Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

















Vol. II1 No. 42 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 4 December 1948


ADAMS BRINGS CHIEF OF
STAFF AND NAVSTA CO
With the- arrival of the Pres.
Adams the last trip, two distinguished -officers reported aboard for
duty.
Captain Henry Crommelin, USN,
assumed his new duties as Chief of Staff and Aide to the Commander, Naval Operating Base, Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN. The Captain and his wife and four children have established their residence at Evans Point. Captain Crommelin's previous duties prior to his arrival at Guantanamo were Chief of Staff and Aide to the Commander, Destroyers, U. S. Atlantic Fleet.
Captain E. A. Taylor, USN, reported aboard to relieve Commander 0. W. Spahr, USN, as Commanding Officer of the Naval Station. In a short but impressive ceremony on Bay Hill, Admiral W.
K. Phillips expressed how pleased he was that Captain Taylor was back under his command again.
Captain- Taylor's previous duties were Commander of Destroyer Flotilla Two. Captain and Mrs. Taylor and .their daughter are residing in
quarters 1103 on Deer Point.
On behalf of the personnel of the
Naval Operating Base, the Indian wishes that their tour of duty here on the Base may be a pleasant one.
Editor's Note: Watch the Indian for stories of these two officers,
complete with pictures.

NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY
STARTS OFF BIG

The Guantanamo Bay Auxiliary
of Jthe Navy Relief Society has started- off in fine style. In the month of November, the Auxiliary loaned to servicemen a total sum of five hundred and seventy dollars ($570.00) plus a loan of seven hundred dollars -and a gratuity (gift) of $750.00 which is pending an approval from National Headquarters.
,The Auxiliary seeks to serve all Naval personnel to the best of its K ability. You can help the Auxiliary
by giving it support in your conversation.


ATLANTIC FLEET LETTER No. 42L-48

From: Commander in Chief, Atlantic and. U. S. Atlantic
Fleet.
To: ATLANTIC FLEET. Subj: Records of Special Requests by Enlisted Personnel.
1. The General Inspector, U. S. Atlantic Fleet has reported that it is evident from various inspections by him that one of the most common complaints of enlisted personnel is that Special Requests submitted by them are either not acted upon at all, or there is a lack of knowledge on the part of the enlisted men of what action is taken thereon.
2. It is directed therefore that all special requests on board all ships and stations within the Atlantic Fleet shall be submitted in duplicate. The executive officer shall keep on file one copy of the request upon which shall be indicated the action taken.-The Special Request file shall be periodically inspected by the commanding officer, and shall also be made available to inspection parties conducting administrative inspections.
HUGH H. GOODWIN,
Chief of Staff.

JOIN THE FUN AND
SWELL THE FUND
Come to the Christmas Carnival to be held on the Chapel Hill on the 16th and 17th of December at 1900. This Carnival is being put on by Branch #100, Fleet Reserve Association for the benefit of the Church Fund.
The committee regrets to announce that it will not be practicable to have Bingo as previously announced.

THRIFT SHOP TO OPEN MONDAY, 6 DECEMBER

The Thrift Shop will open Monday, 6 December at 0830. All Base Personnel are invited to come in and look around. The Shop is located directly across the street from the Commissary. Entrance is in the rear of the Builidng.


LETTER FROM FIGHTING
SQUADRON SIXTY-ONE
I wish to express the appreciation of the Squadron for the excellent cooperation and courtesy extended by all departments. The use of the facilities and services enabled the Squadron to attain a high degree of skill in their training. The excellent recreation facilities contributed greatly in maintaining high morale of the officers and crew.
Robert C: Jones
Commanding.

BISHOP BLANKINGSHIP TO SPEAK SUNDAY EVE

Bishop Blankingship of Cuba will speak at the Sunday evening Vesper service at the Naval Operating Base Chapel. All Base personnel are invited to attend and hear the Bishop.

USAFI TRAINING IS
FOR INDUCTEES, ALSO
(SEA) - Service inductees as well as new enlistees are urged to take advantage of training courses offered by the U. S. Armed Forces Institute.
The Institute, known so familiarly to Veterans of World War II as "USAFI," offers more than 300 courses ranging upward through the level of the first year of college. Included are the usual academic subjects and numerous courses in the commercial, technical and vocational fields.
Educational officers of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard are prepared to furnish counsel and general advice to interested personnel who wish to cdntinue their education while in the service.

SURGEON GENERAL
IS HONORED

Los Angeles, Calif. (AFPS)
Maj. Gen. Raymond W. Bliss, the Army Surgeon General, was honored here recently at the 31st Congress of the American College of Surgeons.








Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library- Phone 672

Saturday, 4 December 1948

U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
B. M. Thomson ------------------ . Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ... Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

Business in the
t Nursery continues steady pace; five babies have been born since the last edition of the Indian: James Fred Dodge born 18 November to YNC and Mrs. S.
F. Dodge; Robert Nicholas Stiles
born 22 November to gM1 and Mrs. Virgil Stiles; Wilma Jeanne Marshburn born 27 November to SC2 and Mrs. W. A. Marshburn; Richard Price born 28 November to QMC and Mrs. R. J. Price; Peggy Ann Lee born 1 December to Ensign and Mrs. J. F. Lee.
A hearty welcome is extended to Ltjg. V. M. Joyce and Ens. M. D. Petit, both Nurse Corps officers, from Chelsea, Mass.
Ltjg. Dorothy Dalesio, NC, USN, leaves today for duty at Bethesda. Miss Dalesio says she has enjoyed her tour of duty here, but is happy to go back to the States. She will be missed by all hands andwe wish her good luck in her new assignment.
At personnel inspection this morning, Captain Robbins commended CWO Brannon, HC, USN, CSCs Bruton and Mullins and all the commissary staff for their effort in the preparation and serving of the Thanksgiving dinner. The dinner was a great success and was enjoyed by the entire Hospital family. Rear Admiral and Mrs. W. K. Phillips and Chaplain Herald were guests of honor.
George I. Dobbs, HM1 has just received a Unit Citation for outstanding heroism while serving on the USS YMS 311 on April 6, 1945, against Japanese forces off Okinawa.


VU-10 NOTES

Personnel's swinging doors have seen several new arrivals during the past week-CSC Lewis, BMC Campbell, and TNs Lee and Bennett. AD2 Biggerstaff and SD3 Washington were sent to NAS Jax to await discharge. AD3 Cason returned from a short stay in the hospital and SAs Coogan and Fensster are back from some Stateside leave-the latter receiving a warm welcome upon his return.
YNSN Gore (Personnel's strong right arm) will soon be leaving to join the forces afloat aboard the USS Kearsarge. His departure will leave only four yeomen-scarcely enough to turn out the daily quota of squadron orders and memoranda.
Our large drone component, sorely fatigued by early rising, a strenuous acey-duecy program, and the lifting of those massive coffee cups, has decided to forego the former in order that the last two may not suffer. The component's senior aviator, Lt. Sullivan, has received orders to the General Line School, Monterey, California, towards which he will wend his way early in the new year.
Seasickness reared its ugly, green head among "our week-end sailors" making the trip to Portau-Prince aboard the Shakori. Once ashore, however, all hands had an enjoyable time and each returned heavily-laden externally with Haitian loot (many heavily-laden internally with Rhum Barbancourt).
The joint VU-10-NAS party was a smashing success in the most literal sense of the word. A few score abandoned themselxes to Bacchus and a lesser number found themselves possessed by Mars in addition.
A photographic detachment went creaking down to NAS, Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico in one of the Navy's most valuable antiques, the PBY. It will provide a brief respite from the ill Winds that blow across McCalla Field and will give some of the boys a chance to do a little "shopping" in San Juan.
Notes from hither and yon: A snarl in the red tape having something to do with commuted rations revealed, when cleared, a bewildered Leo Marchel owing the Navy somewhere in the neighborhood of $150 . . . Ens. Owen Oberg, the local bookie, left the acey-duecy board long enough last week to play cowboy on one of the local scooters . . . Ens. Gerald P. Johns has reacted upon the Training Department like a bottle of benzedrine upon Citation and Training's once-sagging structure is acting like a V-2 - reaching for the moon.
She: "Not very amusing, is he?"
He: "No, he couldn't even entertain a doubt."



CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY',
Sunday, 5 December 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-NavaltBase Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhous6 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each. Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

WHY GO TO CHURCH?

A bright young man called one Monday morning on an old lady who always goes to church. "Good morning," he said, "and how are you today?"
"Quite well, sir," said she.
"You were at church yesterday, no doubt?"
"Oh, yes, I was -morning and evening."
"Unfortunately, I was prevented from going," confessed the young man..
"What did the minister preach about in the morning."
"Eh, lad, I can't remember," admitted the old lady.
"Well, what was his text?"
"I remember it was a very good sermon, but I can't remember what it was about."
"Well, can you tell me what the sermon was about at the evening service?" queried the young man.
"Well-no, I can't say that I can . . . it seems to have slipped my mind."
The young man smiled. "That's queer," he said. "What is the use of going to church if you can't remember a single word of the preacher's sermon?"
The old lady looked at the young man severely. "Lad," she asked, her voice quivering, "will you do me a favor?"
"Certainly," replied the young man.
"Will you take this old clothes basket to the well and bring it back full of water?"
"Come, come," said the young man. "I'm not quite such a simpleton as that. You know there wouldn't be a drop of Water in the basket when 'I got back."
It was the old lady's turn to smile.
"Perhaps you are right," she said. "I dare say there wouldn't be, but the basket might be a bit cleaner!"
E. E. Bosserman,
Chaplain, U. S. Navy


Paste Two


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN Pna,e Three


The final outcome of the promotion examinations held at the Mar ine Barracks recently, resulted in the following
named men being promoted: To Sergeant
was James. R. Flinchum, Jr.; and to Corporal Were Lloyd Hamby; Enoch I. Dittzler; Harry L. Cooke; and Robert L. Barnum from Headquarters Company. George W. Vaught; Frank Brock; Louis J. McGilbra; William G. Pillow, Jr.,; and Kenneth C. Daley all of Guard Company, added another stripe to their sleeves to make Corporal. Congratulations men. In the Touch Football League the Officer-Staff NCO team and the first platoon team are both tied for first place. Both teams being undefeated, the next contest between these two teams should be something to 'see. That put-put noise heard around Marine Site 2 these days is Sgt J. "Pat" Murphy and his Scooter "Red Devil".
Talk is going around that Murphy is quite disappointed with his newly acquired piece of transportation as he is only getting eighty miles per gallon of gas. Could this be true Murphy, or maybe the carburetor needs adjusting.
Due to leave us shortly is 2nd Lt. William A. Fiander who has received his orders for Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
Another short-timer is SSgt John Katchamar the "Santiago* Kid" who is waiting for his relief before shoving off for the Second Marine Division.

ORDNANCE STUFF

By Alston Jones
Things really hummed around the Ordnance Department this past week, in preparation for the arrival of the LST-528. Maintenance men were "busy bees" getting trucks, trailers, etc., in tip top shape for the gruelling work they have to do.
The Ordnance Office is still in a turmoil, and if it stays that way very much longer we are going to be chasing around looking for ourselves. The painters are doing a fine job though, and the improvement of the office can be quickly noted.
With the Christmas holidays just around the corner, a lot of the fellows are looking forward to that very much cherished and envied Christmas Dinner at home, it is not very likely that any of them will be lucky enough to make it. It is rumored that just around that time, there is gonna be another LST heading this way, and everybody knows what that means. Any way its just a rumor.


TRAGRP TRIVIALS
Passing Parade . . . More new faces around the TraGrp ... latest of the arrivals are Mulcahy, GM1; Sapp, MMC; de Lamorton, RM1; Dodge, YNC; Gugliemo, BMC; Smith, FPC; and Walker, BTC. We are happy indeed to say "Bien vendidos to all. Across the ledger I see that Antony, BMC headed for the States to begin a tour of shore duty at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard... also on the outward bound list were, Baker, RD3; Tucker, RD3; and the seven CPOs from FltTraGrp, Narra . . . who we'd like to thank for their help and hope they come back again next year. Scene of despair . . . Cdr. Patriarca boarding the USS Midway for passage to NAS, Pensacola to begin his new tour of duty.
Idyl Musings . . . Cuff notes on intrigue ... the elaborate measures the USS Midway took to prevent ChTorp Thomas' E-boat attack in their final battle problem Midway had three picket boats equipped with walkie-talkie sets patrolling all approaches with orders to capture the E-boat crew and return them to the Midway to be incarcerated in the Brig until morning with an effigy they were going to hoist to the mast next morning as victory . . . however, Mr. Thomas out-maneuvered them and got his hit . . . the details of which are amusing. Sure would like to know why that GMC keeps that left front door off his Packard ... could it be for abandon ship drills? The reason for the flashing photo bulbs the other day in Captain McIntosh's office was a short but impressive ceremony at which time Captain McIntosh presented Lcdr. Kriloff the Army Distinguished Unit Emblem for services on the USS William B. Preston from 15 Jan., 1940 to' 31 Aug., 1943 . . . also the Captain delivered to Ens. Glaser an appointment as Ltjg. to rank from 23 Aug. 1948.
Sport Thawts . . . The baseball team got back into the fray by beating the Marines 10 to 5 . . . then losing to the Naval Station 16 to 12 . . . however, Fleming nearly pulled the game out of the fire with a round trip hit with the bases loaded. Last Monday nite, behind the steady pitching of Fleming and a four-bagger with the bases loaded, by Watson, the TraGrp came out victorious over the NAS team by a score of 9 to 6. As of this writing we have one game with the NAS team on Wed., Nov. 24 and a victory here will give us the Base Championship. We have all got our fingers crossed. Ask Engel, DCC, to tell ya why he bought those divot diggers? Incidently, a bouquet of roses to ChTorp. Thomas for his fine showing in the Golf Tournament and to think he jus' got serious about five months ago.


NAS SLIPSTREAM

The NAS and VU-10 "All Hands" party held Friday, 19 November at the Enlisted Men's Club, turned out to be a huge success. It was so well attended that additional waiters had to be hired at the last minute. So large was the crowd that the 20 civilian personnel employed were hard to find. Chief Malley acting as Master of Ceremonies, was ably assisted by all members of the Recreation Com-. mittee, Chief Cotton and Jones, AN, proved to be excellent shoppers for gifts for dance prizes. Our boy Tyo, ACI and Chief Garver out did themselves in supplying both music and an exceptionally large crowd of girls from Guantanamo. The food was not only excellent in both quality and quantity, but the selection of food was appreciated by all hands, a good job well done, thanks to Nelson, YN3 and Jones, AN.
Chief Schultz managed to keep the liquor and beer flowing at an enormous rate, but due to the inadequacy of the bar, mixed drinks failed to be served fast enough to meet the demands. Among the notables at the party were RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN, Commander Naval Operating Base; and Capt. W. 0. Gallery, USN, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station.
Ensigns Johns, Oberg and Lee and -Ltjg. Jorgensen materially aided the committee in maintaining order. During my wanderings I met Mrs. Dalton and Mrs. Fenton. I believe their husbands were there also. I hear that Ens. Johns really outdid himself at the party (did I hear right) ? The Leeward Point crowd showed up en masse, including Chief Kent and Ltjg. Baker. How do you feel Kent? The Committee is of the opinion that the Transportation boys did an excellent job in keeping the wheels rolling, thanks, fellows.
What Chief Yeoman failed to get permission from his boss (wife) to attend the party? Robbins of GCA spent most of the evening searching for a certain lady's wrap (what price gigolos). I believe someone should ask Marchburn, CS2 what happened to his drinks. What happened at the CPO Barracks after the party Deason? During one of the dances, the building started to shake and everyone thought an earthquake had started but it was only Schiermeister, ENI, trying his hand at dancing.
The following dance contests were held and winners were as follows: Jitterbug Contest, won by Chief and Mrs. R. A. Cotton, the Rhumba Contest was won by Mrs. J. C. Callahan and L. W. Biggerstaff, ADI. The Waltz Contest was won by 41rs. J. J. Wirtz and B. M. Thomson, SN. A lovely time was had by all.

Save the easy way-Buy Bonds!


THE INDIAN


PAPA Thl"e.p.








Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay 2 Dec 48-2500.


6Z~Q ~45N4~W


The Naval Station won the 1948 baseball title Wednesday night by trouncing the Training Group nine to the tune of 10-1, behind the fivehit pitching of "Jack" Machtolf.
On Monday night the Naval Station had taken the lead in the playoffs by turning back the Marine nine, 16-1. On that night too it was the same Machtolf who gave the victory to the Naval Station. Again Wednesday night he pitched a great ball game with only one day's rest.
The Naval Station got off to a 1-0 lead in the second inning on two hits and had their first big inning in -the fourth when three runs crossed the plate as the boys took advantage of two hits, a fielder's choice and a pair of walks by TraGrp hurler, Frankie Fleming.
Ernie Faile, clouted a home run into far left field in the sixth inning with no mates aboard the bases. The Naval Station garnered two more runs in the seventh and exploded for three more in the ninth to wind up the scoring. The victors gathered nine hits off Fleming and fanned only four times before the right-handed pitches of Fleming. Machtolf, on the other hand fanned eight in registering his victory.
Final standings will also be ptiblished next week.
Line score:
Naval Station 010 301 203 10 FltTraGrp _000 000 000 1
The annual golfers handicap tournament was brought to a close on Thanksgiving day when Chief Wright North, playing Chief "Bill" Foulk, both of VU-10, in the championship flight took his match with a four under par 66. This was a unique feat in itself in view of the fact that Chief North was playing two men at the same time. In addition to Foulk, he was playing George Walker, HM1 of the Naval Hospital for low medalist of the tourney.
Chief North, in posting his trophy winning 66, set a new course tournament record. He had 30 on the front side and 36 on the back side. Even this did not break the old record of 29 on the front side which was set early in the summer, oddly enough by Chief North also.
Although Chief North has participated in several of the tournaments that have been held at the local golf course, it is the first time he has been the champion. On the other hand, one of the members playing today, J. D. Brannon, of the Fleet Recreation Office reached the finals without even swinging a club. Brannon drew a bye in the first round and won the second by forfeit. In the final match he won


from Chief Hall of VU-10 on the 18th green.
After the matches, trophies were presented to Chief North and the winners of the five other flights by Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips at 1300 in a short but impressive ceremony.
The Women's annual handicap tourney also ended Thanksgiving Day with Mrs. S. R. Wideberg winning the championship trophy, posting the lowest score turned in by any woman in the tourney. Mrs. Wideberg had a 30, three over par.
Runners-up to Mrs. Wideberg, were Mrs. George Walker and Mrs. R. D. Woodliff, who placed second and third respectively.
Persons participating in the final matches according to their flights were:
Championship Flight - Chief North of VU-10, and Chief Foulk also of VU-10. This was a threesome with Walker of the Naval Hospital playing North for low medalist.
First Flight-Cdr. Scanlon of Dental Clinic and ChTorp. Thomas of FltTraGrp.
Second Flight-Brannon, SN, of Recreation and Chief Hall, VU-10.
Third Flight-Lt. Keehn of Recreation and Ens. Callahan of VU-10.
Fourth Flight-Chief Gehring of Hospital and Ens. Sprague, NSD.
Fifth Flight - Ltjg. Riggins, VU-10 and Ltjg. Luebbe of NSD.

NAS BEATS FLTRAGRP IN SEASON FINAL, 10 - 8

The Naval Air Station baseball team poured six runs across the plate in a wild seventh inning, as ten men came to bat and then hung on grimly to beat back a Training Group rally in the last of the ninth to win by a score of 10-8.
'After playing three and a half innings of scoreless ball, the TraGrp got a two-run lead. The "Flyers" came back in the top of the fourth to garner two of their own and scored another pair in the fifth to go out front to stay 4 - 2. The pitching of TraGrp blew sky high in the sixth and six runs came in before another hurler was put in to stop the rally. The damage had
-been done then as a result of two home runs. The first man up hit a circuit clout and after two were out with two men on base, another was hit, both to left field to put the game on ice.
The Air Station had the edge in hurling and appeared to be very stingy with hits until the night when the roof caved in, as TraGrp staged a mild rally which fell short by two runs.


AS I SEE IT

By Allen Collier
The rapidly approaching basketball season could be one of the best in the history of the station, and the race for top should be close all the way.
There has been no official announcement as to how many, teams there will be or who they will be but all indications now point to the probable entry of some eight or more teams. Those who are expected to put out teams are, Naval Station, NAS, Marine Site, Naval Hospital, VU-10, Fleet Training Group, and others. There will be a newcomer to the base basketball league this year also. That new team is the NOB High School team which may pose as a threat for the pennant. The High school squad have been working out three times a week and due progress has been noted although like any new team they still have to master the finer points of the game.
Other teams have begun: scrimmaging and at the present it looks like the season will be full of thrills and spills.
Odds and Ends ... There is little doubt that a lot of the money changed hands as a result of Navy's fighting a rpighty Army eleven to a 21-21 draw last weekend in their traditional battle. That goes to prove two things, first you may be down but not out, and secondly, keep your money in your pocket. If you must take chances with it don't bet on the Army-Navy game.
None of the strange incidents linked with the annual golf tournament which was ended on Thanksgiving day, was the fact that in one flight the winner of the trophy played only 18 holes while the loser played a total- of 54 holes. The winner had reached the finals without swinging a golf club. He drew a bye in the first round and won on forfeit in the second round.
The Gridiron season has closed for most of the nation's collegiate football teams and the major bowls have already announced their coming attractions.

ATTENTION FISHERMEN!
It is requested that all fishing gear be checked in to the Fishing Locker as soon as possible. The personnel of the Base have to do with out fishing gear quite often because tackle is not returned promptly.
Help the other fishermen to have a good time by turning in the fishing gear you have had all this time.
Waiter: "Yes, sir, we're very up to date. Everything here is cooked by electricity."
Diner: "So? I wonder, would you mind giving this steak another shock ?"


.


Page Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-2 Dee 48-2500.







Arsenic -and Old Lace, Opens

Tuesday Night, 7 December

The Little Theatre's First Production Is an Assured Success
Show Starts 2000 at Marine Site No. 3.


As a matter of fact, this is the first time in three years that Andy's wife, Madeleine, has been giving him his cues. Heretofore, it has usually been the other way around. Mrs. Reid, who is directing "Arsenic and Old Lace," has taken an active part in the Pensacola and Norfolk Little Theatres and this is her second directorial job. Madeleine is a veteran of such well known plays as "Claudia," "The Trial of Mary Dugan," and "Twin Beds." She worked with the Public Relations Department of the Air Forces during the war and appeared in the Army's "Khaki Kapers," "Unauthorized Abbreviations," and the "Maxwell Field Revue," which toured the States for three months in 1943. The Reids' greatest disappointment will be that they cannot stay in Gitmo. to watch The Little Theatre grow, for they leave for Monterrey, California late in December. They have all ready investigated the coast's potentialities however, and report that there is a flourishing Little Theatre in Monterrey in which they hope to find time to participate. The Reids regret having to leave the Base and The Little Theatre surely hates to see them go.
Lt. John Collins and his wife, Dot, are another family duo who joined The Little Theatre for fun and recreation and have more than found it. John, a native of Portland, Maine, and attached to VU-10, after six years in the Navy, plays a sophisticated drama critic who falls in love with a minister's daughter. As "Mortimer Brewster," the only sane member of the fabulous Brewster family, John estimates that he loses several pounds each night keeping his Brewster aunties out of trouble. His is an energetic and exciting role and he handles it admirably. Dot Collins is the chairman of the "Prop" committee and credit for the stage settings go to her and her assistant, Mrs. Earl Cavanaugh. Planning a Victorian decor amid Guantanamo's bamboo and tropical prints was no easy job but Dottie has managed to catch the old fashioned feeling and place it on the stage of The Little Theatre.
"Mortimer's" true-love, "Elaine Harper," is well depicted by Ramona Sparks, another high school student. Ramona calls Oklahoma home and has been on the Base only about eight months. She too, brings to The Little Theatre previous experience, for as a member of her scllool dramatic club, The Footlighters, she has had elocution and acting training. Ramona is a swimming and sailing fan and adds


to her part the freshness and sparkle of a happy, young juvenile.
Every good play should have at least one menace and in "Johnathan Brewster," who has had his face done over so that he looks like Boris Karlof, we have a villian to end all villains. David Horton's evil characterization is enough to strike terrifying chills into the heart of the audience as he lovingly discusses his many victims and the methods he has used to annihilate them.
Dave is a GCA technician and has been most active in school theatrics before he joined the Navy. All this, added to the fact that he actually is made to look like Boris Karlof by The Little Theatre's make-up expert, Leila Souders, more than equals a top notch performance. Be prepared to come away from "Arsenic and Old Lace" applauding his ability.
Graham Abernathy, whom you have all heard announcing on WGBY, is taking the part of "Dr. Einstein," a plastic surgeon of renown and the friend of our menace, "Johnathan." "Dr. Einstein" . . . not Albert, but Herman! . .. moves in a maze of alcoholism and speaks with a German accent, both of which Graham does to perfection in this interpretation. Graham has lived all over the world, having been born in Shanghai eighteen years ago, and at the outbreak of World War II, finding himself in France, managed to escape on a freighter. He hopes to make announcing his career and then would like to retire to California, his favorite State, to listen to jazz recordings for the rest of his life.
"Arsenic and Old Lace" should be one of the most interesting diversions ever offered by the Recreational Departments of the Base. It is fast-moving, funny and ably characterized, and is sure to be a sell-out. Guantanamo is indeed fortunate to have this new facility and a' long and merry life is anticipated for The Little Theatre. . Tuesday, December 7th, will mark the gala opening of The Little Theatre as it offers its first performance of "Arsenic and Old Lace," for a run of four nights ... Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings at 8:0 p. m. Admission is by ticket only and these tickets may be obtained free of charge at The Little Theatre's ticket office at NOB Ship's Service.
The Little Theatre itself has been completed and Gitmo-ites are in for a rare treat when they enter its portals on Marine Site No. 3. The atmosphere is in true summer theatre style with vivid colors and a small, compact seating


arrangement. Only a little over two hundred people will be fortunate enough to see the bright red curtain swing open on Act I of "Arsenic" on opening night.
Much credit goes to The Little Theatre Group for untiring physical effort over the last two months, for aside from the actual platform and lighting outlets that the Recreation Department of NOB had installed, the entire stage was-built, designed, painted and decorated by the Group. They have hung "flats", doors and windows; borrowed, begged and "cum shawed" furniture, paint, curtains and costumes; while the lighting expert, David Proctor, has experimented for days on end to achieve that eerie glow that comes over the set as the "victims" fall into the hands of the charming Brewster sisters.
The poison-toting Brewster sisters' parts are being expertly handled by Ruth Metzger and Susan Chaffin. "Abby," Mrs. John Metzger, whom most of you know as the School Librarian and Senior English and History teacher, is a native of Pennsylvania and a veteran of previous Little Theatres. The part of "Abby" is the longest in "Arsenic and Old Lace" and Ruth was the first to know her lines. She maneuvers in and around the cast for the entire three acts, is seldom off-stage and can be counted on to give a bang-up interpretation..
Sue Chaffin, the youngest member of the cast plays the oldest character in the play, that of "Martha Brewster." Sue is the fourteen-year-old daughter of Cdr. and Mrs. A. N. Chaffin and a freshman in High School. She more than proves her adaptability and talents by coming directly from cheerleader practice to fall naturally into the role of a sixty-five-year-old maid, who kind-heartedly administers poison to the unsuspecting victims. The theatre will surely hear more of Susan.
Perhaps the most amusing moments in store for the theatre-goers next week will be Andy Reid's immortal rendering of "Charge", as he portrays "Teddy Brewster" who thinks he's Teddy Roosevelt. As "Martha Brewster" so aptly puts it in the first act, "We did so want him to be somebody else for a change, but when we suggested it to him he got under the bed Ind wouldn't come out for days. And we'd much rather he'd be Teddy Roosevelt than nobody!" Andy is primarily a song and dance man, having tripped the light fantastic through many a riusical, including, "Anything Goes," and is equally at home behind the footlights or out front.




Full Text

PAGE 1

__ida Vol. III, No. 42 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 4 December 1948 ADAMS BRINGS CHIEF OF STAFF AND NAVSTA CO With the arrival of the Pres. Adams the last trip, two distinguished officers reported aboard for duty. Captain Henry Crommelin, USN, assumed his new duties as Chief of Staff and Aide to the Commander, Naval Operating Base, Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN. The Captain and his wife and four children have established their residence at Evans Point. Captain Crommelin's previous duties prior to his arrival at Guantanamo were Chief of Staff and Aide to the Commander, Destroyers, U. S. Atlantic Fleet. Captain E. A. Taylor, USN, reported aboard to relieve Commander 0. W. Spahr, USN, as Commanding Officer of the Naval Station. In a short but impressive ceremony on Bay Hill, Admiral W. K. Phillips expressed how pleased he was that Captain Taylor was back under his command again. CaptainTaylor's previous duties were Commander of Destroyer Flotilla Two. Captain and Mrs. Taylor and .their daughter are residing in quarters 1103 on Deer Point. On behalf of the personnel of the Naval Operating Base, the Indian wishes that their tour of duty here on the Base may be a pleasant one. Editor's Note: Watch the Indian for stories of these two officers, complete with pictures. NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY STARTS OFF BIG The Guantanamo Bay Auxiliary of the Navy Relief Society has started off in fine style. In the month of November, the Auxiliary loaned to servicemen a total sum of five hundred and seventy dollars ($570.00) plus a loan of seven hundred dollars and a gratuity (gift) of $750.00 which is pending an approval from National Headquarters. The Auxiliary seeks to serve all Naval personnel to the best of its ability. You can help the Auxiliary by giving it support in your conversation. ATLANTIC FLEET LETTER No. 42L-48 From: Commander in Chief, Atlantic and U. S. Atlantic Fleet. To: ATLANTIC FLEET. Subj: Records of Special Requests by Enlisted Personnel. 1. The General Inspector, U. S. Atlantic Fleet has reported that it is evident from various inspections by him that one of the most common complaints of enlisted personnel is that Special Requests submitted by them are either not acted upon at all, or there is a lack of knowledge on the part. of the enlisted men of what action is taken thereon. 2. It is directed therefore that all special requests on board all ships and stations within the Atlantic Fleet shall be submitted in duplicate. The executive officer shall keep on file one copy of the request upon which shall be indicated the action taken. The Special Request file shall be periodically inspected by the commanding officer, and shall also be made available to inspection parties conducting administrative inspections. HUGH H. GOODWIN, Chief of Staff. JOIN THE FUN AND SWELL THE FUND Come to the Christmas Carnival to be held on the Chapel Hill on the 16th and 17th of December at 1900. This Carnival is being put on by Branch #100, Fleet Reserve Association for the benefit of the Church Fund. The committee regrets to announce that it will not be practicable to have Bingo as previously announced. THRIFT SHOP TO OPEN MONDAY, 6 DECEMBER The Thrift Shop will open Monday, 6 December at 0830. All Base Personnel are invited to come in and look around. The Shop is located directly across the street from the Commissary. Entrance is in the rear of the Builidng. LETTER FROM FIGHTING SQUADRON SIXTY-ONE I wish to express the appreciation of the Squadron for the excellent cooperation and courtesy extended by all departments. The use of the facilities and services enabled the Squadron to attain a high degree of skill in their training. The excellent recreation facilities contributed greatly in maintaining high morale of the officers and crew. Robert C. Jones Commanding. BISHOP BLANKINGSHIP TO SPEAK SUNDAY EVE Bishop Blankingship of Cuba will speak at the Sunday evening Vesper service at the Naval Operating Base Chapel. All Base personnel are invited to attend and hear the Bishop. USAFI TRAINING IS FOR INDUCTEES, ALSO (SEA) -Service inductees as well as new enlistees are urged to take advantage of training courses offered by the U. S. Armed Forces Institute. The Institute, known so familiarly to veterans of World War II as "USAFI," offers more than 300 courses ranging upward through the level of the first year of college. Included are the usual academic subjects and numerous courses in the commercial, technical and vocational fields. Educational officers of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force and Coast Guard are prepared to furnish counsel and general advice to interested personnel who wish to continue their education while in the service. SURGEON GENERAL IS HONORED Los Angeles, Calif. (AFPS) Maj. Gen. Raymond W. Bliss, the Army Surgeon General, was honored here recently at the 31st Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 4 December 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander B. M. Thomson------------------. Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman----Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. Business in the os Nursery continues at a steady pace; five babies have been born since the last edition of the Indian: Jams Fred Dodge born 18 November to N a YNC and Mrs. S. NOTE S F. Dodge; Robert Nicholas Stiles born 22 November to HM1 and Mrs. Virgil Stiles; Wilma Jeanne Marshburn born 27 November to SC2 and Mrs. W. A. Marshburn; Richard Price born 28 November to QMC and Mrs. R. J. Price; Peggy Ann Lee born 1 December to Ensign and Mrs. J. F. Lee. A hearty welcome is extended to Ltjg. V. M. Joyce and Ens. M. D. Petit, both Nurse Corps officers, from Chelsea, Mass. Ltjg. Dorothy Dalesio, NC, USN, leaves today for duty at Bethesda. Miss Dalesio says she has enjoyed her tour of duty here, but is happy to go back to the States. She will be missed by all hands and we wish her good luck in her new assignment. At personnel inspection this morning, Captain Robbins commended CWO Brannon, HC, USN, CSCs Bruton and Mullins and all the commissary staff for their effort in the preparation and serving of the Thanksgiving dinner. The dinner was a great success and was enjoyed by the entire Hospital family. Rear Admiral and Mrs. W. K. Phillips and Chaplain Herald were guests of honor. George I. Dobbs, HM1 has just received a Unit Citation for outstanding heroism while serving on the USS YMS 311 on April 6, 1945, against Japanese forces off Okinawa. VU-10 NOTES Personnel's swinging doors have seen several new arrivals during the past week-CSC Lewis, BMC Campbell, and TNs Lee and Bennett. AD2 Biggerstaff and SD3 Washington were sent to NAS Jax to await discharge. AD3 Cason returned from a short stay in the hospital and SAs Coogan and Fensster are back from some Stateside leave-the latter receiving a warm welcome upon his return. YNSN Gore (Personnel's strong right arm) will soon be leaving to join the forces afloat aboard the USS Kearsarge. His departure will leave only four yeomen-scarcely enough to turn out the daily quota of squadron orders and memoranda. Our large drone component, sorely fatigued by early rising, a strenuous acey-duecy program, and the lifting of those massive coffee cups, has decided to forego the former in order that the last two may not suffer. The component's senior aviator, Lt. Sullivan, has received orders to the General Line School, Monterey, California, towards which he will wend his way early in the new year. Seasickness reared its ugly, green head among "our week-end sailors" making the trip to Portau-Prince aboard the Shakori. Once ashore, however, all hands had an enjoyable time and each returned heavily-laden externally with Haitian loot (many heavily-laden internally with Rhum Barbancourt). The joint VU-10-NAS party was a smashing success in the most literal sense of the word. A few score abandoned themselxes to Bacchus and a lesser number found themselves possessed by Mars in addition. A photographic detachment went creaking down to NAS, Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico in one of the Navy's most valuable antiques, the PBY. It will provide a brief respite from the ill Winds that blow across McCalla Field and will give some of the boys a chance to do a little "shopping" in San Juan. Notes from hither and yon: A snarl in the red tape having something to do with commuted rations revealed, when cleared, a bewildered Leo Marchel owing the Navy somewhere in the neighborhood of $150 ...Ens. Owen Oberg, the local bookie, left the acey-duecy board long enough last week to play cowboy on one of the local scooters ...Ens. Gerald P. Johns has reacted upon the Training Department like a bottle of benzedrine upon Citation and Training's once-sagging structure is acting like a V-2 -reaching for the moon. She: "Not very amusing, is he?" He: "No, he couldn't even entertain a doubt." CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY' Sunday, 5 December 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) WHY GO TO CHURCH? A bright young man called one Monday morning on an old lady who always goes to church. "Good morning," he said, "and how are you today?" "Quite well, sir," said she. "You were at church yesterday, no doubt?" "Oh, yes, I was -morning and evening." "Unfortunately, I was prevented from going," confessed the young man. "What did the minister preach about in the morning." "Eh, lad, I can't remember," admitted the old lady. "Well, what was his text?" "I remember it was a very good sermon, but I can't remember what it was about." "Well, can you tell me what the sermon was about at the evening service?" queried the young man. "Well-no, I can't say that I can it seems to have slipped my mind." The young man smiled. "That's queer," he said. "What is the use of going to church if you can't remember a single word of the preacher's sermon?" The old lady looked at the young man severely. "Lad," she asked, her voice quivering, "will you do me a favor?" "Certainly," replied the young man. "Will you take this old clothes basket to the well and bring it back full of water?" "Come, come," said the young man. "I'm not quite such a simpleton as that. You know there wouldn't be a drop of water in the basket when I got back." It was the old lady's turn to smile. "Perhaps you are right," she said. "I dare say there wouldn't be, but the basket might be a bit cleaner!" E. E. Bosserman, Chaplain, U. S. Navy 0 Page Two THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

THE INDIAN Pqaze Three The final outcome of the promotion examinations held at the a Mar ine Bar-racks recently, resulted in the following named men being promoted: To Sergeant was James R. Flinchum, Jr.; and to Corporal were Lloyd Hamby; Enoch I. Dittzler; Harry L. Cooke; and Robert L. Barnum from Headquarters Company. George W. Vaught; Frank Brock; Louis J. McGilbra; William G. Pillow, Jr.,; and Kenneth C. Daley all of Guard Company, added another stripe to their sleeves to make Corporal. Congratulations men. In the Touch Football League the Officer-Staff NCO team and the first platoon team are both tied for first place. Both teams being undefeated, the next contest between these two teams should be something to see. That put-put noise heard around Marine Site 2 these days is Sgt J. "Pat" Murphy and his Scooter "Red Devil". Talk is going around that Murphy is quite disappointed with his newly acquired piece of transportation as he is only getting eighty miles per gallon of gas. Could this be true Murphy, or maybe the carburetor needs adjusting. Due to leave us shortly is 2nd Lt. William A. Fiander who has received his orders for Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Another short-timer is SSgt John Katchamar the "Santiago Kid" who is waiting for his relief before shoving off for the Second Marine Division. ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones Things really hummed around the Ordnance Department this past week, in preparation for the arrival of the LST-528. Maintenance men were "busy bees" getting trucks, trailers, etc., in tip top shape for the gruelling work they have to do. The Ordnance Office is still in a turmoil, and if it stays that way very much longer we are going to be chasing around looking for ourselves. The painters are doing a fine job though, and the improvement of the office can be quickly noted. With the Christmas holidays just around the corner, a lot of the fellows are looking forward to that very much cherished and envied Christmas Dinner at home, it is not very likely that any of them will be lucky enough to make it. It is rumored that just around that time, there is gonna be another LST heading this way, and everybody knows what that means. Any way its just a rumor. TRAGRP TRIVIALS Passing Parade ...More new faces around the TraGrp ...latest of the arrivals are Mulcahy, GM1; Sapp, MMC; de Lamorton, RM1; Dodge, YNC; Gugliemo, BMC; Smith, FPC; and Walker, BTC. We are happy indeed to say "Bien vendidos to all. Across the ledger I see that Antony, BMC headed for the States to begin a tour of shore duty at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard ..also on the outward bound list were, Baker, RD3; Tucker, RD3; and the seven CPOs from FltTraGrp, Narra ...who we'd like to thank for their help and hope they come back again next year. Scene of despair ...Cdr. Patriarea boarding the USS Midway for passage to NAS, Pensacola to begin his new tour of duty. Idyl Musings ...Cuff notes on intrigue ...the elaborate measures the USS Midway took to prevent ChTorp Thomas' E-boat attack in their final battle problem Midway had three picket boats equipped with walkie-talkie sets patrolling all approaches with orders to capture the E-boat crew and return them to the Midway to be incarcerated in the Brig until morning with an effigy they were going to hoist to the mast next morning as victory ...however, Mr. Thomas out-maneuvered them and got his hit ...the details of which are amusing. Sure would like to know why that GMC keeps that left front door off his Packard could it be for abandon ship drills? The reason for the flashing photo bulbs the other day in Captain McIntosh's office was a short but impressive ceremony at which time Captain McIntosh presented Lcdr. Kriloff the Army Distinguished Unit Emblem for services on the USS William B. Preston from 15 Jan., 1940 to 31 Aug., 1943 also the Captain delivered to Ens. Glaser an appointment as Ltjg. to rank from 23 Aug. 1948. Sport Thawts ...The baseball team got back into the fray by beating the Marines 10 to 5 then losing to the Naval Station 16 to 12 ...however, Fleming nearly pulled the game out of the fire with a round trip hit with the bases loaded. Last Monday nite, behind the steady pitching of Fleming and a four-bagger with the bases loaded, by Watson, the TraGrp came out victorious over the NAS team by a score of 9 to 6. As of this writing we have one game with the NAS team on Wed., Nov. 24 and a victory here will give us the Base Championship. We have all got our fingers crossed. Ask Engel, DCC, to tell ya why he bought those divot diggers? Incidently, a bouquet of roses to ChTorp. Thomas for his fine showing in the Golf Tournament and to think he jus' got serious about five months ago. NAS SLIPSTREAM The NAS and VU-10 "All Hands" party held Friday, 19 November at the Enlisted Men's Club, turned out to be a huge success. It was so well attended that additional waiters had to be hired at the last minute. So large was the crowd that the 20 civilian personnel employed were hard to find. Chief Malley acting as Master of Ceremonies, was ably assisted by all members of the Recreation Committee, Chief Cotton and Jones, AN, proved to be excellent shoppers for gifts for dance prizes. Our boy Tyo, AC1 and Chief Garver out did themselves in supplying both music and an exceptionally large crowd of girls from Guantanamo. The food was not only excellent in both quality and quantity, but the selection of food was appreciated by all hands, a good job well done, thanks to Nelson, YN3 and Jones, AN. Chief Schultz managed to keep the liquor and beer flowing at an enormous rate, but due to the inadequacy of the bar, mixed drinks failed to be served fast enough to meet the demands. Among the notables at the party were RADM. W. K. Phillips, USN, Commander Naval Operating Base; and Capt. W. 0. Gallery, USN, Commanding Officer, Naval Air Station. Ensigns Johns, Oberg and Lee and -Ltjg. Jorgensen materially aided the committee in maintaining order. During my wanderings I met Mrs. Dalton and Mrs. Fenton. I believe their husbands were there also. I hear that Ens. Johns really outdid himself at the party (did I hear right) ? The Leeward Point crowd showed up en masse, including Chief Kent and Ltjg. Baker. How do you feel Kent? The Committee is of the opinion that the Transportation boys did an excellent job in keeping the wheels rolling, thanks, fellows. What Chief Yeoman failed to get permission from his boss (wife) to attend the party? Robbins of GCA spent most of the evening searching for a certain lady's wrap (what price gigolos). I believe someone should ask Marchburn, CS2 what happened to his drinks. What happened at the CPO Barracks after the party Deason ? During one of the dances, the building started to shake and everyone thought an earthquake had started but it was only Schiermeister, EN1, trying his hand at dancing. The following dance contests were held and winners were as follows: Jitterbug Contest, won by Chief and Mrs. R. A. Cotton, the Rhumba Contest was won by Mrs. J. C. Callahan and L. W. Biggerstaff, AD1. The Waltz Contest was won by Mrs. J. J. Wirtz and B. M. Thomson, SN. A lovely time was had by all. Save the easy way-Buy Bonds! THE INDIAN Pare Three

PAGE 4

Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-2 Dec 48-2500. s .-o The Naval Station won the 1948 baseball title Wednesday night by trouncing the Training Group nine to the tune of 10-1, behind the fivehit pitching of "Jack" Machtolf. On Monday night the Naval Station had taken the lead in the playoffs by turning back the Marine nine, 16-1. On that night too it was the same Machtolf who gave the victory to the Naval Station. Again Wednesday night he pitched a great ball game with only one day's rest. The Naval Station got off to a 1-0 lead in the second inning on two hits and had their first big inning in the fourth when three runs crossed the plate as the boys took advantage of two hits, a fielder's choice and a pair of walks by TraGrp hurler, Frankie Fleming. Ernie Faile, clouted a home run into far left field in the sixth inning with no mates aboard the bases. The Naval Station garnered two more runs in the seventh and exploded for three more in the ninth to wind up the scoring. The victors gathered nine hits off Fleming and fanned only four times before the right-handed pitches of Fleming. Machtolf, on the other hand fanned eight in registering his victory. Final standings will also be ptiblished next week. Line score: Naval Station 010 301 203 10 F1tTraGrp _-000 000 000 1 The annual golfers handicap tournament was brought to a close on Thanksgiving day when Chief Wright North, playing Chief "Bill" Foulk, both of VU-10, in the championship flight took his match with a four under par 66. This was a unique.feat in itself in view of the fact that Chief North was playing two men at the same time. In addition to Foulk, he was playing George Walker, HM1 of the Naval Hospital for low medalist of the tourney. Chief North, in posting his trophy winning 66, set a new course tournament record. He had 30 on the front side and 36 on the back side. Even this did not break the old record of 29 on the front side which was set early in the summer, oddly enough by Chief North also. Although Chief North has participated in several of the tournaments that have been held at the local golf course, it is the first time he has been the champion. On the other hand, one of the members playing today, J. D. Brannon, of the Fleet Recreation Office reached the finals without even swinging a club. Brannon drew a bye in the first round and won the second by forfeit. In the final match he won from Chief Hall of VU-10 on the 18th green. After the matches, trophies were presented to Chief North and the winners of the five other flights by Rear Admiral W." K. Phillips at 1300 in a short but impressive ceremony. The Women's annual handicap tourney also ended Thanksgiving Day with Mrs. S. R. Wideberg winning the championship trophy, posting the lowest score turned in by any woman in the tourney. Mrs. Wideberg had a 30, three over par. Runners-up to Mrs. Wideberg, were Mrs. George Walker and Mrs. R. D. Woodliff, who placed second and third respectively. Persons participating in the final matches according to their flights were: Championship Flight -Chief North of VU-10, and Chief Foulk also of VU-10. This was a threesome with Walker of the Naval Hospital playing North for low medalist. First Flight -Cdr. Scanlon of Dental Clinic and ChTorp. Thomas of F1tTraGrp. Second Flight-Brannon, SN, of Recreation and Chief Hall, VU-10. Third Flight-Lt. Keehn of Recreation and Ens. Callahan of VU-10. Fourth Flight-Chief Gehring of Hospital and Ens. Sprague, NSD. Fifth Flight -Ltjg. Riggins, VU-10 and Ltjg. Luebbe of NSD. NAS BEATS FLTRAGRP IN SEASON FINAL, 10 -8 The Naval Air Station baseball team poured six runs across the plate in a wild seventh inning, as ten men came to bat and then hung on grimly to beat back a Training Group rally in the last of the ninth to win by a score of 10 -8. After playing three and a half innings of scoreless ball, the TraGrp got a two-run lead. The "Flyers" came back in the top of the fourth to garner two of their own and scored another pair in the fifth to go out front to stay 4 -2. The pitching of TraGrp blew sky high in the sixth and six runs came in before another hurler was put in to stop the rally. The damage had -been done then as a result of two home runs. The first man up hit a circuit clout and after two were out with two men on base, another was hit, both to left field to put the game on ice. The Air Station had the edge in hurling and appeared to be very stingy with hits until the night when the roof caved in, as TraGrp staged a mild rally which fell short by two runs. AS I SEE IT By Allen Collier The rapidly approaching basketball season could be one of the best in the history of the station, and the race for top should be close all the way. There has been no official announcement as to how many teams there will be or who they will be but all indications now point to the probable entry of some eight or more teams. Those who are expected to put out teams are, Naval Station, NAS, Marine Site, Naval Hospital, VU-10, Fleet Training Group, and others. There will be a newcomer to the base basketball league this year also. That new team is the NOB High School team which may pose as a threat for the pennant. The High school squad have been working out three times a week and due progress has been noted although like any new team they still have to master the finer points of the game. Other teams have begun scrimmaging and at the present it looks like the season will be full of thrills and spills. Odds and Ends ...There is little doubt that a lot of the money changed hands as a result of Navy's fighting a mighty Army eleven to a 21-21 draw last weekend in their traditional battle. That goes to prove two things, first you may be down but not out, and secondly, keep your money in your pocket. If you must take chances with it don't bet on the Army-Navy game. None of the strange incidents linked with the annual golf tournament which was ended on Thanksgiving day, was the fact that in one flight the winner of the trophy played only 18 holes while the loser played a total of 54 holes. The winner had reached the finals without swinging a golf club. He drew a bye in the first round and won on forfeit in the second round. The Gridiron season has closed for most of the nation's collegiate football teams and the major bowls have already announced their coming attractions. ATTENTION FISHERMEN! It is requested that all fishing gear be checked in to the Fishing Locker as soon as possible. The personnel of the Base have to do with out fishing gear quite often because tackle is not returned promptly. Help the other fishermen to have a good time by turning in the fishing gear you have had all this time. Waiter: "Yes, sir, we're very up to date. Everything here is cooked by electricity." Diner: "So? I wonder, would you mind giving this steak another shock?" 0 01 Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-2 Dee 48-2500.

PAGE 5

Arsenic and Old Lace Opens Tuesday Night, 7 December The Little Theatre's First Production Is an Assured Success Show Starts 2000 at Marine Site No. 3. As a matter of fact, this is the first time in three years that Andy's wife, Madeleine, has been giving him his cues. Heretofore, it has usually been the other way around. Mrs. Reid, who is directing "Arsenic and Old Lace," has taken an active part in the Pensacola and Norfolk Little Theatres and this is her second directorial job. Madeleine is a veteran of such well known plays as "Claudia," "The Trial of Mary Dugan," and "Twin Beds." She worked with the Publie Relations Department of the Air Forces during the war and appeared in the Army's "Khaki Kapers," "Unauthorized Abbreviations," and the "Maxwell Field Revue," which toured the States for three months in 1943. The Reids' greatest disappointment will be that they cannot stay in Gitmo. to watch The Little Theatre grow, for they leave for Monterrey, California late in December. They have all ready investigated the coast's potentialities however, and report that there is a flourishing Little Theatre in Monterrey in which they hope to find time to participate. The Reids regret having to leave the Base and The Little Theatre surely hates to see them go. Lt. John Collins and his wife, Dot, are another family duo who joined The Little Theatre for fun and recreation and have more than found it. John, a native of Portland, Maine, and attached to VU-10, after six years in the Navy, plays a sophisticated drama critic who falls in love with a minister's daughter. As "Mortimer Brewster," the only sane member of the fabulous Brewster family, John estimates that he loses several pounds each night keeping his Brewster aunties out of trouble. His is an energetic and exciting role and he handles it admirably. Dot Collins is the chairman of the "Prop" committee and credit for the stage settings go to her and her assistant, Mrs. Earl Cavanaugh. Planning a Victorian decor amid Guantanamo's bamboo and tropical prints was no easy job but Dottie has managed to catch the old fashioned feeling and place it on the stage of The Little Theatre. ."Mortimer's" true-love, "Elaine Harper," is well depicted by Ramona Sparks, another high school student. Ramona calls Oklahoma home and has been on the Base only about eight months. She too, brings to The Little Theatre previous experience, for as a member of her school dramatic club, The Footlighters, she has had elocution and acting training. Ramona is a swimming and sailing fan and adds to her part the freshness and sparkle of a happy, young juvenile. Every good play should have at least one menace and in "Johnathan Brewster," who has had his face done over so that he looks like Boris Karlof, we have a villian to end all villains. David Horton's evil characterization is enough to strike terrifying chills into the heart of the audience as he lovingly discusses his many victims and the methods he has used to annihilate them. Dave is a GCA technician and has been most active in school theatrics before he joined the Navy. All this, added to the fact that he actually is made to look like Boris Karlof by The Little Theatre's make-up expert, Leila Souders, more than equals a top notch performance. Be prepared to come away from "Arsenic and Old Lace" applauding his ability. Graham Abernathy, whom you have all heard announcing on WGBY, is taking the part of "Dr. Einstein," a plastic surgeon of renown and the friend of our menace, "Johnathan." "Dr. Einstein" ... not Albert, but Herman! ...moves in a maze of alcoholism and speaks with a German accent, both of which Graham does to perfection in this interpretation. Graham has lived all over the world, having been born in Shanghai eighteen years ago, and at the outbreak of World War II, finding himself in France, managed to escape on a freighter. He hopes to make announcing his career and then would like to retire to California, his favorite State, to listen to jazz recordings for the rest of his life. "Arsenic and Old Lace" should be one of the most interesting diversions ever offered by the Recreational Departments of the Base. It is fast-moving, funny and ably characterized, and is sure to be a sell-out. Guantanamo is indeed fortunate to have this new facility and a long and merry life is anticipated for The Little Theatre. .Tuesday, December 7th, will mark the gala opening of The Little Theatre as it offers its first performance of "Arsenic and Old Lace," for a run of four nights .. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday evenings at 8:00 p. m. Admission is by ticket only and these tickets may be obtained free of charge at The Little Theatre's ticket office at NOB Ship's Service. The Little Theatre itself has been completed and Gitmo-ites are in for a rare treat when they enter its portals on Marine Site No. 3. The atmosphere is in true summer theatre style with vivid colors and a small, compact seating arrangement. Only a little over two hundred people will be fortunate enough to see the bright red curtain swing open on Act I of "Arsenic" on opening night. Much credit goes to The Little Theatre Group for untiring physical effort over the last two months, for aside from the actual platform and lighting outlets that the Recreation Department of NOB had installed, the entire stage was built, designed, painted and decorated by the Group. They have hung "flats", doors and windows; borrowed, begged and "cum shawed" furniture, paint, curtains and costumes; while the lighting expert, David Proctor, has experimented for days on end to achieve that eerie glow that comes over the set as the "victims" fall into the hands of the charming Brewster sisters. The poison-toting Brewster sisters' parts are being expertly handled by Ruth Metzger and Susan Chaffin. "Abby," Mrs. John Metzger, whom most of you know as the School Librarian and Senior English and History teacher, is a native of Pennsylvania and a veteran of previous Little Theatres. The part of "Abby" is the longest in "Arsenic and Old Lace" and Ruth was the first to know her lines. She maneuvers in and around the cast for the entire three acts, is seldom off-stage and can be counted on to give a bang-up interpretation. Sue Chaffin, the youngest member of the cast plays the oldest character in the play, that of "Martha Brewster." Sue is the fourteen-year-old daughter of Cdr. and Mrs. A. N. Chaffin and a freshman in High School. She more than proves her adaptability and talents by coming directly from cheerleader practice to fall naturally into the role of a sixty-five-year-old maid, who kind-heartedly administers poison to the unsuspecting victims. The theatre will surely hear more of Susan. Perhaps the most amusing moments in store for the theatre-goers next week will be Andy Reid's immortal rendering of "Charge", as he portrays "Teddy Brewster" who thinks he's Teddy Roosevelt. As "Martha Brewster" so aptly puts it in the first act, "We did so want him to be somebody else for a change, but when we suggested it to him he got under the bed and wouldn't come out for days. And we'd much rather he'd be Teddy Roosevelt than nobody!" Andy is primarily a song and dance man, having tripped the light fantastic through many a musical, including, "Anything Goes," and is equally at home behind the footlights or out front.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ET6LHPWSJ_UTGA1P INGEST_TIME 2015-05-20T20:51:53Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00036
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ESRYH3O4J_MD1ZJF INGEST_TIME 2015-10-14T20:07:50Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00036
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES