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Vol. IV, No. 4 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 19 March 1949


CUBAN BUSES, TRAINS TO
SET NEW SCHEDULES

0200 1 April, Daylight Saving
Time will go into effect. At that time, all clocks on the Base will
be set ahead one hour. 0200 2 October, the clocks will be set back as the Base goes back on Eastern
Standard time.
To comply with the time change
here on the Base, the Guantanamo Bus Line, Cuban launches, Ferrocaril de Guantanamo and the Guantanamo & Western Railroad Company will change their schedules accordingly on April 1 and October 2, in order to enable Base employees to have the same transportation
schedules as at present.
The "new" time will provide an
extra hour of daylight and this will no doubt be welcomed by sports enthusiasts of the Base and others who enjoy the great out-of-doors.

ALBEMARLE SENDS
THANKS

The following letter addressed to
The Commanding Officer, U. S.
Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was received from the Commanding Officer, USS Albemarle prior to its departure on 11 March:
"In taking our departure, the
officers and crew of the Albemarle wish to thank you for your many courtesies, and a most enjoyable and profitable stay in Guantanamo."

CHIEF OF AIR FORCE
PERSONNEL VISITS HERE

Lt.-General H. I. Edwards, Chief
of Air Force personnel, Washington, D. C., was a visitor of the Base this week, coming in aboard the carrier Leyte after witnessing the Second Task Force maneuvers, recently completed.
Lt. Gen. Edwards was met in
Guantanamo by members of his Staff and flew directly to Washington in his own plane.

A man's strength of character W may be measured by his ability to
control his temper, instead of letting his temper control him.
-J. Sherman Wallace


PAY HIKE BASED ON
CIVILIAN EARNINGS

"Equal Pay for Equal Work" Is
Advocated
(AFPS) - Pay structure for a serviceman should offer initial compensation and progressive increases comparing favorably with what he could expect in other professions and occupations requiring similar ability. .
This was the broad underlying principle set by the Hook Commission in recommending the first general overhaul of pay schedules since 1908. The Armed Forces recommendations for pay revisions, based on the Hook report, is presently before Congress for legislative action.
Basically, the committee reported that present pay scales do not provide sufficient incentive to the serviceman and that a new program should be related to compensation in industry; be formulated on the principle of pay for responsibility and provide incentive for advancement.
Pay Determined by Grades
The pay incentive should be the differential between grades rather than the accumulation of longevity. The distinguishing characteristics of the proposed compensation for length of service, as distinguished from the current longevity are:
The new length of service increases would be known as "ingrade" increases. They would be paid on a flat rate of increase, rather than on a percentage basis, and they would be paid at intervals of two years.
In-Grade Increases-The increase would cease in each grade when it is reasonably expected that the individual should have advanced to a higher grade. Once the individual is promoted, however, his eligibility for additional in-grade increases would continue uninterrupted until he has reached the maximum in that pay grade.
In-Grade increases would be made every two years up to eighteen years and ever four years after that.
The Commission said that laws relating to promotion of officers
(Continued on Page Three)


INFORMATION BUREAU SET UP FOR FLEET USE

Beginning and completing an information bureau in two days is quite a job but that is just what took place at the Air Station this past week.
Workmen constructed and painted an information stand, complete with a map of the Base showing the points of interest and amusement offered for use of the visiting units of the fleet. To cope with the heavy "traffic" when the Second Task Force was in port, the Recreation Department assigned one of its better men, James Rafra, to the duty of explaining the map to the visiting sailors. This is something that has long been needed and the help it gave the visiting personnel while they were ashore cannot be praised too highly.

NAVY ACCIDENTS ON
UPSWING

More vigorous prosecution of the accident prevention program in all Naval shore activities was directed this week by the Under Secretary of the Navy.
Fifteen civilian deaths through accidents were reported in the Naval establishments during the first two months of 1949, compared to a total of 22 deaths for the entire year in 1948.
From the Base Safety Office it was learned that during the first two months of 1949 a decrease in lost time accidents and work days lost at this Base was noted over the corresponding period in 1948. However, it was pointed out by the Safety Engineer, R. E. McCullough, that only through the diligent efforts and cooperation of all hands can accidents and accidental deaths be forestalled.

The peace maker has to take risks as well as the war maker. We want to present to you a nation that has been wise enough to take the risk of peace -because I know that a nation that takes the risk of peace will get peace, just as the nation that takes the risk of war. gets war.
-Ramsey MacDonald








Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672

Saturday, 19 March 1949

U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Allen Collier, SN, USN------------Editor
LCDR P. H. Teeter, USN____Staff Advisor S. F. Dodge, YNC-------------Staff Writer
R. A. Barchenger, YNC--......Staff Writer Jesse Evans, SSGT------------Staff Writer
R. M. Gardner, ENS----------Staff Writer
C. B. Lufburrow, ALC_-.._Staff Writer J. L. Nelson, YN3------------Staff Writer
C. C. Arnolt, DTI ------------- Staff Writer
CG. M. Rushing, AFC Staff Photographer
THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.


EDITORIAL

Unfortunately the recent breach of discipline on the part of certain naval personnel in Havana, Cuba is a conspicuous example of what a few ill-bred hoodlums can do towards disgracing the uniform so proudly worn by so many, and towards creating an international feeling of ill-will in a sister republic whose friendly cooperation With the United States is so necessary to the solidarity, and resultant common good, of the nations of the Western Hemisphere. But of more immediate personal significance to each and every officer and man in the Navy and Marine Corps of the U. S. Atlantic Fleet, is the resultant deprivation of the privilege, enjoyed by every law abiding officer and man of visiting in Cuba. This incident serves to emphasize again the fact that every member of the U. S. Naval Service when going ashore in uniform in foreign territory immediately assumes a great and important responsibility as a direct representative and ambassador-of-good-will from the world's finest military organizations, the United States Navy, and the United States Marine Corps. The world now justifiably has a black mark against us which can only be removed by the concerted effort of all hands, not only to keep themselves but also their shipmates from conducting themselves in a disgraceful and disgusting manner.
W. K. P.


STORK CLUB
SCOOPS: The
TAL stork has been
working overtime - one stop per day for the past five days. Dennis Lee Hill born 12 March to A01
\NOTES and Mrs. S. C.
-NOTE S 11Hill; Janis Colette Childs born
13 March to LT and Mrs. D. R. Childs; John Joseph Rankin born 14 March to LTJG and Mrs. J. R. Rankin; Gary Earl Bruce born 15 March to ADC and Mrs. E. M. Bruce; and baby girl Weber born 16 March to BM2 and Mrs. J. B. Weber.
The Hospital Recreation Council is conducting a monthly fishing contest. Each contestant pays an entrance fee and the fisherman who catches the largest fish during the month wins the prize. Sorry, no booby prize! This contest is for Hospital personnel and their dependents only. CAPT Robbins has caught the largest one we've heard about but that was before the contest started, so he'll have to go out and do it all over aagin.
CDR A. N. Chaffin, MC, USN, formerly attached to the hospital, but now with the Amphibious Command stopped in for a visit on his way back to the States from the Fleet maneuvers.
J. C. Johnson, civilian in the Finance Department, this week celebrated his second anniversary as a hospital employee. Mr. Johnson is a Fleet Reservist with approximately 27 years active duty in the Navy. The hospital is very proud to have Mr. Johnson on it's roster.

YELLOW FEVER INOCULATIONS


All persons planning to travel through the Canal Zone on the USS Pres. Jackson are required to have yellow fever inoculations. These will be given at the Hospital Dependents' Section on Tuesday, 29 March between 1300 and 1400. Any other persons planning to go to the Canal Zone in the near future will also get their Yellow fever inoculations on that date.

BLANKETS APPEAR AS TEMPERATURES DROP

"Break out the blankets", was the word was passed Wednesday night, March 9, as the Base shivered in the coolest weather of the winter. The mercury dropped to 61, according to LT Norman Boyles, aerology officer at NAS.
Coolest weather of the winter, previous to Wednesday's low was 62, recorded during February. Residents of sub-zero areas please note.


Sunday, 20 March 1949
CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplaiis at this Activity
LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


Fleet Examinations
The date for the fleet competitive examinations is drawing near and gradually closing in on the competitors of NSD and, of course, on the other personnel of NOB. It is rumored that plenty of "midnight oil" is being used these days for studying, so NSD wishes you all "Good Luck" and hopes that they will see a new rate on each man taking the examination.
NSD Picnic
An NSD picnic, in honor of the NSD basketball team, is planned for next Wednesday afternoon at 1300 at the NAS Race Track. Although the basketball team was not victorious in the league, they still had the spirit and will to continue their efforts and put up some stiff opposition to opposing teams. Also, in addition, the Golf Tornament prizes will be given to the winner of the match between CHPCLK Lesesne and Barchenger, YNC; the winner receiving one dozen balls and the loser one-half dozen. All personnel are looking forward to the big day with plenty of beer, refreshments and all types of athletics promised for all.
Sick Call
The mastoid operation of Buzzie Kimball at the Bethesda Naval Hospital was very satisfactory, and he is doing fine. All NSD personnel are wishing him a speedy recovery.
Transfer
It was with regrets when ENS R. E. Sprague, SC, USN, departed on the Pres. Jackson on Thursday, after spending twenty-nine enjoyable months at Guantanamo Bay. We all hate to see him go and wish him a pleasant tour of duty at the Naval Ammunition Depot, Port Chicago, California, as Accounting and Disbursing Officer.


I


go


S


Page Two


THE INDIAN







THE INDI kN Paire Three


GTMO. SLUMBERS THRU AIR ATTACK
Base Rolls Over, Cursing Air Raid
and All Its Furor
"Pete! Pete! What's that? Pete! Wake up! Listen!"
"Wassamatter? What . . . for the love of Mike, Helen, what's the matter-it's still dark out?"
"Listen, Dopey! Don't you hear all those planes? What's going on?"
"How the heck do I know! Go back to sleep, you'll wake the baby! For the love of Mike, it isn't bad enough having mid watches-now you have to ask questions in the middle of the night."
That was the scene in hundreds of homes throughout the Base on last Tuesday morning when the Naval Operating Base was subjected to the fury of a ruinous practice air-raid conducted by units of the carriers Roosevelt, Kearsarge and Leyte which were then about 4 hours out of Gtmo.
Striking just before daybreak, the thunder of dive bombers and fighters rattled against the clouds and scared the sun to an early morning rising. Planes zoomed and zipped and dived on every installation on the Base and, theoretically, at least, caught everyone just as they had expected-in their "p.j's", too sleepy to wonder or care about all the fuss. But the raiders were intent and, according to the prearranged plan, systematically obliterated every useful facility in the area, after which they returned to their ships. The entire raid lasted for approximately 30 minutes and was theoretically very successful.
PAY HIKE BASED ON CIVILIAN EARNINGS
(Continued from Page One)
should offer the same opportunities in ALL services.
Forrestal Testifies
Among the first to testify before the House group was James V. Forrestal, former Secretary of the Navy and at the time of his House appearance, Secretary of Defense. Mr. Forrestal asked that the pay bill be approved to bring the pay of servicemen to a parity with civilian wages.
In his recommendation, Forrestal said that it is needed to eliminate inequalities resulting from piece meal adjustments, made in the past, and to put military personnel on "equal pay for equal jobs" with civilians.
Charles R. Hook, who headed the study commission, said that present pay schedules emphasize length of service and failed to compensate top management as it should. He pointed out that by putting military pay on an "equal" basis with that earned by civilians, the services would be able to at.. tract and keep qualified men.


With the departure of the President Jackson yesterday, a number of Mae- ns said good
bye to Gtmo. as they headed for the U. S. and new duty stations. Leaving
were: First Lieutent Patterson and family (LT Patterson is resigning and returning to civilian life), MSgt E. Luddington and family, who are headed for Quantico, Va., TSgt N. Greene and family with orders to Newport, R. I., Sgt. L. M. McCrary, Cpl R. L. Bernard, and PFCs P. E. Booker, T. F. Hackett, A. G. Madewell, B. J. Wilson, F .C. Orr, and G. G. Ramirez who will report to the nearest Marine Barracks in the U. S. for duty pending further assignment.
Promotions
Two men were promoted this past week. They were: E. P. Dean, who made Sergeant and F. L. Dales who was promoted to Corporal. Congratulations, men.

LITTLE THEATRE NOTES

Monday, March 21, NOB Ship's Service will be able to offer you, absolutely free, one of the best entertainment values ever seen in Guantanamo Bay.
There will be lots of tickets available, 250 for each performance of "The Show-Off", April 4, 5, 6 and 7th, but in all probability there will also be a great demand.
We advise you to be early so you can get as many tickets as you desire. So you'll have an idea of what our cast looks like, we had a photographer attend the dress rehearsal Tuesday night. The pictures will be displayed at the ticket counter.
To many of you, WGBY's "Requestfully Yours", (6:30-7:30 p.m.) is your favorite program. We have the pleasure in announcing that Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Seigler will be interviewed at this time Monday evening. Be sure to listen in order to get a glimpse of backstage life. We'd like you to know just what is going on at The Little Theatre on Marine Site Three.
G. G. Seigler, QMC, portrays Mr Fisher and his wife Dorothy is our stage manager. She has transformed the stage of "Arsenic and Old Lace" to a comfortable Philadelphia home for "The Show-Off".
Their interviews will be followed by others on Wednesday and Friday evenings that will give you different slants on our work, and a quick look at the contents of the play.
"My grandfather plays the piano by ear."
"Well, if we must boast - my grandfather fiddles with his beard."


NEW FORD TO BE
RAFFLED OFF SOON

Now that the Base Police Uniform Fund Raffle has been underway for almost a week, many of our readers may wonder why this means is being used to obtain the necessary funds. Since it is a good question, we will take this opportunity to explain to Base personnel the complications confronting our law enforcement agency in this matter.
Shortly after the establishment of the force several years ago, a khaki uniform and distinctive white helmet were adopted for all hands on the Base Police Force. This was based on the desirability of placing all members in a smart, standard uniform regardless of rate, and further because the khaki uniform was considered more practical for the conditions under which they would be operating.
While Chief Petty Officers are required to have khaki uniforms as a part of their military wardrobe, no regulation way exists to provide similar uniforms for men below that rate. In the past, clothing for personnel below the rank of Chief Petty Officer has been procured from various sources in small quantities; however, with the recent redesignation of the Harbor Patrol as a branch of the B'ase Police, the number of personnel requiring clothing has increased beyond the means of procurement available.
As a solution to the above problem, a 1949 6-Cylinder Ford 2-Door Sedan is being raffled off in order to raise funds to replace worn clothing presently in use, to purchase new clothing required for additional personnel, and to provide a continuing fund for replacements required in subsequent years.
Tickets are on sale by all Base and Harbor Police, and in the Naval Station Ship's Service, for one dollar each. Only 3500 will be sold. Some lucky person will be the new owner of the car now on display across from the Ship's Service, and the Base Police will be able to buy uniforms necessary for them to continue to be one of the smartest appearing units on the Base. Let's all get behind the program 100 per cent and support the unit that gives the Base 100 per cent support 24 hours each day.
Father: "Why were you kept in school, son?"
Son: "I didn't know where the Azores were."
Father: "Well, in the future, you just remember where you put things."
* * *
"I wish you wouldn't whistle at your work," cried an irate employer.
"It's all right, sir," said the office boy, "I'm not working."


Page Three


THE INDI \N







ga Four THE INDIAN


By Allen Collier, Sports Editor
BUTLER SETS NEW HIGH AT NAS BOWLING ALLEY

VU-10 CPOs Emerge as Victors In Hotly Contested Bowling League
Going on a terrific bowling spree, Butler of NOB Ship's Service, set a new all time high for a single game at the Air Station Bowling alley this past week as he rolled 269. In attaining this high mark, the new record holder counted nine strikes and two spares on the credit side of the ledger. He was bowling with Westfall, Bowling Alley manager, at the time.
The new mark broke a previous high of 255 set by D. R. Akers, of NAS Operations earlier.
In a torrid race, the VU-10 CPOs came out as the victors of the NAS bowling league. Chief Burton rolled the highest average, a thundering 165. Akers, former record holder until this week, rolled the best single game of the tournament with a neat 232.

DECISION PROLONGED IN
TROPHY AFFAIR

A definite decision was not reached this week as to whether or not the 1949 Base basketball champions, VU-10 would be given a trophy for their feat.
At this writing the whole case seemed doomed. Despite the fact that winning entries in other sports are given trophies, it appeared that the general trend is to bypass VU-10 in this event.
We think that a great injustice will be done if such is the final decision. Other team winners in other sports, baseball, bowling and golf are given trophies, so why not basketball? Could it be that the indecision is due to the fact that VU-10 won the league? All teams participated with the idea of getting some reward for their work. One of the better seasons of basketball ever seen in Guantanamo resulted from the teams working so hard. Please, let's not take credit away from it by not rewarding the Champions.

"What do you mean," roared the politician, "by publicly insulting me in your old rag of a paper? I will not stand for it, and I demand an immediate apology."
"Just a moment," answered the editor. "Didn't the news item appear exactly as you gave it to us, namely, that you had resigned as city treasurer?"
"It did, but where did you print it? In the column under the heading 'Public Improvements.' "


FEBRUARY AIR TRAFFIC HEAVY AT GUANTANAMO

According to a report released by CAPT Oscar Pederson, of the Naval Air Station, February proved to be one of the heaviest air traffic months for Guantanamo Bay since establishment of the Station, barring war-time traffic.
Also the number of VIPs who passed through Gtmo. was exceedingly heavy for the same period.
According to the figures released, forty-nine VIPs passed through the local air strip. Included were one Admiral, one General, one Vice Admiral, five Rear Admirals, three Major Generals, two Brigadier Generals and thirty-six Captains or Colonels.
Further study of the released information shows that some 1469 planes were handled by the McCalla Field alone, with an additional 418 being taken care of over on the Leeward Point Field.
Handling of the large number of aircraft also set a high mark in the amount of fuel used in servicing these planes. Figures included in the report set the fuel consumption at 211,014 gallons of gasoline and 1817 gallons of oil. These figures include the amount used by servicing facilities at Leeward Point.
Also it was disclosed by officials of VP-7, the P2V-2 squadron from Quonset Point, R. I., that a new high mark was set while they were here. The squadron departed yesterday after spending a month here at Guantanamo. The mark set last month by this squadron was 501.3 hours.
Unofficial sources, within the squadron, stated that as far as the squadron knew this was a record high for any naval squadron of this kind. The previous high was said to be about 464 hours. This was set by another squadron and equaled by VP-7. Commander G. C. Bullard is Commanding Officer of VP-7.

ADM BLANDY EXHIBITS SKILL AS FISHERMAN

Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, demonstrated his fishing skill during his recent visit to the Base landing an 8-pound barracuda and a 4-pound grouper.
Admiral Blandy, who has landed the finny species in many parts of the world-including Bikini lagoon-donned his fishing togs for a try in Guantanamo waters. Both his fish were caught off Leeward Point while trolling. The Admiral was the only member of the party to land a fish.

"Is your daddy home, sonny?"
"No, sir. He hasn't been home since mother caught Santa Claus kissing the maid."


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 20 March to Sat. 26 March

Sunday
MR. PEABODY & THE
MERMAID
William Powell Ann Blyth
Monday
SMUGGLERS COVE
Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall
Tuesday
ARCH OF TRIUMPH
Ingrid Bergman Charles Boyer
Wednesday
MANEATER OF KUMOAN
Sabu Wendell Corey
Thursday
GOOD SAM
Gary Cooper Ann Sheridan
Friday
TAP ROOTS
Van Heflin Susan Hayward
Saturday
THE WINNERS' CIRCLE
Johnny Longden Morgan Farley


TRAGROUP TRIVIALS

Fleet Reserve Entry
When RMC Dwight E. Metz qualified as Marksman with a score of 121 at the Gtmo. Rifle Range on January 27, 1928, he probably wasn't planning on being absent from his home state of Georgia very long; in fact, three years broken service were necessary in making his decision. He did the right thing and next Tuesday will be sent to a Stateside Separation Center for transfer to the Fleet Reserve after nineteen and one half years federal service.
Metz's repeated reenlistments are compliments to his Commanding Officers of bygone years, and on their behalf and that of the Navy Department, the Training Group takes this occasion to thank him for his faithful and honorable service and to wish him the utmost happiness and success in future civilian pursuits.
LT Wood to Depart
LT H. D. MacDonald, USN, reported for ASW duty on March 15 as the relief of LT Wood. Mr. Mac's family is expected to arrive shortly. Mr. Wood is trying to be patient while awaiting orders to a new assignment.
Golfer Loses Wheels
DCC Engel has resumed his pedestrian status since the disappear.ance of his scooter last Sunday night. Already, walking has cost him three strokes on the Front Nine.


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THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-17 Mar 49--2500


Pa e Four




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PAGE 1

Vol. IV, No. 4 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 19 March 1949 CUBAN BUSES, TRAINS TO SET NEW SCHEDULES 0200 1 April, Daylight Saving Time will go into effect. At that time, all clocks on the Base will be set ahead one hour. 0200 2 Octo* ber, the clocks will be set back as the Base goes back on Eastern Standard time. To comply with the time change here on the Base, the Guantanamo Bus Line, Cuban launches, Ferrocaril de Guantanamo and the Guantanamo & Western Railroad Company will change their schedules accordingly on April 1 and October 2, in order to enable Base employees to have the same transportation schedules as at present. The "new" time will provide an extra hour of daylight and this will no doubt be welcomed by sports enthusiasts of the Base and others who enjoy the great out-of-doors. ALBEMARLE SENDS THANKS The following letter addressed to The Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was received from the Commanding Officer, USS Albemarle prior to its departure on 11 March: "In taking our departure, the officers and crew of the Albemarle wish to thank you for your many courtesies, and a most enjoyable and profitable stay in Guantanamo." .CHIEF OF AIR FORCE" PERSONNEL VISITS HERE Lt.-General H. I. Edwards, Chief of Air Force personnel, Washington, D. C., was a visitor of the Base this week, coming in aboard the carrier Leyte after witnessing the Second Task Force maneuvers, recently completed. Lt. Gen. Edwards was met in Guantanamo by members of his Staff and flew directly to Washington in his own plane. A man's strength of character may be measured by his ability to control his temper, instead of letting his temper control him. -J. Sherman Wallace PAY HIKE BASED ON CIVILIAN EARNINGS "Equal Pay for Equal Work" Is Advocated (AFPS) -Pay structure for a serviceman should offer initial compensation and progressive increases comparing favorably with what he could expect in other professions and occupations requiring similar ability. This was the broad underlying principle set by the Hook Commission in recommending the first general overhaul of pay schedules since 1908. The Armed Forces recommendations for pay revisions, based on the Hook report, is presently before Congress for legislative action. Basically, the committee reported that present pay scales do not provide sufficient incentive to the serviceman and that a new program should be related to compensation in industry; be formulated on the principle of pay for responsibility and provide incentive for advancement. Pay Determined by Grades The pay incentive should be the differential between grades rather than the accumulation of longevity. The distinguishing characteristics of the proposed compensation for length of service, as distinguished from the current longevity are: The new length of service increases would be known as "ingrade" increases. They would be paid on a flat rate of increase, rather than on a percentage basis, and they would be paid at intervals of two years. In-Grade Increases-The increase would cease in each grade when it is reasonably expected that the individual should have advanced to a higher grade. Once the individual is promoted, however, his eligibility for additional in-grade increases would continue uninterrupted until he has reached the maximum in that pay grade. In-Grade increases would be made every two years up to eighteen years and ever four years after that. The Commission said that laws relating to promotion of officers (Continued on Page Three) INFORMATION BUREAU SET UP FOR FLEET USE Beginning and completing an information bureau in two days is quite a job but that is just what took place at the Air Station this past week. Workmen constructed and painted an information stand, complete with a map of the Base showing the points of interest and amusement offered for use of the visiting units of the fleet. To cope with the heavy "traffic" when the Second Task Force was in port, the Recreation Department assigned one of its better men, James Rafra, to the duty of explaining the map to the visiting sailors. This is something that has long been needed and the help it gave the visiting personnel while they were ashore cannot be praised too highly. NAVY ACCIDENTS ON UPSWING More vigorous prosecution of the accident prevention program in all Naval shore activities was directed this week by the Under Secretary of the Navy. Fifteen civilian deaths through accidents were reported in the Naval establishments during the first two months of 1949, compared to a total of 22 deaths for the entire year in 1948. From the Base Safety Office it was learned that during the first two months of 1949 a decrease in lost time accidents and work days lost at this Base was noted over the corresponding period in 1948. However, it was pointed out by the Safety Engineer, R. E. McCullough, that only through the diligent efforts and cooperation of all hands can accidents and accidental deaths be forestalled. The peace maker has to take risks as well as the war maker. We want to present to you a nation that has been wise enough to take the risk of peace -because I know that a nation that takes the risk of peace will get peace, just as the nation that takes the risk of war. gets war. -Ramsey MacDonald

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Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 19 March 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Allen Collier, SN, USN----------Editor LCDR P. H. Teeter, TSNStaff Advisor S. F. Dodge, YNC----------Staff Writer R. A. Barchenger, YNC-Staff Writer Jesse Evans, SSGT---------Staff Writer R. M. Gardner, ENS--------Staff Writer C. B. Lufburrow, ALCStaff Writer J. L. Nelson, YN---------Staff Writer C. C. Arnott, DT3----------Staff Writer G. M. Rushing, AFC--Staff Photographer THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 46. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. EDITORIAL Unfortunately the recent breach of discipline on the part of certain naval personnel in Havana, Cuba is a conspicuous example of what a few ill-bred hoodlums can do towards disgracing the uniform so proudly worn by so many, and towards creating an international feeling of ill-will in a sister republic whose friendly cooperation with the United States is so necessary to the solidarity, and resultant common good, of the nations of the Western Hemisphere. But of more immediate personal significance to each and every officer and man in the Navy and Marine Corps of the U. S. Atlantic Fleet, is the resultant deprivation of the privilege, enjoyed by every law abiding officer and man of visiting in Cuba. This incident serves to emphasize again the fact that every member of the U. S. Naval Service when going ashore in uniform in foreign territory immediately assumes a great and important responsibility as a direct representative and ambassador-of-good-will from the world's finest military organizations, the United States Navy, and the United States Marine Corps. The world now justifiably has a black mark against us which can only be removed by the concerted effort of all hands, not only to keep themselves but also their shipmates from conducting themselves in a disgraceful and disgusting manner. W. K. P. STORK CLUB S bi SCOOPS: The stork has been working overtime -one stop per day for the past five days. Dennis Lee Hill born 12 March to AO1 NO TES and Mrs. S. C. Hill; Janis Colette Childs born 13 March to LT and Mrs. D. R. Childs; John Joseph Rankin born 14 March to LTJG and Mrs. J. R. Rankin; Gary Earl Bruce born 15 March to ADC and Mrs. E. M. Bruce; and baby girl Weber born 16 March to BM2 and Mrs. J. B. Weber. The Hospital Recreation Council is. conducting a monthly fishing contest. Each contestant pays an entrance fee and the fisherman who catches the largest fish during the month wins the prize. Sorry, no booby prize! This contest is for Hospital personnel and their dependents only. CAPT Robbins has caught the largest one we've heard about but that was before the contest started, so he'll have to go out and do it all over aagin. CDR A. N. Chaffin, MC, USN, formerly attached to the hospital, but now with the Amphibious Command stopped in for a visit on his way back to the States from the Fleet maneuvers. J. C. Johnson, civilian in the Finance Department, this week celebrated his second anniversary as a hospital employee. Mr. Johnson is a Fleet Reservist with approximately 27 years active duty in the Navy. The hospital is very proud to have Mr. Johnson on it's roster. YELLOW FEVER INOCULATIONS All persons planning to travel through the Canal Zone on the USS Pres. Jackson are required to have yellow fever inoculations. These will be given at the Hospital Dependents' Section on Tuesday, 29 March between 1300 and 1400. Any other persons planning to go to the Canal Zone in the near future will also get their yellow fever inoculations on that date. BLANKETS APPEAR AS TEMPERATURES DROP "Break out the blankets", was the word was' passed Wednesday night, March 9, as the Base shivered in the coolest weather of the winter. The mercury dropped to 61, according to LT Norman Boyles, aerology officer at NAS. Coolest weather of the winter, previous to Wednesday's low was 62, recorded during February. Residents of sub-zero areas please note. Sunday, 20 March 1949 CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0980-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1980 Chaplains at this Activity LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) I Fleet Examinations The date for the fleet competitive examinations is drawing near and gradually closing in on the competitors of NSD and, of course, on the other personnel of NOB. It is rumored that plenty of "midnight oil" is being used these days for studying, so NSD wishes you all "Good Luck" and hopes that they will see a new rate on each man taking the examination. NSD Picnic An NSD picnic, in honor of the NSD basketball team, is planned for next Wednesday afternoon at 1300 at the NAS Race Track. Although the basketball team was not victorious in the league, they still had the spirit and will to continue their efforts and put up some stiff opposition to opposing teams. Also, in addition, the Golf Tornament prizes will be given to the winner of the match between CHPCLK Lesesne and Barchenger, YNC; the winner receiving one dozen balls and the loser one-half dozen. All personnel are looking forward to the big day with plenty of beer, refreshments and all types of athletics promised for all. Sick Call The mastoid operation of Buzzie Kimball at the Bethesda Naval Hospital was very satisfactory, and he is doing fine. All NSD personnel are wishing him a speedy recovery. Transfer It was with regrets when ENS R. E. Sprague, SC, USN, departed on the Pres. Jackson on Thursday, after spending twenty-nine enjoyable months at Guantanamo Bay. We all hate to see him go and wish him a pleasant tour of duty at the Naval Ammunition Depot, Port Chicago, California, as Accounting and Disbursing Officer. 9 S Paire Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDI '1N Prhe GTMO. SLUMBERS THRU AIR ATTACK Base Rolls Over, Cursing Air Raid and All Its Furor "Pete! Pete! What's that? Pete! Wake up! Listen!" "Wassamatter? What ...for the love of Mike, Helen, what's the matter-it's still dark out?" "Listen, Dopey! Don't you hear all those planes? What's going on?" "How the heck do I know! Go back to sleep, you'll wake the baby! For the love of Mike, it isn't bad enough having mid watches-now you have to ask questions in the middle of the night." That was the scene in hundreds of homes throughout the Base on last Tuesday morning when the Naval Operating Base was subjected to the fury of a ruinous practice air-raid conducted by units of the carriers Roosevelt, Kearsarge and Leyte which were then about 4 hours out of Gtmo. Striking just before daybreak, the thunder of dive bombers and fighters rattled against the clouds and scared the sun to an early morning rising. Planes zoomed and zipped and dived on every installation on the Base and, theoretically, at least, caught everyone just as they had expected-in their "p.j's", too sleepy to wonder or care about all the fuss. But the raiders were intent and, according to the prearranged plan, systematically obliterated every useful facility in the area, after which they returned to their ships. The entire raid lasted for approximately 30 minutes and was theoretically very successful. PAY HIKE BASED ON CIVILIAN EARNINGS (Continued from Page One) should offer the same opportunities in ALL services. Forrestal Testifies Among the first to testify before the House group was James V. Forrestal, former Secretary of the Navy and at the time of his House .appearance, Secretary of Defense. Mr. Forrestal asked that the pay bill be approved to bring the pay of servicemen to a parity with civilian wages. In his recommendation, Forrestal said that it is needed to eliminate inequalities resulting from piece meal adjustments, made in the past, and to put military personnel on "equal pay for equal jobs" with civilians. Charles R. Hook, who headed the study commission, said that present pay schedules emphasize length of service and failed to compensate top management as it should. He pointed out that by putting military pay on an "equal" basis with that earned by civilians, the services would be able to at-, tract and keep qualified men. With the departure of the President Jackson yesterday, a number of Marines said good O bye to Gtmo. as they headed for the U. S. and new duty stations. Leaving were: First Lieutent Patterson and family (LT Patterson is resigning and returning to civilian life), MSgt E. Luddington and family, who are headed for Quantico, Va., TSgt N. Greene and family with orders to Newport, R. I., Sgt. L. M. McCrary, Cpl R. L. Bernard, and PFCs P. E. Booker, T. F. Hackett, A. G. Madewell, B. J. Wilson, F .C. Orr, and G. G. Ramirez who will report to the nearest Marine Barracks in the U. S. for duty pending further assignment. Promotions Two men were promoted this past week. They were: E. P. Dean, who made Sergeant and F. L. Dales who was promoted to Corporal. Congratulations, men. LITTLE THEATRE NOTES Monday, March 21, NOB Ship's Service will be able to offer you, absolutely free, one of the best entertainment values ever seen in Guantanamo Bay. There will be lots of tickets available, 250 for each performance of "The Show-Off", April 4, 5, 6 and 7th, but in all probability there will also be a great demand. We advise you to be early so you can get as many tickets as you desire. So you'll have an idea of what our cast looks like, we had a photographer attend the dress rehearsal Tuesday night. The pictures will be displayed at the ticket counter. To many of you, WGBY's "Requestfully Yours", (6:30-7:30 p.m.) is your favorite program. We have the pleasure in announcing that Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Seigler will be interviewed at this time Monday evening. Be sure to listen in order to get a glimpse of backstage life. We'd like you to know just what is going on at The Little Theatre on Marine Site Three. G. G. Seigler, QMC, portrays Mr Fisher and his wife Dorothy is our stage manager. She has transformed the stage of "Arsenic and Old Lace" to a comfortable Philadelphia home for "The Show-Off". Their interviews will be followed by others on Wednesday and Friday evenings that will give you different slants on our work, and a quick look at the contents of the play. "My grandfather plays the piano by ear." "Well, if we must boast -my grandfather fiddles with his beard." NEW FORD TO BE RAFFLED OFF SOON Now that the Base Police Uniform Fund Raffle has been underway for almost a week, many of our readers may wonder why this means is being used to obtain the necessary funds. Since it is a good question, we will take this opportunity to explain to Base personnel the complications confronting our law enforcement agency in this matter. Shortly after the establishment of the force several years ago, a khaki uniform and distinctive white helmet were adopted for all hands on the Base Police Force. This was based on the desirability of placing all members in a smart, standard uniform regardless of rate, and further because the khaki uniform was considered more practical for the conditions under which they would be operating. While Chief Petty Officers are required to have khaki uniforms as a part of their military wardrobe, no regulation way exists to provide similar uniforms for men below that rate. In the past, clothing for personnel below the rank of Chief Petty Officer has been procured from various sources in small quantities; however, with the recent redesignation of the Harbor Patrol as a branch of the Base Police, the number of personnel requiring clothing has increased beyond the means of procurement available. As a solution to the above problem, a 1949 6-Cylinder Ford 2-Door Sedan is being raffled off in order to raise funds to replace worn clothing presently in use, to purchase new clothing required for additional personnel, and to provide a continuing fund for replacements required in subsequent years. Tickets are on sale by all Base and Harbor Police, and in the Naval Station Ship's Service, for one dollar each. Only 3500 will be sold. Some lucky person will be the new owner of the car now on display across from the Ship's Service, and the Base Police will be able to buy uniforms necessary for them to continue to be one of the smartest appearing units on the Base. Let's all get behind the program 100 per cent and support the unit that gives the Base 100 per cent support 24 hours each day. Father: "Why were you kept in school, son?" Son: "I didn't know where the Azores were." Father: "Well, in the future, you just remember where you put things." .* "I wish you wouldn't whistle at your work," cried an irate employer. "It's all right, sir," said the office boy, "I'm not working." Page Three THE INDI IN

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Pgour THE INDIAN By Allen Collier, Sports Editor BUTLER SETS NEW HIGH AT NAS BOWLING ALLEY VU-10 CPOs Emerge as Victors In Hotly Contested Bowling League Going on a terrific bowling spree, Butler of NOB Ship's Service, set a new all time high for a single game at the Air Station Bowling alley this past week as he rolled 269. In attaining this high mark, the new record holder counted nine strikes and two spares on the credit side of the ledger. He was bowling with Westfall, Bowling Alley manager, at the time. The new mark broke a previous high of 255 set by D. R. Akers, of NAS Operations earlier. In a torrid race, the VU-10 CPOs came out as the victors of the NAS bowling league. Chief Burton rolled the highest average, a thundering 165. Akers, former record holder until this week, rolled the best single game of the tournament with a neat 232. DECISION PROLONGED IN TROPHY AFFAIR A definite decision was not reached this week as to whether or not the 1949 Base basketball champions, VU-10 would be given a trophy for their feat. At this writing the whole case seemed doomed. Despite the fact that winning entries in other sports are given trophies, it appeared that the general trend is to bypass VU-10 in this event. We think that a great injustice will be done if such is the final decision. Other team winners in other sports, baseball, bowling and golf are given trophies, so why not basketball? Could it be that the indecision is due to the fact that VU-10 won the league? All teams participated with the idea of getting some reward for their work. One of the better seasons of basketball ever seen in Guantanamo resulted from the teams working so hard. Please, let's not take credit away from it by not rewarding the Champions. "What do you mean," roared the politician, "by publicly insulting me in your old rag of a paper? I will not stand for it, and I demand an immediate apology." "Just a moment," answered the editor. "Didn't the news item appear exactly as you gave it to us, namely, that you had resigned as city treasurer?" "It did, but where did you print it? In the column under the heading 'Public Improvements.' FEBRUARY AIR TRAFFIC HEAVY AT GUANTANAMO According to a report released by CAPT Oscar Pederson, of the Naval Air Station, February proved to be one of the heaviest air traffic months for Guantanamo Bay since establishment of the Station, barring war-time traffic. Also the number of VIPs who passed through Gtmo. was exceedingly heavy for the same period. According to the figures released, forty-nine VIPs passed through the local air strip. Included were one Admiral, one General, one Vice Admiral, five Rear Admirals, three Major Generals, two Brigadier Generals and thirty-six Captains or Colonels. Further study of the released information shows that some 1469 planes were handled by the McCalla Field alone, with an additional 418 being taken care of over on the Leeward Point Field. Handling of the large number of aircraft also set a high mark in the amount of fuel used in servicing these planes. Figures included in the report set the fuel consumption at 211,014 gallons of gasoline and 1817 gallons of oil. These figures include the amount used by servicing facilities at Leeward Point. Also it was disclosed by officials of VP-7, the P2V-2 squadron from Quonset Point, R. I., that a new high mark was set while they were here. The squadron departed yesterday after spending a month here at Guantanamo. The mark set last month by this squadron was 501.3 hours. Unofficial sources, within the squadron, stated that as far as the squadron knew this was a record high for any naval squadron of this kind. The previous high was said to be about 464 hours. This was set by another squadron and equaled by VP-7. Commander G. C. Bullard is Commanding Officer of VP-7. ADM BLANDY EXHIBITS SKILL AS FISHERMAN Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, demonstrated his fishing skill during his recent visit to the Base landing an 8-pound barracuda and a 4-pound grouper. Admiral Blandy, who has landed the finny species in many parts of the world -including Bikini lagoon-donned his fishing togs for a try in Guantanamo waters. Both his fish were caught off Leeward Point while trolling. The Admiral was the only member of the party to land a fish. "Is your daddy home, sonny?" "No, sir. He hasn't been home since mother caught Santa Claus kissing the maid." NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 20 March to Sat. 26 March Sunday MR. PEABODY & THE MERMAID William Powell Ann Blyth Monday SMUGGLERS COVE Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall Tuesday ARCH OF TRIUMPH Ingrid Bergman Charles Boyer Wednesday MANEATER OF KUMOAN Sabu Wendell Corey Thursday GOOD SAM Gary Cooper Ann Sheridan Friday TAP ROOTS Van Heflin Susan Hayward Saturday THE WINNERS' CIRCLE Johnny Longden Morgan Farley TRAGROUP TRIVIALS Fleet Reserve Entry When RMC Dwight E. Metz qualified as Marksman with a score of 121 at the Gtmo. Rifle Range on January 27, 1928, he probably wasn't planning on being absent from his home state of Georgia very long; in fact, three years broken service were necessary in making his decision. He did the right thing and next Tuesday will be sent to a Stateside Separation Center for transfer to the Fleet Reserve after nineteen and one half years federal service. Metz's repeated reenlistments are compliments to his Commanding Officers of bygone years, and on their behalf and that of the Navy Department, the Training Group takes this occasion to thank him for his faithful and honorable service and to wish him the utmost happiness and success in future civilian pursuits. LT Wood to Depart LT H. D. MacDonald, USN, reported for ASW duty on March 15 as the relief of LT Wood. Mr. Mac's family is expected to arrive shortly. Mr. Wood is trying to be patient while awaiting orders to a new assignment. Golfer Loses Wheels DCC Engel has resumed his pedestrian status since the disappearance of his scooter last Sunday night. Already, walking has cost him three strokes on the Front Nine. I 0 S Gtmo. Bay-17 Mar 49-2500 THE INDIAN Pa e Four


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