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Vol. IV, No. 6 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 2 April. 1949


CINCLANT COMMENTS ON
CONDUCT ASHORE

Circular Letter Lists Rules For All
Naval Personnel
Perhaps as a result of several
recent occurances in this area, the S Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet has issued a circular letter on the subject "Conduct of Naval Personnel A s h o r e in Foreign Ports." Portions of the letter are quoted below as being of interest
to Base personnel.
"The impression which the United
States desires to make throughout the world is one of Power, Dignity, Modesty and Friendliness. To accomplish this result, careful consideration should be given to instructing all hands on the following points:
"Knowledge of the general customs and attitudes of the people of the port visited, including the current regulations of the country with
the United States.
"Knowledge of the principle
fundamentals of U. S. foreign policy. Generally we seek no territorial gains, want nothing that belongs to other nations and desire to live in peace and friendliness with all
peoples.
"Careful adherence to local laws,
customs and social conventions, including observance of the private rules of clubs or organizations to
which invitations are received.
"Avoidance of acts or words offensive to the national pride, or local religions. There must be no ridicule of any national or religious
customs or ceremonies.
"Avoidance of controversial discussion of foreign affairs and comment or discussion of local political
matters.
"Avoidance of disputes and unpleasant situations. Do not carry a chip on your shoulder. Certain minorities in some countries may try to stage incidents which will bring discredit on the United States.
Such incidents are given wide publicity and exploited to the fullest extent. Walk away from trouble.
Do not seek it.
"Uniform and appearance of all
personnel should meet the highest standards at all times. Hand salutes and other military courtesies
(Continued on Page Four)


WATER BILLING SYSTEM
PROVES ITS WORTH
Average Newtown Water Bill Is
Reduced By $1.40 Per Month
Final water meter readings for Newtown have been totalled for the month ending 15 March. This is the first month under the "incentive system" of billing, and the results are pleasantly startling. Seldom are figures as conclusive as the following:
Newtown water consumption for month ending 15 February, 3,183,700 gallons. Newtown water consumption for month ending 15 March, 1,601,450 gallons. Saving 1,582,250 gallons, valued at $727.00.
Of greater interest to the respective occupants however, is the fact that the average bill per house, which was $3.06 for February, was reduced to $1.66 for March.
The Government's water bill dropped from $840 to $400, so we can now point with pride to achieving a fool-proof system where everybody wins!
ELECTRIC HOT WATER HEATERS INSTALLED
Within the last month, electric hot water heaters have been mstalled in about one half of the Newtown homes. These replace the kerosene heaters which were originally installed.
The new heaters are not only of greater convenience to occupants, but they also eliminate the fire hazard which has long been a matter of concern. The replacement project was made possible by a special allotment from the Bureau of Yards and Docks.
According to a schedule recently furnished to the Manager, Low Cost Housing, Mr. Julio Larcada, all installations should be completed by 13 May. A carefully selected and trained team from the Base Public Works Department has been coached in stream-lined methods, so that four to five heaters per day are being replaced.
The Fire Department which shared the misery of Newtowners by having to make frequent runs to extinguish kerosene heater fires, adds its sigh of relief to those of the Newtowners.


LOUISIANA VETERANS TO
GET STATE BONUS

Service Between January 1, 1941
and March 1, 1946 Required
Every person who served on
active duty in the armed forces of the United States at any time between the period January 1, 1941 and March 1, 1946, and who was honorably discharged or who is still in active service, may be entitled to a Louisiana bonus. Payments range from fifty dollars for domestic service to two hundred and fifty dollars for foreign service.
Application forms may be obtained from Bonus -Division, Department of Veterans Affairs, Old State Capitol Building, Baton Rouge 10, Louisiana.

KEEP SERVICES YOUNG SAYS COMMISSION

Last of Series on Hook Commission
Findings
(AFPS)-The services must be kept young, vigorous and efficient.
This is the underlying thought behind the advisory Commission on Service Pay (Hook Commission) retirement recommendations now before Congress for legislative action.
On voluntary retirement from active Federal service of officers and warrant officers with twenty or more years of service, the commission believes retirement should be optional at age 60.
It should be optional also to request retirement at any age after thirty years service, subject to approval by the head of the Department concerned.
Officers and warrant officers with 20 or more years service at the time these recommendations are enacted should have the right for a period of five years following, to apply for retirement under the present law.
Enlisted Personnel
Voluntary retirement for enlisted personnel with 20 or more years service should be optional at age 50 and should be optional at any age with 30 or more years' service.
On involuntary retirement for all
(continued on Page Four)







Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg.,
Room 205 - Phone 254

Saturday, 2 April 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, SN-------------------Editor
P. H. Teeter, LCDR----------Staff Advisor
S. F. Dodge, YNC-------------Staff Writer
R. A. Barchenger, YNC...--..Staff writer Jesse Evans, SSGT------------Staff Writer
C. B. Lufburrow, ALC - _..Staff Writer B. J. Vandermeiden, SN---_Staff Writer C. C. Arnott, DT3------------- Staff Writer
G. M. Rushing, AFC.-.- Staff Photographer Cecil Pederson ----------- Teen-Age Writer
Skiddy" Masterson - Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-3, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE iNDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

T h e Hospital
furnished four of the players on the Guantanamo Golf Team which thoroughly trounced
- the team from
Raney Field last Su n da ly. lTJG
\N Dutcher, L T J G
NOTES Ellestad, Stiles,
IM1 and Walker,
HM1, are regular members of the team, and LTJG Hunter and Gehring, HMC, are supernumaries. We've heard rumors of a golf tournament for hospital personnel only. More on that later, but it's a good idea for all you duffers to start practicing on the fine points of the game.
Softall Is Starting
The Softball team is getting in shape for the coming Base season and are ready for some practice games in case anyone is interested in finding out what their team can do under competition. If any of the officers from the hospital are seen around the Base showing signs of recent battle, you'll know it's the results of their game with the regular team on Thursday night.
Until ten o'clock Wednesday morning, Mrs. L. L. Elton (wife of L. L. Elton, HM1) lead in the fishing contest with a 5-lb. skipjack. But at that time, Mr. S. L. Gehring (father of J. H. Gehring, HMC) caught a 12-lb. red snapper at Repair Pier One. That's lots of fish and really something for the rest of the Isaac Waltons to shoot at.


LITTLE THEATRE NOTES

Excitement runs high among members of The Little Theatre group as the date of the opening performance of "The Show Off"
draws closer. Little things just keep bobbing up interrupting the otherwise smooth run of events, such as, "Have I forgotten my cues?", "what if someone is ill?", "Suppose no one comes?".
In answer to the last question, it is certain there will be a full house each evening that The Little Theatre group presents its second production, "The Show Off" on April 4, 5, 6, and 7. By noon Monday, March 28, there wasn't a ticket to be had. Many wives sadly shook their heads and then rushed out to corner a friend who might have "just one extra ticket." Trading also was heavy.
This reaction has so flattered the members of the cast and their director, Mrs. Virginia Fielder, that they are seriously considering an impromptu performance on Friday night, April 8th. However, this is still tenative. If such is the case, everyone will be notified by notices in the "Papoose" or spot annonucements over WGBY. It is difficult indeed to turn down so many would be theatre-goers.
It is equally as difficult to choose which member of the cast has turned in the best job in making the character they portray believable. You, the audience, will have to decide that. And there are so many characters!
Ruth Metzger, who turned in a top performance as one of the spinsters in "Arsenic and Old Lace" rivals that performance with her portrayal of Mrs. Fisher.
Poor Mrs. Fisher has a young daughter, played by Betty Hickman, who is in love and cannot be persuaded to make a more suitable marriage as did her sister, Clara (Betty Rollins). The object of her affections is none other than Aubrey Piper (K. H. Allen, YNC), who proves to be quite a man. The question at hand is can he, or will he, ever live up to his opinion of himself.
In comparison to Clara's husband, Frank Hyland, portrayed by LT. K. W. Strebel, his accomplishments are nil. It takes young Joe (Clinton Dutcher) to realize that once in awhile, Aubrey's talk can do more than keep Mr. Fisher (G. G. Siegler, QMC) annoyed. Piper's monologues duly impress Mr. Gill (LCDR. L. F. Washburne) and Mr. Rogers, characterized by LTJG L.
(Continued on Page Three)



I NO--IT IS NOT GOOD I TASTE.


Sunday, 3 April 1949
CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN .
(Catholic)

VU-10 NOTES

Athletics hold the spotlight in and around the squadron area this week. In addition to the hotly contested Officer vs. Enlisted Men's volley ball games each noon outside the hangar, the Fly-boys have organized an Intra-Squadron Bowling League. Composed of eight teams from the various shops and divisions, the league will run for approximately seven weeks to determine the Squadron Champions.
Only two games have been played to date. The Metal Shop split their match with Administration, while Personnel chalked up a four point sweep over Ordnance.
Not to be outdone, sixteen of the squadron Chiefs are in the middle of a red-hot Acey-Ducey elimination tournament to settle once and for all the bitter arguments that have ranged back and forth around the Leading Chief's office.

RETIREMENT REFUND REDEPOSIT IS URGED

Every Navy employee who has at any time received a refund of retirement deductions, must make a redeposit of the amount refunded, with interest, if he (or his qualified survivors) is to receive maximum annuity benefits, it was pointed out in a recent Navy Department circular letter.
Unless the redeposit is made, the employee will receive no credit for the period of service covered by the refund, and thus will receive a reduced annuity.
Redeposits should be made without delay due to the fact that they may not be made by a survivor after the death of the employee. Delay also results in added interest charges.
Additional information and necessary forms may be secured by employees at the Base Industrial Relations Office.


S


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Pave Two


THE INDIAN







THE INMAAN Pr he


TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP

Hi, kids! Did you ever think we would get a 'Teen-Age' column all our own to keep ourselves posted on what's cooking with the younger set and give the rest of the Base a glimpse of some of our activities? Well, believe it or not, we finally made it but boy, oh boy, are we going to need your help and cooperation. So all you Walter Winchells and Drew Pearsons, stop, look, and listen, and tell us the "que pasa" on all that happens concerning the group.
Let us know everything you think will be of interest: what you have done, what you are doing, and what you are going to do. There will be a box in the school library waiting for your news-let's keep it filled! See you next week, gang, and we're looking forward to it as much as we know you are.

SHOTS REQUIRED FOR
NEW EMPLOYEES

In order to protect Base residents against contagious diseases, it has been determined by the Commander, NOB that immunization against typhoid, tetanus, and smallpox will be required of all new civilian employees prior to their entry on duty.
Employees will be permitted to bring evidence of immunization by Cuban physicians, or may secure shots free of charge at the Labor Board Dispensary. They may start work after the first round of shots, but, will be removed from their positions if they fail to complete the immunization.

ADVANCEMENTS IN RATE

Effective April 1, the following men were advanced in rating as indicated:
Naval Hospital
From Seaman Apprentice to Seaman: Mario Ferro and R. L. Fiehn.
Naval Air Station
From Seaman Apprentice to Seaman: D. A. Beahm, R. E. Benson, W. L. Lavalier, H. H. Moore, E. R. Snodgrass, J. A. Green, A Mastropoll, G. A. Haggerty, B. J. Vandermeiden, N. Rudolph.
From Fireman Apprentice to Fireman: Max Elliott, J. J. Whitemore, M. J. Strouse.
From Airman Apprentice to Airman: C. L. Wentz, S. W. Winnie, R. K. Wood, C. R. Morton, H. B. Salley, W. J. Bretana, D. F. Fox, J. A. Ferrigno, C. E. Hughes and John Konitsky..
Naval Station
From Seaman Apprentice to Seaman: H. M. Murphy and George Pierce. The latter from YNSA to YNSN.


LITTLE THEATRE NOTES

(Continued from Page Two)
Bonatta, who seems to have never met up with such an egotist. But, of course, they are unsuspecting outsiders prepared to take anything at face value.
The success of The Little Theatre group's second production is due to the help of so many, many people, that space will not permit us to name them all. Our many thanks go first of all to LT. W. C. D. Keehn of the Recreation Department for sponsoring us in the first place.
We extend from the bottom of our hearts, our thanks and appreciation to Mrs. Dorothy Seigler, our stage manager, to Bill Feebeck, YNSN, who handles the lighting and sound effects, to Ray Hope, AFAN, for coming to our rehearsals at odd times and taking some fine pictures. Mr. Norvall Shoop of the PW Paint Shop has earned the thanks of all concerned with his magnificent job on the scenery. Also we would like to thank LT. John Metzger who mimeographed our tickets, the girls who gave out the tickets at Ship's Service and M. C. Hollic, BMC, who will act as House Manager.
NavSta Band to Entertain
The audience will be greeted by an overture by the Naval Station band before the curtain goes up at 8:00 p.m. This will serve to ease the moments of waiting for the curtain call.
We mention here that the ushers will seat you only before the first act and after the first scene. There will be a ten minute intermission between acts. At this time, cokes and beer will be on sale outside. We must ask you not to bring the bottles into The Little Theatre. In the darkness of the theatre and in the crowd, bottles may easily cause accidents which we wish to avoid.
Our opening night will not be as brilliant as a broadway opening but it will have all the excitement that goes with one. The tension as the lights go out and in a few minutes you find yourself in another world
-in the comfortable front room of the Fishers in Philadelphia, sharing a few tears with them, perhaps, but mostly laughing at the antics of that impossible "Show Off."

MARINE FLASHES

The Family Restaurant on Marine No. 2 for married personnel and their dependents, re-opened on Wednesday. Closed for quite some time, the restaurant has been completely renovated arid doubled in size, now having a seating capacity of about eighty persons. The interior of the restaurant has been decorated in an attractive two-tone shade of green and a small bar has also been installed to give patrons better service.


--- j- FA OThe NSD picnic, held on Tuesday afternoon, 22 March, at the NAS Race Track, was a great success, with an abundance of beer, coke, refreshments and sports for all.
The Chiefs and Officers handed the White Hats a very surprising defeat in the softball game by a score of 18-4, and in the volleyball game by winning two straight games 21-13 and 11-0. The winners were awarded cigars and cigarettes
The 50 and 100 yard dash, and standing broadjump were won by Breeden, SN, who proved to be quite an athlete. He was awarded a Schick razor, a deck of cards, and a pipe, being the only three-time winner of the afternoon.
Lazzeroni, SKSN, received a Sheaffer pencil and shaving cream for his wins in the 25-yard onefooted hop race and the mile race. Second place in the mile race was taken by Berry, SKSN, who was the only other man to finish, and was awarded a keycase for his efforts.
The ball throwing events were won by Rosario, SN, Killion, SRSA, and Guinn, GMC, who were awarded a carton of cigarettes a Schick razor and a box of cigars respectively.
French, SN, won the chinning contest by accomplishing 14 pullups and received a Zippo cigarette lighter.
In addition to the above sports events, awards were made to the winner, CHPCLK Lesesne and runner-up, Barchenger, YNC, of the NSD handicap golf tournament. Lesesne received a dozen Dunlop Golden Cup golf balls and Barchenger a half dozen.
All in all it was an afternoon thoroughly enjoyed by all hands who are already looking forward to the next picnic, which it is hoped is not too far in the distant future.

SPECIAL EDITION OF THE
INDIAN SOON

On April 16th, a special edition of The Indian will be printed. This edition will consist entirely of pictures and stories about the NOB School.
The stories are written by the students themselves. The Southern Accrediting Association on a recent visit here made the school a fully accredited school under the standards of the Southern Accrediting Association. Work done here may now be accepted in any school in the States.


THE 1NbiAN


Page Three







Page Four TEIDA to lyS a 920


GUANTANAMO GOLFERS
BEAT AIR FORCE

Homelings Hand Ramey Field
Their First Defeat
Led by Joe McDonald with a two over par 72, the Guantanamo golfers toppled Ramey Field from the ranks of the undefeated, here last Sunday, by a score of 43 to 131/2. In winning over the Air Force niblickers, the Gtmo. team avenged an earlier defeat on Ramey's home course. Both teams have lost only one match to date.
The day before their disasterous outing here, the Ramey lads had swamped the Vernam Field golfers, on the Vernam course.
MSGT Golas, was the low man for Ramey with a four over par 76. Between them, McDonald and Marchell, of Gtmo. had the low ball of the match with a neat 63. There were thirteen men on each team.
Ramey was the guest of the local golf team on Sunday night at MATS restaurant where a chicken dinner awaited them. The Air Force niblickers stated they wished a return match in the near future. This match will be played on the Ramey course.
The Guantanamo golfers hope to meet the golfers from the Coral Sea and Vernam Field before tackling Ramey again. Dry weather conditions at Vernam make it impossible to set a specific date for the match there.

NAS SLIPSTREAM

The Boys from Aerology and our Canadian friends got together for a picnic on Monday. The picnic was sort of a "farewell" to the departing Royal Canadian unit. This picnic was made possible by the Honorary Leftenant Mr. Conang and LT. N. B. Boyles, NAS Aerology officer. There was much food, drink and recreation for all.
The Canadian boys showed the NAS team they did have talent when it came to playing softball but timely homeruns by Strohlien and Ruest gave the game to the aerology team by 12 to 10.
The Canadians were members of the 826th Royal Canadian Air Squadron commanded by LCDR
John W. Roberts. They have operated from the Guantanamo Naval Air Station for the past week. The squadron is composed of 12 planes, of the Firefly, Mark 1 description. They are twin seated and are used for fighter-reconnaisance.
The story of the prodigal son was repeated the other day when Robert Hogan, QM3, dropped in for a visit. Hogan is stationed aboard the USS Mount Olympus. He worked in the clearance office when he was here and said that he preferred duty here as compared with that on the Olympus.


CINCLANT COMMENTS ON
CONDUCT ASHORE
(Continued from rage One)
must be carefully rendered to the armed services of all nations. "Avoidance of boasting or a patronizing manner. People are proud of their country and resent unfavorable comparisons. "All officers and petty officers must be alert to prevent trouble before an incident is created, to stop disturbances, and to make necessary arrests. Boisterous behavior and drunkenness cannot be tolerated.
"Reports of behavior of naval personnel in foreign ports have generally been excellent. However, since a single unfortunate incident may have serious repercussions, the record of good behavior must be perfect. The majority of men are conscious of their status as representatives of the United States on foreign soil and behave accordingly. For the few who, through indifference, carelessness or willingness, do not comply with the strict requirements for good conduct, punishment shall be CERTAIN, SWIFT and SEVERE."
KEEP SERVICES YOUNG SAYS COMMISSION

(Continued from Page One)
grades, the Commission recommends:
Persons who have a total of 25 years or more of active service may elect retirement pay to begin immediately, or they may elect severance pay based on the number of years of active Federal service at the highest Federally recognized grade held for at least six months.
Disability retirement provisions should be the same for all personnel of all services. The minimum degree of disability to qualify for retirement pay should be 30 per cent. Those separated for disability of less than 30 per cent should receive severance pay.
Severance pay should be made to persons separated from the services involuntarily, but not in case of dishonorable discharge or where the separation is for disciplinary reasons.
Additional compensation should be given for hazardous duty, including flying and deep sea diving. Sea and foreign duty for enlisted personnel will also call for additional pay.
Dependent's allowances, the Commission said, should be discontinued by declaring World War II at an end, except that allowances should be continued for the duration of enlistments in force on the date of discontinuance. Present clothing allowances should continue and travel allowances within the United States should be simplified and made identical for all armed forces.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 3 April to Sat. 9 April
Sunday
CANON CITY
Scott Brady Je'ff Corey
Monday
THE CHECKERED COAT
Tom Conway Noreen Nash
Tuesday
THE LUCK OF THE IRISH
Tyrone Power Anne Baxter
Wednesday
TROUBLE MAKERS
Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall
Thursday
SEALED VERDICT
Ray Milland Florence Marly
Friday
THREE -MUSKETEERS
Lana Turner Gene Kelley
Saturday
DARK PAST
William Holden Lee J. Cobb


TRAGROUP TRIVIALS

Air-Borne Homeguards
The below named officers and men departed by air Wednesday morning for the purpose of spending from three to five days at Culebra, P. R., observing shore bombardment practices to be conducted by the USS Rochester (CA-124): LTJG. W. R. Glaser, CHTORP.'W. E. Thomas, Jr., TMC A. Oliverio, TMC C. R. Young and TMC J. A. Harrell.
Easter Event
At a business meeting of the CPO Club mess members held last Monday, BMC R. J. Gugliemo was elected Chairman of the entertainment committee. The next day he was observed running about with all the spirit of a guided missile in his pursuit of a band and talent to be used Easter Sunday afternoon as the background of a planned tea dance.

DENTAL FILL-IN'S

The arrival of Hanrahan, R. J., DT3, a prosthetic technician, brings to a total of ten, the number of technicians at this activity with two more expected in the near future.
Arriving aboard the Pres. Jackson yesterday, were the wife and children of LCDR. W. N. Gallagher. All hands extend their most cordial welcome to them.
CDR. J. H. Scanlon has returned from ten days leave in Washington, D. C. and Rhode Island. His only comment was "Brrr . . ."


S


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Gtmno. Day--31 Mar 49-2500


Page Four


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PAGE 1

Vol. IV, No. 6 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 2 April. 1949 CINCLANT COMMENTS ON CONDUCT ASHORE Circular Letter Lists Rules For All Naval Personnel Perhaps as a result of several recent occurances in this area, the S Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet has issued a circular letter on the subject "Conduct of Naval Personnel A s h o r e in Foreign Ports." Portions of the letter are quoted below as being of interest to Base personnel. "The impression which the United States desires to make throughout the world is one of Power, Dignity, Modesty and Friendliness. To accomplish this result, careful consideration should be given to instructing all hands on the following points: "Knowledge of the general customs and attitudes of the people of the port visited, including the current regulations of the country with the United States. "Knowledge of the principle fundamentals of U. S. foreign policy. Generally we seek no territorial gains, want nothing that belongs to other nations and desire to live in peace and friendliness with all .peoples. "Careful adherence to local laws, customs and social conventions, including observance of the private rules of clubs or organizations to which invitations are received. "Avoidance of acts or words offensive to the national pride, or local religions. There must be no ridicule of any national or religious customs or ceremonies. "Avoidance of controversial discussion of foreign affairs and comment or discussion of local political matters. "Avoidance of disputes and unpleasant situations. Do not carry a chip on your shoulder. Certain minorities in some countries may try to stage incidents which will bring discredit on the United States. Such incidents are given wide publicity and exploited to the fullest extent. Walk away from trouble. Do not seek it. "Uniform and appearance of all personnel should meet the highest standards at all times. Hand salutes and other military courtesies (Continued on Page Four) WATER BILLING SYSTEM PROVES ITS WORTH Average Newtown Water Bill Is Reduced By $1.40 Per Month Final water meter readings for Newtown have been totalled for the month ending 15 March. This is the first month under the "incentive system" of billing, and the results are pleasantly startling. Seldom are figures as conclusive as the following: Newtown water consumption for month ending 15 February, 3,183,700 gallons. Newtown water consumption for month ending 15 March, 1,601,450 gallons. Saving 1,582,250 gallons, valued at $727.00. Of greater interest to the respective occupants however, is the fact that the average bill per house, which was $3.06 for February, was reduced to $1.66 for March. The Government's water bill dropped from $840 to $400, so we can now point with pride to achieving a fool-proof system where everybody wins! ELECTRIC HOT WATER HEATERS INSTALLED Within the last month, electric hot water heaters have been installed in about one half of the Newtown homes. These replace the kerosene heaters which were originally installed. The new heaters are not only of greater convenience to occupants, but they also eliminate the fire hazard which has long been a matter of concern. The replacement project was made possible by a special allotment from the Bureau of Yards and Docks. According to a schedule recently furnished to the Manager, Low Cost Housing, Mr. Julio Larcada, all installations should be completed by 13 May. A carefully selected and trained team from the Base Public Works Department has been coached in stream-lined methods, so that four to five heaters per day are being replaced. The Fire Department which shared the misery of Newtowners by having to make frequent runs to extinguish kerosene heater fires, adds its sigh of relief to those of the Newtowners. LOUISIANA VETERANS TO GET STATE BONUS Service Between January 1, 1941 and March 1, 1946 Required Every person who served on active duty in the armed forces of the United States at any time between the period January 1, 1941 and March 1, 1946, and who was honorably discharged or who is still in active service, may be entitled to a Louisiana bonus. Payments range from fifty dollars for domestic service to two hundred and fifty dollars for foreign service. Application forms may be obtained from Bonus, Division, Department of Veterans Affairs, Old State Capitol Building, Baton Rouge 10, Louisiana. KEEP SERVICES YOUNG SAYS COMMISSION Last of Series on Hook Commission Findings (AFPS)-The services must be kept young, vigorous and efficient. This is the underlying thought behind the advisory Commission on Service Pay (Hook Commission) retirement recommendations now before Congress for legislative action. On voluntary retirement from active Federal service of officers and warrant officers with twenty or more years of service, the commission believes retirement should be optional at age 60. It should be optional also to request retirement at any age after thirty years service, subject to approval by the head of the Department concerned. Officers and warrant officers with 20 or more years service at the time these recommendations are enacted should have the right for a period of five years following, to apply for retirement under the present law. Enlisted Personnel Voluntary retirement for enlisted personnel with 20 or more years service should be optional at age 50 and should be optional at any age with 30 or more years' service. On involuntary retirement for all (Continued on Page Four)

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Pare Two '~L'HE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Administration Bldg., Room 205 -Phone 254 Saturday, 2 April 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, SN ---------------Editor P. H. Teeter, LCDR--------Staff Advisor S. F. Dodge, YNC-----------Staff Writer R. A. Barchenger, YNC-Staff Writer Jesse Evans, SSGT---------Staff Writer C. B. Lufburrow, ALCStaff Writer B. J. Vandermeiden, SN--Staff Writer C. C. Arnott, DT3-----------Staff Writer G. M. Rushing, AFC---Staff Photographer Cecil Pederson --------Teen-Age Writer "Skiddy" Masterson-Teen-Age Writer THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. T h e Hospital furnished four of the players on the Guantanamo Golf Team which thoroughly trounced the team from Ramey Field last Sunday. LTJG Dutcher, L T J G NOTES Ellestad, Stiles, HM1 and Walker, HM1, are regular members of the team, and LTJG Hunter and Gehring, HMC, are supernumaries. We've heard rumors of a golf tournament for hospital personnel only. More on that later, but it's a good idea for all you duffers to start practicing on the fine points of the game. Softall Is Starting The Softball team is getting in shape for the coming Base season and are ready for some practice games in case anyone is interested in finding out what their team can do under competition. If any of the officers from the hospital are seen around the Base showing signs of recent battle, you'll know it's the results of their game with the regular team on Thursday night. Until ten o'clock Wednesday morning, Mrs. L. L. Elton (wife of L. L. Elton, HM1) lead in the fishing contest with a 5-lb. skipjack. But at that time, Mr. S. L. Gehring (father of J. H. Gehring, HMC) caught a 12-1b. red snapper at Repair Pier One. That's lots of fish and really something for the rest of the Isaac Waltons to shoot at. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES Excitement runs high among members of The Little Theatre group as the date of the opening performance of "The Show Off" draws closer. Little things just keep bobbing up interrupting the otherwise smooth run of events, such as, "Have I forgotten my cues?", "What if someone is ill?", "Suppose no one comes?". In answer to the last question, it is certain there will be a full house each evening that The Little Theatre group presents its second production, "The Show Off" on April 4, 5, 6, and 7. By noon Monday, March 28, there wasn't a ticket to be had. Many wives sadly shook their heads and then rushed out to corner a friend who might have "just one extra ticket." Trading also was heavy. This reaction has so flattered the members of the cast and their director, Mrs. Virginia Fielder, that they are seriously considering an impromptu performance on Friday night, April 8th. However, this is still tenative. If such is the case, everyone will be notified by notices in the "Papoose" or spot annonucements over WGBY. It is difficult indeed to turn down so many would be theatre-goers. It is equally as difficult to choose which member of the cast has turned in the best job in making the character they portray believable. You, the audience, will have to decide that. And there are so many characters! Ruth Metzger, who turned in a top performance as one of the spinsters in "Arsenic and Old Lace" rivals that performance with her portrayal of Mrs. Fisher. Poor Mrs. Fisher has a young daughter, played by Betty Hickman, who is in love and cannot be persuaded to make a more suitable marriage as did her sister, Clara (Betty Rollins). The object of her affections is none other than Aubrey Piper (K. H. Allen, YNC), who proves to be quite a man. The question at hand is can he, or will he, ever live up to his opinion of himself. In comparison to Clara's husband, Frank Hyland, portrayed by LT. K. W. Strebel, his accomplishments are nil. It takes young Joe (Clinton Dutcher) to realize that once in awhile, Aubrey's talk can do more than keep Mr. Fisher (G. G. Siegler, QMC) annoyed. Piper's monologues duly impress Mr. Gill (LCDR. L. F. Washburne) and Mr. Rogers, characterized by LTJG L. (Continued on Page Three) s NO-IT IS NOT GOOD TASTE. Sunday, 3 April 1949 CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) VU-10 NOTES Athletics hold the spotlight in and around the squadron area this week. In addition to the hotly contested Officer vs. Enlisted Men's volley ball games each noon outside the hangar, the Fly-boys have organized an Intra-Squadron Bowling League. Composed of eight teams from the various shops and divisions, the league will run for approximately seven weeks to determine the Squadron Champions. Only two games have been played to date. The Metal Shop split their match with Administration, while Personnel chalked up a four point sweep over Ordnance. Not to be outdone, sixteen of the squadron Chiefs are in the middle of a red-hot Acey-Ducey elimination tournament to settle once and for all the bitter arguments that have ranged back and forth around the Leading Chief's office. RETIREMENT REFUND REDEPOSIT IS URGED Every Navy employee who has at any time received a refund of retirement deductions, must make a redeposit of the amount refunded, with interest, if he (or his qualified survivors) is to receive maximum annuity benefits, it was pointed out in a recent Navy Department circular letter. Unless the redeposit is made, the employee will receive no credit for the period of service covered by the refund, and thus will receive a reduced annuity. Redeposits should be made without delay due to the fact that they may not be made by a survivor after the death of the employee. Delay also results in added interest charges. Additional information and necessary forms may be secured by employees at the Base Industrial Relations Office. S S 0 S 'HE INDIAN Paire Two

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THE INDIAN Pate Three TEEN-AGE ROUNDUP Hi, kids! Did you ever think we would get a 'Teen-Age' column all our own to keep ourselves posted on what's cooking with the younger set and give the rest of the Base a glimpse of some of our activities? Well, believe it or not, we finally made it but boy, oh boy, are we going to need your help and cooperation. So all you Walter Winchells and Drew Pearsons, stop, look, and listen, and tell us the "que pasa" on all that happens concerning the group. Let us know everything you think will be of interest: what you have done, what you are doing, and what you are going to do. There will be a box in the school library waiting for your news-let's keep it filled! See you next week, gang, and we're looking forward to it as much as we know you are. SHOTS REQUIRED FOR NEW EMPLOYEES In order to protect Base residents against contagious diseases, it has been determined by the Commander, NOB that immunization against typhoid, tetanus, and smallpox will be required of all new civilian employees prior to their entry on duty. Employees will be permitted to bring evidence of immunization by Cuban physicians, or may secure shots free of charge at the Labor Board Dispensary. They may start work after the first round of shots, butwill be removed from their positions if they fail to complete the immunization. b ADVANCEMENTS IN RATE Effective April 1, the following men were advanced in rating as indicated: Naval Hospital From Seaman Apprentice to Seaman: Mario Ferro and R. L. Fiehn. Naval Air Station From Seaman Apprentice to Seaman: D. A. Beahm, R. E. Benson, W. L. Lavalier, H. H. Moore, E. R. Snodgrass, J. A. Green, A Mastropoll, G. A. Haggerty, B. J. Vandermeiden, N. Rudolph. From Fireman Apprentice to Fireman: Max Elliott, J. J. Whitemore, M. J. Strouse. From Airman Apprentice to Airman: C. L. Wentz, S. W. Winnie, R. K. Wood, C. R. Morton, H. B. Salley, W. J. Bretana, D. F. Fox, J. A. Ferrigno, C. E. Hughes and John Konitsky. Naval Station From Seaman Apprentice to Seaman: H. M. Murphy and George Pierce. The latter from YNSA to YNSN. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES (Continued from Page Two) Bonatta, who seems to have never met up with such an egotist. But, of course, they are unsuspecting outsiders prepared to take anything at face value. The success of The Little Theatre group's second production is due to the help of so many, many people, that space will not permit us to name them all. Our many thanks go first of all to LT. W. C. D. Keehn of the Recreation Department for sponsoring us in the first place. We extend from the bottom of our hearts, our thanks and appreciation to Mrs. Dorothy Seigler, our stage manager, to Bill Feebeck, YNSN, who handles the lighting and sound effects, to Ray Hope, AFAN, for coming to our rehearsals at odd times and taking some fine pictures. Mr. Norvall Shoop of the PW Paint Shop has earned the thanks of all concerned with his magnificent job on the scenery. Also we would like to thank LT. John Metzger who mimeographed our tickets, the girls who gave out the tickets at Ship's Service and M. C. Hollic, BMC, who will act as House Manager. NavSta Band to Entertain The audience will be greeted by an overture by the Naval Station band before the curtain goes up at 8:00 p.m. This will serve to ease the moments of waiting for the curtain call. We mention here that the ushers will seat you only before the first act and after the first scene. There will be a ten minute intermission between acts. At this time, cokes and beer will be on sale outside. We must ask you not to bring the bottles into The Little Theatre. In the darkness of the theatre and in the crowd, bottles may easily cause accidents which we wish to avoid. Our opening night will not be as brilliant as a broadway opening but it will have all the excitement that goes with one. The tension as the lights go out and in a few minutes you find yourself in another world -in the comfortable front room of the Fishers in Philadelphia, sharing a few tears with them, perhaps, but mostly laughing at the antics of that impossible "Show Off." MARINE FLASHES The Family Restaurant on Marine No. 2 for married personnel and their dependents, re-opened on Wednesday. Closed for quite some time, the restaurant has been completely renovated and doubled in size, now having a seating capacity of about eighty persons. The interior of the restaurant has been decorated in an attractive two-tone shade of green and a small bar has also been installed to give patrons better service. The NSD picnic, held on Tuesday afternoon, 22 March, at the NAS Race Track, was a great success, with an abundance of beer, coke, refreshments and sports for all. The Chiefs and Officers handed the White Hats a very surprising defeat in the softball game by a score of 18-4, and in the volleyball game by winning two straight games 21-13 and 11-0. The winners were awarded cigars and cigarettes The 50 and 100 yard dash, and standing broadjump were won by Breeden, SN, who proved to be quite an athlete. He was awarded a Schick razor, a deck of cards, and a pipe, being the only three-time winner of the afternoon. Lazzeroni, SKSN, received a Sheaffer pencil and shaving cream for his wins in the 25-yard onefooted hop race and the mile race. Second place in the mile race was taken by Berry, SKSN, who was the only other man to finish, and was awarded a keycase for his efforts. The ball throwing events were won by Rosario, SN, Killion, SITSA, and Guinn, GMC, who were awarded a carton of cigarettes a Schick razor and a box of cigars respectively. French, SN, won the chinning contest by accomplishing 14 pullups and received a Zippo cigarette lighter. In addition to the above sports events, awards were made to the winner, CHPCLK Lesesne and runner-up, Barchenger, YNC, of the NSD handicap golf tournament. Lesesne received a dozen Dunlop Golden Cup golf balls and Barchenger a half dozen. All in all it was an afternoon thoroughly enjoyed by all hands who are already looking forward to the next picnic, which it is hoped is not too far in the distant future. SPECIAL EDITION OF THE INDIAN SOON On April 16th, a special edition of The Indian will be printed. This edition will consist entirely of pictures and stories about the NOB School. The stories are written by the students themselves. The Southern Accrediting Association on a recent visit here made the school a fully accredited school under the standards of the Southern Accrediting Association. Work done here may now be accepted in any school in the States. THE INDIAN Page 'Three

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Pa~e1~urTE NDANGmo By-iMa 4-20 GUANTANAMO GOLFERS BEAT AIR FORCE Homelings Hand Ramey Field Their First Defeat Led by Joe McDonald with a two over par 72, the Guantanamo golfers toppled Ramey Field from the ranks of the undefeated, here last Sunday, by a score of 43 to 13%. In winning over the Air Force niblickers, the Gtmo. team avenged an earlier defeat on Ramey's home course. Both teams have lost only one match to date. The day before their disasterous outing here, the Ramey lads had swamped the Vernam Field golfers, on the Vernam course. MSGT Golas, was the low man for Ramey with a four over par 76. Between them, McDonald and Marchell, of Gtmo. had the low ball of the match with a neat 63. There were thirteen men on each team. Ramey was the guest of the local golf team on Sunday night at MATS restaurant where a chicken dinner awaited them. The Air Force niblickers stated they wished a return match in the near future. This match will be played on the Ramey course. The Guantanamo golfers hope to meet the golfers from the Coral Sea and Vernam Field before tackling Ramey again. Dry weather conditions at Vernam make it impossible to set a specific date for the match there. NAS SLIPSTREAM The Boys from Aerology and our Canadian friends got together for a picnic on Monday. The picnic was sort of a "farewell" to the departing Royal Canadian unit. This picnic was made possible by the Honorary Leftenant Mr. Conang and LT. N. B. Boyles, NAS Aerology officer. There was much food, drink and recreation for all. The Canadian boys showed the NAS team they did have talent when it came to playing softball but timely homeruns by Strohlien and Rues't .gave the game to the aerology team by 12 to 10. The Canadians were members of the 826th Royal Canadian Air Squadron commanded by LCDR John W. Roberts. They have operated from the Guantanamo Naval Air Station for the past week. The squadron is composed of 12 planes, of the Firefly, Mark 1 description. They are twin seated and are used for fighter-reconnaisance. The story of the prodigal son was repeated the other day when Robert Hogan, QM3, dropped in for a visit. Hogan is stationed aboard the USS Mount Olympus. He worked in the clearance office when he was here and said that he preferred duty here as compared with that on the Olympus. CINCLANT COMMENTS ON CONDUCT ASHORE -(Continued from Page One) must be carefully rendered to the armed services of all nations. "Avoidance of boasting or a patronizing manner. People are. proud of their country and resent unfavorable comparisons. "All officers and petty officers must be alert to prevent trouble before an incident is created, to stop disturbances, and to make necessary arrests. Boisterous behavior and drunkenness cannot be tolerated. "Reports of behavior of naval personnel in foreign ports have generally been excellent. However, since a single unfortunate incident may have serious repercussions, the record of good behavior must be perfect. The majority of men are conscious of their status as representatives of the United States on foreign soil and behave accordingly. For the few who, through indifference, carelessness or willingness, do not comply with the strict requirements for good conduct, punishment shall be CERTAIN, SWIFT and SEVERE." KEEP SERVICES YOUNG SAYS COMMISSION (Continued from Page One) grades, the Commission recommends: Persons who have a total of 25 years or more of active service may elect retirement pay to begin immediately, or they may elect severance pay based on the number of years of active Federal serviec at the highest Federally recognized grade held for at least six months. Disability retirement provisions should be the same for all personnel of all services. The minimum degree of disability to qualify for retirement pay should be 30 per cent. Those separated for disability of less than 30 per cent should receive severance pay. Severance pay should be made to persons separated from the services involuntarily, but not in case of dishonorable discharge or where the separation is for disciplinary reasons. Additional compensation should be given for hazardous duty, including flying and deep sea diving. Sea and foreign duty for enlisted personnel will also call for additional pay. Dependent's allowances, the Commission said, should be discontinued by declaring World War II at an end, except that allowances should be continued for the duration of enlistments in force on the date of discontinuance. Present clothing allowances should continue and travel allowances within the United States should be simplified and made identical for all armed forces. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 3 April to Sat. 9 April Sunday CANON CITY Scott Brady Je'ff Corey Monday THE CHECKERED COAT Tom Conway Noreen Nash Tuesday THE LUCK OF THE IRISH Tyrone Power Anne Baxter Wednesday TROUBLE MAKERS Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall Thursday SEALED VERDICT Ray Milland Florence Marly Friday THREE MUSKETEERS Lana Turner Gene Kelley Saturday DARK PAST William Holden Lee J. Cobb TRAGROUP TRIVIALS Air-Borne Homeguards The below named officers and men departed by air Wednesday morning for the purpose of spending from three to five days at Culebra, P. R., observing shore bombardment practices to be conducted by the USS Rochester (CA-124): LTJG. W. R. Glaser, CHTORP.'W. E. Thomas, Jr., TMC A. Oliverio, TMC C. R. Young and TMC J. A. Harrell. Easter Event At a business meeting of the CPO Club mess members held last Monday, BMC R. J. Gugliemo was elected Chairman of the entertainment committee. The next day he was observed running about with all the spirit of a guided missile in his pursuit of a band and talent to be used Easter Sunday afternoon as the background of a planned tea dance. DENTAL FILL-IN'S The arrival of Hanrahan, R. J., DT3, a prosthetic technician, brings to a total of ten, the number of technicians at this activity with two more expected in the near future. Arriving aboard the Pres. Jackson yesterday, were the wife and children of LCDR. W. N. Gallagher. All hands extend their most cordial welcome to them. CDR. J. H. Scanlon has returned from ten days leave in Washington, D. C. and Rhode Island. His only comment was "Brrr .." S TlHE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-31 Mar 49-2500 Page Four