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Indian

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Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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wG
Vol. III, No. 46 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 8 Jfanuary 1949


NAVY RELIEF THRIFT SHOP

In order that all hands may be
made aware of the purposes for which our Thrift Shop was estab4lished, the following is published:
1. The Thrift Shop is primarily
service personnel attached to the various commands comprising this Base. U. S. civilians serving on the Base are however, invited to participate.
I 2. It is not established as a means for individuals to make profit.
Therefore, all materials of small value should be donated rather than sold. It does however, provide the individual a means of disposing of articles of real value at modest
prices.
3. Items valued at less than $1.00
will be accepted only as donations.
4. Remember that the ladies who
devote considerable time and effort to this important project are doing so on a purely voluntary basis and
are doing an excellent job.
W. K. PHILLIPS, Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy, President, Guantanamo Chapter, Navy Relief Society.

OUR FIGHT
In 1938 Franklin D. Roosevelt
founded the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. to "lead, direct and unify the fight" against poliomyelitis. We, the people, who contribute voluntarily to the March of Dimes each year, are the sole support of the National Founda* tion. Only through our giving, can
this dreadful disease which attacks our little children be fought at its
source.
In carrying on this war against
polio, the National Foundation has authorized more than $14,000,000 for research and education. Under the educational program, physical therapists, physicians,i nurses, and other professionals whose skills are required to combat this fight are


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THROUGH NAVY RELIEF

Financial assistance may take the form of a loan without interest, an outright gift or a combination of the two depending upon all the facts and circumstances in a given case. The Society operates on the assumption that men of the Naval service desire to maintain their independence, self reliance and financial integrity. On this basis it is established policy to help men to meet their obligations in time of emergency need but not to relieve -them of their responsibility to provide for themselves and their families insofar as they are able to do so. For this reason, financial assistance takes the form of a loan when ever repayment within a reasonable period is possible without undue burden. The repayment of loans enables the Society to help other men when faced with similar situations. In most cases the registration of a small loan 'monthly al; lotment, is the most appropriate method of effecting repayment.

LIBRARY
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Naval Station library announces that a new shipment of books has arrived since the new opening last month. Among the new books are: Every Day Miracle; Behind the Silken Curtain; An Affair of State; The Naked and the Dead.
Westerns and Mysterys also have been added to the fine collection that has accumulated at the NOB Library.
"LITTLE VITTLES" FINDS ACTIVITY ON INCREASE
Berlin (AFPS)-Operationn "Little Vittles," the 'parachuting of candy to the children of Berlin, has reached an all time high-1500 "candychutes" a day.
Thousands of Americans have responded to the request by Lieutenant Gail S. Halversen, USAF,


BASE TO SPONSOR GALA MARDI GRAU CARNIVAL

February is the month of carnivals and Mardi gras, internationally and locally. Next month Will see the famous Carnival at Nice; the Carnival at Rio, the Mardi gras at New Orleans, and locally the Mardi gras at Guantanamo. Almost ,everybody is familiar with the world famous Mardi gras held annually at New Orleans, during which the entire city is, gayly dectrated, costumed parade are held, and where the entire population goes berserk with fun and frolic.
Three Prizes Will Be Awarded
Patterned much after the affair at New Orleans, Guantanamo'Bay's Mardi gras will bo held February 17th, 18th and 19th-three big days of gayety! Elaborate plans are being drawn Lip which include Float Parades, with prizes going to the outfit sponsoring the best-float. There will be childrens' costumes parades, and many other carnival attractions, including three big raffles-one each night. On the opening night, February 17th, a Philco Radio-Phonograph or a crisp, new $100 bill will be raffled off to some lucky Gtmo. guy or gal. On February 18th, a Cushman Scooter, or $250 in cash will go to the fortunate holder of the right ticket. On the final night, February 19th, the prize of prizes, a big, new, 1949 Ford Sedan will be raffled off and will be driven away by someone in our midst. It's hard to imagine anyone being so lucky as to win more than once but to prevent that possibility, the winner of one prize will not be eligible to win a second or third time on the same ticket.
In keeping with true Mardi gras style, a Beauty Contest will also be held and the lovliest girl at Guantanamo Bay will be crowned "Queen of the Mardi Gras" and will reign over the Grand Costume Ball to be held the final night.
The Guantanamo Mardi gras will be, without question, the gay-







Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library- Phone 672
Saturday, 8 January 1949
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander
A. E. Smith ---------------------Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ... Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly from
appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of
NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's
Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press
Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS.
All Photographs used by THE INDIAN
are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab., unless indicated
otherwise.

EDITORIAL
As a petty officer in the United
States Navy, it is one of your responsibilities to see that the men assigned --under your supervision understand fully the regulations regarding a hand salute. Failure-on ,-----your part may result in disciplinary
ac in-to those men who are just starting a career in the Navy. With the Draft Law now in full progress the Navy is receiving young men every day who fail to see the seriousness of discipline and regulations that must be followed to maintain .the world's finest navy.
The hand salute is one of the
highest respects that can be given to the uniform that is being worn by an officer of the United States
Navy.

SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT

The Base Police office has announced that no persons were injured in automobile accidents over
the Christmas holidays.
Only by observing Base rules and
regulations can thfs record be carried on in '49.
For one of your New Year's resolutions, why not write at the top of the list-Take Time, Save a Life.

THERE WERE SOME

In Bethlehem, Christmas Day,
with guns firing within a few miles of Christ's birthplace, there were some who answered the church bells
as pilgrims have for centuries.
We at Guantanamo Bay, can give
thanks that no guns were thundering their deadly flames here as we
worshined God as free ueonle.


The stork made
Lhis last appearance of 1948 on December 30th wlen be left a baby girl, named Bethany, for HMC and Mrs. R.
Johnson. The
New Year has started off with a bang; Leslia Ann
Schrecengost was born 3 January to SSGT and Mrs. K. E. Schrecengost of Vernam Field, Jamaica; Robert Edward Souder was born 3 January to MAJ and Mrs. W. H. Souder, Jr.; Sharon Lee Bowman born 4 January to CSC and Mrs. R. S. Bowman; Mary Ellen Wade born 4 January to SKi Pid Mrs. F. J. Wade; and Raymond Allen Pritchard born 5 January to CH MACH and Mrs. R. A. Pritchard.
CDR A. N. Chaffin and family left for the U. S. today. Dr. Chaffin has been transferred to Little Creek, Va. for duty. We all wish you luck and happiness on the new assignment.
LT P. D. Cronemiller, MC, USN, reported in Tuesday from USNH, Philadelphia for duty. Welcome aboard, Doctor, we feel sure you will enjoy your tour of duty in Cuba.
There have been several changes in the civilian personnel line-up in the past few weeks. Mrs. Carmine Erickson of the Finance Department was the first to leave, followed in quick succession by Mrs. Gloria Davis of the Personnel Offce and Gorden Dickerson of the Record Office. Both Mrs. Erickson and Mrs. Davis are returning to the U. S.;. we understand that Dickerson would like to have another job on the Base. Mrs. Barbara Howell has taken Mrs. Davis' place in the Personnel Office.
We have heard rumors that the Hospital Basketball Team has been taking all comers and really making a showing for themselves. They have passed the word that they would probably do even better if they had more backing. If they will also pass the word as to when and where they are playing, the rooting section will be on hand. How can we do our part when we don't even know they are playing!

NOTICE

New registration plates for privately owned vehicles have been received and are now being issued at the Base Provost Marshal's Office. All vehicle owners are requested to have their cars inspected at Base Transportation, and then report to the Base Provost Marshal's OfficeWITH INSPECTION STICKER AND OLD REGISTRATION for is-


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 9 January 1949 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)
al





CHAPLRIN-S CORNtER
In the middle of the track of a transcontinental railroad at a certain point in Ohio, there is a metal trough. It runs along for a quarter of a mile or more. It is kept filled with water.
Through trains as they rush along--do not stop at water tanks to take on water. When they reach the place where the water trough is, the fireman presses a lever which drops a scoop from the bottom of the tank and takes up the water, as the train keeps going.
No stop, no pause-they just keep going on the dead run and scoop up the water. Isn't that pretty much like a lot of folks try to do with their religion, scoop it up on the run? They haven't time for their soul's needs. .heyvare too busy. "Take time to be holy," bids the hymn. Or like some airplanes pull up packages as they fly, with hanging rope and grappling hook, even so those'hurrying religionists pull a sponge on a string through Christ's church, in absentia, and try to "sponge" up enough religion for a small spiritual appetite. But you just cannot get religion that way!
Time must be given to receive,
to hold and increase the content and possession of true, genuine, living religion in our hearts and lives. You cannot get religion on the run.
H. C. R.
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman

The Navy has eliminated the requirements of two years college for Navy and Marine enlisted personnel seeking commissions under the cadet training program. Enlisted men with high school diplomas who make high test scores now are eligible.


V







THE INDIAN Page Three


Since no Indian was published
last week, some of the paragraphs which follow are two weeks old, but are, nonetheless, current items
and require reporting.
The holiday season is over. It
has been a wonderful season. General observations throughout the Base indicate that there was more genuine Christmas spirit displayed this year than last. There seemed to be more decorations, more trees, more lights, more greeting cards exchanged, more good feeling than
before.

A number of bouquetsF are in
-oider this -week.-Cextainly a bigbouquet is due the Recreation people for brightening the lives of the Base-children by helping Santa distribute those fine presents . . . to
*all the people who helped make the Chapel Christmas services-so beautiful ... to all the cooks and bakers who had a hand in the preparation and serving of the wonderful chow put out for Christmas dinners . . .
to the Hospital Service Volunteers for putting on such a grand party for the boys in the Hospital . . . to the gang of carollers who added that extra touch at midnight on Christmas Eve . . . and to all the folks who put some effort into making Christmas in Guantanamo a
brighter, merrier Christmas.
Wonder Why Department: Wonder why Ship's Service doesn't send out monthly bills for laundry? The Slephone office bills its customers, the Commissary sends bills, New,- towners get rent bills, utility and
water bills-but nobody gets a jig for the laundry. Seems like it would Snot only help a good many forgetful souls, but also help the Laundry as well.
Reports are that another bouquet
is due the new manager of the Officers' Club for the egg-nog party and well-planned Christmas Dinner. Many claimed that it has been quite a while since such a crowd has been attracted, and rarely has
such a good dinner been served.
1949 was ushered in last week
with'a record cold wave, when the old mercury dipped down to a low 66 degrees. At the Officers' Club on New Year's Eve, many female celebrators, bedecked in brief evening 4i' attire, took to their coats before venturing "under the stars" to dance. It was the first time this observer had seen silver fox fur capes worn here, and the first time


officers were known to wear sweaters under their whites. Although new gowns were not displayed to best advantage, the unusual weather failed to dampen the spirits of those welcoming in the New Year, for, it is believed, a record crowd was on hand to see 48's demise and 49's birth.
Many were of the opinion that the Club's Friday night dinner could have been warmer if not better, but most agreed that the chill of the breeze was responsible for cooling off the buffet before the diners ever got through the line and to their tables. Neither the Club management, the Executive Committee, nor Public Works can be responsible for unprecedented drops in temperature. Everything considered, it was a swell party. The band played beautifully with stiff fingers and blue lips, 1949 made it right on schedule, and everybody seemed happy enough.

Out Newtown way, the youngster 1949 was welcomed in grand style. Not minding the cold at all, apparently, the villagers from the outskirts danced to the music of a hot Cuban orchestra until two in the morning. When the Cubans stopped playing and went home to t a k e necessary precautions against pneumonia, the Newtowners pressed the juke box into service and went on dancing until everybody was absolutely sure that the new 1949 had a firm lease on life.
Your correspondent didn't get to all the parties, unfortunately, but it is reliably reported that all celebrations, including those at the CPO Club, the Petty Officers' Club and others were huge successes. It is also noted with justifiable interest and pride, that no unpleasantness managed to creep into any of the celebrations to spoil the fine holiday season just ended.

It will be noticed by most followers of the Crow's Nest that all caustic comments on WGBY have, been omitted this week. This is not because the local station has improved any, but space prevented further criticism this week.
Every year about this time a lot of effort is wasted by guys and gals who make New Year's resolutions. Seldom, if ever, does anyone remember at year's end what he resolved at its beginning. One worthwhile resolution is suggested that is guaranteed to pay off. Let us resolve to be better neighbors to each other by being a bit more friendly, a bit more tolerant, a bit more willing to see the other fellow's viewpoint, a bit less willing to spread idle gossip. We could do well. t e courage the Christmas spirit displayed these past few weeks and reflet it throughout the days of 1949.,


NEWS FROM ELECTRONICS

By "Irish"
What a sensational time of year! Everybody gives parties and presents, nobody works and everybody goes to church (well, 'most everybody that is). Why couldn't it be like that all year around? If we were to have a whole year of half holidays, I betcha my golf game would improve another 500 per cent.
All the boys who had indulged in the cfistomary "Holiday Cheer", including "Hide-the-bottle" Erickson and "I-can-drink-a-coke-faster
- than - you - can" Niebell, were brought back to sober reality upon entering the shop Sunday morning. Seems some other member of our group had cooked his Christmas Dinner in the shop and had neglected to discard the remains Odoriferous, is the polite word, I believe.
Merry tale of Christmas: Christmas Eve had the Base Police in a dither over the sudden and mysterious disappearance of PM2. Frantically, the dispatcher called the lost jeep over the radio ... no answer. Dirty work- Foul play? No, simply the jeep's radio had gone awry and said jeep had been left at our shop for repair. Our little genius was hard at work on it, when he happened to glance at his watch to see that it was nearly time for the Christmas Eve Service. Naturally not wanting to miss it (especially since the Chapel Choir would be singing. the Song of Christmas) he just drove the jeep in the shop, locked up and went to church. When the "Gendarmes" came by for the jeep a few minutes later . . . no jeep . . . no tech ... . no light, no nothing! Two hours, later, thd nbsent-minded tech came back to finish the job and the Base Polie found the Jost jeep.
Best we've heard this week: It seems that Joe Sack got Santa Claus to give his two little daughters, Betty Jo and Patty Ann, an electric traifn for Christmas. Guess who plays with said train!

NOTICE TO PET OWNERS

At one time or another, all of us have heard the old saying, "A Dog is Man's Best Friend". If that be the case, some of us better start looking out for our little friends.
The moral of that story is, don't let your dog run free to wander the whole Base like a displaced person.

Dental treatment for dependents of Army-Air Force personnel has been limited- to emergency work. Reason . . , the heavy load thrown on the Dental Corps by Armed Forces. expansion.


Page Three


THE INDIAN







Pate. Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-S Jan 49-2500.


PRACTICE RESUMED AS
CAGE SEASON NEARS
In just about two more weeks, the first activity in the Base Basketball League will officially begin. We say officially, because there will probably be numerous scrimmage games in these next two weeks as the teams seek to get in a final touch of practice before the season opens.
It is impossible to pick the winner of the league or even the favorite at such an early date and so it would be a waste of time to try. Thus far, all teams who have participated' in the games have shown both good and bad points at various stages in the game. Two teams which haven't appeared in pre-season scrimmage games to date, are Naval Air Station and VU-10. -The question has arisen now as to whether these two will participate in the league. Just what caliber teams will come from these two activities is unknown but it is felt in some circles that' VU-10 may come out With a top notch quintet again this year. NAS should also have. a strong team.
Probably the weakest team in the league at this writing, two weeks before the season opens, is the Fleet Training Group quintet. This must be said in fairness to everyone despite the fact they came from T behind in the only scrimmage game so far to win over the high school team. Despite their rating at the present time, Lt. E. D. Reinhold who is coaching the team hag progressed a great deal with his lads: and they should give a good account of themselves in the loop competition.
Coming next to the High School team. This team has been the hard luck team of the league so far. They have lost four straight exhibition games but have shown a great deal of improvement. In all probability, had the first team been left in or put back in earlier, in the FlTraGrp game before Christmas, they would have probably won. It, was all a case of player-coach Edward Ondrasik not being in condition. Better luck next time gang.
Holder of the best exhibition record is the Hospital Quintet, coached by Lt. Ellestad. This team might be the future title winner of the league but after witnessing the Hospital-Marine game, we will never be so bold as to make that statement. This quintet is led by a "terrible three-some," namely, Zimmerman, Call and Gehring. They will cause plenty of headaches for their foes.
Out on Marine Site No. 2, Captain Frank Sullivan is grooming his leatherneck cagers for the role of "dark horse" of the league. Losers to the Hospital, two weeks ago in a thriller when time ran out, the Marines should wind up about mid way in the standings to say


At a parade
_ held at the Marine Barracks, last Saturday, trophys were presented by the Commanding Officer, COL J.. Lanigan, to
the winners of the Marine
Corps Birthday Field Meet. Receiving awards were:: PFC Robert D. Wilson for the 100-yard dash, the 220-yard dash and the 440 relay race. Also receiving a trophy for the 440-yard relay race were PFC's Domnfinic A. Calvagna, Antonio F. DeSimone and Manual J. Garcia. The. discus trophy was given to PFC James C. Duley and Corporal Robert S. Westbrook received the shot-put award.
As team captain, 1stLT Bevan C. Cass received the volley ball trophy for the Officers' Team, which won the volleyball league. The Intra-Post football league is over and won by the 1st Platoon of Guard Company, which remains undefeated. The Officer-Staff NCO team was second with two losses and one tie. Headquarters Administration came in third and the 2nd Platoon of Guard Company were fourth, with Headquarters Supply team coming in fifth.
Bon Voyage to 2ndLT Fiander and family who left via MATS for thirty days leave before reporting to the Second Marinc Division for duty.
It is rumored that a certain Staff Sergeant is marking the days off the calendar as to the time he has to dn. We wonder if his initials could be W.J.W.
Editor's Note: This article was written for last week's Indian.
Suitor (kidding little sister): "I'll give you a dime for a kiss.'
Little Sister: "Heck, I can make more than that taking castor oil."

the least. Just who their big gun is is hard to say. They have been in only oneexhibition and then Hoylman led the scorers.
Recreation, is represented by a "five" that shows plenty of promise with Sammy Krause as their leading man on offensive. This team is out for scrimmage games with other teams in the remaining week before season play opens. Coaches interested, may call Joe Stocklosa at WGBY-the number is 395.
This is the basketball picture as it now stands. It is not known whether or not the Naval Station will be represented' with a: team other than Stocklosa's Recreation "five". It is possible" that there will be other actively participant teams. As yet however, there is nothing


NAS SLIPSTREAM


Who is the TMSN that believes marriage more .reasonable than paying income tax, .Giepiel? Heard that BOSN Lukacs says he caught a red snapper 71 inches long. P.S. It was. only 31 inches. I wonder who the CPO is that's always'talking about his tin can duty but until recently never had anything but a
(V) in his rating?
Inscoe, BW1, tried to buy some spare parts for his car but he received a report that the Smithsonian Institute didn't have any. Chief Kent and his eager beavers have produced some startling results at Leeward Point; it looks as though they will be all set for the visitors expected for the fourth of January. Good work, Kent!
The future Sailors and Waves of Naval Air Station, all gathered at Naval Air Station Movie Lyceum at 1430, 24 December 1948. With the a Wf L G ta Claus. ar-ri-ve- air as- scheduled, where he was met by approximately 250 youngsters. After giving presents to. all children present, Chief Rose and his volunteers were kept busy, serving ice cream, cookies and Coca Cola. It is reported that CDR Asman arrived at least one half hour earlier for fear of missing Santa Claus. Santa did such an excellent job, it is rumored that The Little Theatre Group is applying for his services to play the leading role in the next if and when.
What Chief Mailman attached to the Naval Air Station has the loudest singing voice of any CPO residing at the NAS Chiefs' Barracks?
It was a very merry Christmas for LT N. B. Boyles, Aerologist, because on the 24th, his wife and two children arrived via plane to join him here. We hope they like the place as well as we do.
LTJG H. T. Gebhart is now in the States and expects to return 4 January with his wife and daughter to make his duty more enjoyable here. V
Mr. L. C. Serig, administrative
assistant, has returned to his duties after spending about ten days in the States. While there, he became acquainted with his first grand child.
It was with profound regret we received the news of the detachment orders of our skipper and friend, CAPT W. 0. Gallery. He expects to be leaving in late January for duty with the Chief of Naval Operations., CAPT Oscar Pederson has been ordered to relieve him here.
BOSN. F' P. Lukacs and family are spending six days well ear""d leave in Havana.

When a man gets too old to set a bad example, he starts giving good


Paze, Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-6 Jan 49-2500.




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PAGE 1

Vol. III, No. 46 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 8 January 1949 NAVY RELIEF THRIFT SHOP In order that all hands may be made aware of the purposes for which our Thrift Shop was established, the following is published: 1. The Thrift Shop is primarily --for thconveienc saiig for. service personnel attached to the various commands comprising this Base. U. S. civilians serving on the Base are however, invited to participate. 2. It is not established as a means for individuals to make profit. Therefore, all materials of small value should be donated rather than sold. It does however, provide the individual a means of disposing of articles of real value at modest prices. 3. Items valued at less than $1.00 will be accepted only as donations. 4. Remember that the ladies who devote considerable time and effort to this important project are doing so on a purely voluntary basis and are doing an excellent job. W. K. PHILLIPS, Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy, President, Guantanamo Chapter, Navy Relief Society. OUR FIGHT In 1938 Franklin D. Roosevelt founded the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis to "lead, direct and unify the fight" against poliomyelitis. We, the people, who contribute voluntarily to the March of Dimes each year, are the sole support of the National Foundation. Only through our giving. can this dreadful disease which attacks our little children be fought at its source. In carrying on this war against polio, the National Foundation has authorized more than $14,000,000 for research and education. Under the educational program, physical therapists, physicians, nurses, and other professionals whose skills are required to combat this fight are trained. In a period of five years, 80,000 Americans were stricken by infantile paralysis ...Give now. Tomorrow might be too late. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THROUGH NAVY RELIEF Financial assistance may take the form of a loan without interest, an outright gift or a combination of the two depending upon all the facts and circumstances in a given case. The Society operates on the assumption that men of the Naval service desire to maintain their independence, self reliance and financial integrity. On this basis it is established policy to help men to meet their obligations in time of emergency need but not to relieve them of their responsibility to provide for themselves and their families insofar as they are able to do so. For this reason, financial assistance takes the form of a loan when ever repayment within a reasonable period is possible without undue burden. The repayment of loans enables the Society to help other men when faced with similar situations. In most cases the registration of a small loan monthly allotment is the most appropriate method of effecting repayment. LIBRARY ANNOUNCEMENT The Naval Station library announces that a new shipment of books has arrived since the new opening last month. Among the new books are: Every Day Miracle; Behind the Silken Curtain; An Affair of State; The Naked and the Dead. Westerns and Mysterys also have been added to the fine collection that has accumulated at the NOB Library. "LITTLE VITTLES" FINDS ACTIVITY ON INCREASE Berlin (AFPS)-Operation "Little Vittles," the parachuting of candy to the children of Berlin, has reached an all time high-1500 "candychutes" a day. Thousands of Americans have responded to the request by Lieutenant Gail S. Halversen, USAF, originator of the project, and have dispatched handkerchiefs and tons of candy to Air Force Headquarters in Germany. BASE TO SPONSOR GALA MARDI GRAU CARNIVAL February is the month of carnivals and Mardi gras, internationally and locally. Next month will see the famous Carnival at Nice, the Carnival at Rio, the Mardi gras at New Orleans, and locally the Mardi gras at Guantanamo. Almost everybody is familiar with the world famous Mardi gras held annually at New Orleans, during which the entire city is gayly decorated, costumed parades are held, and where the entire population goes berserk with fun and frolic. Three Prizes Will Be Awarded Patterned much after the affi.ir at New Orleans, Guantanamo Bay's Mardi gras will bo held February 17th, 18th and 19th -three big days of gayety! Elaborate plans are being drawn up which include Float Parades, with prizes going to the outfit sponsoring the best float. There will be childrens' costumes parades, and many other carnival attractions, including three big raffles -one each night. On the opening night, February 17th, a Philco Radio-Phonograph or a crisp, new $100 bill will be raffled off to some lucky Gtmo. guy or gal. On February 18th, a Cushman Scooter, or $250 in cash will go to the fortunate holder of the right ticket. On the final night, February 19th, the prize of prizes, a big, new, 1949 Ford Sedan will be raffled off and will be driven away by someone in our midst. It's hard to imagine anyone being so lucky as to win more than once but to prevent that possibility, the winner of one prize will not be eligible to win a second or third time on the same ticket. In keeping with true Mardi gras style, a Beauty Contest will also be held and the loveliest girl at Guantanamo Bay will be crowned "Queen of the Mardi Gras" and will reign over the Grand Costume Ball to be held the final night. The Guantanamo Mardi gras will be, without question, the gayest, most gala event ever held in this area. Mark the dates on your calendar now-February 17th, 18th and 19th, and prepare yourself for three wonderful days of fun.

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Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 8 January 1949 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander A. E. Smith -----------------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman----Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material prohibited without permiscion from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab., unless indicated otherwise. EDITORIAL As a petty officer in the United States Navy, it is one of your responsibilities to see that the men assigned under your supervision understand fully the regulations regarding a hand salute. Failure-on your part may result in disciplinary action-to those men who are just starting a career in the Navy. With the Draft Law now in full progress the Navy is receiving young men every day who fail to see the seriousness of discipline and regulations that must be followed to maintain -the world's finest navy. The hand salute is one of the highest respects that can be given to the uniform that is being worn by an officer of the United States Navy. SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT The Base Police office has announced that no persons were injured in automobile accidents over the Christmas holidays. Only by observing Base rules and regulations can this record be carried on in '49. For one of your New Year's resolutions, why not write at the top of the list-Take Time, Save a Life. THERE WERE SOME In Bethlehem, Christmas Day, with guns firing within a few miles of Christ's birthplace, there were some who answered the church bells as pilgrims have for centuries. We at Guantanamo Bay, can give thanks that no guns were thundering their deadly flames here as we worshiped God as free people. The Library requests that all over-due books be returned as soon as possible. The stork made oSP his last appearance of 1948 on December 30th when he left a baby girl, named Bethany, for HMC and Mrs. R. H. Johnson. The .Naw Year has 0 TES started off with a bang; Leslia Ann Schrecengost was born 3 January to SSGT and Mrs. K. E. Schrecengost of Vernam Field, Jamaica; Robert Edward Souder was born 3 January to MAJ and Mrs. W. H. Souder, Jr.; Sharon Lee Bowman born 4 January to CSC and Mrs. R. S. Bowman; Mary Ellen Wade born 4 January to SK1 ae-d Mrs. F. J. Wade; and Raymond Allen Pritchard born 5 January to CH MACH and Mrs. R. A. Pritchard. CDR A. N. Chaffin and family left for the U. S. today. Dr. Chaffin has been transferred to Little Creek, Va. for duty. We all wish you luck and happiness on the new assignment. LT P. D. Cronemiller, MC, USN, reported in Tuesday from USNH, Philadelphia for duty. Welcome aboard, Doctor, we feel sure you will enjoy your tour of duty in Cuba. There have been several changes in the civilian personnel line-up in the past few weeks. Mrs. Carmine Erickson of the Finance Department was the first to leave, followed in quick succession by Mrs. Gloria Davis of the Personnel Offee and Gorden Dickerson of the Record Office. Both Mrs. Erickson and Mrs. Davis are returning to the U. S.; we understand that Dickerson would like to have another job on the Base. Mrs. Barbara Howell has taken Mrs. Davis' place in the Personnel Office. We have heard rumors that the Hospital Basketball Team has been taking all comers and really making a showing for themselves. They have passed the word that they would probably do even better if they had more backing. If they will also pass the word as to when and where they are playing, the rooting section will be on hand. How can we do our part when we don't even know they are playing! NOTICE New registration plates for privately owned vehicles have been received and are now being issued at the Base Provost Marshal's Office. All vehicle owners are requested to have their cars inspected at Base Transportation, and then report to the Base Provost Marshal's OfficeWITH INSPECTION STICKER AND OLD REGISTRATION for issuance of new plates. All privately owned vehicles must be inspected and registered by 31 January 1949. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 9 January 1949 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Naval Base Chapel Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LCDR E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LCDR Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPLAIMS COR4Ef In the middle of the track of a transcontinental railroad at a certain point in Ohio, there is a metal trough. It runs along for a quarter of a mile or more. It is kept filled with water. Through trains as they rush along-do not stop at water tanks to take on water. When they reach the place where the water trough is, the fireman presses a lever which drops a scoop from the bottom of the tank and takes up the water, as the train keeps going. No stop, no pause -they just keep going on the dead run and scoop up the water. Isn't that pretty much like a lot of folks try to do with their religion, scoop it up on the run? They haven't time for their soul's needs. They,C are too busy. "Take time to be holy," bids the hymn. Or like some airplanes pull up packages as they fly, with hanging rope and grappling hook, even so those hurrying religionists pull a sponge on a string through Christ's church, in absentia, and try to "sponge" up enough religion for a small spiritual appetite. But you just cannot get religion that way! Time must be given to receive, to hold and increase the content and possession of true, genuine, living religion in our hearts and lives. You cannot get religion on the run. H. C. R. Chaplain E. E. Bosserman The Navy has eliminated the requirements of two years college for Navy and Marine enlisted personnel seeking commissions under the cadet training program. Enlisted men with high school diplomas who make high test scores now are eligible. Page Two THE INDIAN

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Page Three vTHiE 9 Since no Indian was published last week, some of the paragraphs which follow are two weeks old, but are, nonetheless, current items and require reporting. The holiday season is over. It has been a wonderful season. General observations throughout the Base indicate that there was more genuine Christmas spirit displayed this year than last. There seemed to be more decorations, more trees, more lights, more greeting cards exchanged, more good feeling than before. * A number of bouquets are in order this -wcek.-Certainly a big bouquet is due the Recreation people for brightening the lives of the Base children by helping Santa distribute those fine presents ...to all the people who helped make the Chapel Christmas services-so beautiful ...to all the cooks and bakers who had a hand in the preparation and serving of the wonderful chow put out for Christmas dinners .. to the Hospital Service Volunteers for putting on such a grand party for the boys in the Hospital ..to the gang of carollers who added that extra touch at midnight on Christmas Eve ...and to all the folks who put some effort into making Christmas in Guantanamo a brighter, merrier Christmas. Wonder Why Department: Wonder why Ship's Service doesn't send out monthly bills for laundry? The telephone office bills its customers, the Commissary sends bills, Newtowners get rent bills, utility and water bills-but nobody gets a jig for the laundry. Seems like it would not only help a good many forgetful souls, but also help the Laundry as well. Reports are that another bouquet is due the new manager of the Officers' Club for the egg-nog party and well-planned Christmas Dinner. Many claimed that it has been quite a while since such a crowd has been attracted, and rarely has such a good dinner been served. # # 1949 was ushered in last week with a record cold wave, when the old mercury dipped down to a low 66 degrees. At the Officers' Club on New Year's Eve, many female celebrators, bedecked in brief evening attire, took to their coats before venturing "under the stars" to dance. It was the first time this observer had seen silver fox fur capes worn here, and the first time officers were known to wear sweaters under their whites. Although new gowns were not displayed to best advantage, the unusual weather failed to dampen the spirits of those welcoming in the New Year, for, it is believed, a record crowd was on hand to see 48's demise and 49's birth. Many were of the opinion that the Club's Friday night dinner could have been warmer if not better, but most agreed that the chill of the breeze was responsible for coolng off the buffet before the diners ever got through the line and to their tables. Neither the Club management, the Executive Committee, nor Public Works can be responsible for unprecedented drops in temperature. Everything considered, it was a swell party. The band played beautifully with stiff fingers and blue lips, 1949 made it right on schedule, and everybody seemed happy enough. Out Newtown way, the youngster 1949 was welcomed in grand style. Not minding the cold at all, apparently, the villagers from the outskirts danced to the music of a hot Cuban orchestra until two in the morning. When the Cubans stopped playing and went home to tak e necessary precautions against pneumonia, the Newtowners pressed the juke box into service and went on dancing until everybody was absolutely sure that the new 1949 had a firm 'lease on life. Your correspondent didn't get to all the parties, unfortunately, but it is reliably reported that all celebrations, including those at the CPO Club, the Petty Officers' Club and others were huge successes. It is also noted with justifiable interest and pride, that no unpleasantness managed to creep into any of the celebrations to spoil the fine holiday season just ended. s: > It will be noticed by most followers of the Crow's Nest that all caustic comments on WGBY have been omitted this week. This is not because the local station has improved any, but space prevented further criticism this week. Every year about this time a lot of effort is wasted by guys and gals who make New Year's resolutions. Seldom, if ever, does anyone remember at year's end what he resolved at its beginning. One worthwhile resolution is suggested that is guaranteed to pay off. Let us resolve to be better neighbors to each other by being a bit more friendly, a bit more tolerant, a bit more willing to see the other fellow's viewpoint, a bit less willing to spread idle gossip. We could do well to encourage the Christmas spirit displayed these past few weeks and reflect it throughout the days of 1949. NEWS FROM ELECTRONICS By "Irish" What a sensational time of year! Everybody gives parties and presents, nobody works and everybody goes to church (well, 'most everybody that is). Why couldn't it be like that all year around? If we were to have a whole year of half holidays, I betcha my golf game would improve another 500 per cent. All the boys who had indulged in the customary "Holiday Cheer", including "Hide-the-bottle" Erickson and "I-can-drink-a-coke-faster -than -you -can" Niebell, were brought back to sober reality upon entering the shop Sunday morning. Seems some other member of our group had cooked his Christmas Dinner in the shop and had neglected to discard the remains Odoriferous, is the polite word, I believe. Merry tale of Christmas: Christmas Eve had the Base Police in a dither over the sudden and mysterious disappearance of PM2. Frantically, the dispatcher called the lost jeep over the radio ...no answer. Dirty workFoul play? No, simply the jeep's radio had gone awry and said jeep had been left at our shop for repair. Our little genius was hard at work on it, when he happened to glance at his watch to see that it was nearly time for the Christmas Eve Service. Naturally not wanting to miss it (especially since the Chapel Choir would be singing the Song of Christmas) he just drove the jeep in the shop, locked up and went to church. When the "Gendarmes" came by for the jeep a few minutes later ..no jeep ...no tech ...no light, no nothing! Two hours later, the absent-minded tech came back to finish the job and the Base Police found the lost jeep. Best we've heard this week: It seems that Joe Sack got Santa Claus to give his two little daughters, Betty Jo and Patty Ann, an electric traii for Christmas. Guess who plays with said train! NOTICE TO PET OWNERS At one time or another, all of us have heard the old saying, "A Dog is Man's Best Friend". If that be the case, some of us better start looking out for our little friends. The moral of that story is, don't let your dog run free to wander the whole Base like a displaced person. Dental treatment for dependents of Army-Air Force personnel has been limited to emergency work. Reason ...the heavy load thrown on the Dental Corps by Armed Forces. expansion. THE INDIAN

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Pagn. Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-S Jan 49-2500. PRACTICE RESUMED AS CAGE SEASON NEARS In just about two more weeks, the first activity in the Base Basketball League will officially begin. We say officially, because there will probably be numerous scrimmage games in these next two weeks as the teams seek to get in a final touch of practice before the season opens. It is impossible to pick the winner of the league or even the favorite at such an early date and so it would be a waste of time to try. Thus far, all teams who have participated in the games have shown both good and bad points at various stages in the game. Two teams which haven't appeared in pre-season scrimmage games to date, are Naval Air Station and VU-10. The question has arisen now as to whether these two will participate in the league. Just what caliber teams will come from these two activities is unknown but it is felt in some circles that VU-10 may come out with a top notch quintet again this year. NAS should also have a strong team. Probably the weakest team in the league at this writing, two weeks before the season opens, is the Fleet Training Group quintet. This must be said in fairness to everyone despite the fact they came from 'behind in the only scrimmage game so far to win over the high school team. Despite their rating at the present time, Lt. E. D. Reinhold who is coaching the team has progressed a great deal with his lads and they should give a good account of themselves in the loop competition. Coming next to the High School team. This team has been the hard luck team of the league so far. They have lost four straight exhibition games but have shown a great deal of improvement. In all probability, had the first team been left in or put back in earlier, in the FITraGrp game before Christmas, they would have probably won. It was all a case of player-coach Edward Ondrasik not being in condition. Better luck next time gang. Holder of the best exhibition record is the Hospital Quintet, coached by Lt. Ellestad. This team might be the future title winner of the league but after witnessing the Hospital -Marine game, we will never be so bold as to make that statement. This quintet is led by a "terrible three-some," name ly, Zimmerman, Call and Gehring. They will cause plenty of headaches for their foes. Out on Marine Site No. 2, Captain Frank Sullivan is grooming his leatherneck cagers for the role of "dark horse" of the league. Losers to the Hospital, two weeks ago in a thriller when time ran out, the Marines should wind up about mid way in the standings to say At a parade held at the Marine Barracks last Saturday, trophys were it. .-presented by ) the Commanding Officer, COL J. .Lanigan, to the winners of the Marine Corps Birthday Field Meet. Receiving awards were:: PFC Robert D. Wilson for the 100-yard dash, the 220-yard dash and the 440 relay race. Also receiving a trophy for the 440-yard relay race were P'FC's Dominic A. Calvagna, Antonio F. DeSimone and Manual J. Garcia. The discus trophy was given to PFC James C. Duley and Corporal Robert S. Westbrook received the shot-put award. As team captain, 1stLT Bevan C. Cass received the volley ball trophy for the Officers' Team, which won the volleyball league. The Intra-Post football league is over and won by the 1st Platoon of Guard Company, which remains undefeated. The Officer-Staff NCO team was second with two losses and one tie. Headquarters Administration came in third and the 2nd Platoon of Guard Company were fourth, with Headquarters Supply team coming in fifth. Bon Voyage to 2ndLT Fiander and family who left via MATS for thirty days leave before reporting to the Second Marinc Division for duty. It is rumored that a certain Staff Sergeant is marking the days off the calendar as to the time he has to do. We wonder if his initials could be W.J.W. Editor's Note: This article was written for last week's Indian. Suitor (kidding little sister): "I'll give you a dime for a kiss." Little Sister: "Heck, I can make more than that taking castor oil." the least. Just who their big gun is is hard to say. They have been in only one exhibition and then Hoylman led the scorers. Recreation, is represented by a "five" that shows plenty of promise with Sammy Krause as their leading man on offensive. This team is out for scrimmage games with other teams in the remaining week before season play opens. Coaches interested, may call Joe Stocklosa at WGBY-the number is 395. This is the basketball picture as it now stands. It is not known whether or not the Naval Station will be represented with a team other than Stocklosa's Recreation "five". It is possible that there will be other actively participant teams. As yet however, there is nothing definite on that. Within the next two weeks we hope to be able to present a complete picture to you of the entire league. NAS SLIPSTREAM Who is the TMSN that believes marriage more .reasonable than paying income tax, Ciepiel? Heard that BOSN Lukacs says he caught a red snapper 71 inches long. P.S. It was, only 31 inches. I wonder who the CPO is that's always talking about his tin can duty but until recently never had anything but a (V) in his rating? Inscoe, BM1, tried to buy some spare parts for his car but he received a report that the Smithsonian Institute didn't have any. Chief Kent and his eager beavers have produced some startling results at Leeward Point; it looks as though they will be all set for the visitors expected for the fourth of January. Good work, Kent! The future Sailors and Waves of Naval Air Station, all gathered at Naval Air Station Movie Lyceum at 1430, 24 December 1948. With the assise of LTJG 31er,-Santa Claus arrive y air as scheduled, where he was met by approximately 250 youngsters. After giving presents to all children present, Chief Rose and his volunteers were kept busy serving ice cream, cookies and Coca Cola. It is reported that CDR Asman arrived at least one half hour earlier for fear of missing Santa Claus. Santa did such an excellent job, it is rumored that The Little Theatre Group is applying for his services to play the leading role in the next if and when. What Chief Mailman attached to the Naval Air Station has the loudest singing voice of any CPO residing at the NAS Chiefs' Barracks? It was a very merry Christmas for LT N. B. Boyles, Aerologist, because on the 24th, his wife and two children arrived via plane to join him here. We hope they like_ the place as well as we do. LTJG H. T. Gebhart is now in the States and expects to return 4 January with his wife and daughter to make his duty more enjoyable here. Mr. L. C. Serig, administrative assistant, has returned to his duties after spending about ten days in the States. While there, he became acquainted with his first grand child. It was with profound regret we received the news of the detachment orders of our skipper and friend, CAPT W. 0. Gallery. He expects to be leaving in late January for duty with the Chief of Naval Operations. CAPT Oscar Pederson has been ordered to relieve him here. BOSN. F. P. Lukacs and family are spending six days well earned leave in Havana. When a man gets too old to set a bad example, he starts giving good advice. Pare. Four THE INDIAN otmo. Bay-s Jan 49-25oo.