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Indian

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Title:
Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Sunday Supplement
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Guantanamo Gazette
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Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Daily Gazette
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Guantanamo Bay Gazette

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U. S. Naval Operating-Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 18 December 19


TORE ASHO
OTICE

rees will be plac morning of 18 D kindergarten 's Store Ashore. each 'day incl ,d Sundays unt usted. There ar .e which should Le trees will be ,h. This is the eived from No iark-up. Sales w 1. Delivery if d nged at the tir

re hours duringj son will be: 07 Itb 1600 or 7:00 . and 1:00 P.

isary Store w ember 25 and 26

TL CHIME N - SUNI

Chimes are' ay morning, 1 ,t the 1100 se ro the purcha .ie Chimes" wa ary 22, by tak ering at. the Through this dy and the gen individuals o f$3200.00 has t have the c
plain E. E. Bo ltion of the C
Harris Howe,
chaplain's Div

Coir will sin n, "A Mighty 'o" under the . onald Stuck.


.y of the I o0ol will giv tivity" on er, 1948 at ceum. ited to see


RE LETTER OF
APPRECIATION

ced on USS JOHN W. WEEKS (DD-701) ecem- c/o Fleet Post Office across New York, N. Y. They 30 November 1948 uding
il the From: The Commanding Officer. e 700 To: Commanding Officer, U. S. meet Naval Station, Guantanasold mo Bay, Cuba. cost Subj: Services Rendered - Aprfolk. preciation of. till be
esired 1. During the period of 12-26 ne of .November, this vessel requested of
your repair department many ing the cidental work items up to and in'00 to cluding drydocking for the purpose A.M. of changing a damaged propellor. Ml. to 2. The entire ship's company
of the J. W. Weeks was impressed ill be by the fine-workmanship and spirit 6. of cooperation as exhibited by your
personnel, both military and civilian.
)AY 3. As Commanding Officer, I
therefore extend by thanks and apto be preciation of my ship's company 9 De- to you for a job wel( done by your rvice. repair department. se of G. T. BAKER s be- CDR, U. S. Navy ing a,
1,100 N.O.B. LIBRARY OPENED offer- THURSDAY erous
n the
been Last Thursday the N. 0. B. Lihimes brary opened its doors to the long
waiting and patient personnel of osser- the Base. The library, long in need imes of repairs and paint, has been beauCHC, tifully renovated, as well as the ision, Chaplains' Offices, through the long
range policy of the Base-wide img the provements instituted by the ComFor- mander, Naval Operating Base, direc- RADM W. K. Phillips, USN.
The Base Librarian, Chaplain E.
E. Bosserman, wishes to t]&nk CDR S L. M. Davis, Officer in Charge of
Public Works; and both those under his command as well as all others Naval who have done so much to make this re the job very well done. Wed- Mrs. Mary Besse, senior librar1900 ian, announces that the new card
catalog is indexed and that there this won't be any trouble locating books from now on.


FINANCIAL ASSISTANC THROUGH NAVY RELIE

Since real need is a controlli factor when financial assistance given, funds of the Society are r available as a matter of convei ence in such situations as the fT lowing:
(a) To assist in maintaining standard of living incommensurs with the pay and allowance of t man.
(b) To pay emergency expens which the family is able to 'me from its own resources.
(c) To finance.business ventur( (d) To finance leave or liber


,ema


mentation supply ba:


wrncn am can -or canne be granted, they are b completely definitive an presented are given jul pathetic consideration. made to resolve them on liberality rather than

SUNDAY EVET SERVICE CHAT

The Sunday evenir Service which thas be( Newtown for the past is being changed this the N.O.B. Chapel.
This service which beg (7 P.M.), will be featu playing of the chimes, I ing, alternate flannel" b colored filmstrips, anc motion pictures.
This Sunday evening mas Story will be show ored film strips. This' conducted informally. F; service personnel are c( vited to attend.


mony.


nmay to
at*1900 by the in singd talks,' religious








pn~~TH L14Dri~I'JNi


Editorial Office, NOB Library- Phone 672

Saturday, 18 December 1948

U. S. NAVAI OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips. USN
Commander
A. E. Smith --------------------- Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ---- Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equiprnent, and complies with the provisions of DAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AP~PS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to t e NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

THE INDIAN CHANGES
EDITORS

Last week, Bruce Thomson, SN, long time editor of the Indian, left or the States for Christmas leavq. His work as editor of the Base pper, The Indian, has been turned over to Arthur Smith, SN, better known as "Smitty." Smitty is pretty much of a new comer on the Base but has already become known for his smile and' friendliness. He hails from Cincinnati, Ohio. Smith has some fine new ideas for the paper which will soon be evident. It is our hope that The Indian will be interesting and popular with everyone.
We thank Thomson for his loyal work in keeping the paper published and hope that his new duties will be happy ones.
HOMEWARD BOUND

The President Adams booked seventy-six passengers from the Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, on her departure from here last week. The passengers boarding the Adams could hae called their voyage "Operation Sardine", because all available space was used up. The list included five officers, twelve first class passengers, and fifty-nine troop passengers.
The ports of discharge scheduled for the Pres. Adams were New York, N. Y.' and Norfolk, Va. To all those going home-Bon Voyage - we sincerely wish them a very Merry Chiistmas and a happy New Year.
Wife: "You are the laziest man in town. Why, you've been fired from 20 jobs already!"
Indolent Husband: "Well, you can't say I'm a quitter."


CDR. A. N.
SPIA CaffnMC, USN
! L has received
transfer orders to U. S. Naval Amphibious B a s e, Little Creek, Va.
and will be leavng shortly after the first of the
NOTE S year. Dr. Chaffin
has been popular
with the staff and patients alike, and our best wishes for a happy tour of duty go with him and his family.
The theme song at the Hospital right now is "I'll be home for Christmas". More and more lucky men departing every day. Besides the men going on leave, five others have received orders to the USS Consolation: Cooper, Broderson, Davis, Lesher and Hall. Good luck, fellows-if you happen to come this way some time in the future be sure to come arid say hello.
In view of the elaborate plans made for a Base-wide Christmas party for the children, it has been decided that the Hospital will not have their party as has been the policy in previous years. A family dinner will be served however, on Christmas Day in the Recreation Hall at 1700. All staff personnel, their families and guests are invited.

PAYROLL SAVINGS IS
SURE SAVINGS!

At this season of the year the idea of giving is uppermost in our minds. This year it would be well if all of us considered the value of what we give-not in terms of cost, but rather in terms of long range benefits. Certainly, from that standpoint, there can be no better gift than U. S. Savings Bondsthe bonds millions of thrifty, sensible working-men and women like yourself are buying every payday through regular Payroll Savings. Savings Bonds" keep on giving. As the years pass you'll find they've actually increased in value - and therefore the meaning to the recipient. And, ten years from now when they reach maturity, their full benefits will make themselves felt. Remember--"E" is for Everybody.

NEW USO CLUBS SOON

Washingotn (AFPS)-Secretary of Defense James V. Forrestal recently announced the opening of 22 new USO clubs for servicemen.
An additional 14 clubs will open before January 1 to reach an overall total of 133 in operation. At present 97 clubs in or near Armed Forces installations are bringing entertainment and recreation to Army, Navy and Air Force personnel.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 19 December 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base, Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

CHAPEL CHIMES PRAYERr
OF DEDICATION

Almighty God, who by Thy servant Moses didst command that silver trumpets should be made to call the people to holy assemblies: Bless, we beseech Thee, these Carillonic Chimes, dedicated to Thine honor and glory, and grant that these chimes may sound forth from generation to generation, ever calling Thy children to holy convocation in praise and worship of Thy Name; through Jesus Christ, Thy Son, our 'Lord. Amen.
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman.

FLEET RESERVE ASS'N TO MEET 28 DECEMBER

A business meeting of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association, will be held at the N. C .0. Club, Tuesday, 28 December at 2000. All members are requested to attend.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Have you graduated from high. school? The fulfillment of this question on your part may decide your future, social standings, and even an important business position. Your Educational Services Officer is very much concerned about you, and if you will take time to drop in and see him, he will give you all of the necessary informa. tion.
If your state acknowledges this system, you can graduate at no cost to you through the General Educational Development Test. The United States Armed Forces Institute offers yo ucourses for two dollars which will enable you to go even farther and obtain college credits. Visit your Educational Officer now at Barracks No. 4, Bay Hill, or call 657.
Climate lasts all the time, but weather only a few days at a time.


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J.


T T T , I , I+]I A N"








THE INDIAN Pare Three


T-iHiE



It's a good quality in a person to want to take care of his property, to. preserve and protect it. With the advent of the new automobile to the Base, it was a certainty that the good citizens of Newtown were to devise some method for keeping the blistering rays of sun from their shining new cars. Consequently, all sorts of shacks, shanties, ieantos and sheds have sprung up. Don't get me wrong-this is not intended to criticize for what's already happened,
*--b ytt to offer a: constructive suggestion for the future. Before the area f Newtown is permanently marred y these ramshackle structures, wouldn't it be a good idea to stan1 dardize the design and location of
the garages? If some standard specifications could be drawn up which show where and how to build garages, it might. help all concerned.
A certain sailor we know, subsisted by the Navy passed along an interesting, study-worthy thought.
He claims that in his 12 years in the Navy, he has never seen an asparagus tip. He said he looked into the situation and learned that the farmers who grow asparagus for the Navy use a secret process and the stalks grow more than three feet high. The net result is an awful lot of stalk and very little tip. When you consider the proportion of messcooks to sailors, he claims, you begin to get the idea why he has never seen an aspara= tip. * * *
Marine Site No. 1 is looking like
a bit of old Holland these days. It appears that all they need is some tulip gardens . . they already have the windmill with red lights,
yet!
Getting back to Newtown, it is
understood that the good people out there are literally crying in their- beer. Public Works is doing
a splendid job of repairing roads,
but the sand they use in covering them is getting in everybody's hair.
The gals complain that they scarcely see the light of day between buses. As one sailor put it, he doesn't mind fighting for his country, but he sure hates to eat it.
One consoling thought, however, by writing your name on your newly b dusted furniture proves that you're
literate, anyway!
This Week's Bouquet. Whether
performed by the residents of Col.
Lanigan's Home for Wayward


NAVY PLANS PEAK AIR STRENGTH BY JULY
Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced it will reach its authorized strength of 14,500 planes by July, 1949.
Under its new construction program for 1949, the Navy will build 1,165 planes. It was emphasized, however, that it will be necessary to withdraw 3,000 World 11 planes from storage to realize the 14,500 plane strength.
The Navy also revealed that tests are being conducted, with a highspeed, twin-jet, flying wing type of fighter plane, the Chance Voight XF7s-1.
Boys, or by whom, the Marines are doing an outstanding job of cleaning up the brush and generally improving the appearance of the Marine Site. The over-all neatness of this part of the Base is in keeping With the fine way the Marines do things!
* * *
Sudden Thought. If all the sailors on the station sat down to one long Christmas dinner table, they would reach.
Wonder Why Department. After nearly three years, wonder why they don't do something to that burned out barracks on Marine Site No. 3? There must be a good reason, but now that the rest of the Base has been beautified, it seems a shame for this eyesore to remain.
Rumor has it that The Little Theatre group is swinging right into rehearsal for its next production. I don't want to be repetitious in singing the praises of this new group, but The Little Theatre and its "Arsenic and Old Lace" is just about the best thing we've had happen to us in a long time.
Your observer doesn't know exactly where to place the credit, but there was a big improvement noticed in the music at the Officers' Club last Saturday night, to the delight of all those present. This is a step in the right direction toward getting more people to enjoy these" Saturday night parties. Nice going, mates, keep it up!
This next week will see the appearance of Christmas Trees throughout the Base. It is expected that within a few days Santa's helpers all over the Station will be putting up and decorating their trees, both indoors and out, in celebration of this wonderful time of year. This week, also, will see the installation of the Chapel Chimes, from which there will peal forth familiar Christmas carols to further add to the beauty of this Base. Your correspondent is no pollyanna, but considering everything, aren't you glad you're doing duty here?


SURFACE SCRATCHES

By A. B. and J. H.
Once more we gird our literary loins, strain our cerebellum, and push forth a masterpiece of prose
(I hope they print this one) .Disregard the first sentence, we've been reading books with fine print again.
We have a new face at the studio, a human of the female variety. nice voice, nice personality, very nice in every respect, folks, meet Mrs. Alice Allen. She can be heard on her own personal request show, "Allen's Alley", which gets an airing Monday through Saturday at 1:00 P. M. Don't miss it.
Lord Popinoff has left us; he was one of our pet studio mice. That leaves four of Herman's old gang, which, says Mrs. Allen, is exactly four too many! How unkind of her, Herman won't like that. I'm afraid he'll be squeaking loudly and furiously for the next few weeks.
Speaking of squeaking, we'll get to those "Wonder Why Department" remarks by the Crow's Nest columnist next issue. Time and space do not permit for said literary blast as we want to tell you about our special Christmas Week programs.
During the first part of the week, the schedule runs about the same with Christmas songs predominating on all the musical shows . . . "Greatest Story Ever Told" presents a special Christmas series dramatizing the events of the Birth of Christ. These programs may be heard at 9:30 Wednesday 22nd through Sunday 26th. Friday night spots several very' fine Christmas Eve programs: Lionel Barrymore in a dramatization of Dicken's Christmas Carol at 6:00; Duff ey's Tavern at 7:30, and the "new" Bob Hope Show at 8:00. We could wax eloquent over the program for Christmas Day, but, space you know. However, we do want to mention a few of the more notable shows. Also, remind you that every program on Saturday, 25th, is a special Xmas Day presentation.
In the morning, Angelus, Jill's Christmas Juke Box, The Hawthorne Thing, and Fred Waring's Show, shine fort has really wonderful half hours. The afternoon brings you, Ranch House Party, a two-hour "command performance", the Carmel Christmas Day Festival, Jubilee, and Mail Call. The five programs just mentioned are "out of this world."
Every type of music and the greatest names in show business are jammed into this, the finest four hours we have ever had the pleasure to present.
The Christmas Night schedule is not to be found lacking, with Amos 'n Andy, Burns and Allen, Dick Haymes, and Al Jolson, all presenting very fine Christmas programs.


THE INDIAN


Paze Three







Pare Four THE INDIAN Otmo. Bay-16 Dec 48-2504


AS I SEE IT
By Allen Collier
Try as we might we cannot seerm
to get away from the grid iron season and all the odd. happenings
that go with it.
While the nation's press is trying to convince John Q. Public that Michigan is mightier than Notre Dame or vice versa, the most important incident in the grid iron world has been the naming of the All-America teams. Unlike the large wire services which had their All-America team picked and the pictures already distributed to the sports departments of our nation's newspapers, at the latest by 27 November, we have waited until the season ended for all the teams before making our choices. These we present at this time without malice to anyone, if that is possible in any selection.
First Team: Ends, Rifenburg ,of Michigan and Hart of Notre Dame; Tackles, Nomellini of Minnesota and Wistert of Michigan; Guards, Fischer of Notre Dame and Healey of Georgia Tech; Center, Dednarik of Pennsylvania. In the backfield, we have Walker of S.M.U.; Justice of North Carolina, Van Brocklin of Oregon and Scott of Arkansas.
Our second team is almost as strong with Poole of Mississippi and Weiner- of North Carolina at ends; Joe Henry of Army and Burris of Oklahoma at guards; Lea of Tulane and Turner of California at tackles and Sarkisian of Northwestern at center. In the backfield we have four more aces in, Jensen of California, Rauch of Georgia, Gage, Clemson and Elliott of Michigan.
There you have our All-America selections, for the gridiron season of 1948. The climax of the ending of a great season marked by memorable occasions such as Navy's . 21-21 deadlock with Army, So. California's 14-14 draw with Notre Dame and William and Mary tieing the great Charlie Justice led North Carolina team, 7-7. Next week'we will have the forecasts of the bowl games ready for you, as well as odd facts about some bowl games that you may or may not already know. Join us then.

VERNAM FIELD GOLFERS HERE FOR RETURN PLAY
The best the Air Force at Vernam Field had to offer flew to Guantanamo Bay today for a re-match with the golfers of the Naval Station..
This was the third meeting between these two teams, the last being on December 5th, at the Vernam Field golf course where the Navy won a 13/2 to 7 victory. The match was to have been completed todav and results will be announced


BASKETBALL TEAMS
PREPA.IE FOR 1949 DEBUT

All over the4.,As6, the various activities are -busy as bees with .the work of preparing for the coming basketball season. Teams have begun work-.'in earnest as the opening whistle for theifirst game will be blown about miobJanuary. Scrimmages between' the various
teams continued this week with the High School team appearing in both and losing both. In a last half thriller on Monday, they bowed to Recreation, 35-31 and were trounced by the Naval Hospital quintet on Wednesday night, 50-26.
Although losing both exhibitions, the high school lads gained invaluable experience, and gave their opponents a run for their money. Certainly they will be one of the most colorful teams in the league.
In rolling over the High School "Five" the Naval Hospital quintet showed signs 6f becoming one of the more powerful squads on the Base.
FltTraGrp began working in earnest this week at the Fleet Recreation courts and Should, be out for scrimmage games in the near future. Also looking for scrimmage games is the Marine Site entry into, the Base League. The I4eathernecks have been working at night over at Marine Site 2 and sh0 ld 'come up with a powerful' five -his season. Four of last year's team will be back and a new lad, Dowler, promises to be the other starter for'the Marines.
In Monday night's scrimmage, Recreation owes its victory to the fact that time ran out on the High School lads and the terrific shooting of Sammy Krause who bucketed 13 points to lead the victors. Eddie Groome, stellar guard for the high school team, led his team with nine points. . I
In Wednesday night's encounter, Call led the Hospital scoring as he hit 18 points. Zimmerman was hot on his trail With 14 and Moten added 8 to the Hospital's total.
For the High School, Edward OPydrasik, tall center, Who doubles as a player-coach, dropped in 15 points and was followed by Pete Broughton with six. Eddie Groome was forced to sit out a large portion of the game with injured feet which hampered his play even when he was in the game.
Up 'til now, all indications are that this season's league will be a "hot" one and the standings will be close all the way. Every team is preparing itself to weather any type offense and also dish out a little of its own.
This week's Line Scores:
Recreation 16 23 27 35-35 High School 4 8 13 31-31 Nay. Hospital 10 22 37 50-50 High School 5 12 22 26-26


NAVAL STATION. LYCEUM
Sun. 19 Dec. to Sat. 25 Dec.

Sunday
I REMEMBER MAMA
Irene Dunne Phillip Dorne
Monday
WHEN A GIRL'S BEAUTIFUL Adele Jergens Marc Platt
Tuesday
ALL MY SONS
Edw. G. Robinson, Mady Christians
Wednesday
YANKEE FAKIR
Douglas Frawley Joan Woodbury
Thursday
COPACABANA
Carmen Miranda Gkoucho Mar) A
Friday
KILLER McCOY
Mickey Rooney Brian Donlevy
Saturday
KID GALLAHAD
Edw. G. Robinson Bette Davis

NOB TO BE REPRESENTED IN ALL-NAVY TOURNEY

The top bowlers of the Naval Operating Base were chosen in recent 'elimination matches held at the Fleet Recreation alleys this past week. First of the matches were held on Monday night with. three men making the team. Originally another match was to have taken place on Wednesday night but unavoidable circumstances would not permit it. I IFurther information as to when the match will be held may be obtained from the Fleet Recreation Office.
Those Who qualified in Monday ,night's matches were Chief Ray, SH(B)lc Butler and Jarrett. To make the team, a score of 160 had to be your average. Rules governing competition were those of ABC.

INDUCTEES' JOBS SAFE

Washington (AFPS) - Men inducted into the Armed Forces under Selective Service may serve for as long as three years without forfeiting claim to their civilian jobs, the Veterans Re-employment Rights Bureau has announced.
The new Selective Service Act calls for service of not more than three years, said Robert K. Salyers, bureau director. Under the draft, enlistment is for 21 months, but an inductee may, without loss of re-employment rights, extend his period for a maxmium of 15 months, providing there is no break in the continuity of such service, he concluded.


Pa -e Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-16 Dec 48-2801




Full Text

PAGE 1

la/ Vol. III, No. 44 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 18 December 1948 SHIP'S STORE ASHORE NOTICE Christmas trees will be placed on sale on the morning of 18 December at the', kindergarten across from the Ship's Store Ashore. They :ill be sold each day including Saturdays and Sundays until the stock is exhausted. There are 700 trees available which should meet all needs. The trees will be sold fer $2.00 each. This is the cost price as received from Norfolk. There is no mark-up. Sales will be fcr cash only. Delivery if desired nomy be arranged at the time of pu chase. Special store hours during the Christmas Season will be: 0700 to 11310 and 1300 to 1600 or 7:00 A.M. toi 11:30 A.M. and 1:00 P.M. to 4:q0 P. M. he Commissary Store will be closed on December 25 and 26. CHAPEL CHIME .I DEDICATION -SUNDAY The Chapel Chimes are to be dedicated Sunday morning, 19 Deceinber, 1948, at the 1100 service. The fund for the purchase of t hese "Carillonic Chimes" was begun last February 22, by taking a "free *ill" .offering at the 1100 Chapel-Service. Through this offerir.g every Sunday and the generous gifts of many individuals on the Bose, the sum of $3200.00 has been raised in time to have the chimes for Christmas. Assisting Chaplain E. E. Bosserman in the dedication of the Chimes will be CDR. Harris Howe, CHIC, U$N, from the Chaplain's Division, Washington, D. C. The Chapel Choir will sing the majestic anthem, "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" under the direction of Mr. E. Donald Stuck. SCHOOL CHRISTMAS PAGEANT The student body of the Naval Operating Base School will give the pageant "The Nativity" on Wednesday, 22 December, 1948 at 1900 at the N. 0. B. Lyceum. Everyone is invited to see this beautiful pageant. LETTER OF APPRECIATION USS JOHN W. WEEKS (DD-701) c/o Fleet Post Office New York, N. Y. 30 November 1948 From: The Commanding Officer. To: Commanding Officer, U. S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Subj: Services Rendered -Appreciation of. 1. During the period of 12-26 .November, this vessel requested of your repair department many incidental work items up to and including drydocking for the purpose of changing a damaged propellor. 2. The entire ship's company of the J. W. Weeks was impressed by the fine workmanship and spirit of cooperation as exhibited by your personnel, both military and civilian. 3. As Commanding Officer, I therefore extend by thanks and appreciation of my ship's company to you for a job wel( done by your repair department. G. T. BAKER CDR, U. S. Navy N.O.B. LIBRARY OPENED THURSDAY Last Thursday the N. 0. B. Library opened its doors to the long waiting and patient personnel of the Base. The library, long in need of repairs and paint, has been beautifully renovated, as well as the Chaplains' Offices, through the long range policy of the Base-wide improvements instituted by the Commander, Naval Operating Base, RADM W. K. Phillips, USN. The Base Librarian, Chaplain E. E. Bosserman, wishes to thnk CDR L. M. Davis, Officer in Charge of Public Works, and both those under his command as well as all others who have done so much to make this job very well done. Mrs. Mary Besse, senior librarian, announces that the new card catalog is indexed and that there won't be any trouble locating books from now on. FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE THROUGH NAVY RELIEF Since real need is a controlling factor when financial assistance is given, funds of the Society are not available as a matter of convenience in such situations as the following: (a) To assist in maintaining a standard of living incommensurate with the pay and allowance of the man. (b) To pay emergency expenses which the family is able to meet from its own resources. (c) To finance business ventures. (d) To finance leave or liberty (except in special cases such as critical illness or death of a member of a serviceman's immediate family). (e) To pay debts contracted prior to the man's entry into the service. (f) To purchase non-essentials or to pay debts created thereby. (g) To provide .regular supplementation of income in order to supply basic needs. While the above are typical of the more frequent situations in which aid can or cannot normally be granted, they are by no means completely definitive and all cases presented are given full and sympathetic consideration. Attempt is made to resolve them on the side of liberality rather than parsimony. SUNDAY EVENING SERVICE CHANGED The Sunday evening Vesper Service which has been held at Newtown for the past 14 months is being changed this Sunday to the N.O.B. Chapel. This service which begins at 1900 (7 P.M.), will be featured by the playing of the chimes, hymn singing, alternate flannel board talks, colored filmstrips, and religious motion pictures. This Sunday evening the Christmas Story will be shown with colored film strips. This service is conducted informally. Families and service personnel are cordially invited to attend.

PAGE 2

Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 18 December 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander A. E. Smith---------------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman----Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. TIE INDIAN CHANGES EDITORS Last week, Bruce Thomson, SN, long time editor of the Indian, left for the States for Christmas leave. His work as editor of the Base paper, The Indian, has been turned over to Arthur Smith, SN, better known as "Smitty." Smitty is pretty much of a new comer on the Base but has already become known for his smile and friendliness. He hails from Cincinnati, Ohio. Smith has some fine new ideas for the paper which will soon be evident. It is our hope that The Indian will be interesting and popular with everyone. We thank Thomson for his loyal work in keeping the paper published and hope that his new duties will be happy ones. HOMEWARD BOUND The President Adams booked seventy-six passengers from the Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, on her departure from here last week. The passengers boarding the Adams could haN e called their voyage "Operation Sardine", because all available space was used up. The list included five officers, twelve first class passengers, and fifty-nine troop passengers. The ports of discharge scheduled for the Pres. Adams were New York, N. Y. and Norfolk, Va. To all those going home -Bon Voyage -we sincerely wish them a very Merry Christmas and a happy New Year. Wife: "You are the laziest man in town. Why, you've been fired from 20 jobs already!" Indolent Husband: "Well, you can't say I'm a quitter." CD R. A. N. ASPl lI Chaffin, MC, USN has received transfer orders to U. S. Naval Amphibious B a s e, Little Creek, Va. and will be leaving shortly after the first of the OTES year. Dr. Chaffin has been popular with the staff and patients alike, and our best wishes for a happy tour of duty go with him and his family. The theme song at the Hospital right now is "I'll be home for Christmas". More and more lucky men departing every day. Besides the men going on leave, five others have received orders to the USS Consolation: Cooper, Broderson, Davis, Lesher and Hall. Good luck, fellows-if you happen to come this way some time in the future be sure to come aid say hello. In view of the elaborate plans made for a Base-wide Christmas party for the children, it has been decided that the Hospital will not have their party as has been the policy in previous years. A family dinner will be served however, on Christmas Day in the Recreation Hall at 1700. All staff personnel, their families and guests are invited. PAYROLL SAVINGS IS SURE SAVINGS! At this season of the year the idea of giving is uppermost in our minds. This year it would be well if all of us considered the value of what we give-not in terms of cost, but rather in terms of long range benefits. Certainly, from that standpoint, there can be no better gift than U. S. Savings Bondsthe bonds millions of thrifty, sensible working-men and women like yourself are buying every payday through regular Payroll Savings. Savings Bonds keep on giving. As the years pass you'll find they've actually increased in value -and therefore the meaning to the recipient. And, ten years from now when they reach maturity, their full benefits will make themselves felt. Remember-"E" is for Everybody. NEW USO CLUBS SOON Washingotn (AFPS)-Secretary of Defense James V. Forrestal recently announced the opening of 22 new USO clubs for servicemen. An additional 14 clubs will open before January 1 to reach an overall total of 133 in operation. At present 97 clubs in or near Armed Forces installations are bringing entertainment and recreation to Army, Navy and Air Force personnel. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 19 December 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPEL CHIMES PRAYER OF DEDICATION Almighty God, who by Thy servant Moses didst command that silver trumpets should be made to call the people to holy assemblies: Bless, we beseech Thee, these Carillonic Chimes, dedicated to Thine honor and glory, and grant that these chimes may sound forth from generation to generation, ever calling Thy children to holy convocation in praise and worship of Thy Name; through Jesus Christ, Thy Son, our Lord. Amen. Chaplain E. E. Bosserman. FLEET RESERVE ASS'N TO MEET 28 DECEMBER A business meeting of Branch 100, Fleet Reserve Association, will be held at the N. C .0. Club, Tuesday, 28 December at 2000. All members are requested to attend. EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Have you graduated from high school? The fulfillment of this question on your part may decide your future, social standings, and even an important business position. Your Educational Services Officer is very much concerned about you, and if you will take time to drop in and see him, he will give you all of the necessary informa. tion. If your state acknowledges this system, you can graduate at no cost to you through the General Educational Development Test. The United States Armed Forces Institute offers yo ucourses for two dollars which will enable you to go even farther and obtain college credits. Visit your Educational Officer now at Barracks No. 4, Bay Hill, or call 657. Climate lasts all the time, but weather only a few days at a time. age wo P T THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Pane Three Tus It's a good quality in a person to want to take care of his property, to. preserve and protect it. With the advent of the new automobile to the Base, it was a certainty that the good citizens of Newtown were to devise some method for keeping the blistering rays of sun from their shining new cars. Consequently, all sorts of shacks, shanties, ieantos and sheds have sprung up. Don't get me wrong-this is not intended to criticize for what's already happened, -btt to offer a constructive suggestion for the future. Before the area .f Newtown is permanently marred sy these ramshackle structures, wouldn't it be a good idea to standardize the design and location of the garages? If some standard specifications could be drawn up which show where and how to build garages, it might help all concerned. A certain sailor we know, subsisted by the Navy passed along an interesting, study-worthy thought. He claims that in his 12 years in the Navy, he has never seen an asparagus tip. He said he looked into the situation and learned that the farmers who grow asparagus for the Navy use a secret process and the stalks grow more than three feet high. The net result is an awful lot of stalk and very little tip. When you consider the proportion of messcooks to sailors, he claims, you begin to get the idea why he has never seen an asparagus tip. Marine Site No. 1 is looking like a bit of old Holland these days. It appears that all they need is some tulip gardens ...they already have the windmill with red lights, yet! Getting back to Newtown, it is understood that the good people out there are literally crying in their beer. Public Works is doing a splendid job of repairing roads, but the sand they use in covering them is getting in everybody's hair. The gals complain that they scarcely see the light of day between buses. As one sailor put it, he doesn't mind fighting for his country, but he sure hates to eat it. One consoling thought, however, by writing your name on your newly dusted furniture proves that you're literate, anyway! This Week's Bouquet. Whether performed by the residents of Col. Lanigan's Home for Wayward NAVY PLANS PEAK AIR STRENGTH BY JULY Washington (AFPS)-The Navy has announced it will reach its authorized strength of 14,500 planes by July, 1949. Under its new construction program for 1949, the Navy will build 1,165 planes. It was emphasized, however, that it will be necessary to withdraw 3,000 World II planes from storage to realize the 14,500 plane strength. The Navy also revealed that tests are being conducted with a highspeed, twin-jet, flying wing type of fighter plane, the Chance Voight XF7s-1. Boys, or by whom, the Marines are doing an outstanding job of cleaning up the brush and generally improving the appearance of the Marine Site. The over-all neatness of this part of the Base is in keeping with the fine way the Marines do things! :k Sudden Thought. If all the sailors on the station sat down to one long Christmas dinner table, they would reach. Wonder Why Department. After nearly three years, wonder why they don't do something to that burned out barracks on Marine Site No. 3? There must be a good reason, but now that the rest of the Base has been beautified, it seems a shame for this eyesore to remain. Rumor has it that The Little Theatre group is swinging right into rehearsal for its next production. I don't want to be repetitious in singing the praises of this new group, but The Little Theatre and its "Arsenic and Old Lace" is just about the best thing we've had happen to us in a long time. Your observer doesn't know exactly where to place the credit, but there was a big improvement noticed in the music at the Officers' Club last Saturday night, to the delight of all those present. This is a step in the right direction toward getting more people to enjoy these Saturday night parties. Nice going, mates, keep it up! This next week will see the appearance of Christmas Trees throughout the Base. It is expected that within a few days Santa's helpers all over the Station will be putting up and decorating their trees, both indoors and out, in celebration of this wonderful time of year. This week, also, will see the installation of the Chapel Chimes, from which there will peal forth familiar Christmas carols to further add to the beauty of this Base. Your correspondent is no pollyanna, but considering everything, aren't you glad you're doing duty here? SURFACE SCRATCHES By A. B. and J. H. Once more we gird our literary loins, strain our cerebellum, and push forth a masterpiece of prose .(I hope they print this one) .Disregard the first sentence, we've been reading books with fine print again. We have a new face at the studio, a human of the female variety. nice voice, nice personality, very nice in every respect, folks, meet Mrs. Alice Allen. She can be heard on her own personal request show, "Allen's Alley", which gets an airing Monday through Saturday at 1:00 P. M. Don't miss it. Lord Popinoff has left us; he was one of our pet studio mice. That leaves four of Herman's old gang, which, says Mrs. Allen, is exactly four too many! How unkind of her, Herman won't like that. I'm afraid he'll be squeaking loudly and furiously for the next few weeks. Speaking of squeaking, we'll get to those "Wonder Why Department" remarks by the Crow's Nest columnist next issue. Time and space do not permit for said literary blast as we want to tell you about our special Christmas Week programs. During the first part of the week, the schedule runs about the same with Christmas songs predominating on all the musical shows ... "Greatest Story Ever Told" presents a special Christmas series dramatizing the events of the Birth of Christ. These programs may be heard at 9:30 Wednesday 22nd through Sunday 26th. Friday night spots several very fine Christmas Eve programs: Lionel Barrymore in a dramatization of Dicken's Christmas Carol at 6:00; Duffey's Tavern at 7:30, and the "new" Bob Hope Show at 8:00. We could wax eloquent over the program for Christmas Day, but, space you know. However, we do want to mention a few of the more notable shows. Also, remind you that every program on Saturday, 25th, is a special Xmas Day presentation. In the morning, Angelus, Jill's Christmas Juke Box, The Hawthorne Thing, and Fred Waring's Show, shine fort has really wonderful half hours. The afternoon brings you, Ranch House Party, a two-hour "command performance", the Carmel Christmas Day Festival, Jubilee, and Mail Call. The five programs just mentioned are "out of this world." Every type of music and the greatest names in show business are jammed into this, the finest four hours we have ever had the pleasure to present. The Christmas Night schedule is not to be found lacking, with Amos 'n Andy, Burns and Allen, Dick Haymes, and Al Jolson, all presenting very fine Christmas programs. THE INDIAN Pare Three

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THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-16 Dec 48-2800. AS I SEE IT By Allen Collier Try as we might we cannot seep to get away from the grid iron season and all the odd happenings that go with it. While the nation's press is trying to convince John Q. Public that Michigan is mightier than Notre Dame or vice versa, the most important incident in the grid iron world has been the naming of the All-America teams. Unlike the large wire services which had their All-America team picked and the pictures already distributed to the sports departments of our nation's newspapers, at the latest by 27 November, we have waited until the season ended for all the teams before making our choices. These we present at this time without malice to anyone, if that is possible in any selection. First Team: Ends, Rifenburg of Michigan and Hart of Notre Dame; Tackles, Nomellini of Minnesota and Wistert of Michigan; Guards, Fischer of Notre Dame and Healey of Georgia Tech; Center, Dednarik of Pennsylvania. In the backfield, we have Walker of S.M.U.; Justice of North Carolina, Van Brocklin of Oregon and Scott of Arkansas. Our second team is almost as strong with Poole of Mississippi and Weiner of North Carolina at ends; Joe Henry of Army and Burris of Oklahoma at guards; Lea of Tulane and Turner of California at tackles and Sarkisian of Northwestern at center. In the backfield we have four more aces in, Jensen of California, Rauch of Georgia, Gage, Clemson and Elliott of Michigan. There you have our All-America selections, for the gridiron season of 1948. The climax of the ending of a great season marked by memorable occasions such as Navy's 21-21 deadlock with Army, So. California's 14-14 draw with Notre Dame and William and Mary tieing the great Charlie Justice led North Carolina team, 7-7. Next week we will have the forecasts of the bowl games ready for you, as well as odd facts about some bowl games that you may or may not already know. Join us then. VERNAM FIELD GOLFERS HERE FOR RETURN PLAY The best the Air Force at Vernam Field had to offer flew to Guantanamo Bay today for a re-match with the golfers of the Naval Station. This was the third meeting between these two teams, the last being on December 5th, at the Vernam Field golf course where the Navy won a 13/2 to 7 victory. The match was to have been completed today and results will be announced in next week's issue. BASKETBALL TEAMS PREPAlRE FOR 1949 DEBUT All overthe. ,'ise, the various activities are busy as bees with .the work of preparing for the coming basketball season. Teams have begun work in earnest as the opening whistle for thefirst game will be blown about mioJanuary. Scrimmages between the various teams continued this week with the High School team appearing in both and losing both. In a last half thriller on Monday, they bowed to Recreation, 35-31 and were trounced by the Naval Hospital quintet on Wednesday night, 50-26. Although losing both exhibitions, the high school lads gained invaluable experience and gave their opponents a run for their money. Certainly they will be one of the most colorful teams in the league. In rolling over the High School "Five" the Naval Hospital quintet showed signs 6f becoming one of the more powerful squads on the Base. F1tTraGrp began working in earnest this week at the Fleet Recreation courts and should be out for scrimmage games in the near future. Also looking for scrimmage games is the Marine Site entry into the Base League. The Leathernecks have been working at night over at Marine Site 2 and should come up with a powerful five jhis season. Four of last year's team will be back and a new lad, Dowler, promises to be the other starter for the Marines. In Monday night's scrimmage, Recreation owes its victory to the fact that time ran out on the High School lads and the terrific shooting of Sammy Krause who bucketed 13 points to lead the victors. Eddie Groome, stellar guard for the high school team, led his team with nine points. In Wednesday night's encounter, Call led the Hospital scoring as he hit 18 points. Zimmerman was hot on his trail with 14 and Moten added 8 to the Hospital's total. For the High School, Edward Ondrasik, tall center,. who doubles as a player-coach, dropped in 15 points and was followed by Pete Broughton with six. Eddie Groome was forced to sit out a large portion of the game with injured feet which hampered his play even when he was in the game. Up 'til now, all indications are that this season's league will be a "hot" one and the standings will be close all the way. Every team is preparing itself to weather any type offense and also dish out a little of its own. This week's Line Scores: Recreation 16 23 27 35-35 High School 4 8 13 31-31 Nay. Hospital 10 22 37 50-50 High School 5 12 22 26-26 NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 19 Dec. to Sat. 25 Dec. Sunday I REMEMBER MAMA Irene Dunne Phillip Dorne Monday WHEN A GIRL'S BEAUTIFUL Adele Jergens Marc Platt Tuesday ALL MY SONS Edw. G. Robinson, Mady Christians Wednesday YANKEE FAKIR Douglas Frawley Joan Woodbury Thursday COPACABANA Carmen Miranda Groucho Marx_ Friday KILLER McCOY Mickey Rooney Brian Donlevy Saturday KID GALLAHAD Edw. G. Robinson Bette Davis NOB TO BE REPRESENTED IN ALL-NAVY TOURNEY The top bowlers of the Naval Operating Base were chosen in recent elimination matches held at the Fleet Recreation alleys this past week. First of the matches were held on Monday night with three men making the team. Originally another match was to have taken place on Wednesday night but unavoidable circumstances would not permit it. Further information as to when the match will be held may be obtained from the Fleet Recreation Office. Those who qualified in Monday night's matches were Chief Ray, SH(B)lc Butler and Jarrett. To make the team, a score of 160 had to be your average. Rules governing competition were those of ABC. INDUCTEES' JOBS SAFE Washington (AFPS) -Men inducted into the Armed Forces under Selective Service may serve for as long as three years without forfeiting claim to their civilian jobs, the Veterans Re-employment Rights Bureau has announced. The new Selective Service Act calls for service of not more than three years, said Robert K. Salyers, bureau director. Under the draft, enlistment is for 21 months, but an inductee may, without loss of re-employment rights, extend his period for a maxmium of 15 months, providing there is no break in the continuity of such service, he concluded. Page Four b


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