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U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 October:1948


LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT NOW UNDERWAY
Admiral Phillips, Commander, Navol Operating Baae, ;has -Added another much needed-and muth appreciated project to his alreadyy long list of improvements to the Naval 'Operating Base. This Ipast week with the approval of the Admiral and the immediate cooperation of Commander Davis, ;Base Public Works Office, the Naval Operating Base Library and Chaplains' Offices are being considerably changed and improved.
The library will have an overhead which will insulate the library to a large degree from the heat of the metal roof. Mr. Chapman, Electrical Foreman, is rearranging and adding additional lights so that the servicemen who use the library will find it much better for reading and writing.
The Chaplains' Offices have been enlarged and enclosed. This is of advantage to all personnel in that both .chaplains will have the necessary privacy for personal counseling.
The Red Cross office has been moved to the south west side of the library into offices that are cool and comfortable.
The new Navy Relief office will be incorporated in the new arrangement for the Chaplains. In about two weeks we invite all personnel to drop in and see the new set-up.

NEW FLEET AIR BASE AT
JACKSONVILLE
(SEA)-The Jacksonville, Florida area has been selected by the Navy for development of a major fleet air base with facilities to accommodate- the' largest aircraft carriers now afloat.
Two berths which could handle carriers of the Midway class will be constructed. The St. John river will be dredged to a depth of 42 feet from its mouth to Ribault Bay. Tbe channel entering into the bay will 'be widened to 500 feet.
To berth one Midway class carrier, two quay walls must be built. Piers will connect the quays to the nainland.


-CAPTAIN ARTHU R L. PLEASANTS, JR., USN
AND FAMILY DEPART IN PRES. ADAMS
When the President Adams departed Thursday, 28 October, the Base lost three fine people, Captain and Mrs. Arthur L. Pleasants, Jr., USN, and Mrs. Alma Bagby. Captain Pleasants has received orders to report to the First Naval District for duty as Commanding Officer, Office of Naval Research, Boston, Mass. Before assuming this command, he will report for temporary duty with the Chief of Naval Research, Washington, D. C.Captain Pleasants, a native of Richmond, Va., graduated -from the U. S. Naval Academy in the Class of 1922. During the ensuing years, he saw sea duty in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Caribbean areas. His training as an executive began early in his Naval career and led a long trail through destroyers, cruisers and battleships. Tropical duty was no new experience as he served 'or two years prior to the war at the Naval Station, Tuituila, Samoa. His wartime experience included Navigator and Executive Officer of the Wyoming, and Commanding Officer of the General Patrick and the Auburn. However, his most important assignment was that of Fleet Personnel Officer on the Staff of CoinCapt. Arthur L. Pleasants, Jr;, USN mander Service Force, Atlantic Fleet, and for this service he reS.S. James eived the Legion of Merit.
Culines When Captain Pleasants reported Boqueron, Cuba aboard in August, 1946, this Base 19 Ocotber 1948 was being readied as an all-yearThe Officer in Charge round Fleet Training Base, and he U. S. Naval Base helped formulate the policies and Guantanamo. plans which at present are in operaDear Sir: tion. For more than two years in
On my vessel's arrival at this his capacity as Chief of Staff and port. I had on board, a very sick Aide to the Commander, U. S. man and had occasion to call your Naval Operating Base, he has signal station for medical advice poured oil on troubled waters and and assistance. Unfortunately, by through his good humor and tact, the time the doctor arrived, the has maintained a consistently pleasman had died and on the following ant atmosphere among the various day (Sunday) I asked once again commands throughout the Naval for help, this time for the services Operating Base. of the Catholic Chaplain, who con- Captain and Mrs. Pleasants have ducted the funeral services. been very democratic. No one has I wish to extend to you, my sin- been too big or too small for them cere thanks for such prompt and to be interested in. They have been courteous services given so will- guests at enlisted men's parties and ingly. picnics, and host to visiting Cuban
Yours sincerely, and American VIPs.
John McIvor Their two sons, Arthur L., III,
Master. (Continued on Pare F 0f)


w


Vol. III, 38







Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672
Saturday, 30 October 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Philips,.USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson -------------------- Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman-Staff Advisor
THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-3. Rev. Nov. 45.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from -SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS.
All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless- indicated otherwise.

DATES TO REMEMBER IN
NOVEMBER

2 Nbvember-General election day
in all states and territories.
4 Nov. 1941-Navy tanker Salinas torpedoed off coast of
Iceland.
7 Nov. 1942-Navy, Army, Air Force began invasion of North
Africa.
11 November -Armistice Day
(Victory Day in Colo., Tenn.,
and Texas).
12-14 Nov. 1942-Navy sank 28
Jap ships in Battle of Guadalcanal.
12 Nov. 1942 - Nazi battleship
Tirpitz sunk by British off
Norway.
14 Nov. 1942-Draft ordered for
18-19 year olds in United
States.
17 Nov. 1869-Suez Canal opened,
shortening 'distance to Far
East.
22 Nov. 1943-Marines landed on
Tarawa; Army landed on Makin.
23 Nov. 1944-U. S. planes make
second air attack on city of
Tokyo.
25 November - Thanksgiving Day
in U. S., territories and possessions.
27 Nov. 1942 - French sank 55
units of their fleet in Toulon
harbor.
28 Nov. 1773-Colonist tax rebellion leads to "Boston Tea
Party."
28 Nov. 1783 .- First U. S. Post
Office open6d in city of New
York.
28 Nov. 1929 - RAdm. Byrd flew
over South Pole; dropped U. S.
flag.
30 Nov. 1939-Russia invaded Finland; met with stubborn resistance.


Six babies in
A~j~Jb ~ one week is a lot
SITAL of babies even for 7 Gtmo., but that
was the record set the past week.
Baby boy Plank led the parade on 20 October, named
~ Glenn William ; T " the son of TMC
G. W. and Mrs.
Plank; AMC and Mrs. W. R. North are having trouble choosing a name for their boy, born cn the 22. Maybe the boys at VU-10 could give them some suggestions; HMC and Mrs. P. W. Barrett should ask the hospital staff to help them make a selection for a name for their baby girl born the 24th-they too are having their troubles with a suitable name; Gail Marie Boillet born on the 25th to BMI and Mrs. W. C. Boillet was luckier-her parents were all prepared and knew all the time what she would be named; ,baby boy Simmons too, has not yet been named but his father and mother, MSgt. and Mrs. C. M. Simmons, USAF, are giving the subject their utmost considerationbaby Simmons was born the 25th; Carroll Ann Starcevic was born the 27th to A. C. and Mrs. Starcevic. Mr. Starcevic is the American Vice-Consul at Kingston, Jamaica. Mrs. Starcevic and Mrs. Simmons are the latest patients admitted to our Dependent's Ward under the new program of caring for American dependents in Jamaica.
Captain L. L. Wilson, MC, USN, and family arrived on the Pres. Hayes on Tuesday of this week. Captain Wilson is our new Executive Officer. All hands are giving a big welcome to the Captain and Mrs. Wilson and daughter, Jane. We hope your tour in Gtmo. will be an enjoyable one.
Cdr. A. N. Chaffin, MC, USN and Lt. (g) J. R. Rankin, MSC, USN and his family, all returned to the Base' via the Hayes and report a nice time in the States while on leave. However, with the high cost of living they feel that this is a pretty good place to be.
(SEA)-A Navy-financed atomsmasher, boasting a barrel 160 feet long, is being constructed at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif.
The name of the smasher is linear electron accelerator and it is capable of firing nuclear projectiles with energies of approximately one billion electron volts.
The accelerator is only one of many scientific instruments being constructed under the Office of Naval Research contracts.

"We're going to give you any thing you want for your last meal."
"Could I please have a bottle of champagne, Warden?"
"Sure, any particular vintage?"
"Yes-1985."


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 31 October 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base'Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)









WHAT ARE THEY WORTH?
My wife was in search of a corner cupboard for the dining room. She found one through a friend who directed her to an outof-the-way farmhouse.
The cupboard was hiding in the corner of the workshop at the rear of the house. Beside it stood a solid mahogany secretary with cherry paneled drawers and hand-hewn posts. Each piece was a genuine antique.
"I'll sell 'em both," said the owner as she swung the smallpaned glass doors of the cupboard on their H-hinges. "If you're willing to scrub a bit, you can get a lot of good use out of them. They're nothing but dirt-catchers here."
My wife eyed the pieces critically and remembered a secretary, almost identical to this one, which a dealer had priced at $300.
"What will you take for these?" she asked.
The woman feigned an attempt to dispel the dust and cobwebs that had collected on the heirlooms. "You can have 'em both for five dollars-if you think that's not too much."
I've been wondering whether many of us may not have a confused sense of values. What of the family pew-the family Bible-the family altar? Are they gathering dust and cobwebs, to our eternal loss ?
Paul Hamsher
from "The Lutheran'
(SEA) -Chain cables for anchors'were introduced in 1812 and quickly demonstrated their superiority over rope. "Old Ironsides" was one of the last American Ships to employ hemp-anchor cables.


THE INDIAN


Paff TWO







THE INDIAN Pa~'A Three


TRAGRP TRIVIALS

Passing Parade ... The various
depts. of TraGrp are happy to welcome aboard the following Chiefs from TraGrp, Nariagansett who are here on TAD to assist during the coming peak period of Training
. . Lt. Spinney; Bradley, CSC;
Comstock, M M C; Cunningham, GMC; Edmonds, GMC; Hallisey, MEC; Meyer, BTC; and Walton, BTC ... most of these Chiefs were down here last year on the same kind of a junket and we look forward to renewing old acquaintances. Another countenance that will be seen around Bldg. 15 is that of Richardson, RMC who'll be standing. CWO watches in the
Comm. Shack.
Idyll Musings . . . "Doc" Sant,
the scientific farmer, has little to say to Lt. Woods who grows the Cuban weed (okra) . . . with his four little helpers he could have a good garden. Heard a story about a Gunnery Chief who fretted around waiting for his car to come in...
finally he heard it was to be on a certain ship . . . so he begged the day off to watch them unload it .. . stood around all morning sweating it out and wondering when his would come over the side ... but no Chevy... in desperation he started checking only to find out . . you guessed it... that it had been standing on the dock for a week waiting for him to claim it j.. Jus Igoes to prove the saying "There's always someone who don't get the word." Can't tell whether Jacobs is glum or happy about going to school in Key West for a couple of months ... his wife jus' got here ... well wotta you think?
You'd of been surprised at some of the wierd costumes that showed up
* Wed. nite at the Halloween party
the CPO Club had. . . tell ya.more about it next week. Our prize soapbox orator, Moskerintz. finally got off on leave . . . going up to study' modern methods during the windup.
of the political situation in the States ... wonder wet his dessertations will be like upon his.return.
MacAndrews reports from his bed that his tonnage\ is decreasing
slowly.. too'slow!
Sport ThawtS . . . with all the
rain these last couple of weeks .
our ball team will' have to go back to spring training to warm up to their hot pace. The various Training Group Bowling teams wound up their respective league competition . . . in the following manner
Officer's confident of 'clinching
fourth place .,'. . paced these last weeks by the hot kegli.ng of Lt.
(jg) Vasey. Chiefs ... fairly secure in th place .... steady bowling @ :. but no threat to any team. White
Hats . . . Off' in a blaze of glory � . . but broke their legs in the home stretch .. . our only consolation - . . S02 White's practically


ORDNANCE STUFF

By Alston Jones
The Ordnance Department has a "one track mind" these days. All efforts are being made to reduce the accident ratio to a minimum or even less than that if possible. A meeting was held n the past week, both for enlistedd personnel and civilians and committees were formed to initiate and maintain an accident prevention program. The Ordnance Officer in his talkto the Ordnance personnel stressed the necessity for the cooperation of all hands, in making this program a success. "We have got to eliminate accidents in one way or another" he said "and to do that' is not the job .of just one individual, but the combined efforts of each and every one of you, binding the Department together in a mass drive against accidents."
A picnic was held on Wednesday, 20 October for the men of the Sixth Division, and from the comments overheard it seemed to have been a success. This picnic was beld at Windmill Beach and all the men of the division except those on duty turned out for that date with the "Indian Head" (and I have heard say is a very good friend as long as you treat him right). The highlights of the picnic were swimming, soft ball games, tug o' war, and eating and drinking, of course. The umpire was E. R.Cary, SN, JSN, and one has heard of games sold out for thousands of dollars, but'it didn't take very much to buy this ump out, an Indian Head label was enough (with that I mean, the article that carried the label). There was enough drinks and ;eats for everyone-five barrels of ;beer, six cases of cokes, ham, tu1~ey, pork, weiners, and a score of i different delicacies, from which eadh person could pick and'ch6ose to his heart's content, even a little K9 -friend had his little bit of fun. Overall i4 was a longed for break for the men who had been putting in pretty hard work in the past weeks. All the men join in thanking Lt. Speith, Jacobs, GM3, Rairden, SN, Chief Gaspar and "Sentelik, YN3,.. who were the organizers of ,the pleasant day's outing, and hope that another one of its kind will not be long in coming.
Some of Uncle Sam's sailors were in Naples, looking at the, molten lava inside Mt.' Vesuvius. One guy remarked,. "Looks hot as 'ell." An Englishman mumbled under his breath, 'These Americans have been everywhere."
unbeatable, high"' triple to. garner
-himself a -very worthy trophy. :
Annonymous Query . . . How about a de'lilefyservice for Beer � . . too many folks are without transportation.. . "and hauling it about on the Bus is questionable? ?


FISHING PARTY BATTLES LARGE SHARK

A group of residents from Victory Hill recently experienced an unusual episode while on a fishing trip and picnic at the East end of Guantanamo Bay. The party included: Kenneth Chase, ET2 and his wife, Carol; Bob Bosworth, DT1 and his wife, Doris; Merril Bosworth and Richard Showalter, SN who navigated their small sail boat.
The fishing party set sail during mid-afternoon with high hopes of catching an ample supply of fish for a fish bake for that evening. They fished patiently for one hour or so without a single bite, Showalter landed a good sized red snapper to break the monoton.y
Then after another long monotonous wait without a single bite, a shriek of delight resounded throughout the boat, as -they had spied a large bariacuda about four feet from their boat. They immediately placed the red snapper o4 a large hook, about the size of a meat hook,, and dangled the fish under the barracuda's mouth. But to no avail! The barracuda utterly ignored the temptation, and rfused to be caught.
Members of the party decided to turn back and head in at 1600. Mrs. Chase, playing a hunch, proceeded to troll- off the stern of the boat.
"How'll I know I have a bite", exclaimed Mrs. Chase. After they had advanced about 100 yards and before she could finish her statement, the familiar sizzing of the reel sounded.
Showalter grabbed the rod and reel. He pulled hard. "It seems like I'm pulling the floor of the whole darn bay," he shouted. Then suddenly a large white bellied fish broke the surface of the water. "It's a shark," screamed the women. "No young one either," retorted the men. He's' at least five or six feet long and more than a 100 pounds in weight," exclaimed Ken Chase.
Showalter played with the shark for more than an hour. The shark fought every inch of the way to the side of the boat.
When Showalter finally pulled the' shark up to the boat, Bob Bosworth shot two bullets into the man-eater's. head, which only' seemed to anger him. In desperation Bob grabbed two heavy oak oars which cracked like. fire-wood over the shark's head.
Ken dropped a line over the maneater's head. When they proceeded to pull the line tight, the shark gave a terrific jerk and the steel leader snapped. The line was not y t tight enough, the shark slipped through and made his get away. He had won the victory. , "I just feel like crying," lamented Mrs. Bosworth. "But we have the proof, Carol has taken many pictures of the episode."


THE INDIAN


. kava







.Pw Four -THE INDIAN Gtmo. nay-25 Oct 48-2600.


X CAPTAIN ]LEASANTS LEAVES ON PRES. ADAMS
(Continued. from Page One)
and John B., are at present attending the Naval Academy. They visited their parents recently during their refresher training.
Leaving also at this time is Mrs. Alma Bagby, mother of Mrs. Pleasants, who has endeared herself to everyone by her charm and friendliness, Upon reaching the States, she will return to her home in Richmond, Va., where she lives with her son.
Captain Pleasants is to be relieved by Captain Henry Crommelin, USN, who comes to us from Destroyers, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, where he was Chief of Staff to Commander Destroyers, Atlantic Fleet.
At the Marine
Barracks, plans are undei way for a gala celebration of the 173rd Anniversary of the Marine Corps on the 10th of November.
F~romvlll.1 induications it promises to be the biggest celebration ever held by the Marines at this Post.
When the ballots were counted after the recent election of officers atithe Staff NCO Club, the results showed MSgt. Carcelli as President; Tsgt. Lewis as Vice-President; SSgt. Simmons as, Secretary; TSgt. Emrich as Treasurer, TSgt. Bateman as manager; and the Board of Governors is coniprised of MSgt. Avery; MSgt. Stroud; SSgt.. Payne and SSgt. Wolfkeil. Congratulations men.
Missing from the chow table for a week was TSgt. "Anyface" Emrich who was in Miami. How is the USA these days, Emrichf?
New arrivals on the Post are Mrs. Carcelli who arrived on the Pres. Adams, and Mrs. Patterson who arrived on the Pres. -ayes. Welcome aboard ladies and we hope your stay will be a pleasant one.
In the baseball league, the Maiines are tied for first place with the Fleet Training Group. First place in the volley ball league is held by the officers with the staff NdOs in second place and battling for the lead.

A sailor at a restaurant eounter, after waiting -for several minutes was finally approached by the waitress. He said he would like some coffee without *ream. The waitress went back into the kitchen. About five minutes later she returned and said: "I'mi sorry, we)re all out of cream, would you just ,s soon have your :coffee without mik?"


Q. Has the Kentucky Derby ever been won by a foreign bred horse? A. Yes. Omar Khayyam, an English-bred horse-won it in 1917.
Q. Can you name the players deelared mnost valuable in the National an-d American Leagues in 1947? A. National League: Bob Elliott of the Boston Braves; American Leagupe: Joe DiMaggio of the New York Yankees.
Q. A Pacific Coast housewife, Gretchen 'Fraser, was a surprise star in what athletic event this year ?
A. The 1948 Winter Olympic Games, , winning points in the Downhill and Slalom Races.
Q. He won the U. S. Open Golf tournament in 1922 and repeated 10 years later. He was often called the "Connecticut Squire." Who is hen
A. Gene Sarazen.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 31 Oct. to Sat. 6 Nov.
I Sunday
THE SEARCH
Aline MacMahon J. N ovotna
Monday
TRAPPED BY BOSTON
BLACKIE
Chester Morris June Vincent
Tuesday
CALIFORNIA
Ray Miland Barbara Stanwyck
Wednesday
THE COUNTERFEITERS
John Sutton Doris Merrick
Thursday
HEART OF VIRGINIA
Janet Martin Robert Lowery
Friday
MY DARLING CLEMENTINE Henry Fonda Linda Darnell
Saturday
OVERLAND TRAIL
J. MacBrown Virginia Belmont


h ltwants.tolknow ilf have aidend for her mother!"


.


19HE i INDIAN


"PAW FQr


Gtmo. Bay-28 Oct 48-2500.




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PAGE 1

Ia' U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 30 October 1948 LIBRARY IMPROVEMENT NOW UNDERWAY Admiral Phillips, Commander, Naval Operating Base, has added another much needed and much appreciated project to his already long list of improvements to the Naval Operating Base. This past week with the approval of the Admiral and the immediate cooperation of Commander Davis, Base Public Works Office, the Naval Operating Base Library and Chaplains' Offices are being considerably changed and improved. The library will have an overhead which will insulate the library to a large degree from the heat of the metal roof. Mr. Chapman, Electrical Foreman, is rearranging and adding additional lights so that the servicemen who use the library will find it much better for reading and writing. The Chaplains' Offices have been enlarged and enclosed. This is of advantage to all personnel in that both chaplains will have the necessary privacy for personal counseling. The Red Cross office has been moved to the south west side of the library into offices that are cool and comfortable. The new Navy Relief office will be incorporated in the new arrangement for the Chaplains. In about two weeks we invite all personnel to drop in and see the new set-up. NEW FLEET AIR BASE AT JACKSONVILLE (SEA)-The Jacksonville, Florida area has been selected by the Navy for development of a major fleet air base with facilities to accommodate the largest aircraft carriers now afloat. Two berths which could handle carriers of the Midway class will be constructed. The St. John river will be dredged to a depth of 42 feet from its mouth to Ribault Bay. The channel entering into the bay will be widened to 500 feet. To berth one Midway class carrier, two quay walls must be built. Piers will connect the quays to the plainland. CAPTAIN ARTHUR L. PLEASANTS, JR., USN AND FAMILY DEPART IN PRES. ADAMS When the President Adams departed Thursday, 28 October, the Base lost three fine people, Captain and Mrs. Arthur L. Pleasants, Jr., USN, and Mrs. Alma Bagby. Captain Pleasants has received orders to report to the First Naval District for duty as Commanding Officer, Office of Naval Research, Boston, Mass. Before assuming this command, he will report for temporary duty with the Chief of Naval Research, Washington, D. C. Captain Pleasants, a native of Richmond, Va., graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in the Class of 1922. During the ensuing years, he saw sea duty in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Caribbean areas. His training as an executive began early in his Naval career and led a long trail through destroyers, cruisers and battleships. Tropical duty was no new experience as he served for two years prior to the war at the Naval Station, Tuituila, Samoa. His wartime experience included Navigator rand Executive Officer of the Wyomaing, and Commanding Officer of the General Patrick and the Auburn. ptsignment was that of Fleet Pernsonnel Officer on the Staff of CoinCapt. Arthur L. Pleasants, Jr., USN mander Service Force, Atlantic e Fleet, and for this service he received the Legion of Merit. S.S. James Culines When Captain Plea sants reported Boqueron, Cuba aboard in August, 1946, this Base 19 October 1948 was being readied as an all-yearThe Officer in Charge round Fleet Training Base, and he U. S. Naval Base helped formulate the policies and Guantanamo. plans which at present are in operaDear Sir: tion. For more than two years in On my vessel s arrival at this his capacity as Chief of Staff and port I had on board, a very sick Aide to the Commander, U. S. man and had occasion to call your Naval Operating Base, he has signal station for medical advice poured oil on troubled waters and and assistance. Unfortunately, by through his good humor and tact, the time the Yoctor arrived, the has maintained a consistently pleasman had died and on the following ant atmosphere among the various day (Sunday) I asked once again commands throughout the Naval for help, this time for the services Operating Base. of the Catholic Chaplain who conCaptain and Mrs. Pleasants have ducted the funeral services. .been very democratic. No one has I wish to extend to you, my sinbeen too big or too small for them cere thanks for such prompt and to be interested in. They have been courteous services given so willguests at enlisted men's parties and ingly. picnics, and host to visiting Cuban Yours sinFerely, and American VIPs. John Mcavor Their two sons, Arthur L., III, Master. (Continued on Page Foly) Vol. III, 38

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 30 October 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson-------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman.---Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from -SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. DATES TO REMEMBER IN NOVEMBER 2 November-General election day in all states and territories. 4 Nov. 1941-Navy tanker Salinas torpedoed off coast of Iceland. 7 Nov. 1942-Navy, Army, Air Force began invasion of North Africa. 11 November -Armistice Day (Victory Day in Colo., Tenn., and Texas). 12-14 Nov. 1942-Navy sank 28 Jap ships in Battle of Guadalcanal. 12 Nov. 1942 -Nazi battleship Tirpitz sunk by British off Norway. 14 Nov. 1942-Draft ordered for 18-19 year olds in United States. 17 Nov. 1869-Suez Canal opened, shortening distance to Far East. 22 Nov. 1943-Marines landed on Tarawa; Army landed on Makin. 23 Nov. 1944-U. S. planes make second air attack on city of Tokyo. 25 November -Thanksgiving Day in U. S., territories and possessions. 27 Nov. 1942 -French sank 55 units of their fleet in Toulon harbor. 28 Nov. 1773-Colonist tax rebellion leads to "Boston Tea Party." 28 Nov. 1783 -First U. S. Post Office opened in city of New York. 28 Nov. 1929 -RAdm. Byrd flew over South Pole; dropped U. S. flag. 30 Nov. 1939-Russia invaded Finland; met with stubborn resistance. Six babies in one week is a lot of babies even for Gtmo., but that was the record set the past week. Baby boy Plank led the parade on 20 October, named Glenn William NOTES the son of TMC G. W. and Mrs. Plank; AMC and Mrs. W. R. North are having trouble choosing a name for their boy, born cn the 22. Maybe the boys at VU-10 could give them some suggestions; HMC and Mrs. P. W. Barrett should ask the hospital staff to help them make a selection for a name for their baby girl born the 24th-they too are having their troubles with a suitable name; Gail Marie Boillet born on the 25th to BM1 and Mrs. W. C. Boillet was luckier-her parents were all prepared and knew all the time what she would be named; baby boy Simmons too, has not yet been named but his father and mother, MSgt. and Mrs. C. M. Simmons, USAF, are giving the subject their utmost considerationbaby Simmons was born the 25th; Carroll Ann Starcevic was born the 27th to A. C. and Mrs. Starcevic. Mr. Starcevic is the American Vice-Consul at Kingston, Jamaica. Mrs. Starcevic and Mrs. Simmons are the latest patients admitted to our Dependent's Ward under the new program of caring for American dependents in Jamaica. Captain L. L. Wilson, MC, USN, and family arrived on the Pres. Hayes on Tuesday of this week. Captain Wilson is our new Executive Officer. All hands are giving a big welcome to the Captain and Mrs. Wilson and daughter, Jane. We hope your tour in Gtmo. will be an enjoyable one. -Cdr. A. N. Chaffin, MC, USN and Lt. (jg) J. R. Rankin, MSC, USN and his family, all returned to the Base via the Hayes and report a nice time in the States while on leave. However, with the high cost of living they feel that this is a pretty good place to be. (SEA)-A Navy-financed atomsmasher, boasting a barrel 160 feet long, is being constructed at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. The name of the smasher is linear electron accelerator and it is capable of firing nuclear projectiles with energies of approximately one billion electron volts. The accelerator is only one of many scientific instruments being constructed under the Office of Naval Research contracts. "We're going to give you any thing you want for your last meal." "Could I please have a bottle of champagne, Warden?" "Sure, any particular vintage?" "Yes-1985." CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 31 October 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0750-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPU1~tit CORNER WHAT ARE THEY WORTH? My wife was in search of a corner cupboard for the dining room. She found one through a friend who directed her to an outof-the-way farmhouse. The cupboard was hiding in the corner of the workshop at the rear of the house. Beside it stood a solid mahogany secretary with cherry paneled drawers and hand-hewn posts. Each piece was a genuine antique. "I'll sell 'em both," said the owner as she swung the smallpaned glass doors of the cupboard on their H-hinges. "If you're willing to scrub a bit, you can get a lot of good use out of them. They're nothing but dirt-catchers here." My wife eyed the pieces critically and remembered a secretary, almost identical to this one, which a dealer had priced at $300. "What will you take for these?" she asked. The woman feigned an attempt to dispel the dust and cobwebs that had collected on the heirlooms. "You can have 'em both for five dollars-if you think that's not too much." I've been wondering whether many of us may not have a confused sense of values. What of the family pew-the family Bible-the family altar? Are they gathering dust and cobwebs, to our eternal loss? Paul Hamsher from "The Lutheran" (SEA) -Chain cables for anchors' were introduced in 1812 and quickly demonstrated their superiority over rope. "Old Ironsides" was one of the last American ships to employ hemp, anchor cables. 0 Pagre Two THE INDIAN

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THE IDIANPage Three TRAGRP TRIVIALS Passing Parade ...The various depts. of TraGrp are happy to welcome aboard the following Chiefs from TraGrp, Nariagansett who are here on TAD to assist during the coming peak period of Training Lt. Spinney; Bradley, CSC; Comstock, M M C; Cunningham, GMC; Edmonds, GMC; Hallisey, MEC; Meyer, BTC; and Walton, BTC ...most of these Chiefs were down here last year on the same kind of a junket and we look forward to renewing old acquaintances. Another countenance that will be seen around Bldg. 15 is that of Richardson, RMC who'll be standing CWO watches in the Comm. Shack. Idyll Musings ..."Doc" Sant, the scientific farmer, has little to say to Lt. Woods who grows the Cuban weed (okra) ...with his four little helpers he could have a good garden. Heard a story about a Gunnery Chief who fretted around waiting for his car to come in .. finally he heard it was to be on a certain ship ...so he begged the day off to watch them unload it stood around all morning sweating it out and wondering when his would come over the side but no Chevy ..in desperation he started checking only to find out .you guessed it .that it had been standing on the dock for a week waiting for him to claim it jus' goes to prove the saying "There's always someone who don't get the word." Can't tell whether Jacobs is glum or happy about going to school in Key West for a couple of months ...his wife jus' got here ...well wotta you think? You'd of been surprised at some of the wierd costumes that showed up Wed. nite at the Halloween party the CPO Club had ..tell ya more about it next week. Our prize soap-. box orator, Moskerintz finally got off on leave ...going up to study modern methods during the windup of the political situation in the States ...wonder wot his dessertations will be like upon his return. MacAndrews reports from his bed that his tonnage\ is decreasing slowly ...too slow! Sport Thawts ...with all the rain these last couple of weeks .. our ball team will have to go back to spring training to warm up to their hot pace. The various Training Group Bowling teams wound up their respective league competition ...in the following manner Officer's confident of clinching fourth place ..paced these last weeks by the hot kegling of Lt. (jg) Vasey. Chiefs ..fairly secure in 7th place ...steady bowling but no threat to any team. White Hats ...Off in a blaze of glory but broke their legs in the home stretch ..our only consolation ...S02 White's practically ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones The Ordnance Department has a "one track mind" these days. All efforts are being made to reduce the accident ratio to a minimum or even less than that if possible. A meeting was held in the past week, both for enlisted personnel and civilians and committees were formed to initiate and maintain an accident prevention program. The Ordnance Officer in his talk to the Ordnance personnel stressed the necessity for the cooperation of all hands, in making this program a success. "We have got to eliminate accidents in one way or another" he said 'land to do that is not the job .of just one individual, but the combined efforts of each and every one of you, binding the Department together in a mass drive against accidents." A picnic was held on Wednesday, 20 October for the men of the Sixth Division, and from the comments overheard it seemed to have been a success. This picnic was held at Windmill Beach and all the men of the division except those on duty turned out for that date with the "Indian Head" (and I have heard say is a very good friend as long as you treat him right). The highlights of the picnic were swimming, soft ball games, tug o' war, and eating and drinking, of course. The umpire was E. R. Cary, SN, tSN, and one has heard of games sold out for thousands of dollars, but it didn't take very much to buy this ump out, an Indian Head label was enough (with that I mean the article that carried the label). There was enough drinks and ;eats for everyone-five barrels of beer, six cases of cokes, ham, turkey, pork, weiners, and a score of .different delicacies, from which each person could pick and choose to his heart's content, even a little K9 friend had his little bit of fun. Overall it was a longed for break for the men who had been putting in pretty hard work in the past weeks.' All the men join in thanking Lt. Speith, Jacobs, GM3, Rairden, SN, Chief Gaspar and Sentelik, YN3, -who were the organizers of the pleasant day's outing, and hope : that another one of its kind will not be long in coming. Some of Uncle Sam's sailors were in Naples, looking at the molten lava inside Mt. Vesuvius. One guy remarked, "Looks hot as 'ell." An Englishman mumbled under his breath, "These Americans have been everywhere." unbeatable high triple to garner himself a very worthy trophy. Annonymous Query ..How about a deliveryservice for Beer ..too many folks are without transportation ..'and hauling it about on the Bus is questionable? ? FISHING PARTY BATTLES LARGE SHARK A group of residents from Victory Hill recently experienced an unusual episode while on a fishing trip and picnic at the East end of Guantanamo Bay. The party included: Kenneth Chase, ET2 and his wife, Carol; Bob Bosworth, DT1 and his wife, Doris; Merril Bosworth and Richard Showalter, SN who navigated their small sail boat. The fishing party set sail during mid-afternoon with high hopes of catching an ample supply of fish for a fish bake for that evening. They fished patiently for one hour or so without a single bite, Showalter landed a good sized red snapper to break the monoton.y Then after another long monotonous wait without a single bite, a shriek of delight resounded throughout the boat as they had spied a large barracuda about four feet from their boat. They immediately placed the red snapper on a large hook, about the size of a meat hook,. and dangled the fish under the barracuda's mouth. But to no avail! The barracuda utterly ignored the temptation, and refused to be caught. Members of the party decided to turn back and head in at 1600. Mrs. Chase, playing a hunch, proceeded to troll off the stern of the boat. "How'll I know I have a bite", exclaimed Mrs. Chase. After they had advanced about 100 yards and before she could finish her statement, the familiar sizzing of the reel sounded. Showalter grabbed the rod and reel. He pulled hard. "It seems like I'm pulling. the floor of the whole darn bay," he shouted. Then suddenly a large white bellied fish broke the surface of the water. "It's a shark," screamed the women. "No young one either," retorted the men. He's at least five or six feet long and more than a 100 pounds in weight," exclaimed Ken Chase. Showalter played with the shark for more than an hour. The shark fought every inch of the way to the side of the boat. When Showalter finally pulled the shark up to the boat, Bob Bosworth shot two bullets into the man-eater's head, which only seemed to anger him. In desperation Bob grabbed two heavy oak oars which cracked like fire-wood over the shark's head. Ken dropped a line over the maneater's head. When they proceeded to pull the line tight, the shark gave a terrific jerk and the steel leader snapped. The line was not yet tight enough, the shark slipped through and made his get away. He had won the victory. ."I just feel like crying," lamented Mrs. Bosworth. "But we have the proof, Carol has taken many pictures of the episode." THE INDIAN Page Three

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Paz. Fo~ir THE INDIAN Gtmo. nay-25 Oct 48-2~OO. CAPTAIN PLEASANTS LEAVES ON PRES. ADAMS (Continued from Page One) and John B., are at present attending the Naval Academy. They visited their parents recently during their refresher training. Leaving also at this time is Mrs. Alma Bagby, mother of Mrs. Pleasants, who has endeared herself to everyone by her charm and friendliness. Upon reaching the States, she will return to her home in Richmond, Va., where she lives with her son. Captain Pleasants is to be relieved by Captain Henry Crommelin, USN, who comes to us from Destroyers, U. S. Atlantic Fleet, where he was Chief of Staff to Commander Destroyers, Atlantic Fleet. At the Marine Barracks, plans are undei way for a gala. cele/ bration of the 173rd Anniversary of the Marine Corps on the 10th of No v emb er. n iFrom all indications it promises to be the biggest celebration ever held by the Marines at this Post. When the ballots were counted after the recent election of officers at the Staff NCO Club, the results showed MSgt. Carcelli as President; TSgt. Lewis as Vice-President; SSgt. Simmons as Secretary; TSgt. Emrich as Treasurer, TSgt. Bateman as manager; and the Board of Governors is comprised of MSgt. Avery; MSgt. Stroud; SSgt. Payne and SSgt. Wolfkeil. Congratulations men. Missing from the chow table for a week was TSgt. "Anyface" Emrich who was in Miami. How is the USA these days, Emrich? New arrivals on the Post are Mrs. Carcelli who arrived on the Pres. Adams, and Mrs. Patterson who arrived on the Pres. Hayes. Welcome aboard ladies and we hope your stay will be a pleasant one. In the baseball league, the Marines are tied for first place with the Fleet Training Group. First place in the volley ball league is held by the officers with the staff NCOs in second place and battling for the lead. A sailor at a restaurant counter, after waiting for several minutes was finally approached by the waitress. He said he would like some coffee without cream. The waitress went back into the kitchen. About five minutes later she returned and said: "I'm sorry, we're all out of cream, would you just as soon have your coffee without milk?" Q. Has the Kentucky Derby ever been won by a foreign bred horse? A. Yes. Omar Khayyam, an English-bred horse won it in 1917. Q. Can you name the players declared most valuable in the National and American Leagues in 1947? A. National League: Bob Elliott of the Boston Braves; American League: Joe DiMaggio of the New York Yankees. Q. A Pacific Coast housewife, Gretchen Fraser, was a surprise star in what athletic event this year? A. The 1948 Winter Olympic Games, winning points in the Downhill and Slalom Races. Q. He won the U. S. Open Golf tournament in 1922 and repeated 10 years later. He was often called the "Connecticut Squire." Who is he? A. Gene Sarazen. (The Wolf NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 31 Oct. to Sat. 6 Nov. Sunday THE SEARCH Aline MacMahon J. Novotna Monday TRAPPED BY BOSTON BLACKIE Chester Morris June Vincent Tuesday CALIFORNIA Ray Miland Barbara Stanwyck Wednesday THE COUNTERFEITERS John Sutton Doris Merrick Thursday HEART OF VIRGINIA Janet Martin Robert Lowery Friday MY DARLING CLEMENTINE Henry Fonda Linda Darnell Saturday OVERLAND TRAIL J. MacBrown Virginia Belmont by Sansone! I 'cmlt~ Ids b, ,r ,a/ ~.F "She wants to:know if I have a friend for her mother!" THE INDIAN 'f'aze Four Gtmo. Bay-28 Oct 48-2500.