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Indian

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Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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Vol. III, No. 41 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 November 1948


MARINES CELEBRATE
173rd ANNIVERSARY
In spite of lowering skies which
constantly threatened to unleash a deluge, the 173rd birthday of the United States Marine Corps was celebrated on November 10th in . traditional style at the Marine Barracks with an inter-company athletic field day; a sunset parade; a birthday banquet; and a Post
Dance.
The competition for the morning
events featured Guard Company personnel versus the men of Headquarters Company. Though the final results totalled up to a rather top heavy score, 62 to 18, in favor of Guard Company, all events were hotly contested, and the undermanned Headquarters Company squad deserves a great deal of credit for the fine fighting spirit they maintained throughout the meet.
The days' events got underway
with the 100 yard dash, won by PFC R. D. Wilson, Jr., of Guard Company with Cpl. D. D. Christiansen, Headquarters Company and PFC M. J. Garcia, Jr., Guard Company, placing 2nd and 3rd respectively.
In the Tug-of-War, the ten man
* Guard Company aggregation succeeded in out pulling the Headquarters Company crew in a very
evenly matched contest.
The Discus Throw, third event
on the slate, resulted in a grand slam for Guard Company with PFC's J. C. Duley, K. L. Stubbs, and L. M. Rotundo placing in that
order.
- The 220 Yard Dash proved to be easy meat for Guard Company's Wilson who won the event by 20 yards with PFC's B. J. Wilson and G. Ramirez, both of Headquarters
Company finishing 2nd and 3rd.
The Three-Legged race was literally a runaway for Cpl. D. D. Christiansen and PFC C. E. Farmer of Headquarters Company, with PFC's R. E. Bell and C. T. Vallee of Guard Company 2nd, and PFC's D. F. Butcher and B. J. Wilson of Headquarters Company a close 3rd.
Cpl. R. S. Westbrook of Headquarters Company unlimbered his
good right arm to win the shotput, Stubbs and Duley, both of
(Continued on Page Three)


ATTENTION ALL HANDS
By order of the Commander, U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, your attention is brought to Base Order No. 25.48 which is quoted below: "Subject: Questionnaires and Surveys.
Reference: (a) SecNav ltr. Op32D2/an A8-6/QM, Ser.
5783P32 of 30 Sept.
1948. (BuPers SemiMonthly Bulletin of 15
October 1948).
1. As'set forth in reference (a), the Department of the Navy neither desires nor intends to withhold from the public any information which can be released without imperiling national interests. However, because of the fact that a large scale compilation of information obtained by apparently innocent questions could result in danger to the national security, it is directed that all personnel of the Base, before replying to any questionnaires or polls not propounded by the Government, first clear the originator, content, and questions with the Base Intelligence Officer.
W. K. Phillips."

LETTER FROM THE
USS SEA CAT (SS-399)
The Commanding Officer desires to express his sincere appreciation for the highly efficient manner in which the Air Sea Rescue plane delivered a patient for an emergency appendectomy from the USS SEA CAT (SS-399) at Santiago de Cuba, to the U. S. Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
At about 0515R, 7 November, 1948, the message was transmitted from Santiago de Cuba requesting air transportation. At 0645R the Air Sea Rescue plane landed in Santiago harbor. At 0730R, the plane took off with the patient on board. At approximately 1000R, the appendectomy was performed on the patient, Gravett, Darrel E., EM2
(SS), U. S. Navy.
M. H. Rindskopf,
Commanding
Editor's Note: Well done boys, keep up the good work.


THE PURPOSE OF THE NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY

Captain McIntosh, USN, Executive Vice President of the Guantanamo Bay Auxiliary of the Navy Relief Society wishes that all the personnel on the Naval Operating Base be familiar with the functions and purpose of the Navy Relief Society. This is the first of a series of articles on the Navy Relief Society.
The purpose of the Navy Relief Society: The Navy Relief Society was incorporated 23 January, 1904, in the District of Columbia for the purpose of aiding indigent widows and orphans of personnel of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. Subsequent amendments to its Certificate of Incorporation have materially broadened the scope of its work. As currently phrased, the purpose of the Society is to "collect and hold funds and to use the same for aid in times of need of the officers and enlisted 'personnel of the Naval Service of the United States, which term shall include the regular Navy and Marine Corps of the United States, the reserve components thereof when on active duty, and the United States Coast Guard when serving as part of the United States Navy in time of war, and also for the aid in times of need of dependents of such officers and enlisted personnel, and to provide relief and assistance to the dependents of deceased officers and enlisted personnel of the said Naval Service." A primary responsibility of the Society, however, is still to provide relief and aid to dependent widows, minor orphan children and dependent mothers of deceased personnel, principally during the interim period while awaiting pension and insurance benefits and adjustment to the new situation.

(SEA)-Navy and Marine Corps Savings Bond allotments in force in September totaled 173,035.
Total September bond issues for 147,999 Navy allotments amounted to $2,421,543.75. The Marine Corps' 25,036 allotments totaled $448,837, both substantial increases over the corresponding period in 1947.


U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 November 1948


Vol. III, No. 41







Pane Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672

Saturday, 20 November 1948

U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson -------------------- Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ---- Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weelly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

EDITORIAL

There are still a few of our shipmates who so far forget their manners as to use profane and vulgar language in the presence of ladies. This is the very thing that brings disgrace on the white hats in general.' I know that about 95 per cent of the men in the Navy do not do this, but those 95 per cent are branded and classed by the 5 per cent of the men who lose their self-control and make monkies of themselves.
The loud mouthed individual in uniform who is such a BIG man that he has to impress the ladies by using loud, vulgar, obscene language in public, is a poor excuse for a gentleman and shows his lack of education. There is a good place to start practicing self-control here on the Naval Operating Base and that is in our daily work.
Learn to make yourself understood by your shipmates without using profanity and obscenity. This loud, vulgar language and idle chatter is noticed mostly among the new men just coming into the Navy who have the wrong idea of how a Navy man should act in public. It is not a sign -of a salty sailor but of ignorance and stupidity on your part if you can't make yourself understood to your shipmates unless you use vulgar language.
Even if you should lose your selfcontrol while in public, you will not bring disgrace on the rest of the 95 per cent if you keep your mouth shut. Incidently, PROFANITY is a serious offense in the Navy and is awarded with a BAD CONDUCT DISCHARGE. Is it worth it ?


The birth rate
during the past
091 L w e e k dropped
somewhat below average, but we had two to report: Richard Eugene Conway born 14 November to Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Conway, civilians;
Lloyd Francis Behrendt also born on 14 November to Captain and Mrs. L. L. Behrendt, U. S. A. F., Vernam Field, Jamaica.
Dr. Ellestad received a message that he is the father of a bouncing baby boy born at U. S. Naval Hospital, Bethesada. Dr. Ellestad has gone to the States to see the new arrival and to accompany his family back to Guantanamo.
Congratulations are in order for Lt. (jg). Hunter and Lt. (jg) Smith. Both have just received their promotions from Ensign.
Several months ago, the hospital started publishing a small weekly newspaper, just for the Hospital Command. A contest was held with the staff offering suggestions for a name for the paper-the one finally chosen was "The Echo". We now learn that the newspaper for one of the state prisons in Texas is also named The Echo. We certainly hope that the similarity between the two institutions ceases at that point.

NOTICE

The Thrift Shop will open in approximately three weeks in the building across the street from the Commissary. The object of the Thrift Shop is to sell all types of merchandise that people on the Naval Operating Base no longer have use for and would like to make available to others.
This includes all types of clothing, toys, cribs, buggies, washing machines, curtains, winter clothes, etc. The Shop will be open every day but Sunday from 0830 to 1130. Items will be picked up immediately by calling 672. Items such as home furnishings, clothes, children's clothes, toys, etc., may be sold through the Thrift Shop.
A vaudevillian approached a booking agent with, "Say, I've got a terrific act! My dog plays the piano and my parrot sings opera."
Said the cynical agent: "Give me the proof."
The dog played, the parrot sang.
Great! Wonderful! Terrific! said the agent. "I'll get you $5,000 a week!"
"But I only want $300," said the actor.
"Why?" asked the agent.
"It's all a fake." replied the actor bursting into tears. "You see, the parrot .doesn't sing at all. The dog's a ventriloquist."


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 21 November 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, UON
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)







CA lAtr(S CORNER
NEARER THAN WE IMAGINE

Just off the Parkway in Philadelphia, stands the famous Rodin museum. Late one afternoon, a friend and I stopped in. As we made our way up the long walk and into the main hall, we saw statues dexterously fashioned- by the renowned French sculptor, Auguste Rodin.
Over to one side, somewhat alone, we noticed an odd piece of work just a hand. It seemed somewhat out of place amid all the shapely figures and forms. Really, I could see nothing so very attractive about it.
I turned to the guide standing
near and asked, "Why did they place that hand in the main display V room . . . what is unusual about it?"
Courteously, he said, "Look closely. Have you read the lettering underneath?"
I read and immediately saw my mistake. The title was, "The Hand of God."
We spent the next twenty minutes just looking at the piece from every angle. It was amazing what we saw in it now. The lines of the fingers, the contour of the wrist, the divineness of the palm, each told a story. The other statues dwindled to insignificance beside it.
As we left the museum, I thought how often we fail to recognize the Hand of God, near us, in us, every day.
Elmer E. Bosserman
Chaplain, USN

Passenger: Which end of the car do I get off?"
Motorman: "Either one. It stops at both ends."


Page Two


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN Paer' Three


. MARINES CELEBRATE
173rd ANNIVERSARY
(Continued from Page One)
Guard Company taking the place
and show laurels.
In the final event of the tra k
meet, the Guard Company's crack relay team of PFC M. J. Garcia, Jr., PFC D. A. Calvagna, PFC A.
F. DeSimone, and PFC R. D. Wilson, Jr., ran up a big lead to bring
home the points.
After a short break in honor of
Chief Hatuey, the big event of the morning, an 11 man touch football game between squads from the same two organization, got underway. The game was close all the way and provided thrills galore, with Guard Company coming out on the heavy end of a 15-0 score.
The first period featured a very
even contest with the ball changing -hands frequently and never penetrating beyond either 20 yard line.
In the second quarter, a pass
from PFC E. E. Robbins into the flat in the end zone to PFC C. T.
Vallee drew first blood for Guard Company. The pass attempted for the extra point was knocked down.
Moments later, an alert Guard Company line capitalized on a bad pass by the Headquarter's center, to score a 2 point safety. The half ended with no further scoring, 8-0
Guard Company.
The 3rd stanza and all but the
final minute of the fourth, saw a see-saw scoreless battle. With seconds to go in the ball game, PFC L. J. McGilbra grabbed a partially deflected pass in the end zone to build the Guard Company score to 14-0, then as the final gun cracked, ending the ball game, PFC Garcia hit PFC T. F. Hackett with a perfect bullet pass in the end zone to score the point after touchdown,
final score 15-0 Guard Company.
Picnic Lunch
After a picnic lunch with some
more of Chief Hatuey's nectar, all hands assembled on the parade ground to see the Officers upset the highly touted Staff NCO softball team 3-1. The game was officiated (?) by the Base Chaplains, and was highly enjoyed by participants and
spectators alike.
At 1700, all hands again assembled on the parade ground to participate in the Sunset Parade. During this ceremony, Colonel J. R.
Lanigan, Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, presented the Marine Birthday Athletic Trophy to Major R. "C" Rosacker, Company Commander of the victorious
Guard Company.
Immediately following the marchoff of the colors, wllich ended the picturesque parade, all hands trooped into th Post Mess Hall where a truly magnificent feast had been prepared by MSgt. L. P.
Stroud and his talented crew of
cooks.
(Continued on Page Four)


NAS SLIPSTREAM

It is with deep regret that 'we report the death of Joseph Eugene Dunlap, AA, USN, on 14 October, at the U. S. Naval Hospital. Dunlap had reported on board this station for duty, less than three weeks ago, and his sudden death shocked the many friends he had made since his arrival. Our sincerest sympathy to his father, Mr. Dennis C. Dunlap, of Fort Seneca, Ohio.
Lt. and Mrs. Jack N. Vinson and daughter departed a week ago Tuesday for NAS, Atlantic City, N. J., where Lt. Vinson is expected to report as OinC, GCA Unit No. 20. The Air Station also lost Mr. Geo. M. Liddell, popular manager of NAS Ship's Store Ashore who has been reassigned to duty at Ship's Store, Brooklyn, N. Y. We welcome his relief, Ch. PClk. Raymond C. Brown, USN, who we know will prove equally popular.
Lt. R. W. Sasser and Chief Schultz returned recently from a trip to the North Pole where they saw "St. Nicholas" and arranged for the delivery of Christmas presents to the "good" boys and girls living in this part of the world. Santa must have had a lot of good reports from this area because we note he sent a small mountain of gifts back via his assistants with instructions to hold them until he could get down here and distribute them. Lt. (jg) Hayden who is also acting as an assistant to Santa was requested to have the packages wrapped. We understand he has already done so with the help of several ladies who volunteered willingly when appealed to on short notice Saturday morning, Nov. 13, at the Ad. Bldg. Well done, Mrs. R. W. Sasser, Mrs. P. H. Dalton, Mrs. W. L. Hayden, Mrs. J. C. Raines, Mrs. R. A. Brown, Mrs. A. J. Pechy, and Mrs. T. Moses. The Recreation Officer appreciated and thanks you for your assistance.
Most of us take for granted the facilities enjoyed by personnel attached to this station. We never ask, "how come", "who made it possible," "who do we thank?" Corral some of the men who were attached to this station two years ago, or as recently as six months ago, the next time they come ashore, and ask them what they think of the duty here. I think you'll get the same comments I did when I talked to some of them, "Boy, what an improvement. I'd give my right arm to be back. You guys have everything, a bowling alley, a hobby shop, club, tennis courts,, basketball court, restaurant, etc., etc. Well we've got something else to be grateful for. An honest to goodness gym. It's located in AV-75 and will be commissioned Monday, Nov. 22. You guys with the bulging muscles and bubbling energy, it's all yours, for free. Athletic gear will be issued from the


ORDNANCE STUFF

By Alston Jones
The Ordnance Department "Renovator and New Look" squad have finally reached to the Ordnance Office proper. It is amazing how much dust, etc., can accumulate in the unseen places of a building. Everything is topsy-turvy in the office, and it is hoped that speed limits will be violated to get it in shape again. It must be honestly said that such a cleaning and painting was very necessary, and it was about time something was done about it. Congratulations for initiating this drive goes to a certain Senor whose fingers have the knack of getting in the way of 'dust in places where you would hardly think of. Wouldn't be fair to call any names, but his initials are the "Ordnance Officer." When the office is finished it will be worth while to see the building on a whole. It's gonna look mighty fine.
All plans were made for the major program of the Ordnance Department this week - Ammo handling-and a change ii plans somewhere along the line delayed this program. Sighs of relief were surely given, but that won't help. Next week is only a short time away.
Pecuch, MN3, returned from 'leave on 11 November, after spending 20 days, at home in Pennsylvania. He says the highlight of his leave was the Penn-Army football game, where he had a chance to "root" for two of his school-mates who played for Penn. Army lost the game and he was very happy. Says he is glad to be back here at Gtmo. again. Glad you came back fella, you're just in time to pitch in with the rest of us and get your tropical tan.
London (AFPS)-All was not shipshape at a recent meeting of the Port of London Authority-the Admiral forgot his speech.
Adm. Sir John Edgell, Admiralty representive of the Port Authority, apologized to the members of the Royal Navy Old Comrades Association, whom he was scheduled to address.
"By mistake, I brought my wife's shopping list instead of my notes," he said.

Hobby Shop daily, 1600-1930; Saturdays and Sundays, 1300-1930. Good news? Well, how's to remember, Thursday, when you're counting your blessings that all of the facilities now available to you were made possible through the intelligent planning, interest, and effort of three of your present officers: The Commanding Officer, the Executive Officer, and the Recreation Officer. It is to these officers that we owe our thanks. In closing, a most "Happy Thanksgiving" to you all.


\ THE INDIAN


Pa n Three







PaForTHE INDIANGtoBa-SNv825.


MARINES CELEBRATE
173rd ANNIVERSARY
(Continued from Page Three)
The dinner was opened by the reading of the Invocation by Chaplain Herold, after which. every one turned to with a will to demolish the platters of turkey, ham, and quantities and varieties of delicious viands too numerous-to mention.
Following 'the dinner, Colonel Lanigan introduced Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, -.hose brief, complimentary message brought forth cheers from all corners of the hall.
When the applause subsided, Colonel Lanigan read the Birthday Message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps to all Marines every where, a tribute to the past, and a pledge for the future.
Cutting of Birthday Cake
Then with all eyes centered on the huge and beautifully decorated Birthday Cake, the Commanding Officer, Colonel Lanigan, and the Post Sergeant Major, MSgt. Carcelli, took up the Marine Corps saber for the traditional cake cutting. Colonel Lanigan's choice, of Mrs. A. F. Johnston as recipient of the prized "First Slice" of cake, was vociferously approved by all the Marines of whom that lady is such a favorite.
The dinner finished, couples and groups drifted from the Mess Hall and were drawn toward the Rustic Pavilion by the melodious strains of the "Hungry Five" increased to a "Hungry Eight" for this festive occasion. The Birthday Dance, which topped off a fine day of celebration, was hailed by all present, as the best dance we've had..
With memories of the enjoyable day still fresh,-vwe wish to thank our Commanding Officer, Colonel J. R. Lanigan, for his leadership and assistance in making this day the success that it certainly was.
We wish to congratulate the officers and men of the Post for their fine cooperation and participation in the day's events.
Our thanks to the Naval Station Band, whose rousing music added much to, the spirit of the football game, and without whom our parade would have lacked much of its color.
To MSgt. Avery and his dance committee, our thanks for a beautifully decorated pavilion and an excellently organized dance.
To MSgt. Stroud and his mess force, the highest praise for a superb birthday dinner.
To all other Base personnel, our sincere regret that our facilities did not permit our holding open house and being host to all.
And now with the Birthday duly celebrated and past, we will settle down to the business of doing our small part in making the 174th .year of the Marine Corps as honorable and useful in our country's service as the past 173 years.


GOLF TOURNEY OPENS WITH A BANG
The inauguration of the annual Club Members Handicap Golf Tournament was off to a very fine start last Saturday morning on the local course.
In the championship flight, North of VU-10, with a handicap of one
(1) drew Lt. (jg) Dutcher of the Hospital for the first round. With North giving Lt. (jg) Dutcher six
(6) strokes, and with Mr. Dutcher's capabilities of shooting in the low seventies, this was expected to be a very close match. However, North with his magic wedge closed out the match on the 15th hole by the decisive score of five (5) up and four (4) to go.
Included in the foursome was Ens. Lee also of VU-10, playing Chief Marchel of the same outfit. This last match was not decided until the 18th hole, where Marchel chipped dead to the pin for a par to win with a two (2) up.
Chief Foulk of VU-10,, won an impressive victory over Chief Lawrence of the Telephone Office when Lawrence's inverted hook failed to materialize. One of the highlights of the day was the medal score of seventy-nine turned in by Lt. Keehn of the Naval Station Recreation Dept. in downing Ch. Mach. Prashaw of the USS Shakori when Lt. Keehn one-putted ten green.
The outstanding upset of the day was Cdr. Scanlon's decisive win over Chief Gerry of the Supply Depot.
Other Results
The results of the other flights are as follows: Walker of the Hospital, won over Piselli of FCP with a score of 5 to 4; Averett of FCP, won over Lt. Cdr.. Weatherson of NSD with a score of 4 to 3; Lt. (jg) Craig of F-.T.G. won over Lt. (jg) Hunter of the Hospital with a score of 3 to 2; Cdr. Demo of the Hospital, won over Lt. (jg) Ellestad of the Hospital with a score of 3 to 2; Lt. (jg) Callahan won 1, up in 19 holes, over Strichek, both are of VU-10; Gehring of the Hospital, won 1 up in 20 holes, over Lt. Woodliff of the USS Shakori; Lt. Bailey of VU-10, won over Shearing of the same outfit, 2 to 1; Drum of VU-10, forfeited to Ens. Sprague of NSD; Allen drew a bye; Ens. Riggin of VU-10, won 1 up over Goodsell of VU-10; Lt. Leidle of Naval Station, won 2 up over Lt. Cdr. Washbourne of NSD; Lt. (ig) Cookinham of NAS, with the score of 4 to 2 and Ch. Elec. Pollock of VU-10, drew a bye.
Semi-Finals Played Today
The final rounds being played today will find North of VU-10, giving one stroke each on fourth, eighth, tenth and twelfth holes to Chief Marcel, also of VU-10. Chief Foulk, VU-10, will also be conceding strokes on the eighth, tenth,


OVERSEAS CHRISTMAS MAIL SHOULD BE SENT

(SEA)-Christmas packages for personnel stationed overseas should be mailed now to insure their arrival before or during the holiday period. This'also applies to greeting cards sent first class other than air mail. Air mail deliveries are expected- to be handled on normal schedules and greeting cards sent by air mail may be posted as late as 1 December.
Gifts should be packed securely, and the addressee's name, together i with a list of the contents, written on a paper enclosed in the box. This will insure delivery should the outside address be obliterated. The address should be placed directly on the box rather than on a gummed label which might become moist and lost from the package. The weight limit is 70 pounds and maximum measurement 100 inches, length and girth combined.

First Inmate: "And what are you doing now?"
Second Inmate: "Buying old wells, sawing them up and selling them for post holes."

and twelfth holes to George Walker of the Hospital. This writer feels that though Marcel's and Walker's capabilities to consistently hit the green on the approach shots, both will have to do some extremely good chipping and putting in order to advance to the finals of the championship flight. Incidentally, included in this group, binds the two men tied for the low medalists' honors with scores of seventy-three each. North after finishing the fifteenth hole was caught in a downpour of rain and bogged the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth holes. Walker on the following day, with some extremely good putting, tied the score.
The play off between the two men will be on Thanksgiving Day, November 25th.
In a difference of the handicap of one for North, and seven for Walker, it is very likely that North will take a three or four stroke lead on the first nine holes and never be headed and will probably win by several strokes.
The first flight finds Ch. 'Torp. Thomas of F. T. G. vs. Cdr. Kimball of NSD and Cdr. Scanlon playing Ens. Oberg on even terms.
Second flight finds Chief Hall of VU-10, a much improved golfer in the past several months, tangling with Lt. (jg) Averett from the FCP, and Lt. (jg) Craig, of F. T. G., locking hoins with Brannon of the Hospital. The third flight finds Lt. Keehn of the Rec. Dept. trying his best to win over Cdr. Demo of the Hospital, also included, in this flight, is Pritchard vs. Ens. Callahan.


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay--18 Nov 48-2500.


16 ) FI




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PAGE 1

ian Vol. III, No. 41 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 20 November 1948 MARINES CELEBRATE 173rd ANNIVERSARY In spite of lowering skies which constantly threatened to unleash a deluge, the 173rd birthday of the United States Marine Corps was celebrated on November 10th in traditional style at the Marine Barracks with an inter-company athletic field day; a sunset parade; a birthday banquet; and a Post Dance. The competition for the morning events featured Guard Company personnel versus the men of Headquarters Company. Though the final results totalled up to a rather top heavy score, 62 to 18, in favor of Guard Company, all events were hotly contested, and the undermanned Headquarters Company squad deserves a great deal of credit for the fine fighting spirit they maintained throughout the meet. The days' events got underway with the 100 yard dash, won by PFC R. D. Wilson, Jr., of Guard Company with Cpl. D. D. Christiansen, Headquarters Company and PFC M. J. Garcia, Jr., Guard Company, placing 2nd and 3rd respectively. In the Tug-of-War, the ten man Guard Company aggregation succeeded in out pulling the Headquarters Company crew in a very evenly matched contest. The Discus Throw, third event on the slate, resulted in a grand slam for Guard Company with PFC's J. C. Duley, K. L. Stubbs, and L. M. Rotundo placing in that order. The 220 Yard Dash proved to be easy meat for Guard Company's Wilson who won the event by 20 yards with PFC's B. J. Wilson and G. Ramirez, both of Headquarters Company finishing 2nd and 3rd. The Three-Legged race was literally a runaway for Cpl. D. D. Christiansen and PFC C. E. Farmer of Headquarters Company, with PFC's R. E. Bell and C. T. Vallee of Guard Company 2nd, and PFC's D. F. Butcher and B. J. Wilson of Headquarters Company a close 3rd. Cpl. R. S. Westbrook of Headquarters Company unlimbered his good right arm to win the shotput, Stubbs and Duley, both of (Continued on Page Three) ATTENTION ALL HANDS By order of the Commander, U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, your attention is brought to Base Order No. 25-48 which is quoted below: "Subject: Questionnaires and Surveys. Reference: (a) SecNav ltr. Op32D2/an A8-6/QM, Ser. 5783P32 of 30 Sept. 1948. (BuPers SemiMonthly Bulletin of 15 October 1948). 1. Asset forth in reference (a), the Department of the Navy neither desires nor intends to withhold from the public any information which can be released without imperiling national interests. However, because of the fact that a large scale compilation of information obtained by apparently innocent questions could result in danger to the national security, it is directed that all personnel of the Base, before replying to any questionnaires or polls not propounded by the Government, first clear the originator, content, and questions with the Base Intelligence Officer. W. K. Phillips." LETTER FROM THE USS SEA CAT (SS-399) The Commanding Officer desires to express his sincere appreciation for the highly efficient manner in which the Air Sea Rescue plane delivered a patient for an emergency appendectomy from the USS SEA CAT (SS-399) at Santiago.de Cuba, to the U. S. Naval Hospital, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. At about 0515R, 7 November, 1948, the message was transmitted from Santiago de Cuba requesting air transportation. At 0645R the Air Sea Rescue plane landed in Santiago harbor. At 0730R, the plane took off with the patient on board. At approximately 1000R, the appendectomy was performed on the patient, Gravett, Darrel E., EM2 (SS), U. S. Navy. M. H. Rindskopf, Commanding Editor's Note: Well done boys, keep up the good work. THE PURPOSE OF THE NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY Captain McIntosh, USN, Executive Vice President of the Guantanamo Bay Auxiliary of the Navy Relief Society wishes that all the personnel on the Naval Operating Base be familiar with the functions and purpose of the Navy Relief Society. This is the first of a series of articles on the Navy Relief Society. The purpose of the Navy Relief Society: The Navy Relief Society was incorporated 23 January, 1904, in the District of Columbia for the purpose of aiding indigent widows and orphans of personnel of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. Subsequent amendments to its Certificate of Incorporation have materially broadened the scope of its work. As currently phrased, the purpose of the Society is to "collect and hold funds and to use the same for aid in times of need of the officers and enlisted personnel of the Naval Service of the United States, which term shall include the regular Navy and Marine Corps of the United States, the reserve components thereof when on active duty, and the United States Coast Guard when serving as part of the United States Navy in time of war, and also for the aid in times of need of dependents of such officers and enlisted personnel, and to provide relief and assistance to the dependents of deceased officers and enlisted personnel of the said Naval Service." A primary responsibility of the Society, however, is still to provide relief and aid to dependent widows, minor orphan children and dependent mothers of deceased personnel, principally during the interim period while awaiting pension and insurance benefits and adjustment to the new situation. (SEA)-Navy and Marine Corps Savings Bond allotments in force in September totaled 173,035. Total September bond issues for 147,999 Navy allotments amounted to $2,421,543.75. The Marine Corps' 25,036 allotments totaled $448,837, both substantial increases over the corresponding period in 1947.

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PageTwo THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 20 November 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson -------------------.Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman---Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AIPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. EDITORIAL There are still a few of our shipmates who so far forget their manners as to use profane and vulgar language in the presence of ladies. This is the very thing that brings disgrace on the white hats in general. I know that about 95 per cent of the men in the Navy do not do this, but those 95 per cent are branded and classed by the 5 per cent of the men who lose their. self-control and make monkies of themselves. The loud mouthed individual in uniform who is such a BIG man that he has to impress the ladies by using loud, vulgar, obscene language in public, is a poor excuse for a gentleman and shows his lack of education. There is a good place to start practicing self-control here on the Naval Operating Base and that is in our daily work. Learn to make yourself understood by your shipmates without using profanity and obscenity. This loud, vulgar language and idle chatter is noticed mostly among the new men just coming into the Navy who have the wrong idea of how a Navy man should act in public. It is not a sign of a salty sailor but of ignorance and stupidity on your part if you can't make yourself understood to your shipmates unless you use vulgar language. Even if you should lose your selfcontrol while in public, you will not bring disgrace on the rest of the 95 per cent if you keep your mouth shut. Incidently, PROFANITY is a serious offense in the Navy and is awarded with a BAD CONDUCT DISCHARGE. Is it worth it? The birth rate QSPI P during the past wee k dropped somewhat below average, but we had two to report: Richard Eugene Conway born 14 NovemS-ber to Mr. and NOTES Mrs. J. T. Conway, civilians; Lloyd Francis Behrendt also born on 14 November to Captain and Mrs. L. L. Behrendt, U. S. A. F., Vernam Field, Jamaica. Dr. Ellestad received a message that he is the father of a bouncing baby boy born at U. S. Naval Hospital, Bethesada. Dr. Ellestad has gone to the States to see the new arrival and to accompany his family back to Guantanamo. Congratulations are in order for Lt. (jg) Hunter and Lt. (jg) Smith. Both have just received their promotions from Ensign. Several months ago, the hospital started publishing a small weekly newspaper, just for the Hospital Command. A contest was held with the staff offering suggestions for a name for the paper-the one finally chosen was "The Echo". We now learn that the newspaper for one of the state prisons in Texas is also named The Echo. We certainly hope that the similarity between the two institutions ceases at that point. NOTICE The Thrift Shop will open in approximately three weeks in the building across the street from the Commissary. The object of the Thrift Shop is to sell all types of merchandise that people on the Naval Operating Base no longer have use for and would like to make available to others. 'I'his includes all types of clothing, toys, cribs, buggies, washing machines, curtains, winter clothes, etc. The Shop will be open every day but Sunday from 0830 to 1130. Items will be picked up immediately by calling 672. Items such as home furnishings, clothes, children's clothes, toys, etc., may be sold through the Thrift Shop. A vaudevillian approached a booking agent with, "Say, I've got a terrific act! My dog plays the piano and my parrot sings opera." Said the cynical agent: "Give me the proof." The dog played, the parrot sang. Great! Wonderful! Terrific! said the agent. "I'll get you $5,000 a week!" "But I only want $300," said the actor. "Why?" asked the agent. "It's all a fake." replied the actor bursting into tears. "You see, the parrot doesn't sing at all. The dog's a ventriloquist." -* CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 21 November 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPAI'S CORNER NEARER THAN WE IMAGINE Just off the Parkway in Philadelphia, stands the famous Rodin museum. Late one afternoon, a friend and I stopped in. As we made our way up the long walk and into the main hall, we saw statues dexterously fashionedby the renowned French sculptor, Auguste Rodin. Over to one side, somewhat alone, we noticed an odd piece of work just a hand. It seemed somewhat out of place amid all the shapely figures and forms. Really, I could see nothing so very attractive about it. I turned to the guide standing near and asked, "Why did they place that hand in the main display room ...what is unusual about it?" Courteously, he said, "Look closely. Have you read the lettering underneath?" I read and immediately saw my mistake. The title was, "The Hand of God." We spent the next twenty minutes just looking at the piece from every angle. It was amazing what we saw in it now. The lines of the fingers, the contour of the wrist, the divineness of the palm, each told a story. The other statues dwindled to insignificance beside it. As we left the museum, I thought how often we fail to recognize the Hand of God, near us, in us, every day. Elmer E. Bosserman Chaplain, USN Passenger: Which end of the car do I get off?" Motorman: "Either one. It stops at both ends." Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Pa~'r' Thr"e O MARINES CELEBRATE 173rd ANNIVERSARY (Continued from Page One) Guard Company taking the place and show laurels. In the final event of the track meet, the Guard Company's crack relay team of PFC M. J. Garcia, Jr., PFC D. A. Calvagna, PFC A. F. DeSimone, and FFC R. D. Wilson, Jr., ran up a big lead to bring home the points. After a short break in honor of Chief Hatuey, the big event of the morning, an 11 man touch football game between squads from the same two organization, got underway. The game was close all the way and provided thrills galore, with Guard Company coming out on the heavy end of a 15-0 score. The first period featured a very even contest with the ball changing hands frequently and never penetrating beyond either 20 yard line. In the second quarter, a pass from PFC E. E. Robbins into the flat in the end zone to PFC C. T. Vallee drew first blood for Guard Company. The pass attempted for the extra point was knocked down. Moments later, an alert Guard Company line capitalized on a bad pass by the Headquarter's center, to score a 2 point safety. The half ended with no further scoring, 8-0 Guard Company. The 3rd stanza and all but the final minute of the fourth, saw a see-saw scoreless battle. With seconds to go in the ball game, PFC L. J. McGilbra grabbed a partially deflected pass in the end zone to build the Guard Company score to 14-0, then as the final gun cracked, ending the ball game, PFC Garcia hit PFC T. F. Hackett with a perfect bullet pass in the end zone to score the point after touchdown, final score 15-0 Guard Company. Picnic Lunch After a picnic lunch with some more of Chief Hatuey's nectar, all hands assembled on the parade ground to see the Officers upset the highly touted Staff NCO softball team 3-1. The game was officiated (?) by the Base Chaplains, and was highly enjoyed by participants and spectators alike. At 1700, all hands again assembled on the parade ground to participate in the Sunset Parade. During this ceremony, Colonel J. R. Lanigan, Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, presented the Marine Birthday Athletic Trophy to Major R. "C" Rosacker, Company Commander of the victorious Guard Company. Immediately following the marchoff of the colors, which ended the picturesque parade, all hands trooped into th Post Mess Hall where a truly magnificent feast had been prepared by MSgt. L. P. Stroud and his talented crew of cooks. (Continued on Page Four) NAS SLIPSTREAM It is with deep regret that 'we report the death of Joseph Eugene' Dunlap, AA, USN, on 14 October, at the U. S. Naval Hospital. Dunlap had reported on board this station for duty, less than three weeks ago, and his sudden death shocked the many friends he had made since his arrival. Our sincerest sympathy to his father, Mr. Dennis C. Dunlap, of Fort Seneca, Ohio. Lt. and Mrs. Jack N. Vinson and daughter departed a week ago Tuesday for NAS, Atlantic City, N. J., where Lt. Vinson is expected to report as OinC, GCA Unit No. 20. The Air Station also lost Mr. Geo. M. Liddell, popular manager of NAS Ship's Store Ashore who has been reassigned to duty at Ship's Store, Brooklyn, N. Y. We welcome his relief, Ch. PCIk. Raymond C. Brown, USN, who we know will prove equally popular. Lt. R. W. Sasser and Chief Schultz returned recently from a trip to the North Pole where they saw "St. Nicholas" and arranged for the delivery of Christmas presents to the "good" boys and girls living in this part of the world. Santa must have had a lot of good reports from this area because we note he sent a small mountain of gifts back via his assistants with instructions to hold them until he could get down here and distribute them. Lt. (jg) Hayden who is also acting as an assistant to Santa was requested to have the packages wrapped. We understand he has already done so with the help of several ladies who volunteered willingly when appealed to on short notice Saturday morning, Nov. 13, at the Ad. Bldg. Well done, Mrs. R. W. Sasser, Mrs. P. H. Dalton, Mrs. W. L. Hayden, Mrs. J. C. Raines, Mrs. R. A. Brown, Mrs. A. J. Pechy, and Mrs. T. Moses. The Recreation Officer appreciated and thanks you for your assistance. Most of us take for granted the facilities enjoyed by personnel attached to this station. We never ask, "how come", "who made it possible," "who do we thank?" Corral some of the men who were attached to this station two years ago, or as recently as six months ago, the next time they come ashore, and ask them what they think of the duty here. I think you'll get the same comments I did when I talked to some of them, "Boy, what an improvement. I'd give my right arm to be back. You guys have everything, a bowling alley a hobby shop, club, tennis courts, basketball court, restaurant, etc., etc. Well we've got something else to be grateful for. An honest to goodness gym. It's located in AV-75 and will be commissioned Monday, Nov. 22. You guys with the bulging muscles and bubbling energy, it's all yours, for free. Athletic gear will be issued from the ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones The Ordnance Department "Renovator and New Look" squad have finally reached to the Ordnance Office proper. It is amazing how much dust, etc., can accumulate in the unseen places of a building. Everything is topsy-turvy in the office, and it is hoped that speed limits will be violated to get it in shape again. It must be honestly said that such a cleaning and painting was very necessary, and it was about time something was done about it. Congratulations for initiating this drive goes to a certain Senor whose fingers have the knack of getting in the way of dust in places where you would hardly think of. Wouldn't be fair to call any names, but his initials are the "Ordnance Officer." When the office is finished it will be worth while to see the building on a whole. It's gonna look mighty fine. All plans were made for the major program of the Ordnance Department this week -Ammo handling-and a change in plans somewhere along the line delayed this program. Sighs of relief were surely given, but that won't help. Next week is only a short time away. Pecuch, MN3, returned from leave on 11 November, after spending 20 days at home in Pennsylvania. He says the highlight of his leave was the Penn-Army football game, where he had a chance to "root" for two of his school-mates who played for Penn. Army lost the game and he was very happy. Says he is glad to be back here at Gtmo. again. Glad you came back fella, you're just in time to pitch in with the rest of us and get your tropical tan. London (AFPS)-All was not shipshape at a recent meeting of the Port of London Authority-the Admiral forgot his speech. Adm. Sir John Edgell, Admiralty representive of the Port Authority, apologized to the members of the Royal Navy Old Comrades Association, whom he was scheduled to address. "By mistake, I brought my wife's shopping list instead of my notes," he said. Hobby Shop daily, 1600-1930; Saturdays and Sundays, 1300-1930. Good news? Well, how's to remember, Thursday, when you're counting your blessings that all of the facilities now available to you were made possible through the intelligent planning, interest, and effort of three of your present officers: The Commanding Officer, the Executive Officer, and the Recreation Officer. It is to these officers that we owe our thanks. In closing, a most "Happy Thanksgiving" to you all. THE INDIAN Pa?" Three

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ga Four THE INDIAN MARINES CELEBRATE 173rd ANNIVERSARY (Continued from Page Three) The dinner was opened by the reading of the Invocation by Chaplain Herold, after which. every one turned to with a will to demolish the platters of turkey, ham, and quantities and varieties of delicious viands too numerous'to mention. Following the dinner, Colonel Lanigan introduced Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, whose brief, complimentary message brought forth cheers from all corners of the hall. When the applause subsided, Colonel Lanigan read the Birthday Message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps to all Marines every where, a tribute to the past, and a pledge for the future. Cutting of Birthday Cake Then with all eyes centered on the huge and beautifully decorated Birthday Cake, the Commanding Officer, Colonel Lanigan, and the Post Sergeant Major, MSgt. Carcelli, took up the Marine Corps saber for the traditional cake cutting. Colonel Lanigan's choice of Mrs. A. F. Johnston as recipient of the prized "First Slice" of cake, was vociferously approved by all the Marines of whom that lady is such a favorite. The dinner finished, couples and groups drifted from the Mess Hall and were drawn toward the Rustic Pavilion by the melodious strains of the "Hungry Five" increased to a "Hungry Eight" for this festive occasion. The Birthday Dance, which topped off a fine day of celebration, was hailed by all present, as the best dance we've had. With memories of the enjoyable day still fresh, we wish to thank our Commanding Officer, Colonel J. R. Lanigan, for his leadership and assistance in making this day the success that it certainly was. We wish to congratulate the officers and men of the Post for their fine cooperation and participation in the day's events. Our thanks to the Naval Station Band, whose rousing music added much to. the spirit of the football game, and without whom our parade would have lacked much of its color. To MSgt. Avery and his dance committee, our thanks for a beautifully decorated pavilion and an excellently organized dance. To MSgt. Stroud and his mess force, the highest praise for a superb birthday dinner. To all other Base personnel, our sincere regret that our facilities did not permit our holding open house and being host to all. And now with the Birthday duly celebrated and past, we will settle down to the business of doing our small part in making the 174th year of the Marine Corps as honorable and useful in our country's service as the past 173 years. GOLF TOURNEY OPENS WITH A BANG The inauguration of the annual Club Members Handicap Golf Tournament was off to a very fine start last Saturday morning on the local course. In the championship flight, North of VU-10, with a handicap of one (1) drew Lt. (jg) Dutcher of the Hospital for the first round. With North giving Lt. (jg) Dutcher six (6) strokes, and with Mr. Dutcher's capabilities of shooting in the low seventies, this was expected to be a very close match. However, North with his magic wedge closed out the match on the 15th hole by the decisive score of five (5) up and four (4) to go. Included in the foursome was Ens. Lee also of VU-10, playing Chief Marchel of the same outfit. This last match was not decided until the 18th hole, where Marchel chipped dead to the pin for a par to win with a two (2) up. Chief Foulk of VU-10, won an impressive victory over Chief Lawrence of the Telephone Office when Lawrence's inverted hook failed to materialize. One of the highlights of the day was the medal score of seventy-nine turned in by Lt. Keehn of the Naval Station Recreation Dept. in downing Ch. Mach. Prashaw of the USS Shakori when Lt. Keehn one-putted ten green. The outstanding upset of the day was Cdr. Scanlon's decisive win over Chief Gerry of the Supply Depot. Other Results The results of the other flights are as follows: Walker of the Hospital, won over Piselli of FCP with a score of 5 to 4; Averett of FCP, won over Lt. Cdr. Weatherson of NSD with a score of 4 to 3; Lt. (jg) Craig of F.T.G. won over Lt. (jg) Hunter of the Hospital with a score of 3 to 2; Cdr. Demo of the Hospital, won over Lt. (jg) Ellestad of the Hospital with a score of 3 to 2; Lt. (jg) Callahan won 1 up in 19 holes, over Strichek, both are of VU-10; Gehring of the Hospital, won 1 up in 20 holes, over Lt. Woodliff of the USS Shakori; Lt. Bailey of VU-10, won over Shearing of the same outfit, 2 to 1; Drum of VU-10, forfeited to Ens. Sprague of NSD; Allen drew a bye; Ens. Riggin of VU-10, won 1 up over Goodsell of VU-10; Lt. Leidle of Naval Station, won 2 up over Lt. Cdr. Washbourne of NSD; Lt. (jg) Cookinham of NAS, with the score of 4 to 2 and Ch. Elec. Pollock of VU-10, drew a bye. Semi-Finals Played Today The final rounds being played today will find North of VU-10, giving one stroke each on fourth, eighth, tenth and twelfth holes to Chief Marcel, also of VU-10. Chief Foulk, VU-10, will also be conceding strokes on the eighth, tenth, OVERSEAS CHRISTMAS MAIL SHOULD BE SENT (SEA)-Christmas packages for personnel stationed overseas should be mailed now to insure their arrival before or during the holiday period. This also applies to greeting cards sent first class other than air mail. Air mail deliveries are expected to be handled on normal schedules and greeting cards sent by air mail may be posted as late as 1 December. Gifts should be packed securely, and the addressee's name, together with a list of the contents, written on a paper enclosed in the box. This will insure delivery should the outside address be obliterated. The address should be placed directly on the box rather than on a gummed label which might become moist and lost from the package. The weight limit is 70 pounds and maximum measurement 100 inches, length and girth combined. First Inmate: "And what are you doing now?" Second Inmate: "Buying old wells, sawing them up and selling them for post holes." and twelfth holes to George Walker of the Hospital. This writer feels that though Marcel's and Walker's capabilities to consistently hit the green on the approach shots, both will have to do some extremely good chipping and putting in order to advance to the finals of the championship flight. Incidentally, included in this group, binds the two men tied for the low medalists' honors with scores of seventy-three each. North after finishing the fifteenth hole was caught in a downpour of rain and bogged the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth holes. Walker on the following day, with some extremely good putting, tied the score. The play off between the two men will be on Thanksgiving Day, November 25th. In a difference of the handicap of one for North, and seven for Walker, it is very likely that North will take a three or four stroke lead on the first nine holes and never be headed and will probably win by several strokes. The first flight finds Ch. Torp. Thomas of F. T. G. vs. Cdr. Kimball of NSD and Cdr. Scanlon playing Ens. Oberg on even terms. Second flight finds Chief Hall of VU-10, a much improved golfer in the past several months, tangling with Lt. (jg) Averett from the FCP, and Lt. (jg) Craig, of F. T. G., locking horns with Brannon of the Hospital. The third flight finds Lt. Keehn of the Rec. Dept. trying his best to win over Cdr. Demo of the Hospital, also included in this flight, is Pritchard vs. Ens. Callahan. THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-18 Nov 48-2500. Pa e Four #1


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