Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


















Vol. III, No. 43 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 December 1948


ASSISTANCE THROUGH NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY
This is a second in the series of
articles to acquaint the Naval Operating Base with the Navy Relief Society.
It is the purpose of the Society
that all its services, financial as well as advisory, be of a lasting and truely constructive value. In many cases direct financial assistance, either by loan or gratuity or both are given. In cases where financial assistance is not needed the services of the Navy Relief Nurse, is given through assistance with transportation, housing, securing information about dependency allowances, pensions, government insurance, locating and communicating with Naval personnel, and advising about available community resources such as Aid to Dependent Children, Crippled Children Service, Polio League, Welfare Department and relating services.
Financial assistance is predicated upon two basic considerations: (1) An established Naval status and in case of dependents, actual dependency as opposed to mere relationship, and (2) there must be
a real need.
The following situations in which
financial aid may be granted are:
(a) Where a man has lost his
life and the widow, minor children or truly dependent parents need assistance pending the receipt of Government benefits; or to provide a widow with transportation to her 'family, or to complete a course of vocational training, if she would otherwise have sufficient funds
for basic needs.
(b) When hospitalization is required for acute illnesses by dependents where Naval facilities for such care are not available or for some good reason cannot be utilized, assistance may be given by helping the serviceman or his dependents to pay for such services as ward accomodations do not include the the services of a hospital doctor and when the services of Naval medical officers are not available, the Society- may also assist in paying part of a private
doctor's fee.
LContinued on Page Four)


LETTER OF
APPRECIATION

U:. S. S. GYATT (DD-712)
c/o Fleet Post Office
New York, N. Y.
21 November 1948 From: The Commanding Officer. To: The Commander U. S. Naval
Station, Guantanamo Bay,
Cuba.
1. The Repair Department of the Naval Station was, on various occasions, requested to assist this vessel during its. recent stay in the Guantanamo Area. In each instance, immediate and effective
-action was taken by the Repair Department, enabling this vessel to meet its operating schedule.
2. The cooperation of all Naval
Station personnel was excellent. It is considered that the performance of the welder, Mr. Jose Calderin, was outstanding and worthy of particular. notice.
- 3. The Commanding Officer taies pleasure in expressing his appreciation for the invaluable service rendered this vessel by the Repair Department, U. S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
J. M. WOLFE, JR.

HOSPITAL SERVICE
VOLUNTEERS

-One day last week, as I was walking down the corridor in the Hospital,-I heard a cheerful voice in one of the wards, call out 'B-11'. Naturally, being curious, I stopped to see just what was going on. I noticed a group of ladies playing Bingo with the patients. I was promptly told that those ladies were members of the Hospital Service Volunteers, an organization of women who have set aside a part of their time each week to make things more cheerful for our patients.
Each and every one of us realize what a wonderful job these ladies are doing to keep the morale of our patients at a high level. As we would say in the Navy, you ladies are "4.0".
-An Observer.


NEW GASOLINE STATION
TO OPEN 15 DECEMBER
It has been announced that on or about the 15th of December, the new gasoline station directly behind the Ship's Store will be open for business. The purpose of this activity is to serve all privately owned vehicles.
For the convenience of all persons involved in this change, general car accessories and repair work will be done also. Such items of interest to be sold will include mirrors, wind shield wipers, spark plugs, oil, and tires in popular sizes. This is just one of the many undertakings the Ship's Service Store has done in recent months to make life here at Guantanamo more pleasant.
This project was constructed under the supervision of the Ships Repair Department. The completion of this station adds another job well done to the fine record the Ships Repair Department has established here at the Naval Operating Base.

THRIFT SHOP NOW OPEN

Just'five days ago, the Thrift Shop opened in the building across the street from the Commissary Store where the Mechanical Dairy was formerly located. Entrance is in the rear of the building.
Mrs. J. R. Lanigan, chairman of the Thrift Shop, extends her warmest appreciation to those who are contributing their time and effort to this worthy project.
Since the grand opening, Mrs. Lanigan informs us that the sale of items already turned in are moving successfully.

BON VOYAGE

LCDR J. C. Hill, II, USN, Aide to RADM Phillips, and Public Information Officer has been detached from duties here at Guantanamo.
Upon arrival in the States, LCDR Hill will report to the Navy Department, Washington; D. C., for temporary duty and F.F.T. To LCDR Hill and family, we say "good luck and a Merry Christmas."








Pare Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672

Saturday, 11 December 1948

U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
A. E. Smith --------------------- Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ---- Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipinent, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-86, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's' Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

STORK NEWS
A~PI1. . THERE
L AIN'T NONE!
As usual, physical changes are the biggest news -around the Hospital. Building
17A, former Finance Office, has
NOTES been razed, ad� mitting more air and light to the Corps Quarters. A new medical storeroom is under construction adjacent to the Commissary Office. Lights are being installed on the basket ball court, so that practice and games may be held at night.
The major project which awaits only-the final approval of the Secretary of the Navy is the re-designation and alteration to Quarters "A", "F", and "H". Quarters "A" was formerly occupied by the Naval Station Dispensary; Quarters "F" and "H" are the present Nurses' Quarters. If present plans are approved, Quarters "A" will be converted into quarters for the Nurses and Quarters "F" and "H" will be converted into private. quarters for medical officers and their families.
Christmas plans are being formulated: Two picnics for staff personnel are in the offing and a Christ-, mas Day party for children of the staff.
Mrs. Ethel Spence, civilian clerk in the Finance Department, has returned to work after a brief sojourn in our Hospital as a patient.
The basketball team has been holding daily practice under the leadership of Dr. Ellestad. We have only two men who played on last year's championship team, but we are expecting the team this year to be just as good and retain the Base championship for the Hospital.


Now that a lot of the old clothing on the Base has changed hands, via the Thrift Shop, unconfirmed and unreliable sources are telling this story. It seems as though Mary, by living well, but not too wisely, developed that old middle aged spread, and, as she puts it, her clothes got too small for her. (It's always the same, the 'clothes get too small-never the gals get too big.) Anyway, Mary toted off her clothes to the Thrift Shop, hoping to benefit all concerned. Bright and early Monday morning, Jane, a good friend of Mary, just couldn't wait to get at all the bargains. She spotted some darling dresses
-not her size unfortunately, but just the thing for her friend Mary at home tied down with the kids. In order not to let these wonderful bargains get away from her, Jane bought them quickly and hurried over to Mary's house to show her the bargains she had purchased especially for her. Mary was not only surprised to see her own clothes, but much too much of a good sport to let on. So, she bought back her dresses, and consoled, herself a little knowing that at least the Navy Relief had benefited somewhat by the small margin of profit they had made on the deal.

More unconfirmed reports from unreliable sources have it that LCDR and Mrs. Raymond, who expect to take up living in New York soon, are practicing every night. Southern Gentleman Jack, not too much thrilled with the prospects of big city living, is anticipating the subway rushes. Every night, upon a given signal, he and Ruth jump up and rush for the door and scramble through, elbowing each other madly. It's not only good practice, but it'll probably toughen them up a bit-the better to withstand the elbowing they'll get from the more experienced, less polite, New Yorkers.

The calibre of the movies hasn't improved much lately. It must be kept in mind, however, that even in the neighborhood theatres, at home only twd or three different pictures are shown each week. Here, there's a new (rather, a different) picture every'night, 365 days a year. Hollywood just doesn't turn out that many "A" jobs and it's obvious that we've got to run in "B", "C" and "D" shows to fill our schedule. Incidently, isn't it about time for a re-run of "Salome, Where She
(Continued on Page Three)


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 12 December 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtowni Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


VU-10 NOTES

New arrivals in Hatuey Land include DC3 Mower, TN Sanders, ALAN Williams, and ADC Wilson.
ATAN Stevens has received orders to FAETULANT; AMI Votour will soon be leaving for NAS Quonset Point; AEC Storm is off for Pt. Mugu, Calif.; and LTJG Callahan was seen buying three pairs of saddle shoes for his coming duty at the University of Kansas.
ADI Allen's transfer from UL2's plane captain to the check crew will make several San Juan mamacitas unhappy.
Peggy Ann Lee (7 pounds, 1 ounce) recently reported aboard for duty with Ens. and Mrs. Lee. Ens. John Riggins returned from running amok in Puerto Rico just in time to collect the anchor pool on Peggy Ann's arrival.
Mayor Malinowski and Commissioner of Sanitation O'Brien made an inspection tour of Caimanera last week in some very distinguished company.
The word that Frenchy's Bar in Guantanamo City was for sale had LT. Bertram Drum seeking the hecessary capital for -purchase last week. Heavy acey-deucy losses, a trip to Puerto Rico, and a rash wager on his ability with the .45 cal. 'pistol combined to remove Bertram from the list of eligible buyers, though.
Arsenic and Old -Lace's 14-yearold Aunt Martha is reported to have told LTJG Mortimer Collins that he wasn't very well checked out in this business of being a lover.
UTRON TEN's skipper, CDR. Conroy, will be leaving early next year. His relief will be CDR G. R. Egbert.
When last seen in Miami, LTJG Dahlby was attired in a natty, pinstripe suit- with bow tie and was pleading to be returned to the hot, barren hills that surround Guantanamo Bay.


Pa~re Two


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN Page Three


.I NAS SLIPSTREAM
During the past week we had
several new men reporting for duty at NAS, Guantanamo; they are as follows: Firestone, C. B., AEAA, who was assigned to Operations; Kessel, G. L., YNSA who was assigned to the Personnel Office and last but not least Miskiewicz, L. A., AC2, who was- assigned to Operations. Here's hoping you fellows
enjoy your stay at NAS, Gtmo.
Boetting, W. F., RD3, of GCA,
left for PDSA, NAS, Jacksonville, Florida. for separation. Good luck, Bill. Culpepper, L. L., HM2, will leave for the separation center on Saturday, he is one man the whole Air Station will miss. Stevens, J.
W., SN, is also leaving for separation Saturday. Good luck, Jack.
White, C. C., A01, is all grins,
his Mrs. has arrived. Glad to have
you aboard Mrs. White.
Lt. Sasser, the Communications
Officer, spent a couple of days in
Jacksonville but before he left he purchased several dozen eggs, I
wonder if he broke any?
The Personnel Office welcomes
Bailey, C. F., PNC, who reported recently. He is proving to be very popular with all the force. Someone told me that Chief Bailey was a great fisherman but all he's caught so far has been a cold (I guess he doesn't speak to the fish
right).
Say, Schiermeister, did you ever
find out how to turn a horse ?
The other day, Bowman, CSC,
thought he was in an airplane until the Base Police told him to pull over to the curb (he has been
grounded ever since).
Hickman, W. J., AT2, recently
had to choose between trying for the Aviation Cadet Program or the hand of his best girl. Ask him ,O which he picked? P. S.-Don't tell
the Medical Department.
The Post Office boys (Ahern and
Groves) work on the average of five hours a week (our estimate) and now they are asking for a
day off.
Mrs. Graf, the bookkeeper for
NAS Recreation is complaining that she never catches any fish. I guess she doesn't know you have to put bait on the hook before you catch
them.
There we were, the "Invincible
Bowling Team" (NAS Officers) all set to vanquish the NAS Chiefs at their own game (bowling). Now the contest is on, we bowled as we never bowled before, pins came crashing down so hard and fast that it sounded like the "Battle of the Bulge", and now the game is over. The beer flowed freely (the losing team paid for all) (Officers).
Several of the officers failed to show up, so the Officers appointed Chief Yeoman Pechy to play for them. What happened Chief-did
you throw the game?


ORDNANCE STUFF

By Alston Jones
The office force finally moved into the office again, after approximately three weeks of having the "New Lookers" turn- the place inside out, and the aggravating situation of looking for the things you want most, and finding the things you want least. All in all it would be fair to say that from the looks of the place at present, it was worth the inconvenience.
Chests expand a couple of inches, and "autopatting" on the shoulder can be readily observed each time some one walks in the office these days. To be honest about it, the place looks "algo serio" (slang term for "wonderful," "magnificent" depending on how you look at it).
LTJG Spieth, the Assistant Ordnance Officer was detached from this Base and goes to the USS Kearsarge as his next duty station. He left aboard the Pres. Adams on Thursday, 9 December. LT Spieth reported aboard this Base in September 1946, and was assigned to the Ordnance Department, Naval Station. He is pleasant, jovial and was very much liked by all who knew him, and his detachment is felt with regret. As a "mustang" he knew the ropes and always tried to keep everybody happy, including himself. He hails from Kentucky, and enlisted in the Navy in January 1927, giving him twenty one years service to his credit. HIe had duty on several ships, including the Idaho, Mississippi, Bainbridge, Pensacola, St. Louis, Springfield, and is a "plank owner" of the St. Louis and the Springfield. He saw action in the Asiatic-Pacific theatres of World War II after which he reported for duty in the Bureau of Ordnance, Washington, from where he was sent down here.
His remark when asked how well he liked his duty tour down here, was a casual, "Very, very good," but the way he said it meant a lot more than just that.
The Ordnance Department on a whole honestly regrets to see him go, and wishes to extend their best wishes for Bon Voyage, Happy Landing, and the best of luck for himself and Mrs. Spieth at his next duty station. Hasta luego y hasta la vista (So long "til we meet again).

COME ONE, COME ALL

Coming the 16th and 17th of December, the Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 100 is having their Christmas Carnival. The benefits of this Carnival are being given to the Church Fund.
All Base personnel are cordially invited to attend. There will be amusements for the old as well as the young.


THE CROW'S NEST
(Continued from Page Two)
Danced"? Brother! Last time around, a seaman was, overheard to say that he had seen Salome seven times and each time he hoped that she was going to shake off her veil-but to date she hasn't done it.
Indications are that the "first $600" for the "best'transportation on the Base" hasn't yet been offered. The used car market is interesting to behold. It wasn't long ago that advertising a used car down here was unheard of. All a guy needed to do was to get his orders and immediately his phone jangled front morning 'til night with offers of fabulous prices. The old law of supply and demand is bringing the situation back to normal, and nowadays, if you want to get back what you paid for your 1925 Model T, you might have to advertise for a day or two.
* *_ *
An officer we know is getting so much sleep these days that he's getting circles over his eyes. Not so, however, for soire of the good Gtmo. wives, who, for the want of a good fresh egg, have to get up in the bleak hours of dawn for a place at the head of the eggline. It seems that this problem could be solved either by paying the chickens time and a half for overtime, or getting more chickens. But, it's like everything else . . . as soon as eggs -would become plentiful, the gals would begin complaining about the shortage of nutmeg. If anybody deserves a big "Well Done", LTJG Cozy of the Commissary Stores does for anticipating the many needs of the housewife and making the Commissary just like a "back home" store. Wonder why, though, he hasn't thought of carrying "Stateside" bread - rye, wholewheat, pumpernickel ?
Wonder Why Department. Wonder why WGBY calls their 0730 program "Platter Predictions" when everybody knows well in advance what their scheudle is, and predictions don't enter into it? Also wonder why the program entitled "Club 1215" comes on at 1245?

The truth was stretched just a little bit the other day when an item appeared in the Papoose about Santa Claus coming to town with his team of Gtmo. dogs. There ain't no such animal. Furthermore, Santa's sled is supposed to be pulled by eight animals, and where can you find eight Gtmo. dogs all of one kind? That's picayune, pulling technicalities like that. The important thing is that Santa is coming. It's a step in the right direction
(Continued on Page Four)


THE INDIAN


Page Three







Pa e FourTH N ANtm.n-sDe4250


LARGEST PLANE TO TAKE OFF FROM CARRIER DECK
(SEA)-The Lockheed P2V Neptune has become the largest plane ever to be launched from a carrier deck.
The twin-engined search-patrol plane, using jet assistance, took off from the USS Coral Sea (CVB 43) in a test conducted off the Virginia Capes to determine the practicality of dispatching long-range search craft from a carrier in time of war when suitable-land bases might not be available.
A second Neptune also successfully took off from the carrier, both planes later landing at Naval. Air Station, Patuxent, Md.
Piloting the first plane was Commander T. D. Davies, USN, who two years ago set the world's longdistance record in another P2V Neptune, the Navy's famed "Truculent Turtle" which completed a flight of 11,236 great circle miles in October, 1946. The flight was from Perth, Australia, to Columbus, Ohio, and the distance was covered in 55 hours and 15 minutes. The plane carried a gross load of 85,000 pounds.

NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY
(Continued from Page One)
Assistance may also be granted in the payment of Naval hospital bills for dependents when necessity arises.
(c) Funeral expenses for dependents.
(d) Situations involving temporary distress of dependents for basic living essentials.
(e) Travel in special cases involving critical illness or death. Funds of the Navy Relief Society are not availible to personnel as a matter of convenience in such cases as: annual leave, down payments on cars, getting married, 'business ventures, non-essential debts, etc.
THE CROW'S NEST
(Continued from Page Three)
taken by the people who run Ship's Service. It's a little hard to get the Christmas spirit in this tropical weather, and Santa is just another way of calling attention to this wonderful time of year. Further, a lot of. fast-growing youngsters would have been denied the thrill of actually seeing and talking to Santa if somebody hadn't engineered the deal. Nice going!

To all the other praises being sung, this observer adds his bouquet to all who had a part in the very professionel "Arsenic and Old Lace". It can only be hoped that The Little Theatre movement will grow and that the group will soon again stage another similar production.


AS I SEE ITBy Allen Collier
Partial proof of last week's column setting up the NOB High School basketball squad as a possible hurdle the pennant winning "five" would have to overcome to gain the Base Championship, was echoed in part by the spirited play of that team in their first game scrimmage against the squad representing the Cruiser Worchester.
The lads from the Worchester grabbed a 2-0 lead at the opening jump but had only increased it to a 4-2 lead at the end of the first quarter. At the half the sailors were still ahead by 6-2.
The high school team gained back the lead by the all-around play of Eddie Groome and Pete Broughton on offense and Edward Ondrasik's terrific game under the basket to take the lead after a torrid third quarter by 10-8. Shortly after the fourth quarter began, the Worchester tied the game up and then the two teams matched a couple of baskets to deadlock the game at 14-14 at the end of the regular period of play. The Worchester squad lost little time in dropping a basket through in the first couple of seconds to go out in front to stay, and finally win 20-14.
The high school "five" was hampered by the lack of reserves because of a dress rehearsal of the play Arsenic and Old Lace which took towering Bill Harris and lanky Fred Johnson, both first team boys, and one of the most valuable reserves, "Skiddy" Masterson. Had these three been there it might have been a different story. While the high school lads put up a good fight, it must-be said that both teams looked ragged on passing and other techniques of the game. These will have to be corrected before loop play opens in January.
Odds and Ends
Virtually all sports activity has come to a halt in favor of the rapidly approaching Yuletide season. Pracically all the life comes from the practice and scrimmages between various teams who expect to enter the Base basketball league ... Did you know that what was' probably the most thrilling one man gridiron exhibition ever witnessed, happened back in 1924 when the masterful Red Grange carried the ball five times and each time raced for a touchdown-four in the first twelve minutes of play, little wonder he is respectfully referred to as the "Galloping Ghost" . . . Speaking' of the gridiron world... the prognostications of this writer as to the outcome of the New Year's Day games will be made known in the Dec. 25 issue of the Indian. Watch for them in this column.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 12 Dec. to Sat. 18 Dec.
Sunday
THE IRON CURTAIN
Dana Andrews Gene Tierney Mystery-Drama Shorts 87 Min.
Monday
THE PEARL
P. Armendariz M. E. Marques Mystery-Drama Short 78 Min.
Tuesday
THE FULLER BRUSH MAN Red Skelton Janet Blair Comedy 93 Min.
Wednesday
DEAR MURDERER
Eric Portman Greta Gynt Murder Mystery 90 Min.
Thursday
BERLIN EXPRESS
Merle Oberon Robert ryan . Mystery-Drama Short 86 Min.
Friday
PRINCE OF THIEVES
John Hall Patricia Morrison Robinhood Shorts 72 Min.
Saturday
GREEN GRASS OF WYOMING Peggy Cummings Charles Coburn
89 Min.

MARINES OVERCOME TRAGRP FOR SECOND

The Marines topped the FltTraGrp in a wild game last 'Friday night to take the runner up position in the baseball league here on the Base.
Friday night's battle was a semiclimax to the playoffs after Naval Station had clinched the pennant earlier in the week.
Final standings of the season in-, cluding playoffs are: Team W L . Naval Station ----------- 8 3
Marines -------------- 7 4
TraGrp ----------------6 5
NAS* ----4 5
* Did not participate in playoffs.

Father-in-Law: "I suppose you know that when I die my daughter will inherit 50 thousand dollars... well, why don't you say something?"
Husband: "Drop dead."
Two small boys proved that humans are always out to get something for nothing.
Boy: "My old man's a doctor, so I can be sick for nothing."
Playmate: "My father's a minister, so I can be good for nothing."
Marital experts predict that there will be fewer divorces among former servicemen now living in trailers. No room for argument.


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-9 Dec 48-2500.




Full Text

PAGE 1

ian Vol. III, No. 43 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 December 1948 ASSISTANCE THROUGH NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY This is a second in the series of articles to acquaint the Naval Operating Base with the Navy Relief Society. It is the purpose of the Society that all its services, financial as well as advisory, be of a lasting and truely constructive value. In many cases direct financial assistance, either by loan or gratuity or both are given. In cases where financial assistance is not needed the services of the Navy Relief Nurse, is given through assistance with transportation, housing, securing information about dependency allowances, pensions, government insurance, locating and communicating with Naval personnel, and advising about available community resources such as Aid to Dependent Children, Crippled Children Service, Polio League, Welfare Department and relating services. Financial assistance is predicated upon two basic considerations: (1) An established Naval status and in case of dependents, actual dependency as opposed to mere relationship, and (2) there must be a real need. The following situations in which financial aid may be granted are: (a) Where a man has lost his life and the widow, minor children or truly dependent parents need assistance pending the receipt of Government benefits; or to provide a widow with transportation to her family, or to complete a course of vocational training, if she would otherwise have sufficient funds for basic needs. (b) When hospitalization is required for acute illnesses by dependents where Naval facilities for such care are not available or for some good reason cannot be utilized, assistance may be given by helping the serviceman or his dependents to pay for such services as ward accomodations do not include the the services of a hospital doctor and when the services of Naval medical officers are not available, the Society may also assist in paying part of a private doctor's fee. JContinued on Page Four) LETTER OF APPRECIATION U. S. S. GYATT (DD-712) c/o Fleet Post Office New York, N. Y. 21 November 1948 From: The Commanding Officer. To: The Commander U. S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 1. The Repair Department of the Naval Station was, on various occasions, requested to assist this vessel during its-recent stay in the Guantanamo Area. In each instance, immediate and effective action was taken by the Repair Department, enabling this vessel to meet its operating schedule. 2. The cooperation of all Naval Station personnel was excellent. It is considered that the performance of the welder, Mr. Jose Calderin, was outstanding and worthy of particular notice. 3. The Commanding Officer takes pleasure in expressing his appreciation for the invaluable service rendered this vessel by the Repair Department, U. S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. J. M. WOLFE, JR. HOSPITAL SERVICE VOLUNTEERS One day last week, as I was walking down the corridor in the Hospital,I heard a cheerful voice in one of the wards, call out 'B-11'. Naturally, being curious, I stopped to see just what was going on. I noticed a group of ladies playing Bingo with the patients. I was promptly told that those ladies were members of the Hospital Service Volunteers, an organization of women who have set aside a part of their time each week to make things more cheerful for our patients. Each and every one of us realize what a wonderful job these ladies are doing to keep the morale of our patients at a high level. As we would say in the Navy, you ladies are "4.0". -An Observer NEW GASOLINE STATION TO OPEN 15 DECEMBER It has been announced that on or about the 15th of December, the new gasoline station directly behind the Ship's Store will be open for business. The purpose of this activity is to serve all privately owned vehicles. For the convenience of all persons involved in this change, general car accessories and repair work will be done also. Such items of interest to be sold will include mirrors, wind shield wipers, spark plugs, oil, and tires in popular sizes. This is just one of the many undertakings the Ship's Service Store has done in recent months to make life here at Guantanamo more pleasant. This project was constructed under the supervision of the Ships Repair Department. The completion of this station adds another job well done to the fine record the Ships Repair Department has established here at the Naval Operating Base. THRIFT SHOP NOW OPEN Just five days ago, the Thrift Shop opened in the building across the street from the Commissary Store where the Mechanical Dairy was formerly located. Entrance is in the rear of the building. Mrs. J. R. Lanigan, chairman of the Thrift Shop, extends her warmest appreciation to those who are contributing their time and effort to this worthy project. Since the grand opening, Mrs. Lanigan informs us that the sale of items already turned in are moving successfully. BON VOYAGE LCDR J. C. Hill, II, USN, Aide to RADM Phillips, and Public Information Officer has been detached from duties here at Guantanamo. Upon arrival in t he States, LCDR Hill will report to the Navy Department, Washington; D. C., for temporary duty and F.F.T. To LCDR Hill and family, we say "good luck and a Merry Christmas."

PAGE 2

Pare Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 11 December 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander A. E. Smith ---------------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman .Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipinent, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. STORK NEWS o f) .THERE ~' '' AIN'T NONE! As usual, physical changes .are the biggest news around the Hospital. Building 17A, former Fi-nance Office, has NOTE been razed, admitting more air and light to the Corps Quarters. A new medical storeroom is under construction adjacent to the Commissary Office. Lights are being installed on the basket ball court, so that practice and games may be held at night. The major project which awaits only the final approval of the Secretary of the Navy is the re-designation and alteration to Quarters "A", "F", and "H". Quarters "A" was formerly occupied by the Naval Station Dispensary; Quarters "F" and "H" are the present Nurses' Quarters. If present plans are approved, Quarters "A" will be converted into quarters for the Nurses and Quarters "F" and "H" will be converted into private quarters for medical officers and their families. Christmas plans are being formulated: Two picnics for staff personnel are in the offing and a Christmas Day party for children of the staff. Mrs. Ethel Spence, civilian clerk in the Finance Department, has returned to work after a brief sojourn in our Hospital as a patient. The basketball team has been holding daily practice under the leadership of Dr. Ellestad. We have only two men who played on last year's championship team, but we are expecting the team this year to be just as good and retain the Base championship for the Hospital. -THE 7 Now that a lot of the old clothing on the Base has changed hands, via the Thrift Shop, unconfirmed and unreliable sources are telling this story. It seems as though Mary, by living well, but not too wisely, developed that old middle aged spread, and, as she puts it, her clothes got too small for her. (It's always the same, the clothes get too small-never the gals get too big.) Anyway, Mary toted off her clothes to the Thrift Shop, hoping to benefit all concerned. Bright and early Monday morning, Jane, a good friend of Mary, just couldn't wait to get at all the bargains. She spotted some darling dresses -not her size unfortunately, but just the thing for her friend Mary at home tied down with the kids. In order not to let these wonderful bargains get away from her, Jane bought them quickly and hurried over to Mary's house to show her the bargains she had purchased especially for her. Mary was not only surprised to see her own clothes, but much too much of a good sport to let on. So, she bought back her dresses, and consoled. herself a little knowing that at least the Navy Relief had benefited somewhat by the small margin of profit they had made on the deal. * More unconfirmed reports from unreliable sources have it that LCDR and Mrs. Raymond, who expect to take up living in New York soon, are practicing every night. Southern Gentleman Jack, not too much thrilled with the prospects of big city living, is anticipating the subway rushes. Every night, upon a given signal, he and Ruth jump up and rush for the door and scramble through, elbowing each other madly. It's not only good practice, but it'll probably toughen them up a bit-the better to withstand the elbowing they'll get from the more experienced, less polite, New Yorkers. The calibre of the movies hasn't improved much lately. It must be kept in mind, however, that even in the neighborhood theatres, at home only two or three different pictures are shown each week. Here, there's a new (rather, a different) picture every night, 365 days a year. Hollywood just doesn't turn out that many "A" jobs and it's obvious that we've got to run in "B", "C" and "D" shows to fill our schedule. Incidently, isn't it about time for a re-run of "Salome, Where She (Continued on Page Three) -o CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 12 December 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtowi Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) VU-10 NOTES New arrivals in Hatuey Land include DC3 Mower, TN Sanders, ALAN Williams, and ADC Wilson. ATAN Stevens has received orders to FAETULANT; AM1 Votour will soon be leaving for NAS Quonset Point; AEC Storm is off for Pt. Mugu, Calif.; and LTJG Callahan was seen buying three pairs of saddle shoes for his coming duty at the University of Kansas. AD1 Allen's transfer from UL2's plane captain to the check crew will make several San Juan mamacitas unhappy. Peggy Ann Lee (7 pounds, 1 ounce) recently reported aboard fpr duty with Ens. and Mrs. Lee. Ens. John Riggins returned from running amok in Puerto Rico just in time to collect the anchor pool on Peggy Ann's arrival. Mayor Malinowski and Commissioner of Sanitation O'Brien made an inspection tour of Caimanera last week in some very distinguished company. The word that Frenchy's Bar in Guantanamo City was for sale had LT. Bertram Drum seeking the necessary capital for purchase last week. Heavy acey-deucy losses, a trip to Puerto Rico, and a rash wager on his ability with the .45 cal. pistol combined to remove Bertram from the list of eligible buyers, though. Arsenic and Old-Lace's 14-yearold Aunt Martha is reported to have told LTJG Mortimer Collins that he wasn't very well checked out in this business of being a lover. UTRON TEN's skipper, CDR. Conroy, will be leaving early next year. His relief will be CDR G. R. Egbert. When last seen in Miami, LTJG Dahlby was attired in a natty, pinstripe suit with bow tie and was pleading to be returned to the hot, barren hills that surround Guantanamo Bay. e Page Two THE INDIAN 0

PAGE 3

THE INDIAN Page Three .NAS SLIPSTREAM During the past week we had several new men reporting for duty at NAS, Guantanamo; they are as follows: Firestone, C. B., AEAA, who was assigned to Operations; Kessel, G. L., YNSA who was assigned to the Personnel Office and last but not least Miskiewicz, L. A., AC2, who was assigned to Operations. Here's hoping you fellows enjoy your stay at NAS, Gtmo. Boetting, W. F., RD3, of GCA, left for PDSA, NAS, Jacksonville, Florida for separation. Good luck, Bill. Culpepper, L. L., HM2, will leave for the separation center on Saturday, he is one man the whole Air Station will miss. Stevens, J. W., SN, is also leaving for separation Saturday. Good luck, Jack. White, C. C., AO1, is all grins, his Mrs. has arrived. Glad to have you aboard Mrs. White. Lt. Sasser, the Communications fN Officer, spent a couple of days in Jacksonville but before he left he purchased several dozen eggs, I wonder if he broke any ? The Personnel Office welcomes Bailey, C. F., PNC, who reported recently. He is proving to be very popular with all Lhe force. Someone told me that Chief Bailey was a great fisherman but all he's caught so far has been a cold (I guess he doesn't speak to the fish right). Say, Schiermeister, did you ever find out how to turn a horse? The other day, Bowman, CSC, thought he was in an airplane until the Base Police told him to pull over to the curb (he has been grounded ever since). Hickman, W. J., AT2, recently had to choose between trying for the Aviation Cadet Program or the hand of his best girl. Ask him which he picked? P. S.-Don't tell the Medical Department. The Post Office boys (Ahern and Groves) work on the average of five hours a week (our estimate) and now they are asking for a day off. Mrs. Graf, the bookkeeper for NAS Recreation is complaining that she never catches any fish. I guess she doesn't know you have to put bait on the hook before you catch them. There we were, the "Invincible Bowling Team" (NAS Officers) all set to vanquish the NAS Chiefs at their own game (bowling). Now the contest is on, we bowled as we never bowled before, pins came crashing down so hard and fast that it sounded like the "Battle of the Bulge", and now the game is over. The beer flowed freely (the losing team paid for all) (Officers). Several of the officers failed to show up, so the Officers appointed Chief Yeoman Pechy to play for them. What happened Chief-did you throw the game? ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones The office force finally moved into the office again, after approximately three weeks of having the "New Lookers" turn the place inside out, and the aggravating situation of looking for the things you want most, and finding the things you want least. All in all it would be fair to say that from the looks of the place at present, it was worth the inconvenience. Chests expand a couple of inches, and "autopatting" on the shoulder can be readily observed each time some one walks in the office these days. To be honest about it, the place looks "algo serio" (slang term for "wonderful," "magnificent" depending on how you look at it). LTJG Spieth, the Assistant Ordnance Officer was detached from this Base and goes to the USS Kearsarge as his next duty station. He left aboard the Pres. Adams on Thursday, 9 December. LT Spieth reported aboard this Base in September 1946, and was assigned to the Ordnance Department, Naval Station. He is pleasant, jovial and was very much liked by all who knew him, and his detachment is felt with regret. As a "mustang" he knew the ropes and always tried to keep everybody happy, including himself. He hails from Kentucky, and enlisted in the Navy in January 1927, giving him twenty one years service to his credit. $e had duty on several ships, including the Idaho, Mississippi, Bainbridge, Pensacola, St. Louis, Springfield, and is a "plank owner" of the St. Louis and the Springfield. He saw action in the Asiatic-Pacific theatres of World War II after which he reported for duty in the Bureau of Ordnance, Washington, from where he was sent down here. His remark when asked how well he liked his duty tour down here, was a casual, "Very, very good," but the way he said it meant a lot more than just that. The Ordnance Department on a whole honestly regrets to see him go, and wishes to extend their best wishes for Bon Voyage, Happy Landing, and the best of luck for himself and Mrs. Spieth at his next duty station. Hasta luego y hasta la vista (So long 'til we meet again). COME ONE, COME ALL Coming the 16th and 17th of December, the Fleet Reserve Association, Branch 100 is having their Christmas Carnival. The benefits of this Carnival are being given to the Church Fund. All Base personnel are cordially invited to attend. There will be amusements for the old as well as the young. THE CROW'S NEST (Continued from Page Two) Danced"? Brother! Last time around, a seaman was overheard to say that he had seen Salome seven times and each time he hoped that she was going to shake off her veil-but to date she hasn't done it. Indications are that the "first $600" for the "best transportation on the Base" hasn't yet been offered. The used car market is interesting to behold. It wasn't long ago that advertising a used far down here was unheard of. All a guy needed to do was to get his orders and immediately his phone jangled from morning 'til night with offers of fabulous prices. The old law of supply and demand is bringing the situation back to normal, and nowadays, if you want to get back what you paid for your 1925 Model T, you might have to advertise for a day or two. An officer we know is getting so much sleep these days that he's getting circles over his eyes. Not so, however, for some of the good Gtmo. wives, who, for the want of a good fresh egg, have to get up in the bleak hours of dawn for a place at the head of the eggline. It seems that this problem could be solved either by paying the chickens time and a half for overtime, or getting more chickens. But, it's like everything else ...as soon as eggs would become plentiful, the gals would begin complaining about the shortage of nutmeg. If anybody deserves a big "Well Done", LTJG Cozy of the Commissary Stores does for anticipating the many needs of the housewife and making the Commissary just like a "back home" store. Wonder why, though, he hasn't thought of carrying "Stateside" bread -rye, wholewheat, pumpernickel ? Wonder Why Department. Wonder why WGBY calls their 0730 program "Platter Predictions" when everybody knows well in advance what their scheudle is, and predictions don't enter into it? Also wonder why the program entitled "Club 1215" comes on at 1245? The truth was stretched just a little bit the other day when an item appeared in the Papoose about Santa Claus coming to town with his team of Gtmo. dogs. There ain't no such animal. Furthermore, Santa's sled is supposed to be pulled by eight animals, and where can you find eight Gtmo. dogs all of one kind? That's picayune, pulling technicalities like that. The important thing is that Santa is coming. It's a step in the right direction (Continued on Page Four) THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 4

Page FourTH ININtno ay9ec4-50 LARGEST PLANE TO TAKE OFF FROM CARRIER DECK (SEA)-The Lockheed P2V Neptune has become the largest plane ever to be launched from a carrier deck. The twin-engined search-patrol plane, using jet assistance, took off from the USS Coral Sea (CVB 43) in a test conducted off the Virginia Capes to determine the practicality of dispatching long-range search craft from a carrier in time of war when suitable land bases might not be available. A second Neptune also successfully took off from the carrier, both planes later landing at Naval Air Station, Patuxent, Md. Piloting the first plane was Commander T. D. Davies, USN, who two years ago set the world's longdistance record in another P2V Neptune, the Navy's famed "Truculent Turtle" which completed a flight of 11,236 great circle miles in October, 1946. The flight was from Perth, Australia, to Columbus, Ohio, and the distance was covered in 55 hours and 15 minutes. The plane carried a gross load of 85,000 pounds. NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY (Continued from Page One) Assistance may also be granted in the payment of Naval hospital bills for dependents when necessity arises. (c) Funeral expenses for dependents. (d) Situations involving temporary distress of dependents for basic living essentials. (e) Travel in special cases involving critical illness or death. Funds of the Navy Relief Society are not availible to personnel as a matter of convenience in such cases as: annual leave, down payments on cars, getting married, business ventures, non-essential debts, etc. THE CROW'S NEST (Continued from Page Three) taken by the people who run Ship's Service. It's a little hard to get the Christmas spirit in this tropical weather, and Santa is just another way of calling attention to this wonderful time of year. Further, a lot of fast-growing youngsters would have been denied the thrill of actually seeing and talking to Santa if somebody hadn't engineered the deal. Nice going! To all the other praises being sung, this observer adds his bouquet to all who had a part in the very professionel "Arsenic and Old Lace". It can only be hoped that The Little Theatre movement will grow and that the group will soon again stage another similar production. AS I SEE ITBy Allen Collier Partial proof of last week's column setting up the NOB High School basketball squad as a possible hurdle the pennant winning "five" would have to overcome to gain the Base Championship, was echoed in part by the spirited play of that team in their first game scrimmage against the squad representing the Cruiser Worchester. The lads from the Worchester grabbed a 2-0 lead at the opening jump but had only increased it to a 4-2 lead at the end of the first quarter. At the half the sailors were still ahead by 6-2. The high school team gained back the lead by the all-around play of Eddie Groome and Pete Broughton on offense and Edward Ondrasik's terrific game under the basket to take the lead after a torrid third quarter by 10-8. Shortly after the fourth quarter began, the Worchester tied the game up and then the two teams matched a couple of baskets to deadlock the game at 14-14 at the end of the regular period of play. The Worchester squad lost little time in dropping a basket through in the first couple of seconds to go out in front to stay, and finally win 20-14. The high school "five" was hampered by the lack of reserves because of a dress rehearsal of the play Arsenic and Old Lace which took towering Bill Harris and lanky Fred Johnson, both first team boys, and one of the most valuable reserves, "Skiddy" Masterson. Had these three been there it might have been a different story. While the high school lads put up a good fight, it must be said that both teams looked ragged on passing and other techniques of the game. These will have to be corrected before loop play opens in January. Odds and Ends Virtually all sports activity has come to a halt in favor of the rapidly approaching Yuletide season. Pracically all the life comes from the practice and scrimmages between various teams who expect to enter the Base basketball league .Did you know that what was' probably the most thrilling one man gridiron exhibition ever witnessed, happened back in 1924 when the masterful Red Grange carried the ball five times and each time raced for a touchdown-four in the first twelve minutes of play, little wonder he is respectfully referred to as the "Galloping Ghost" ... Speaking of the gridiron world the prognostications of this writer as to the outcome of the New Year's Day games will be made known in the Dec. 25 issue of the Indian. Watch for them in this column. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 12 Dec. to Sat. 18 Dec. Sunday THE IRON CURTAIN Dana Andrews Gene Tierney Mystery-Drama Shorts 87 Min. Monday THE PEARL P. Armendariz M. E. Marques Mystery-Drama Short 78 Min. Tuesday THE FULLER BRUSH MAN Red Skelton Janet Blair Comedy 93 Min. Wednesday DEAR MURDERER Eric Portman Greta Gynt Murder Mystery 90 Min. Thursday BERLIN EXPRESS l Merle Oberon Robert ;yan Mystery-Drama Short 86 Min. Friday PRINCE OF THIEVES John Hall Patricia Morrison Robinhood Shorts 72 Min. Saturday GREEN GRASS OF WYOMING Peggy Cummings Charles Coburn 89 Min. MARINES OVERCOME TRAGRP FOR SECOND The Marines topped the FltTraGrp in a wild game last Friday night to take the runner up position in the baseball league here on the Base. Friday night's battle was a semiclimax to the playoffs after Naval Station had clinched the pennant earlier in the week. Final standings of the season including playoffs are: Team W L Naval Station -----------8 3 Marines ---------------7 4 TraGrp ---------------6 5 NAS* -----------------4 5 Did not participate in playoffs. Father-in-Law: "I suppose you know that when I die my daughter will inherit 50 thousand dollars well, why don't you say something?" Husband: "Drop dead." Two small boys proved that humans are always out to get something for nothing. Boy: "My old man's a doctor, so I can be sick for nothing." Playmate: "My father's a minister, so I can be good for nothing." Marital experts predict that there will be fewer divorces among former servicemen now living in trailers. No room for argument. THE INDIAN otma. Bay-9 Dec 48-25oo. Page Four


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EUNQLHOQF_7G9Z06 INGEST_TIME 2015-10-14T20:16:42Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00037
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EKJWG7WQB_UDWV77 INGEST_TIME 2015-05-20T21:39:57Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00037
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES