with a single loss in their only appearance with VU-10 and NSD sharing the cellar with no wins in two starts.
All games scheduled for this week will be played in the order scheduled with the first game being played on April 27. Weather conditions permitting, this week's schedule is as follows:
Monday-VU-10 vs. NavSta and Training Group vs. Hospital.
Tuesday-Marines vs. NSD.
Wednesday-VU-10 vs. Hospital and Naval Station vs. NAS.
Thursday - NSD vs. Training Group.
All games start at 1830.

HIGH SCHOOL CAGERS, CHEERLEADERS FETED

Thursday night the School Board gave a banquet at the Marine Site Restaurant in honor of the High School basketball team and cheerleaders.
After dinner Edward Groome, master-of-ceremonies for the night and Captain of this year's basketball team introduced the speakers.
RADM. W. K. Phillips, Commander, Naval Operating Base, gave the first short talk emphasizing the fact that the entrance of the High School in the league this year gave added spirit to the league. He said that he was confident that in years to come the high school athletic teams would improve and that someday with their spirit and will to win, they may perhaps become Base champions.
Following Admiral Phillips to the speakers rostrum were J. A. Permenter, principal of NOB School, Edward Ondrasik, athletic director and CAPT. J. H. Lewis. Following his talk, CAPT. Lewis presented the


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 24 April to Sat. 30 April
Sunday
WALK A CROOKED MILE
Louis Hayward Dennis O'Keefe
Monday SOFIA
Gene Raymond Patricia Morison
Tuesday
SLIGHTLY FRENCH
Dorothy Lamour Don Ameche
Wednesday
THE SPIRITUALIST
Turhan Bey Lynn Bari
Thursday
ANGEL ON THE AMAZON
George Brent Vera Ralston
Friday
THEY LIVE BY NIGHT
Cathy O'Donnel Farley Granger
Saturday
SONS OF ADVENTURE
Russell Hayden Lynn Roberts

"23rd QUALM"

The Section Leader is my Master; I shall not rest. He maketh me stand watches; He putteth me on Report; He plagueth my soul; he scareth
me out of the Beer Hall for
mine own sake.
Yea, though I thinketh of crawling
under the fence, he restraineth
me.
He is always after me. His Watch Bill and Musters confound me.
He prepareth a watch for me to
stand in the presence of the
O.O.D.
He loadeth me down with a club, a
belt and a pot-bellied pistol. I looketh like a light cruiser. I feeleth like a fool. My morale sinketh low. Surely if I can't wrangleth an X
card

green and white letters to the basketball team and cheerleaders.
The evening was topped off with the showing of a full length technicolor movie, "Whispering Smith."
Those on the basketball team awarded letters were: Edward Groome, Pete Broughton, Fred Johnson, Bill Harris, Bill Barrett, Pat Burke, "Skiddy" Masterson, Clinton Dutcher, Bob Gover and Ramon Alonso (manager).
Cheerleaders awarded letters were: Joan McNeal, Jeaneen Hummel, Eunice Besse and Phyllis Hummell.


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THE INDIAN


Gtmo. 13ay-21 Apr 49-2500




Full Text

PAGE 1

Vol. IV, No. 9 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 23 April 1949 SALVAGE OPERATION IS '' " " AIDED BY HELICOPTER Yacht "Hurricane" Runs Aground Off Kittery Beach Last Saturday afternoon at. approximately 4:09 p.m., the Naval Station duty officer notified the N.O.B. duty officer that he had been informed by the Marine sentry on duty near Kittery Beach, that the Recreation Department's Yacht "Hurricane" was aground and floundering off Kittery Beach. A crash boat was dispatched from the NAS boatshed to the scene to make a preliminary investigation. Upon completion, it was to return to the boatshed because of heavy seas and a southwest wind. Approximately thirty minutes later the crash boat returned. After a hurried conference between NAS OOD, LT J. F. Pringle, and the C.O., Naval Station, CAPT. E. A. Taylor, a helicopter from the carrier Coral Sea, was dispatched to the scene to obtain more information in view that darkness was rapidly approaching and lack of information was holding back positive action. Effective communications were maintained between the helicopter and the control tower at all times. Helicopter Saves Time The helicopter, piloted by LT. Little, dropped a line to the YTB as soon as the tug approached the scene -this line was used to carry a tow line to the "Hurricane" and enabled the tug to free the yacht without. delay. If this had not been accomplished by LT. Little, it would have been long past darkness by the time the tug could have sent a line over to the grounded ship in a smaller boat over some 100 yards of shoal water. Salvage operations at night would have been extremely difficult plus the possibility of danger to the tug. As was pointed out in a report to the Commander, Naval Operating Base by the NOB Duty Officer, LCDR. Watson, that the excellent spirit and cooperation of the Naval SAir Station duty officer, together with the outstanding display of ability, sound judgement and quick thinking on the part of LT. Little, piloting the helicopter expedited ANNUAL OUTING TO BE HELD Third Annual NOB School Outing to Be Held 30 April The third annual NOB School picnic and field day is being planned for Saturday, April 30th from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Racetrack. This affair, which is fast becoming a Base and School tradition, promises to be bigger and better than ever this year. The Committee in Charge has declared that this will be a closed picnic, restricted to pupils, teachers, and parents. The only compulsion is that every pupil from kindergarten through the third grade must be accompanied by at least one parent'or other responsible adult, or by a brother or sister of high school age. Parents in every case are urged to come with their children. School buses, to transport everyone who does not come by private car, will make their usual rounds beginning at about 9:30 a.m. LT. W. H. LOONEY IS NAS EDUCATIONAL OFFICER LT. William H. Looney reported aboard as the Educational Services officer for the Naval Air Station on 12 April. His office is the Training Office, NAS Administration building, with Charles R. Burns, PNSN, as Educational Services yeoman. LT. Looney entered the Navy in May 1942 and graduated from Flight School in June 1943. He saw action in the Pacific, participating in the battle of the Philippine Sea. Prior to coming to Guantanamo, LT. Looney, a native Californian, was flight instructor in PBM aircraft at the Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas. the salvage operations under difficult conditions and contributed to the successful recovery of what was left of the "Hurricane." COMMISSARY TO DELIVER BEER AND COKES Effective Monday, 25 April, the Commissary will have available for retail purchase the following items: Hatuey Beer, Stateside Beer, (limited quantity), Coca Cola, Soda Water and soft drinks. Sales will be made in case or carton lots only. Individual bottles will not be available. Deliveries will be made at all points on regular delivery days. It is requested however, that those families who have transportation and normally transport their own groceries, do the same for bottled goods. A deposit will be required on all returnable bottles and cases. Upon return of the bottles, (in case or carton) the refund will be made. Refunds where original purchases were at cash register will be made at cash register with credit refunds being taken care of at the credit register. NOB FINDS NAVY RELIEF BIG ASSET The Naval Operating Base has found that the Guantanamo Aux. iliary of the Navy Relief Society is a big asset to our community life. Since last November 16th this Auxiliary has loaned out $6,075.00 to servicemen and their dependents. One gratuity (gift) has been made to a serviceman and his family for $800.00. The Navy Relief Society seeks to serve all Navy and Marine service personnel in every financial emergency. NAVY FILM WINS OSCAR "The Secret Land," a film of Admiral Byrd's expedition to the Antarctic Region was awarded an Oscar by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The film, which was recently shown here in Guantanamo Bay, was filmed almost entirely by Navy cameramen on the 1946-47 Antarctic expedieon. Simultaneous premieres of the M-G-M release were held throughout the United States coinciding with Navy Day, 1948.

PAGE 2

Paoge Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 23 April 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, SN-----------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR---------Staff Advisor S. F. Dodge, YNC----------Staff Writer R. A. Barchenger, YNC--.-Staff Writer Jesse Evans, SSGT-----------Staff Writer C. B. Lufburrow, ALC.Staff Writer B. J. Vandermeiden, SN.Staff Writer C. C. Arnott, DT3-----------Staff Writer G. M. Rushing, AFC-Staff Photographer Cecil Pederson---------Teen-Age Writer "Skiddy" Masterson---Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly, financed by appropriated funds, printed on government equipment, for free distribution on the U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by order of the Base Commander. THE INDIAN is published in compliance with the provisions of NAVEXOS-P-35 (Rev) 1945. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All. Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAB Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. TEENAGE ROUND-UP That long awaited hay ride lived up to expectations and more. It was really fun. From the time we climbed aboard the truck at Chapel Hill until we were dropped off at our homes or the movies, tired but happy, not a thought was given to anything except the wonderful fun, food and games. Thanks ever so much, Chaplain Bosserman. We boys, handsome, but not at all at home in our semi-formal attire, and girls happy to get a chance to wear our new formals, reached the climax of a swell week at the dance given by Chaplain and Mrs. Bosserman at their home. As with all the Chaplain's parties, everyone had a wonderful time, and we are very grateful to them for giving it. Happy birthday, Ramona Sparks, and congratulations on becoming "sweet sixteen and never been ..". well, "sweet sixteen," anyway. By the way, Eunice Besse has been pulling a little red wagon full of books which she claims the "Easter bunny" gave her, around the school. Anyway, we think it's a very convenient way of transporting books. There are six sunburned boys around in the high school this week after a two-day camping trip at Blue Beach. From all we can gather it was worth it though. CHAPL.Alt'S CORNER THE MARKS REMAIN The horses were loping easily along Yellow Creek trail. Jim Wescott was letting them get their wind after pulling the hill from Canyon City. Jim was the parson. He earned extra money driving the stage because in 1887 the church in Canyon City wasn't big enough to support him full-time. I rode as lookout. Yesterday Jim had preached about God's love and forgiveness of sin, but one thing bothered me and I asked him: "If God loves his people so much, why does He say He'll visit the iniquities of the fathers upon the children? Why should a youngster be blamed for the things his parents did? It doesn't seem to fit in with the idea of love and forgiveness." Jim thought for a while. Then he said, "Watch the horses." They continued their easy trot until we approached Badman Cut, then suddenly lit out like there were sand burrs under the harness. When we were through the cut they slowed down. "Why do they do it?" I asked. "Sins of the fathers," Jim drawled. "There were lots of holdups back there 20 years ago and the drivers always whipped up the team to get through as soon as possible. After a while the horses learned to break into a run without any signal." "But these horses weren't on the line 20 years ago," I reminded him. "No," he allowed, "these horses weren't even in harness 20 years ago, but we never changed the whole team at once. The old horses taught it to the new ones as they were broken in. "You see," he went on, "these are the results of what happened years ago. The danger has passed .the need for running isn't here anymore, but the evidence of those holdups remains." Then I understood. God will forgive our sins if we repent, but sometimes the consequences of our acts -the outward signs -remain in our lives for a long time ... can even be transmitted to those who come after us. Elmer E. Bosserman, Chaplain, U. S. Navy (SEA)-Bilge blocks are built up wooden blocks upon which a vessel's bilge rests when it is in drydock. Procastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday. -s Sunday, 24 April 1949 CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0000-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) STORK CLUB SCOOPS: James Boyd Bowman born 15 April to ADC and Mrs. L. G. Bowman. Last Saturday, CAPT. Wilson was declared the L T winner of the 0 TES first monthly fishing contest and presented with a prize of $20 worth of fishing gear and $5 in cash. CAPT. Robbins was so impressed with the prizes that he went out Sunday afternoon and caught a 141/-pounder. to get things started on the new contest. The present contest will be run on a little different basis; two prizes instead of one, identical prizes going for the largest fish caught from a boat and the largest caught from shore. CAPT. T. H. Taber, MC, USN, District Medical Officer and his Administrative Assistant, LT. F. H. Belknap, MSC, USN, inspected the hospital on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. CAPT. Taber in a statement to this reporter said that he had found the hospital in a most satisfactory state of cleanliness, and readiness for any emergency. When asked about the possibility of a new hospital at Guantanamo Bay, CAPT Taber stated that all he knows is that it is being worked on; every one realizes the need and wants a new hospital, it only remains for the money to be made available. IN CLARIFICATION In the Indian's April 9th edition, a story concerning two Public Works civilians earning $20 by a suggestion, was printed. Just so there won't be any domestic misunderstanding, Messers' Thomas and Mustelier were awarded jointly, not individually. e S THE INDIAN Page Two

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THE INDIAN Pr he PUREST WATER ON BASE IN SWIMMING POOLS Continuous Purification Process Is Carried on 24 Hours a Day Warmer weather has inevitably restored the urge to take a dip in the "ole swimmin' holes" around the Base. Of course, the most popular bathing spots are the pools at the Fleet Recreation Center, Marine Site No. 2, and the Officers' Club, and Guantanamo is fortunate, indeed, to be endowed with three such fine pools. From time to time the Base authorities are belabored for not directing more frequent draining and refilling of the pools "for sanitary reasons". Possibly seeing a culprit sneak into the pool without taking a shower causes a certain amount of this concern, but he will temporarily contaminate the water regardless of how clean it is. Actually, the water in all the pools is purer than the water you drink here or elsewhere, even though there may not have been a complete change of water for many months. This startling fact is the result of the recirculating process through which pool water is carried .24 hours per day. This process involves pumping the water over and over again through a hair trap and filters. Prescribed amount of chlorine and ammonia are introduced as disinfectants into the water between the hair trap and the pump. Then, alum and soda ash are introduced as "coagulators" to pick up bacteria and foreign matter for depositing in the filters where they are regularly disposed of. Other Purification Methods In addition to the automatic process, daily, 7 days per week, the water level in the pools is raised sufficiently to flood water into the scum gutters to take off any surface dust and floating debris. In addition, a special, under-water vacuum cleaner is used to remove from the bottom or sides any leaves or other debris which have settled but not yet entered the drains. Naturally, fresh air and sunshine do their part to help in purification. With this type of water treatment it is not normally necessary to refill the pool completely, except after an interval of approximately 6 months, at which time the sole reason is to remove harmless algae, caulk leaking joints, and repaint bottom guide lines. Prescribed checks for bacteria are also made at frequent intervals as a further safeguard. This is another "behind the scenes" job which is scrupulously followed, but apparently not taken for granted. The moral to this story is, when you use the Gtmo. pools, relax and enjoy yourself. Follow the pool regulations and have fun!!! SHIPS REPAIR DOES IT ONCE MORE! The Commandant, Eighth Naval District, in a dispatch addressed to the Commanding Officer, Naval Station, commended the Ships Repair Department for the assistance rendered by that facility to the PCE 870 while that ship was engaged on Reserve Training exercises in this vicinity. The PCE 870 was operating out of New Orleans, La., with naval reserves on a two week's training cruise and developed mechanical trouble of such a nature that correction was considered essential for the safe completion of the voyage. In addition to these mechanical difficulties which, by themselves presented repair problems which could have delayed the ship for days, there was the added hazard that the reserve cruise would necessarily be extended beyond the date for which money and orders had been allotted. But, with the combined technical knowledge, skill and patience of Chief Engineman O'Bryan, EM1 Norgard and civilian Vincent Sinclair, the job was accomplished in record time and the ship was able to return to its home port without serious delay. In commending the Ships Repair Department, ComEIGHT dispatched the following message: "Your assistance to the PCE 870 enabled that ship to return to New Orleans to disembark Reservists on time and is greatly appreciated by all concerned." Departing this past week for the U. S. were SGTS. H. L. Wagner, C. C. Faulkner; PFCs H W. H. Ray and M. C. Taylor of "* this Command, and SGT. R. Rentz of the Marine Barracks, NOB, Trinidad, B.W.I., after being selected to represent the 10th Naval District in the Southeastern Division Rifle Matches to be held at the Marine Barracks, Camp Lejeune, North Caroline. Congratulations men and good shooting. Bowling The final winner in the bowling league is the 1st Platoon who took three straight games in the playoff against Headquarters Supply with a total pinfall of 2840 to 2490. High single with handicap was won by PFC. R. D. Shield with 283. High triple handicap was won by SGT. C. C. Faulkner with 633. High average without handicap and high average with handicap were both won by SSGT. K. L. Nordine with 172 and 176. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES Those amateur carpenters and painters are at it again. Last Monday night, at the first rehearsal of "Laura", notes were compared and mysterious sources of lumber, paint, and excess furniture revealed. The stage crew is approaching the chore of tearing down and rebuilding a stage set with alacrity. Just how would you go about setting up a modernistic penthouse apartment such as Laura Hunt's with the limited facilities Gtmo. offers? Ingenuity is the answer to this problem and the Metzgers and Seiglers, veterans of "The Show Off," have that with more to spare. They also have the aid of several newcomers to The Little Theatre Group, including Laura's real-life husband, LT. Bill Lampman of the NAS Ship's Service. Bill Feeback is still with us to handle the lights and sound effects in his own very adequate manner. Cast Change There is a change in the cast as it was printed here in last week's "Indian." Unfortunately, Nell Abernathy, secretary of the group, who had been given the role of Mrs. Dorgan, a rather frustrated mother, will be heading for the States sometime in May to accompany her husband on leave. To replace her, Chief Richardson, director, has chosen Evelyn Perdue, also with the group during the production of "The Show Off." Rehearsals have gone fairly well to date, although the expected stumbling over feet and lines is much in evidence as the cast assumes its new character. It appears that another wonderful job of casting has again been done. The early part of June, at which time Chief Richardson expects to present "Laura" to the public, will tell. We hope your applause will be every bit as enthusiastic as it has been previously. "UNCOVERED" OFFICERS WILL RETURN SALUTES (SEA)-When not wearing hats, Navy officers now may return hand salutes tendered by Army and Air Force officers. The new regulation thus modifies for the first time a Navy custom as old as the U. S. itself. The new order was authorized by the Chief of Naval Personnel. It intends to eliminate any "embarrassment or misunderstanding" which might result from failure by naval officers to salute uncovered while in close contact with Army and Air Force officers. All Army and Air Force personnel must salute, even though uncovered. Navy enlisted personnel are not affected by the new regulation. THE INDIAN Page Three

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PaeeFourTHE NDIN Gtio. ~ay21 Ar 49250 By Allen Collier, COUNCIL OUTLINES NEW RECREATION POLICY Work On All-Time Base Athletic Policy Begun At a meeting Tuesday afternoon, 29 March, the Base Recreation Council, with Captain E. A. Taylor, Commanding Officer, Naval Station, as Senior Member, convened to discuss and draw up a complete recreation policy for the Naval Operating Base. Such a policy would replace the piece-meal adjustments which heretofore have been dominant in the Recreation policy. The committee met, and made recommendations which were to be submitted to the Commander Naval Operating Base for approval. Listed below are the recommendations submitted for approval. 1. That a team trophy, in the form of a suitable plaque, be procured for each recognized sport. That these plaques be awarded to and remain in the custody of the commands winning the respective competitions until the end of the next competitive season in the sport, when they will be returned to the Base Recreation Officer for re-award. That the name of the winning command and the season be suitably inscribed on the plaque. Individual Trophies 2. That, in addition to the team trophies, appropriate individual trophies be procured each year and given to the commands winning the respective team competitions. That the number of these individual trophies for any team sport be equal to the number of persons authorized to form the squad for that sport. That the command award those individual trophies to those persons which it considers to have contributed most to the winning of the competition. 3. That similar appropriate individual trophies be procured each year and awarded to the winners of individual competitions. Another recommendation submitted was "that the Base Athletic Officers of the various commands constitute a Working Committee to formulate a set of rules governing inter-command athletic competitions. These rules would cover such items as length and appropriate time of year for the various competitions, the handling of protests, the eligibility of officials, etc." Thus, the first step has been taken to provide the Naval Operating Base with its first complete, competent athletic policy, something which has long been lacking. Sports Editor RAIN HALTS PLAY IN SOFTBALL LEAGUE After a full week of competition, the rains came and turned the recreation softball diamonds into a quagmire, thus forcing a halt of all games scheduled for the past week. As the teams await starting time Monday evening, with fingers crossed, hoping the weatherman will let them play, the standings remain almost unchanged. The only change came as a reult of the Marine-VU-10 game played last Thursday night with the Marines dropping the "fly-boys" 5-3. Still deadlocked in the number one spot are Naval Station and the Naval Air Station. Training Group is next with one win and no losses with the Marines following with a one-one record. The hospital is currently in the number five slot with a single loss in their only appearance with VU-10 and NSD sharing the cellar with no wins in two starts. All games scheduled for this week will be played in the order scheduled with the first game being played on April 27. Weather conditions permitting, this week's schedule is as follows: Monday-VU-10 vs. NavSta and Training Group vs. Hospital. Tuesday-Marines vs. NSD. Wednesday-VU-10 vs. Hospital and Naval Station vs. NAS. Thursday -NSD vs. Training Group. All games start at 1830. HIGH SCHOOL CAGERS, CHEERLEADERS FETED Thursday night the School Board gave a banquet at the Marine Site Restaurant in honor of the High School basketball team and cheerleaders. After dinner Edward Groome, master-of-ceremonies for the night and Captain of this year's basketball team introduced the speakers. RADM. W. K. Phillips, Commander, Naval Operating Base, gave the first short talk emphasizing the fact that the entrance of the High School in the league this year gave added spirit to the league. He said that he was confident that in years to come the high school athletic teams would improve and that someday with their spirit and will to win, they may perhaps become Base champions. Following Admiral Phillips to the speakers rostrum were J. A. Permenter, principal of NOB School, Edward Ondrasik, athletic director and CAPT. J. H. Lewis. Following his talk, CAPT. Lewis presented the NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 24 April to Sat. 30 April Sunday WALK A CROOKED MILE Louis Hayward Dennis O'Keefe Monday SOFIA Gene Raymond Patricia Morison Tuesday SLIGHTLY FRENCH Dorothy Lamour Don Ameche Wednesday THE SPIRITUALIST Turhan Bey Lynn Bari Thursday ANGEL ON THE AMAZON George Brent Vera Ralston Friday THEY LIVE BY NIGHT Cathy O'Donnel Farley Granger Saturday SONS OF ADVENTURE Russell Hayden Lynn Roberts "23rd QUALM" The Section Leader is my Master; I shall not rest. He maketh me stand watches; He putteth me on Report; He plagueth my soul; he scareth me out of the Beer Hall for mine own sake. Yea, though I thinketh of crawling under the fence, he restraineth me. He is always after me. His Watch Bill and Musters confound me. He prepareth a watch for me to stand in the presence of the O.O.D. He loadeth me down with a club, a belt and a pot-bellied pistol. I looketh like a light cruiser. I feeleth like a fool. My morale sinketh low. Surely if I can't wrangleth an X card green and white letters to the basketball team and cheerleaders. The evening was topped off with the showing of a full length technicolor movie, "Whispering Smith." Those on the basketball team awarded letters were: Edward Groome, Pete Broughton, Fred Johnson, Bill Harris, Bill Barrett, Pat Burke, "Skiddy" Masterson, Clinton Dutcher, Bob Gover and Ramon Alonso (manager). Cheerleaders awarded letters were: Joan McNeal, Jeaneen Hummel, Eunice Besse and Phyllis Hummell. S Paee Pour THE INDIAN Gtmo. B3ay-21 Apr 49-2500


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