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Vol. III, No. 39 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 November 1948


THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES PROGRAM

By G. A. Muguira
In the lives of many Navy men
the acquisition of a .high school diploma is an extremely important
* matter. High school graduation is
a requirement for assignment to certain Navy schools, while in . " others, it is not, although it may be stated that it is important in the 'eyes of those charged with making selections. In civilian life (and practically all Navy men go back to civilian life eventually, even those who serve out thirty years or more) high school graduation has become a prerequisite for consideration for a very large proportion
of jobs.
The purpose of this article is to
point out specific ways in which steps leading to a diploma or equivalency certificate may be obtained.
Three Methods Available
There are fundamentally three
ways in which Navy men may work toward high school graduation. The simplest method, provided the individual has been active intellectually since leaving school, and proS vided the high school or state deW partment of education in question
looks favorably upon the method, is by way of the USAFI GED (General Educational Development) tests. These tests, five in number and requiring approximately 10 hours in all for their administration, are designed to determine the educational level of the examinee without regard to his formal educational background. If that level proves sufficiently high, most high schools are willing to grant their diplomas, even if the candidates have had only one year of high school, or even less. In some cases where the high school itself is unwilling to award a diploma, the state department of education may grant a high school equivalency certificate, a document which, as its name indicates, is generally accepted as the equivalent of a , diploma.
A second way to attack the problem is through USAFI course*.
These courses are of two kindscorrespondence courses, which in(Continued on Page Four)


"GRAY ANGELS" ARE OF
FLAG RANK
The Navy's flying flag rank trio, the "Flying Admirals," have thrilled many people by zooming at high speeds across the skies of the United States.
The three, also known as the "Gray Angels" have piloted their Phantom jet fighters in exhibitions at Idlewild airport in New York and at the Air Races in Cleveland, Ohio.
The three flying admirals are: Rear Admiral D. V. Gallery, USN, Assistant Chief of Naval Operations and incidentally the brother of Captain W. 0. Gallery, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station; Rear Admiral E. A. Cruise, USN, head of Air Warfare Division of Deputy CNO (Air); and Rear Admiral A. Soucek, USN, Commander of the Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent, Maryland.
Send the Indian to the folks back home- they too will find it interesting and helpful in knowing more about the Navy and Gtmo.

T3OU FIGURE BETTER
WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS.


U i


JAMAICA TRIP WAS A
HUGE SUCCESS
By R. E. Welsh, YN2
Bright and early Friday morning, the 22nd of October, the USS Utina (ATF-163) got underway for Kingston, Jamaica, with a cargo of men and women from the Naval Operating Base, Gtmo. The* trip down was rather uneventful, providing much talk of "I wonder what it will be like." Some made use of the mattresses supplied by the Utina, to catch up on a little "shut eye," but most of us were a little anxious and enthusiastic' about our forthcoming experience.
Upon arriving, and with no casualties from sea sickness (as far as I know), we were met by the American Counsel, who gave us our traveling passports, and a bit of advice in regard to hotel accomodations, transportation, etc.
From this point on, we were on our own. The majority of the passengers exchanged their money for English pence, shillings and pounds at the Myrtle Bank. Hotel. I guess every one had a little trouble getting used to the "new" type of money, but shortly after you arrive, you are using "three pound ten" and "five and six pence" just as you do "two bits."
Many Stopped at Myrtle Bank
The Myrtle Bank Hotel was the home of most of the passengers during our stay. It is comparable to fine resort hotels in the United States, and no one had any complaint of the $10.00 a day rate for room, and three meals. The meals alone are worth much more. Nine course dinners of tempting steaks and all the trimmings were just one of the items on the menu while we were there.
Another place where a night's lodging and three meals may be had- is the Melrose Hotel at $7.25 a day. The primary difference'being the Melrose is of old 'English design and custom, and the Myrtle Bank being Spanish Modern. Foods of both places are deliciously spiced and cooked "to a turn."*
Points of interest are too numerous to mention here, but on a weekend stay, you might visit the many night spots, The Hope Botanical
(Continued on Page Four)







P. ..~ 'rTHE1 INDIhAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library- Phone 672
Saturday, 6 November 1948
U, S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. PhillipsUSN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson ------------------ Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman .... Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted-without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official* U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS" Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

EDITORIAL

Our life here on the Naval Operating Base is a confined one in the sense of seeing and living with the same people day after day and sooner or later you realize that you have your good days and your oad ones.
You learn that it doesn't pay to be too sensitive; that he also is just as sensitive about certain things as you are.
You learn that he who loses his temper usually lose out.
You learn that all men have burnt toast for breakfast now and then and that he shouldn't take the other fellow's grouch too seriously.
You learn that carrying a chip on your shoulder is the easiest way to get into trouble.
You learn that passing the buck always turns out to be a boomerang and that it never pays.
You learn that when your buddies and friends leave that life still goes on.
You learn that even the janitor is human and that it does no harm to say "Good Morning" even if it is raining.
You learn that other people are just as ambitious as you and have brains just as good and better, and that hard work, not cleverness, is the secret of success.
You learn to sympathize with the new recruits just coming in, because you remember how bewildered you were when you were in their shoes.
You learn that folks are not any harder to get along with in one place than another, and that the "getting along" depends about ninety-eight per cent on your own behavior. If you have mastered the above you have learned the art of Getting Along.


Three baby girls
L entrance at the
SHospital during
the past week.
Elaine Doreen McKnight was born Thursday, 28 October to PRI and Mrs. H. J.
McKnight; with Chaplain Bosserman's smile dimming even the tropical sun, no doubt everyone knows that Mrs. Bosserman presented him with a little bundle named Catherine Jeanne, on Sunday, 31 October; ETI and Mrs. Melvin Brown have not yet chosen a name for their little girl who was born on Monday, 1 November. Incidentally Baby Brown is practicaly the heavyweight of Naval Hospital, Guantanamo history, weighing in at 8 pounds, 14 ounces.
The Junior Corpsmen from the Hospital held an impromptu picnic at Cable Beach last Saturday plenty of eats and drinks and mucho fun for all hands.
Lt. Cdr. R. S. Kibler, MC, USN,
has gone to the States on TAD for five days. That X-ray equipment that everyone has heard so much about has failed to show and as a last resort, Dr. Kibler is doing a little sleuthing.
Phelps, HMC, former Hospital Recreation and Welfare Assistant, has been transferred to VU-10. Good luck on the new assignment, Phelps.
Mr. 0. H. Dutcher of Colorado Springs, Colorado, is visiting his son, Lt, (jg) C. H. Dutcher, MSC, USN for a few weeks.

TO THE GUARD
By R. E. McCullough
When darkness covers all earth and
man alike,
Who will sleep, who wll hear
midnight strike,
Whose tired feet will tramp the
earth so hard,
We can say, we will .know for
we're the guard.
When sun or darkness is on earth
here below,
Who will see, who will hear, who
will know
When the call is sounded for the
alarm
We will sound it, for vigilance is
our arm.
We who watch the bastions iar and
wide
Know of the wind, the water and
the tide
Comes days of toil, sleep well, work
hard -�
We'll watch, ready ever, for
we're "the guard.

Short story ... will the lady who left her laundry in my car please c�ll and explain to my wife.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 7 November 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval BaseChapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1950
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)







C WAPLA1 CORNER
DIRECT ACCESS

A dozen or more officers on motorcycles went by. A car full of men followed. Then came a car with men standing on the running boards. Another group of motorcycles completed the procession. The President of the United States had just passed by 736 Jackson Place-where I happened to be standing at the time. He was on his way home to the White House.
I caught only a passing glimpse of him in the car in which he was riding. It would have been impossible for me to see him at that moment if I had wanted to. The guards would have prevented me. Even though I had followed the procession, I would not have been __-able to approach him without having some definite business which would have merited time out of his busy schedule.
As I watched him pass, I realized the need of such adequate measures for the protection of the President. I realized too, the need for eliminating all but the most dressing business from his personal attention. Then I thought how different it is when I want to approach Him who is the ruler of the universe.
I'need only to whisper His name and He is listening. I need only to address Him to come into His immediate presence. There are no secretaries to convince of the' importance of my mission. God allows me to come into His presence without making an appointment. What a privilege is mine as His child in Christ Jesus! What a pity that I often do not make the most of that privilege!
William F. Bruening
from The Messenger.


Dan, I A


T..T T'r 'l T A "h.T








THE INDIAN Pr he


. ORDNANCE STUFF
By Alston Jones
The Ordnance Department is
really going places in its reorganization program, and renovation project. Those of you who have been to the Mine Depot Building, where the Ordnance Office is located, and have not been there for a long time, would get the surprise of your life. A transformation has really taken place, and one which is mentioned with pride. Painted decks, scrubbed windows, replaced broken panes, and an overall cleaning has given the building the appearance of having gone to the hairdresser for one of the latest hairdos. The Carpenter Shop is working twelve hours in an eight hour day getting the ammunition trucks in shape for the coming ammunition handling. (That's part of
Sthe a6cident prevention program.)
All defective stakes and worn out boards in the truck beds are being replaced and repaired and that is keeping the crew very busy, trying
to meet the dead line.
Our "White Hat of the Week" is
none other than pleasant, easy going, Hirsch, B. E., SN, USN, who hails from Baltimore, Maryland.
Hirsch has been literally all over the place since he joined this man's Navy. He enlisted in December, 1944, and went through "boots" at Bainbridge, Md. In March 1945, h6 finished his training and was sent to Little Creek, Va. and then aboard LSMR 18, of which he is a "plank owner". After duty on this ship, he was sent to Camp Allen, Va.
with CoctLant, and from CoctLant was transferred to the USS Auburn (AGC-10), in January 1946.
While on the Auburn, he visited several places including Boston, Newport, New York, Philadelphia, . Guantanamo Bay, Norfolk and Key West. In October 1946 he was sent to Guantanamo, reporting aboard on October 15, for duty with the Training Group where he stayed until April 1948, when he was transferred to Naval Station for duty in the Ordnance Department.
Upon being asked how he liked
his duty with the Department, he declared: "It was the happiest day of my life when I heard I was being transferred here. I like this duty, because I went through Gunner's Mate School and like the duties involved in that branch. I am up for promotion, and have taken the test, and I hope I make the grade. The truth is I am keeping my fingers crossed." Hirsch says that even though he likes the Navy he is still counting the days and keeping track of them, because he hopes to get out in about sixty days. He plans to get a Civil Service job when he gets out and it would be no surprise if he hasn't got the little lady to help him carry the joy of life along. Here's to all


TRAGRP TRIVIALS
Passing Parade . . Looking around I don't see any new faces . . . or any missing ones . . . meaning no new arrivals or any departures. Heard where Weathers, GMC and Nalley, RD3 made the trip to Panama with the USS Worcester . .. ought to hear some fancy tales upon their return. Cdr. Alford flew up to the States to take delivery on that new car he bought.
Idyl Musings . . . See a new shiny LTJG's bar glittering on Mr. Wine's collar . . . congratulations. TraGrp Charley says, "He who hurries . . . must digest ticket . . . eh wot Sparrow." The boys in the barracks say they'll be glad when Brown, GM1 finally moves into his rancho . . . seems he's keeping every one hopping doin' this and that . .. says Brown, "gotta have the place ship shape for the wife." What's the info I hear about those people on upper 4th avenue mowing their own lawns ... what labor troubles? ?? . The new guessing game the boys in the barracks (TraGrp) are playing is "Who is it that gripes out loud in his sleep every nite" . . . a group led by Stanton will pay $5.00 if the man's identity is disclosed.
Sport Thawts . . . A rehash of the sports picture regarding the finals of the bowling league windup found the "White Hats" finishing in fifth place . . . and White losing out on the last nite . . . the high triple trophy . . . to Klunder who finally topped White's 620 with a 658. The "CPO's" team trimmed the Marines in their last match of the league to wind up solid in eighth place. The baseball team sharpened to perform Wednesday against the Marines only to have the game called again . . . wet grounds. The CPO's have challenged the TraGrp officers to a bowling match Friday at the new Air Station alleys . . . odds are even right now. You'll soon be seeing many shipriders chopping up the fairways slack period coming up.
(SEA) - An amateur enlisted fencing team, known as the Norfolk Division of the Amateur Fencers League, has been organized by the enlisted personnel at NAS, Norfolk, Va.
Twenty-five sailors and Marines and about an equal number of civilians compose the team's roll. The new unit is an affiliate of the "Federation Internationale D'Escrime" (FIE), the AAU and the U. S. Olympic Committee.

of your plans and dreams coming true Hirsch, and the best of luck in anything you may undertake. If you change your mind about going out of the Navy let me know. Good luck.


SLIPSTREAM

Wonder what those 39 new men who reported aboard for duty on Tuesday, the Pres. Hayes think of their new duty station? They got a pretty wet reception-as who didn't that day. Cheer up, men, brighter days ahead. Gochneaur, R. M., RM1, says he doesn't know the reason he's nicknamed "Goats." Who could I talk to that could refresh his memory? Know it isn't a record but hear that Lt. Cdr. A. H. Reid, and ADC Malley accompanied by their wives had themselves quite a time recently hunting Langosta. Seems Mally caught 56, all by himself.
A minor mystery was cleared up recently when Nelson, J. L., YN3, suddenly stopped talking to himself. Seems he brought a thoroughbred cocker spaniel from Ch. Gun. Parker and had to have three names for registration purposes. His final selections, after weeks of mumbling to himself: Sinbad the Sailor, Black as Sin, and Black, Antilles Pearl. Aside to NelsonIf you don't mind, Jim, we'd like to continue calling him "Laddie."
Mrs. Avis S. Vinson, mother of Lt. Jack N. Vinson, who has been visiting her son and family here, departed on the Pres. Hayes, Wednesday, for her home in California. Her many friends wish her "Beon Voyage, Bobby," and very sorry to see you leave,
Mrs. Ethel Wideberg and daughter Sandra, dependents of Lt. S. R. Wideberg, arrived Tuesday. Welcome aboard folks, we know you'll like it here.
You folks that had the chance to make the Kingston trip and passed it up, can get all the dope fom Lt. (jg) and Mrs. W. L. Hayden, Lt. (jg) and Mrs. E. J. Carroll; West, SH3. They all made the trip and from what they say it's well worth the visit.
Mrs. H: E. Fellers, who has been confined to the Hospital for the past five weeks, we hear is well on her way to recovery and expects to be home shortly. We hope she has a speedy recovery.
We're sorry to hear, too, that Mrs. F. P. Lukacs, wife of the Bos'n is also in the hospital. So is Karen, their little daughter, who was bitten by a dog. We wish the two of them a speedy recovery.
NSD Bowlers nosed out the NAS Officers team for second place by one point in their last game of the season. Too bad, fellers, but better luck next season.
A few weeks ago "Red" Schultz, Recreation Chief, wondered if there would be enough ladies turn out if an afternoon was set aside for them to bowl at the NAS Alleys. He got his answer last Wednesday when about 20 of the fair sex showed up. Hey, Red, how about swapping jobs?


THE INDIAN


Pave Three








Pare Four THE INDIAN Grmo. Bay-4 Nov 48-2500.


13M OX

Q. 1. Viscount Montgomery was appointed chairman of the Western Union (of Europe) defense organization recently. These three men were also given posts-Jean de Lattre de Tassigny of France and Sir James Robb of Britain.' What are their new jobs,
Q. 2. The United States recently commemorated the 456th anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus' expedition. Can you name the ships in that expedition? Q. 3. The word "snorkel" crops up in many news stories dealing with the Navy. What is a "snorkel?" Q. 4. A famous Army Post was recently honored with the issue of a postage stamp commemorating its centennial celebration. What Post is this ?.
A. 1. General de Lattre de Tassig-' ny, Commander-in-Chief of the ground forces; Air Marshall Robb, Commander-in-Chief of the air forces.
A. 2. Santa Maria, Pinta, Nina. A. 3. The "snorkel" is a "breathing" device for submarines, originally developed by Germany. It permits a submarine to remain submerged for virtually any length of time.
A. 4. The Army Post is Fort Bliss, at El Paso, Texas.

COMMISSIONS IN USN FOR
WOMEN DOCTORS

(SEA)-Up to 25 civilian women doctors, if qualified, will be accepted by the regular Navy and will be commissioned as lieutenants (junior grade) in the Medical Corps.
Qualified women must be graduates of a medical school and will be commissioned as lientenants (junior grade) in the Naval Reserve and ordered to a year's internship at a naval hospital. Four months before the completion of internship, they will be qualified to take the professional examination for appointment in rank to the regular Navy Medical Corps. All appoint-ments in the regular Navy will be subject to existing vacancies.
Women who do not apply for a commission 'in the regular Navy, may remain in the Naval Reserve after completion of 12 months internship, unless they resign their Reserve commissions.


THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES PROGRAM

(Continued from Page One)
elude lesson-service (correction and grading of lessons, advice on difficulties encountered); and selfteaching texts, which are simply ordinary textbooks 'with helpful self-study material added. Both types of course have. end-of-course tests which indicate whether or not the student has mastered the ma-. terial and which permit a civilian school to award credit, if it wishes, on a sound basis. USAFI does not consider any course completed until the end-of-course test has been taken and scored.
There is another group of correspondence courses that should be mentioned here-the correspondence courses offered by the 59 colleges and universities cooperat ing with USAFI. These institutions offer hundreds of college courses but they list many high school courses, too.
Now we bring up the subject of cost, the point should be made emphatically that, if a civilian were to take from private correspondence schools courses similar to USAFI courses or the courses offered by cooperating colleges, the cost would be anywhere from 25 to 100 times as much as USAFI charges. USAFI' courses require only a one-time fee of two dollars; after that has been paid, all courses taken are free. In the case of courses from cooperating universities, the student pays only the cost of books and a small enrollment fee; all other expenses are borne by the government. USAFI education, then, is an incomparable investment even if-regarded from only a financial point of view.
A third method of progressing toward a high school diploma is through credit received for Navy training. Most high schools are willing to give diploma credit, sometimes a substantial amount of it, for courses taken in Navy training schools. Often this credit for Navy training is enough to qualify a man for a diploma without further study, especially if he has had three or more years of high school before enlisting.
This writer will elaborate more upon this subject if all Base personnel interested in the educational opportunities offered by the United States Armed Forces Institute will visit the Naval Educational Services -Office located on Bay Hill in Barracks No. Four at any time. during working hours, at your ,convenience.

Two pigs met on the street one sweltering summer's day. Said one, "Phew, I never sausage heatl" Replied the other, "I know, I'm almost bacon."


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 7 Nov. to Sat. 13 Nov.
Sunday
SALOME, WHERE SHE DANCED Yvonne DeCarlo Rod Cameron
Monday
PILLOW OF DEATH
Lon Chaney Brenda Joyce
Tuesday
PATRICK' THE GREAT
Donald O'Connor Peggy Ryan
Wednesday
DANGEROUS MILLIONS
Kent Taylor Donna Drake
Thursday
MEXICANA
Constance Moore Tito Guizar
Friday
STEPPING IN SOCIETY
Edward E. Horton Gladys George
Saturday
THE WOMAN IN GREEN
Nigel Bruce Basil Rathbone

JAMAICA TRIP WAS A
HUGE SUCCESS
(Continued from Page One)
Gardens, which has a series of planned gardens as big as many public parks in the U. S., with plantings of almost every known type of flowers and shrubs, the shops selling fine English and Scottish plaids and woolens, the local market selling everything from food to native souvenirs, the street side flower vendors, and many more places of interest to all. I I would recommend this trip without hesitation, to any one, marrind or single, who is looking for a week-end of fun; excitement, and something different and interesting to do. Of all the passengers making this first trip, I know of no one who would not have paid many times over for the marvelous times that they -now carry as pleasant memories of their Kingston trip.
Shortly after leaving the harbor, we find the women scurrying about looking for mattresses, and a cool place to get a little nap. This lasted all the way back to Gtmo., and thus, "The Mattress Club" was formed with Mrs. Seigler as chairman. All were good runners up however, including some of the men
L Hazelbaker, the officers and crew of the USS Utina are to be sencerely thanked for their contribution to the comfort and welfare of the passengers during the, entire trip. Not only did they offer normal courtesies but all hands on the Utina "bent over backward" trying to be of assistance, and make the trip more enjoyable for all.


":THE INDIAN


Pare Pout


Grmo. Bay--4 Nov, 48-2500.




Full Text

PAGE 1

qk~ Id/ Vol. III, No. 39 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 6 November 1948 THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES PROGRAM By G. A. Muguira In the lives of many Navy men the acquisition of a high school diploma is an extremely important matter. High school graduation is a requirement for assignment to certain Navy schools, while in others, it is not, although it may be stated that it is important in the eyes of those charged with making selections. In civilian life (and practically all Navy men go back to civilian life eventually, even those who serve out thirty years or more) high school graduation has become a prerequisite for consideration for a very large proportion of jobs. The purpose of this article is to point out specific ways in which steps leading to a diploma or equivalency certificate may be obtained. Three Methods Available There are fundamentally three ways in which Navy men inay work toward high school graduation. The simplest method, provided the individual has been active intellectually since leaving school, and provided the high school or state department of education in question looks favorably upon the method, is by way of the USAFI GED (General Educational Development) tests. These tests, five in number and requiring approximately 10 hours in all for their administration, are designed to determine the educational level of the examinee without regard to his formal educational background. If that level proves sufficiently high, most high schools are willing to grant their diplomas, even if the candidates have had only one year of high school, or even less. In some cases where the high school itself is unwilling to award a diploma, the state department of education may grant a high school equivalency certificate, a document which, as its name indicates, is generally accepted as the equivalent of a diploma. A second way to attack the problem is through USAFI courses. These courses are of two kindscorrespondence courses, which in(Continued on Page Four) "GRAY ANGELS" ARE OF FLAG RANK The Navy's flying flag rank trio, the "Flying Admirals," have thrilled many people by zooming at high speeds across the skies of the United States. The three, also known as the "Gray Angels" have piloted their Phantom jet fighters in exhibitions at Idlewild airport in New York and at the Air Races in Cleveland, Ohio. The three flying admirals are: Rear Admiral D. V. Gallery, USN, Assistant Chief of Naval Operations and incidentally the brother of Captain W. 0. Gallery, Commanding Officer of .the Naval Air Station; Rear Admiral E. A. Cruise, USN, head of Air Warfare Division of Deputy CNO (Air); and Rear Admiral A. Soucek, USN, Commander of the Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent, Maryland. Send the Indian to the folks back home -they too will find it interesting and helpful in knowing more about the Navy and Gtmo. QOU FIGURE BETTER WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS. JAMAICA TRIP WAS A HUGE SUCCESS By R. E. Welsh, YN2 Bright and early Friday morning, the 22nd of October, the USS Utina (ATF-163) got underway for Kingston, Jamaica, with a cargo of men and women from the Naval Operating Base, Gtmo. The trip. down was rather uneventful, providing much talk of "I wonder what it will be like." Some made use of the mattresses supplied by the Utina, to catch up on a little "shut eye," but most of us were a little anxious and enthusiastic about our forthcoming experience. Upon arriving, and with no casualties from sea sickness (as far as I know), we were met by the American Counsel, who gave us our traveling passports, and a bit of advice in regard to hotel accomodations, transportation, etc. From this point on, we were on our own. The majority of the passengers exchanged their money for English pence, shillings and pounds at the Myrtle Bank Hotel. I guess every one had a little trouble getting used to the "new" type of money, but shortly after you arrive, you are using "three pound ten" and "five and six pence" just as you do "two bits." Many Stopped at Myrtle Bank The Myrtle Bank Hotel was the home of most of the passengers during our stay. It is comparable to fine resort hotels in the United States, and no one had any complaint of the $10.00 a day rate for room, and three meals. The meals alone are worth much more. Nine course dinners of tempting steaks and all the trimmings were just one of the items on the menu while we were there. Another place where a night's lodging and three meals may be had is the Melrose Hotel at $7.25 a day. The primary difference being the Melrose is of old English design and custom, and the Myrtle Bank being Spanish Modern. Foods of both places are deliciously spiced and cooked "to a turn." Points of interest are too numerous to mention here, but on a weekend stay, you might visit the many night spots, The Hope Botanical (Continued on Page Four) 6

PAGE 2

Paire Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 6 November 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson -----------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman.---Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted -without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. EDITORIAL Our life here on the Naval Operating Base is a confined one in the sense of seeing and living with the same people day after day and sooner or later you realize that you have your good days and your oad ones. You learn that it doesn't pay to be too sensitive; that he also is just as sensitive about certain things as you are. You learn that he who loses his temper usually lose out. You learn that all men have burnt toast for breakfast now and then and that he shouldn't take the other fellow's grouch too seriously. You learn that carrying a chip on your shoulder is the easiest way to get into trouble. You learn that passing the buck always turns out to be a boomerang and that it never pays. You learn that when your buddies and friends leave that life still goes on. You learn that even the janitor is human and that it does no harm to say "Good Morning" even if it is raining. You learn that other people are just as ambitious as you and have brains just as good and better, and that hard work, not cleverness, is the secret of success. You learn to sympathize with the new recruits just coming in, because you remember how bewildered you were when you were in their shoes. You learn that folks are not any harder to get along with in one place than another, and that the "getting along" depends about ninety-eight per cent on your own behavior. If you have mastered the above you have learned the art of Getting Along. Three baby girls SPI1A made their grand entrance at the Hospital during the past week. Elaine Doreen McKnight was born Thursday, 28 October to PR1 and Mrs. H. J. NOTES McKnight; with Chaplain Bosserman's smile dimming even the tropical sun, no doubt everyone knows that Mrs. Bosserman presented him with a little bundle named Catherine Jeanne, on Sunday, 31 October; ET1 and Mrs. Melvin Brown have not yet chosen a name for their little girl who was born on Monday, 1 November. Incidentally Baby Brown is practicaly the heavyweight of Naval Hospital, Guantanamo history, weighing in at 8 pounds, 14 ounces. The Junior Corpsmen from the Hospital held an impromptu picnic at Cable Beach last Saturday plenty of eats and drinks and mucho fun for all hands. Lt. Cdr. R. S. Kibler, MC, USN, has gone to the States on TAD for five days. That X-ray equipment that everyone has heard so much about has failed to show and as a last resort, Dr. Kibler is doing a little sleuthing. Phelps, HMC, former Hospital Recreation and Welfare Assistant, has been transferred to VU-10. Good luck on the new assignment, Phelps. Mr. 0. H. Dutcher of Colorado Springs, Colorado, is visiting his son, Lt, (jg) C. H. Dutcher, MSC, USN for a few weeks. TO THE GUARD By R. E. McCullough When darkness covers all earth and man alike, Who will sleep, who will hear midnight strike, Whose tired feet will tramp the earth so hard, We can say, we will ,know for we're the guard. When sun or darkness is on earth here below, Who will see, who will hear, who will know When the call is sounded for the alarm We will sound it, for vigilance is our arm. We who watch the bastions far and wide Know of the wind, the water and the tide Comes days of toil, sleep well, work hard We'll watch, ready ever, for we're the guard. Short story .will the lady who left her laundry in my car please call and explain to my wife. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 7 November 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPI.AlstS CORNER DIRECT ACCESS A dozen or more officers on motorcycles went by. A car full of men followed. Then came a car with men' standing on the running boards. Another group of motorcycles completed the procession. The President of the United States had just passed by 736 Jackson Place-where I happened to be standing at the time. He was on his way home to the White House. I caught only a passing glimpse of him in the car in which he was riding. It would have been impossible for me to see him at that moment if I had wanted to. The guards would have prevented me. Even though I had followed the procession, I would not have been able to approach him without having some definite business which would have merited time out of his busy schedule. As I watched him pass, I realized the need of such adequate measures for the protection of the President. I realized too, the need for eliminating all but the most pressing business from his personal attention. Then I thought how different it is when I want to approach Him who is the ruler of the universe. I need only to whisper His name and He is listening. I need only to address Him to come into His immediate presence. There are no secretaries to convince of the importance of my mission. God allows me to come into His presence without making an appointment. What a privilege is mine as His child in Christ Jesus! What a pity that I often do not make the most of that privilege! William F. Bruening from The Messenger. THE INDIAN Pare Two is

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THE INDIAN Paee Three A ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones The Ordnance Department is really going places in its reorganization program, and renovation project. Those of you who have been to the Mine Depot Building, where the Ordnance Office is located, and have not been there for a long time, would get the surprise of your life. A transformation has really taken place, and one which is mentioned with pride. Painted decks, scrubbed windows, replaced broken panes, and an overall cleaning has given the building the appearance of having gone to the hairdresser for one of the latest hairdos. The Carpenter Shop is working twelve hours in an eight hour day getting the ammunition trucks in shape for the coming ammunition handling. (That's part of the accident prevention program.) All defective stakes and worn out boards in the truck beds are being replaced and repaired and that is keeping the crew very busy, trying to meet the dead line. Our "White Hat of the Week" is none other than pleasant, easy going, Hirsch, B. E., SN, USN, who hails from Baltimore, Maryland. Hirsch has been literally all over the place since he joined this man's Navy. He enlisted in December, 1944, and went through "boots" at Bainbridge, Md. In March 1945, he finished his training and was sent to Little Creek, Va. and then aboard LSMR 18, of which he is a "plank owner". After duty on this ship, he was sent to Camp Allen, Va. with CoctLant, and from CoctLant was transferred to the USS Auburn (AGC-10), in January 1946. While on the Auburn, he visited several places including Boston, Newport, New York, Philadelphia, Guantanamo Bay, Norfolk and Key W West. In October 1946 he was sent to Guantanamo, reporting aboard on October 15, for duty with the Training Group where he stayed until April 1948, when he was transferred to Naval Station for duty in the Ordnance Department. Upon being asked how he liked his duty with the Department, he declared: "It was the happiest day of my life when I heard I was being transferred here. I like this duty, because I went through Gunner's Mate School and like the duties involved in that branch. I am up for promotion, and have taken the test, and I hope I make the grade. The truth is I am keeping my fingers crossed." Hirsch says that even though he likes the Navy he is still counting the days and keeping track of them, because he hopes to get out in about sixty days. He plans to get a Civil Service job when he gets out and it would be no surprise if he hasn't got the little lady to help him carry the joy of life along. Here's to all TRAGRP TRIVIALS Passing Parade ...Looking around I don't see any new faces or any missing ones meaning no new arrivals or any departures. Heard where Weathers, GMC and Nalley, RD3 made the trip to Panama with the USS Worcester ...ought to hear some fancy tales upon their return. Cdr. Alford flew up to the States to take delivery on that new car he bought. Idyl Musings ...See a new shiny LTJG's bar glittering on Mr. Wine's collar ...congratulations. TraGrp Charley says, "He who hurries ...must digest ticket eh wot Sparrow." The boys in the barracks say they'll be glad when Brown, GM1 finally moves into his rancho ...seems he's keeping every one hopping doin' this and that ...says Brown, "gotta have the place ship shape for the wife." What's the info I hear about those people on upper 4th avenue mowing their own lawns .what labor troubles? ? ? The new guessing game the boys in the barracks (TraGrp) are playing is "Who is it that gripes out loud in his sleep every nite" ...a group led by Stanton will pay $5.00 if the man's identity is disclosed. Sport Thawts ...A rehash of the sports picture regarding the finals of the bowling league windup found the "White Hats" finishing in fifth place ...and White losing out on the last nite ...the high triple trophy ...to Klunder who finally topped White's 620 with a 658. The "CPO's" team trimmed the Marines in their last match of the league to wind up solid in eighth place. The baseball team sharpened to perform Wednesday against the Marines only to have the game called again ...wet grounds. The CPO's have challenged the TraGrp officers to a bowling match Friday at the new Air Station alleys odds are even right now. You'll soon be seeing many shipriders chopping up the fairways ... slack period coming up. (SEA) -An amateur enlisted fencing team, known as the Norfolk Division of the Amateur Fencers League, has been organized by the enlisted personnel at NAS, Norfolk, Va. Twenty-five sailors and Marines and about an equal number of civilians compose the team's roll. The new unit is an affiliate of the "Federation Internationale D'Escrime" (FIE), the AAU and the U. S. Olympic Committee. of your plans and dreams coming true Hirsch, and the best of luck in anything you may undertake. If you change your mind about going out of the Navy let me know. Good luck. SLIPSTREAM Wonder what those 39 new men who reported aboard for duty on Tuesday, the Pres. Hayes think of their new duty station? They got a pretty wet reception -as who didn't that day. Cheer up, men, brighter days ahead. Gochneaur, R. M., RM1, says he doesn't know the reason he's nicknamed "Goats." Who could I talk to that could refresh his memory? Know it isn't a record but hear that Lt. Cdr. A. H. Reid, and ADC Malley accompanied by their wives had themselves quite a time recently hunting Langosta. Seems Mally caught 56, all by himself. A minor mystery was cleared up recently when Nelson, J. L., YN3, suddenly stopped talking to himself. Seems he brought a thoroughbred cocker spaniel from Ch. Gun. Parker and had to have three names for registration purposes. His final selections, after weeks of mumbling to himself: Sinbad the Sailor, Black as Sin, and Black Antilles Pearl. Aside to NelsonIf you don't mind, Jim, we'd like to continue calling him "Laddie." Mrs. Avis S. Vinson, mother of Lt. Jack N. Vinson, who has been visiting her son and family here, departed on the Pres. Hayes, Wednesday, for her home in California. Her many friends wish her "Bon Voyage, Bobby," and very sorry to see you leave, Mrs. Ethel Wideberg and daughter Sandra, dependents of Lt. S. R. Wideberg, arrived Tuesday. Welcome aboard folks, we know you'll like it here. You folks that had the chance to make the Kingston trip and passed it up, can get all the dope from Lt. (jg) and Mrs. W. L. Hayden, Lt. (jg) and Mrs. E. J. Carroll; West, SH3. They all made the trip and from what they say it's well worth the visit. Mrs. H. E. Fellers, who has been confined to the Hospital for the past five weeks, we hear is well on her way to recovery and expects to be home shortly. We hope she has a speedy recovery. We're sorry to hear, too, that Mrs. F. P. Lukacs, wife of the Bos'n is also in the hospital. So is Karen, their little daughter, who was bitten by a dog. We wish the two of them a speedy recovery. NSD Bowlers nosed out the NAS Officers team for second place by one point in their last game of the season. Too bad, fellers, but better luck next season. A few weeks ago "Red" Schultz, Recreation Chief, wondered if there would be enough ladies turn out if an afternoon was set aside for them to bowl at the NAS Alleys. He got his answer last Wednesday when about 20 of the fair sex showed up. Hey, Red, how about swapping jobs? THE INDIAN Pare Three

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Pafe Four THE INDIAN Grmo. Bny-4 Nov 48-2500. 4 0 QUESTION Q. 1. Viscount Montgomery was appointed chairman of the Western Union (of Europe) defense organization recently. These three men were also given posts-Jean de Lattre de Tassigny of France and Sir James Robb of Britain. What are their new jobs. Q. 2. The United States recently commemorated the 456th anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus' expedition. Can you name the ships in that expedition? Q. 3. The word "snorkel" crops up in many news stories dealing with the Navy. What is a "snorkel?" Q. 4. A famous Army Post was recently honored with the issue of a postage stamp commemorating its centennial celebration. What Post is this?. A. 1. General de Lattre de Tassigny, Commander-in-Chief of the ground forces; Air Marshall Robb, Commander-in-Chief of the air forces. A. 2. Santa Maria, Pinta, Nina. A. 3. The "snorkel" is a "breathing" device for submarines, originally developed by Germany. It permits a submarine to remain submerged for virtually any length of time. A. 4. The Army Post is Fort Bliss, at El Paso, Texas. COMMISSIONS IN USN FOR WOMEN DOCTORS (SEA)-Up to 25 civilian women doctors, if qualified, will be accepted by the regular Navy and will be commissioned as lieutenants (junior grade) in the Medical Corps. Qualified women must be graduates of a medical school and will be commissioned as lientenants (junior grade) in the Naval Reserve and ordered to a year's internship at a naval hospital. Four months before the completion of internship, they will be qualified to take the professional examination for appointment in rank to the regular Navy Medical Corps. All appoint*ments in the regular Navy will be subject to existing vacancies. Women who do not apply for a commission in the regular Navy, may remain in the Naval Reserve after completion of 12 months internship, unless they resign their Reserve commissions. THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES PROGRAM (Continued from Page One) elude lesson service (correction and grading of lessons, advice on difficulties encountered); and selfteaching texts, which are simply ordinary textbooks 'with helpful self-study material added. Both types of course have end-of-course tests which indicate whether or not the student has mastered the material and which permit a civilian school to award credit, if it wishes, on a sound basis. USAFI does not consider any course completed until the end-of-course test has been taken and scored. There is another group of correspondence courses that should be mentioned here -the correspondence courses offered by the 59 colleges and universities cooperating with USAFI. These institutions offer hundreds of college courses, but they list many high school courses, too. Now we bring up the subject of cost, the point should be made emphatically that, if a civilian were to take from private. correspondence schools courses similar to USAFI courses or the courses offered by cooperating colleges, the cost would be anywhere from 25 to 100 times as much as USAFI charges. USAFI courses require only a one-time fee of two dollars; after that has been paid, all courses taken are free. In the case of courses from cooperating universities, the student pays only the cost of books and a small enrollment fee; all other expenses are borne by the government. USAFI education, then, is an incomparable investment even if regarded from only a financial point of view. A third method of progressing toward a high school diploma is through credit received for Navy training. Most high schools are willing to give diploma credit, sometimes a substantial amount of it, for courses taken in Navy training schools. Often this credit for Navy training is enough to qualify a man for a diploma without further study, especially if he has had three or more years of high school before enlisting. This writer will elaborate more upon this subject if all Base personnel interested in the educational opportunities offered by the United States Armed Forces Institute will visit the Naval Educational Services -Office located on Bay Hill in Barracks No. Four at any time during working hours at your convenience. Two pigs met on the street one sweltering summer's day. Said one, "Phew, I never sausage heat!" Replied the other, "I know, I'm almost bacon." NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 7 Nov. to Sat. 13 Nov. Sunday SALOME, WHERE SHE DANCED Yvonne DeCarlo Rod Cameron Monday PILLOW OF DEATH Lon Chaney Brenda Joyce Tuesday PATRICK THE GREAT Donald O'Connor Peggy Ryan Wednesday DANGEROUS MILLIONS Kent Taylor Donna Drake Thursday MEXICANA Constance Moore Tito Guizar Friday STEPPING IN SOCIETY Edward E. Horton Gladys George Saturday THE WOMAN IN GREEN Nigel Bruce Basil Rathbone JAMAICA TRIP WAS A HUGE SUCCESS (Continued from Page One) Gardens, which has a series of planned gardens as big as many public parks in the U. S., with plantings of almost every known type of flowers and shrubs, the shops selling fine English and Scottish plaids and woolens, the local market selling everything from food to native souvenirs, the street side flower vendors, and many more places of interest to all. I would recommend this trip without hesitation, to any one, marriqd or single, who is looking for a week-end of fun; excitement, and something different and interesting to do. Of all the passengers making this first trip, I know of no one who would not have paid many times over for the marvelous times that they now carry as pleasant memories of their Kingston trip. Shortly after leaving the harbor, we find the women scurrying about looking for mattresses, and a cool place to get a little nap. This lasted all the way back to Gtmo., and thus, "The Mattress Club" was formed with Mrs. Seigler as chairman. All were good runners up however, including some of the men. Lt. Hazelbaker, the officers and crew of the USS Utina are to be sencerely thanked for their contribution to the comfort and welfare of the passengers during the entire trip. Not only did they offer normal courtesies but all hands on the Utina "bent over backward" trying to be of assistance, and make the trip more enjoyable for all. K. Pace Four THE INDIAN Grmo. Bay-4 Nov 48-2500. TLOGM


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