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Indian
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Vol. III, No. 35 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 October 1948


ADMIRAL W. K. PHILLIPS
INSPECTS NAS

Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN, Commander, Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay. Cuba, inspected the Naval Air Station personnel on Saturday, 2 October 1948, at 0900, at the Land Plane Hangar. The Admiral was accompanied by Captain A. L. Pleasants, Jr., USN, Chief -of Staff; Captain W. 0. Gallery, USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station; and Commander E. C. Asman, Executive Officer.
Every officer and man not actually on watch was present. The uniform prescribed was khaki with ties for officers, anddungarees for enlisted, other than chief petty officers.
For many men attached, this was their first "Admiral's" inspection. It proved to be an experience they no doubt will long rememberas will those who call themselves "veterans." For, from the first, it quickly became apparent that no defect however small, in uniform or military bearing,, would escape, the Admiral's keen eye, without being commented upon. Each individual found that out-personally.
Some Men Get 4.0
Those' who somehow hadn't gotten the word on where markings should show up on uniforms, speedily got the answers-from the Admiral. Those who survived the inspection and earned the Admiral's hearty commendation are today strutting around with their feet on the deck and their hearts in the clouds for his commendation would warm the heart of the saltiest seagoing tar. Most disappointed man on the Station: McAnulty, AKI. He "just missed" the Admiral's 4.0. Those who didn't miss and were singled out for exceptionally good appearances: Cook, R. A., AA; Jackson, C. R., A01; Smith, L. V., AD3; Jones, G. C., SN; and Popovich, T., SN.
Following the inspection of personnel, the Admiral and his 'party proceeded to the Chief's Barracks, thence to AV-50, AV-51, and the Galley for material inspection. All buildings were inspected thorouglly. Various areas within each


'GATOR OR CROCODILE IN FRESH WATER RIVER

Sunday afternoon, cruising up the Fresh Water River in a power boat, Commander Lewis M. Davis, Base Public Works Officer, his two sons and Commander R. W. Thompson, Commanding Officer of the USS Bailey (DD713) sighted an alligator or a crocodile swimming upstream on the surface within ten yards off the starboard side of their boat. .
The reptile was under close observation for approximately 20 to 30 seconds and was definitely identified as a crocodile or an alligator. Commander Davis and his party saw only the head of the reptile and as the boat drew nearer to the creature, it submerged and its tail was also seen to break the surface but not enough to identify the creature. The actual size of the reptile could not be determined but from the size of the head alone, it was estimated that it was approximately five feet in length.
Commander Davis has made an official report to the Commander Naval Operating Base of this incident to dispel further rumors of the presence or absence of crocodiles or alligators in the Fresh Water River. You are cautioned not to go swimming in the Fresh Water River.

building were praised or criticized, depending on their merit. Good "Joe" and Good Ice Cream Enroute through AV-50, the Admiral stopped a moment when he found a hot pot of "Joe" on the range in the MAA Office and proceeded to pour himself a sample of it. Sheriff "Mally" CMAA of the Air Station was heard to heave a sigh of relief as the Admiral pronounced his verdict, "fine, very good." The same verdict was awarded the Galley for ;ts ice cream.
Well, that was it. At 1030 it was all over. We departed the area, particularly gratified by one of the Admiral's comments as the inspection neared its end, "I haven't seen anything particularly bad, as a matter of fact, some of.it has been exceptionally good,'..... .,


CAPTAIN J. H. ROBBINS COMMENDS EIGHT MEN
During the Hospital Staff personnel inspection last Saturday, 2 October 1948,. eight Hospitalmen received individual letters of commendation from the Commanding Officer of the U. S. Naval Hospital, Captain John H. Robbins, in a token of appreciation "for the zeal and attention to duty displayed while standing special watches on the late Gwendolyn Street."
The men were: L. L. Elton, H1; H. R. Hulst, HM1; T. J. O'Brien, HM2; L. A. Page, HM2; C. H. Gerhold, HM2; M. Capriotti, HM3; J. G. Livoti, HM3 and J. L. IcCall, HN.
The care of civilians, both indigent and non-indigent is another shining example of the versatility of Navy Hospitalmen. This type of duty is performed in the same cheerful, efficient manner and on the parity with that in connection with service personnel.
The late Gwendolyn Street was admitted to the Naval Hospital here on the Base in July 1948 because of humanitarian reasons. She suffered with acute pulmonory tuberculosis. Miss Street was seventeen years old, and was a native of Boqueron, Oriente, Cuba.
Captain Robbins also declared that the manner in which the above named men performed their duties is "in keeping with the highest Naval Traditions." Appropriate entry of each letter of commendation has been made in each man's service record.

WANTED: Experienced or trained persons interested in substitute teaching at the NOB School during the 1948-49 academic year are asked to register in person Eit the office of the Supervising Principal at the School. Such registration should be made between the hours of 8 a. m. and 4. p. m. on any school day this week or next. Available substitute teachers are desired for all grades and subjects.
(SEA)-King Minos of Crete is considered the founder of naval power. He is recorded as being the first to establish a navy-in 3,000 B. C.








Page Two TEIDA


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672
Saturday, 9 October 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson -------------------- Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman .. Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-85, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

ORDNANCE STUFF
By Alston Jones
The ammunition handling work hit its peak this past week and has rolled along almost to completion without mishap (hope it isn't being said too soon). It must be said that to aqcomplish two weeks of this kind of work with only two minor injuries so far, is an achievement to be proud of. Ammunition handling is dangerous and hazardous work and the Ordnance Department accident average was too high for comfort. All enlisted and civilian personnel were given instructions on safety measures prior to the start of the work, and all hands are to be congratulated on their cooperation in trying to put the department on a "No accident basis."
Plans have been made to conduct similar meetings every three months, until each and every one is completely familiar with safety regulations and precautions.
E. R. Cary, SN, USN, returned, from thirty days leave spent Stateside, and he brought with him that fresh and satisfied expression on his face, indicative of the wonderful time he spent at home. Upon being asked how he liked being home for those thirty days, he-remarked: "Wonderful is all I can say, it was grand sleeping in bed as long as I liked, and that home cooking-oomphJ!!! .
The Ordnance Department, especially Ch. Gun. Secondo, wishes to welcome aboard Mrs. A. P. Secondo who arrived here two weeks ago. The happy newly-weds reside. in Newtown, Quarters 417. Best wishes for the beginning of a happy ending to both of them, and a wonderful tour of duty here.
F. Stewart, GMC, USN, who has


Four little boys
OSPiAL we re born at the
Hospital during the past week.
Sorry we were unable to learn the names of any of these new arrivals: Baby boy Seiber, born 1 October to BMC and Mrs. Kyle Seiber; baby boy Dotson born 1 October to CSC and Mrs. Cay Dotson; baby boy Muijca, born 5 October to Mr .and Mrs. 0. Muijca, civilians; and baby boy Logan born 6 October to Lt. and Mrs. Sam Logan, MC, USA, Vernam Field, Jamaica, B. W. I. Incidentally, USNH, Gtmo., has arranged to take care of the obstetrical cases of Army dependents stationed at Vernam Field and Mrs. Logan is the first of several expected in the near future.
Lt. D. R. Childs, MC, USN reported'for duty this week as relief for Cdr. R. F. Sanders who has gone to the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda for postgraduate study.
Lt. (jg) Elizabeth Strang, Lt.
(jg) Helen Hayes and Lt. (jg) Margaret Jennings, three nurses who have been here on TAD from Bethesda, returned to their permanent duty stations this week.
The Hospital baseball team lost their first game of the seasondefeated 12-8 by VU-10. We expect better results as Lhe season progresses.
A new policy recognizing the birthdays of service personnel attached to the Hospital was inaugurated this week. A birthday cake will be presented to each man on his birthday, together with a birthday card from the MOIC. Hollweek, HM1 and Johnson, HMC received the first cakes. It is contemplated to include the patients in this program in the near future.
He: "That's a flimsy dress yo>-'re wearing."
She: "That's a flimsy excuse for staring."
Good Health Hint: To stay in the pink, pedestrians should watch 1the red and green.
been hospitalized for the past two months with a broken ankle, returned to his normal duties on Monday 4 October. The Ordnance Department on a whole are glad to see him back, and wish to express their gratitude for his recovery.
G. C. Pecuch, MN3, and G. K. Andrews, FC3, USN, are leaving Wednesday, 6 October for fifteen days Stateside leave. Good luck fellows and have a wonderful time for the rest of us. R. J. Ellis, FNCM has been transferred to the Supply Depot. Hope you like it as much as you did over here. Good luck.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 10 October 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
Confessions before all Masses Protestant Serviced 0745-Naval Base Chapel 0910-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


4


CHAPLM!4I CORt4ERJ
Fraternal Charity for all of God's children is one of the great principles in the foundation of the social structure in our American way of living. God has blessed our people with an abundance of good will toward all nations even toward our enemies. This is an indelible mark of Christian love put into action.
St. Paul the Apostle of the Gentiles so aptly states this principle in his letter to the Romans: "Let love be without pretense. Hate what is evil, hold to what is good. Love one another with fraternal charity, anticipating one another with honor. Be not slothf1ul in zeal, be fervent in spirit. serving the Lord, rejoicing in hope. Be patient, in tribulation, persevering in prayer. Share th needs of the saints, practicing hospitality. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. Rejoice with those who rejoice; weep with those who weep. Be of one mind towards one another. Do not set your mind on high things but condescend to the lowly. Be not wise in your own conceits. To no man render evil for evil, but provide good things not only in the sight of God, but also in the sight of all men. If it be possible, as far as lies in you, be at peace with all men. Do not avenge yourselves, beloved, but give place to the wrath, for it is written, "Vengence is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord." (12:9-19).
Carl A. Herold
Catholic Chaplain

(SEA)-Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan holds an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree awarded by Duquesne university at commencement exercises this year.


Pa e Two


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN Pr he


ARMED FORCES TO PAY
INCOME .TAX.

Patriotism is going to take a
financial kicking around at the end of this year. At that time, due to the failure of the 80th Congress to pass an-amendment to the income tax bill, members of the Army, Navy and Air Corps are going to lose their tax exemption. The present exemption is $1,500 for officers and the complete pay of enlisted men. A bill that would have extended the exemption until 1 January 1950, passed the House but got bogged down in the Senate Rules
Committee.
Officers
A commander with more than 12
years of service. Pay and longevity amounts to $4,620 a year. Under the $1,500 exemption provision his tax would be $268. Without it, his
tax would be $492.
A lieutenant with more than six
years of service. Pay and longevity amounts to $3,036. Old tax was $31.
New one will be $253, an increase
of $124.
An ensign with less than three
years of service. Pay is $2,160. No
tax-now it will be $124.
Enlisted Men
Chief Petty Officer with about
nine years of service. Pay is $2,227.
Has had to pay no tax. Now has
to pay $143.
Third class petty officer, grade 4
,man, six years of service.' Pay is $1,320. He had to pay no tax and still does not have to if he is married but if he is not he will have a tax bill of $96 instead of the
present complete exclusion.
Even the apprentice seaman,
grade 7 man, who is single as are most men of this rate is going to feel the pinch. He now pays no tax out of his pay of $900, but after 1 January his tax bill will be $37a little more than $3 a month.
This prospective pay cut comes
at a time when service personnel is admittedly far behind other government employees and civilian
workers in the matter of income.
It comes, too, when the Armed
Forces badly need more officers to handle incoming draftees and is trying to get re-enlistments. There is one bright side to the picture-or at least the service men hope so.
A. Pay Raise?
A commission under the chairmanship of Charles R. Hook former president of the American Rolling Mill Company, has been studying pay conditions in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, the Coast and Geodetic Survey and the Pub* lic Health Service.
The Hook Commission has completed a series of hearings and is now drafting a report to submit to Secretary of Defense James Forrestal next month.


FIRST NEGRO MARINE OFFICER IN TRAINING
The first Negro to be commissioned in the Regular Marine Corps, Second Lieutenant John E. Rudder, USMC, of Paducah, Kentucky, is now undergoing training in the Pre-Basic Marine Corps School at Quantico, Virginia.
Second Lieutenant Rudder who is 23 years old, entered the Marine Corps upon graduation from Purdue University where he, was enrolled in the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Program.
While serving as an enlisted man in the Marine Corps during the war, he qualified in 1944 for the reserve officer training program, and was transferred from his duty station at Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands for enrollment at Purdue University. He graduated from Purdue and accepted his commission in the Marine Corps on 28 May 1948.
Second Lieutenant Rudder enlisted in the Marine Corps on 23 July 1943. Ordered to Camp LeJeune, North Carolina, he entered the radio operators' school and, upon completion of this course, became an instructor at the Montford Point, North Carolina School. He later joined the 52nd Antiaircraft Battalion on Majuro Island in October 1944.
Upon successful completion of the Pre-Basic School course, Second Lieutenant Rudder will attend the Basic Marine Corps School at Quantico, Virginia.
Four other Negro officers presently hold commissions in the Marine Corps Reserve. A fifth Reserve officer resigned his commission in November of 1947 to accept an appointment in the U. S. Public Health Service.
In addition to the one Regular Marine Corps officer and the four holding Reserve commissions, there are 1,535 Negro enlisted personnel in the Fleet Marine Force, Security Forces, and supporting establishments on 30 June 1948. Of these 400 were on steward duty only on their own written request.
A new Navy Circular directs that the Bureau of Personnel be informed immediately in cases of disciplinary action against officers. Previous -practice was to forward such reports with the officer's fitness reports, resulting in delay up to 10 months in bringing the matter to the Board's attention. The directive also orders use of specific language in describing the alleged offense, and permits the accused to submit a statement in his own defense.
WANTED: Anyone desiring to share their home with a man and wife (no children). Contact Soja, CS3 at 332 or 641.


WGBY AD LIBS
By Ab
Greetings Listeners:
Things are very cheerful around the, studio these days, our new transmitting equipment has passed its final tests and as soon as a few last minute details are taken care of, we shall install it. This will. probably be some time this week. At that time our frequency will change from 1550 to 1450 kcs.
So much for our troubles, let's preview some of this week's programs. The'8:00 p. m, Monday spot,. which usually brings you Amos and Andy, now features that great comedian, Bill Bendix and his "Life of Riley" show, with Junior, Digger O'Dell and the rest of his cast. Should be pretty good . . . Command Performance (7:30 p. in., Tuesday), looks very promising this week, featuring music by Lina Romay and comedy by Garry Moore . . . due to the many complaints about the music emanating from WGBY, our slightly boppish "5:30 Club" has been replaced by a half hour taken from our symphonic popular files, entitled, "Make Mine Music." Should aid the digestion some ...
Henry Morgan fans may listen and enjoy the Morgan wit each Wednesday evening at 9:00 . . Hawthorne makes strange noises on Wednesday morning at 9:00 on this "Thing". This week's guest stars are: Johnny, the mud turtle and Pete the penguin, singing TuHu-Wa-Hi-La-Tu-Wa-Hu-Wa-I, or the Hawaiian War Hogan (oh well).
Calling all Bobby Soxers, young and ancient! Frank Sinatra appears on this week's Jack Benny show (Sunday, 7:30 p. in,) listen and swoon. Speaking of music, as we weren't, those of you with classical tastes can hear the music you enjoy on Sundays at i.00 p. m.: until 2:00. At this time we present one hour with the Philadelphia Symphony. This week it features Miss Margo Rabao, soprano. On this program, she -sings the Concerto for Voice and Orchestra. The orchestra presents Vivaldi's Second Violin Concerto. It should be excellent music.
Also Monday, Wednesday and Friday of this week, yours truly puts on the Long Hair's Review. This is a classical music disc jockey show. By the way, how about some requests? Jazz fans will welcome the appearance of Woody Herman on Thursday's "One Night Stand" at 9:30 p. m.
I just don't seem to have space enough in this column to tell you of all the fine programs that we present for your enjoyment. For further information, check with the WGBY Radio Schedule attached to Friday's Papoose, or pick up a copy at either of the Ship's Service Stores, the Commissary or the Marine PX.


Page Three


THE INDIAN







PA... Wnu, ~~THE INDIAN Gm.ByiOt4-50


$!1,500 TOP PRIZE
IN ESSAY CONTEST
(SEA)-Not less than $500 and up to $1,500 is being offered by the U. . Naval Institute as. top award in its 1948 annual essay contest for service personnel and civilians.
A gold medal and a life membership in the Institute also will be awarded for the best essay. Monetary and other awards will be commensurate with the degree of merit of the entry as adjudged by the Institute's Board of Control.
In addition to the first award, to be known as the "Prize," essays may win honorable mentions or special awards. Each essay awarded an honorable mention will win $100 for its author as well as the regular page compensation for publication. Essays must pertain to any subject on the naval profession and must not exceed 8,000 words.
Deadline for receipt by the secretary-treasurer of the U. S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md., is 1 January 1949.
All entries must be sent in a sealed envelope marked "Prize Essay Contest." The name of the competitor shall not appear on the essay, but each essay must have a motto and must be accompanied by a separate sealed envelope with the motto written on the outside and the name of the competitor and the motto inside. This envelope will not be opened until the Board of Control, Voting by ballot without knowledge of the names of the competitors, has made the awards.
All essays must be typewritten, double spaced, on paper 8%"xl1", and must be submitted in triplicate, each copy complete in itself.
Essays awarded the "Prize," "Honorable Mention," or "Special Award" are for publication in the Naval Institute Proceedings. Essays not awarded a prize may be published at the discretion of the Board, and the writers of such essays shall be compensated at the rate established for articles not submitted in competition.
All awards will be made known and presented to successful competitors as soon as practicable after the February meeting of the Board.
The Institute's annual essay competition exclusively for enlisted personnel, concluded in August.

Enlisted personnel discharged after less than three years service are being informed that they are subject to the Selective Service law, and may be returned to service by their local boards, unless otherwise exempt.

(SEA)-Rear Admiral John J. Manning, USN, Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, is a trustee of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, N. Y., and, president of the Alumni Association.


APPRECIATION FROM IV' . "
THE U.S.S. ROAN' ___________L


On departure of this vessel from the Guantanamo area after five weeks of operations, I wish to express my thanks and sincere appreciation for the services performed by the Naval Operating Base during our stay. The facilities of the.Naval Station, Naval Supply Depot, Fleet Training Group, Utili-, ty Squadron Ten, and all the other subordinate commands have been freely extended, and their assistance has been extremely helpful. The rapid and expert repairs made on the Roan's damaged bow by the Repair Facilities of the Naval Station is only one example of this.
It has been a pleasure to be in contact with a Base where all the, officers and men have worked with the basic idea of serving the fleet.
W. N. Deragon
Commanding

AIN'T SCIENCE GRANDDROP THAT COAL SHOVEL
(AFPS)-A Massachusetts scientist disclosed here recently that the rays of the sun can be trapped, stored and used in winter for heating homes in place of the conventional oil and coal units.
The method was described to the American Association for the Advancement of Science by the developer of the system, Dr. Maria Tblekes of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who declared she planned to move into a sunheated house for the winter.
Dr. Telkes estimated that the
*house will cost $20,000 when it is finished, about $3,000 of this for the solar unit. The scientist believes that mass construction of such a house will be feasible in the near future and will be an important step in the elimination of coal, oil and gas as sources of heat " r private homes.
The heating unit will be built into the roof of the house in the form of a collector of sun-rays consisting of an 800-square foot black metal sheet behind two glass plates acting as a heat trap.
Air is circulated behind the metal sheet in ducts, and when warmed is conducted to "heat bins" at strategic points throughout the house, each connected to registers and each capable of serving two rooms. Warm air is blown from the heat bins through the registers into the rooms.
.The device will enable heat to be stored for 10 days, with heat available at all times--even on days when bad weather cuts down the availability of sun rays.
If the heating system lives up to expectations, it will cost virtually nothing to operate, will last indefinitely and will save an annual average fuel expense of $150.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 10 Oct. to Sat. 16 Oct.
Sunday
IT HAPPENED ON 5TH AVENUE Don "DeFore Ann Harding
Monday
DANGEROUS MILLIONS
Kent Taylor Donna Drake
Tuesday
NOB HILL
George Raft Vivian Blaine
Wednesday BIG TOWN
Phillip Reed Hillary Brooks
Thursday
THIS LOVE OF OURS
Merle Oberon Charles Korvin
Friday
THE FUGITIVE
Dolores Del Rio Henry Fonda
Saturday
MAN FROM OKLAHOMA
Roy Rogers Dale Evans

RUSSIAN COLONEL
ESCAPES SOVIET UNION
(APFS) - Added to the evergrowing list of refugees from Soviet controlled countries is a Russian Army Colonel who escaped from the Soviet Union to seek asylum in England.
Known as Citizen Tokaev, the Colonel is an engineer and rocket expert. His story was disclosed when he sent a 4,000 word declaration of reasons for his brepk with the Soviet regime to a New York newspaper.
In his declaration, the Colonel said: "The first step I took is the highest crime in the U.S.S.R., and I do not have any illusions as to the consequences it may have for my friends, relatives and fellowworkers. I know in advance that they are going to be terrorized only for having met me and communicated with me."
FASTEST ATTACK
BOMBER PASSES TEST
A new, bigger and faster attack bomber has passed its initial tests for the Navy.
The new plane, classified as the XAJ-1, shapes up as the heaviest yet designed for use on carriers, it has been announced. It wifi carry more -than three tons of bombs at a speed considerably faster than 350 miles an hour.
A compromise between speed and distance, the new plane has two conventional engines for normal
-operations and one turbo-jet in the tail for sudden bursts of speed.


4


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-7 Oct 48--2500.


P~lt lrm.




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PAGE 1

Vol. III, No. 35 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 9 October 1948 ADMIRAL W. K. PHILLIPS INSPECTS NAS Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN, Commander, Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay. Cuba, inspected the Naval Air Station personnel on Saturday, 2 October 1948, at 0900, at the Land Plane Hangar. The Admiral was accompanied by Captain A. L. Pleasants, Jr., USN, Chief -of Staff; Captain W. 0. Gallery, USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station; and Commander E. C. Asman, Executive Officer. Every officer and man not actually on watch was present. The uniform prescribed was khaki with ties for officers, and dungarees for enlisted, other than chief petty officers. For many men attached, this was their first "Admiral's" inspection. It proved to be an experience they no doubt will long rememberas will those who call themselves "veterans." For, from the first, it quickly became apparent that no defect however small, in uniform or military bearing, would escape the Admiral's keen eye, without being commented upon. Each individual found that out-personally. Some Men Get 4.0 Those who somehow hadn't gotten the word on where markings should show up on uniforms, speedily got the answers-from the Admiral. Those who survived the inspection and earned the Admiral's hearty commendation are today strutting around with their feet on the deck and their hearts in the clouds for his commendation would warm the heart of the saltiest seagoing tar. Most disappointed man on the Station: McAnulty, AK1. He "just missed" the Admiral's 4.0. Those who didn't miss and were singled out for exceptionally good appearances: Cook, R. A., AA; Jackson, C. R., AO1; Smith, L. V., AD3; Jones, G. C., SN; and Popovich, T., SN. Following the inspection of personnel, the Admiral and his party proceeded to the Chief's Barracks, thence to AV-50, AV-51, and the Galley for material inspection. All buildings were inspected thoroughly. Various areas within each 'GATOR OR CROCODILE IN FRESH WATER RIVER Sunday afternoon, cruising up the Fresh Water River in a power ]-oat, Commander Lewis M. Davis, Base Public Works Officer, his two sons and Commander R. W. Thomp,on, Commanding Officer of the USS Bailey (DD713) sighted an alligator or a crocodile swimming upstream on the surface within ten yards off the starboard side of their boat. The reptile was under close observation for approximately 20 to 30 seconds and was definitely identified as a crocodile or an alligator. Commander Davis and his party saw only the head of the reptile and as the boat drew nearer to the creature, it submerged and its tail was also seen to break the surface but not enough to identify the creature. The actual size of the reptile could not be determined but from the size of the head alone, it was estimated that it was approximately five feet in length. Commander Davis has made an official report to the Commander Naval Operating Base of this incident to dispel further rumors of the presence or absence of crocodiles or alligators in the Fresh Water River. You are cautioned not to go swimming in the Fresh Water River. building were praised or criticized, depending on their merit. Good "Joe" and Good Ice Cream Enroute through AV-50, the Admiral stopped a moment when he found a hot pot of "Joe" on the range in the MAA Office and proceeded to pour himself a sample of it. Sheriff "Mally" CMAA of the Air Station was heard to heave a sigh of relief as the Admiral pronounced his verdict, "fine, very good." The same verdict was awarded the Galley for Its ice cream. Well, that was it. At 1030 it was all over. We departed the area, particularly gratified by one of the Admiral's comments as the inspection neared its end, "I haven't seen anything particularly bad, as a matter of fact, some of it has been exceptionally good.'. CAPTAIN J. H. ROBBINS COMMENDS EIGHT MEN During the Hospital Staff personnel inspection last Saturday, 2 October 1948, eight Hospitalmen received individual letters of commendation from the Commanding Officer of the U. S. Naval Hospital, Captain John H. Robbins, in a token of appreciation "for the zeal and attention to duty displayed while standing special watches on the late Gwendolyn Street." The men were: L. L. Elton, Hi; H. R. Hulst, HM1; T. J. O'Brien, HM2; L. A. Page, HM2; C. H. Gerhold, HM2; M. Capriotti, HM3; J. G. Livoti, HM3 and J. L. McCall, HN. The care of civilians, both indigent and non-indigent is another shining example of the versatility of Navy Hospitalmen. This type of duty is performed in the same cheerful, efficient manner and on the parity with that in connection with service personnel. The late Gwendolyn Street was admitted to the Naval Hospital here on the Base in July 1948 because of humanitarian reasons. She suffered with acute pulmonory tuberculosis. Miss Street was seventeen years old, and was a native of Boqueron, Oriente, Cuba. Captain Robbins also declared that the manner in which the above named men performed their duties is "in keeping with the highest Naval Traditions." Appropriate entry of each letter of commendation has been made in each man's service record. WANTED: Experienced or trained persons interested in substitute teaching at the NOB School during the 1948-49 academic year are asked to register in person at the office of the Supervising Principal at the School. Such registration should be made between the hours of 8 a. m. and 4. p. m. on any school day this week or next. Available substitute teachers are desired for all grades and subjects. (SEA)-King Minos of Crete is considered the founder of naval power. He is recorded as being the first to establish a navy-in 3,000 B. C.

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Pace Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 9 October 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson___-------____ Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ---Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones The ammunition handling work hit its peak this past week and has rolled along almost to completion without mishap (hope it isn't being said too soon). It must be said that to acomplish two weeks of this kind of work with only two minor injuries so far, is an achievement to be proud of. Ammunition handling is dangerous and hazardous work and the Ordnance Department accident average was too high for comfort. All enlisted and civilian personnel were given instructions on safety measures prior to the start of the work, and all hands are to be congratulated on their cooperation in trying to put the department on a "No accident basis." Plans have been made to conduct similar meetings every three months, until each and every one is completely familiar with safety regulations and precautions. E. R. Cary, SN, USN, returned from thirty days leave spent Stateside, and he brought with him that fresh and satisfied expression on his face, indicative of the wonderful time he spent at home. Upon being asked how he liked being home for those thirty days, he remarked: "Wonderful is all I can say, it was grand sleeping in bed as long as I liked, and that home cooking-oomph!!!!" The Ordnance Department, especially Ch. Gun. Secondo, wishes to welcome aboard Mrs. A. P. Secondo who arrived here two weeks ago. The happy newly-weds reside in Newtown, Quarters 417. Best wishes for the beginning of a happy ending to both of them, and a wonderful tour of duty here. F. Stewart, GMC, USN, who has Four little boys wIT ere born at the L Hospital during the past week. Sorry we were unable to learn the names of any of these new arrivals: Baby boy Seiber, born 1 NOTES October to BMC and Mrs. Kyle Seiber; baby boy Dotson born 1 October to CSC and Mrs. Cay Dotson; baby boy Muijca, born 5 October to Mr .and Mrs. 0. Muijca, civilians; and baby boy Logan born 6 October to Lt. and Mrs. Sam Logan, MC, USA, Vernam Field, Jamaica, B. W. I. Incidentally, USNH, Gtmo., has arranged to take care of the obstetrical cases of Army dependents stationed at Vernam Field and Mrs. Logan is the first of several expected in the near future. Lt. D. R. Childs, MC, USN reported for duty this week as relief for Cdr. R. F. Sanders who has gone to the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda for postgraduate study. Lt. (jg) Elizabeth Strang, Lt. (jg) Helen Hayes and Lt. (jg) Margaret Jennings, three nurses who have been here on TAD from Bethesda, returned to their permanent duty stations this week. The Hospital baseball team lost their first game of the seasondefeated 12-8 by VU-10. We expect better results as the season progresses. A new policy recognizing the birthdays of service personnel attached to the Hospital was inaugurated this week. A birthday cake will be presented to each man on his birthday, together with a birthday card from the MOIC. Hollweek, HM1 and Johnson, HMC received the first cakes. It is contemplated to include the patients in this program in the near future. He: "That's a flimsy dress you're wearing." She: "That's a flimsy excuse for staring." Good Health Hint: To stay in the pink, pedestrians should watch the red and green. been hospitalized for the past two months with a broken ankle, returned to his normal duties on Monday 4 October. The Ordnance Department on a whole are glad to see him back, and wish to express their gratitude for his recovery. G. C. Pecuch, MN3, and G. K. Andrews, FC3, USN, are leaving Wednesday, 6 October for fifteen days Stateside leave. Good luck fellows and have a wonderful time for the rest of us. R. J. Ellis, FNCM has been transferred to the Supply Depot. Hope you like it as much as you did over here. Good luck. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 10 October 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0745-Naval Base Chapel 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1930 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPLI.Als CORNER Fraternal Charity for all of God's children is one of the great principles in the foundation of the social structure in our American way of living. God has blessed our people with an abundance of good will toward all nations even toward our enemies. This is an indelible mark of Christian love put into action. St. Paul the Apostle of the Gentiles so aptly states this principle in his letter to the Romans: "Let love be without pretense. Hate what is evil, hold to what is good. Love one another with fraternal charity, anticipating one another with honor. Be not slothful in zeal, be fervent in spirit. serving the Lord, rejoicing in hope. Be patient in tribulation, persevering in prayer. Share the needs of the saints, practicing hospitality. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. Rejoice with those who rejoice; weep with those who weep. Be of one mind towards one another. Do not set your mind on high things but condescend to the lowly. Be not wise in your own conceits. To no man render evil for evil, but provide good things not only in the sight of God, but also in the sight of all men. If it be possible, as far as lies in you, be at peace with all men. Do not avenge yourselves, beloved, but give place to the wrath, for it is written, "Vengence is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord." (12:9-19). Carl A. Herold Catholic Chaplain (SEA)-Secretary of the Navy John L. Sullivan holds an Honorary Doctorate of Laws degree awarded by Duquesne university at commencement exercises this year. Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN aeThe ARMED FORCES TO PAY INCOME TAX. Patriotism is going to take a financial kicking around at the end of this year. At that time, due to the failure of the 80th Congress to pass an-amendment to the income tax bill, members of the Army, Navy and Air Corps are going to lose their tax exemption. The present exemption is $1,500 for officers and the complete pay of enlisted men. A bill that would have extended the exemption until 1 January 1950, passed the House but got bogged down in the Senate Rules Committee. Officers A commander with more than 12 years of service. Pay and longevity amounts to $4,620 a year. Under the $1,500 exemption provision his tax would be $268. Without it, his tax would be $492. A lieutenant with more than six years of service. Pay and longevity amounts to $3,036. Old tax was $31. New one will be $253, an increase of $124. An ensign with less than three years of service. Pay is $2,160. No tax-now it will be $124. Enlisted Men Chief Petty Officer with about nine years of service. Pay is $2,227. Has had to pay no tax. Now has to pay $143. Third class petty officer, grade 4 man, six years of service. Pay is $1,320. He had to pay no tax and still does not have to if he is married but if he is not he will have a tax bill of $96 instead of the present complete exclusion. Even the apprentice seaman, grade 7 man, who is single as are most men of this rate is going to feel the pinch. He now pays no tax out of his pay of $900, but after 1 January his tax bill will be $37a little more than $3 a month. This prospective pay cut comes at a time when service personnel is admittedly far behind other government employees and civilian workers in the matter of income. It comes, too, when the Armed Forces badly need more officers to handle incoming draftees and is trying to get re-enlistments. There is one bright side to the picture-or at least the service men hope so. A Pay Raise? A commission under the chairmanship of Charles R. Hook former president of the American Rolling Mill Company, has been studying pay conditions in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, the Coast and Geodetic Survey and the Public Health Service. The Hook Commission has completed a series of hearings and is now drafting a report to submit to Secretary of Defense James Forrestal next month. FIRST NEGRO MARINE OFFICER IN TRAINING The first Negro to be commissioned in the Regular Marine Corps, Second Lieutenant John E. Rudder, USMC, of Paducah, Kentucky, is now undergoing training in the Pre-Basic Marine Corps School at Quantico, Virginia. Second Lieutenant Rudder who is 23 years old, entered the Marine Corps upon graduation from Purdue University where he was enrolled in the Naval Reserve Officers' Training Program. While serving as an enlisted man in the Marine Corps during the war, he qualified in 1944 for the reserve officer training program, and was transferred from his duty station at Majuro Atoll in the Marshall Islands for enrollment at Purdue University. He graduated from Purdue and accepted his commission in the Marine Corps on 28 May 1948. Second Lieutenant Rudder enlisted in the Marine Corps on 23 July 1943. Ordered to Camp LeJeune, North Carolina, he entered the radio operators' school and, upon completion of this course, became an instructor at the Montford Point, North Carolina School. He later joined the 52nd Antiaircraft Battalion on Majuro Island in October 1944. Upon successful completion of the Pre-Basic School course, Second Lieutenant Rudder will attend the Basic Marine Corps School at Quantico, Virginia. Four other Negro officers presently hold commissions in the Marine Corps Reserve. A fifth Reserve officer resigned his commission in November of 1947 to accept an appointment in the U. S. Public Health Service. In addition to the one Regular Marine Corps officer and the four holding Reserve commissions, there are 1,535 Negro enlisted personnel in the Fleet Marine Force, Security Forces, and supporting establishments on 30 June 1948. Of these 400 were on steward duty only on their own written request. A new Navy Circular directs that the Bureau of Personnel be informed immediately in cases of disciplinary action against officers. Previous practice was to forward such reports with the officer's fitness reports, resulting in delay up to 10 months in bringing the matter to the Board's attention. The directive also orders use of specific language in describing the alleged offense, and permits the accused to submit a statement in his own defense. WANTED: Anyone desiring to share their home with a man and wife (no children). Contact Soja, CS3 at 332 or 641. 9 WGBY AD LIBS By Ab Greetings Listeners: Things are very cheerful around the studio these days, our new transmitting equipment has passed its final tests and as soon as a few last minute details are taken care of, we shall install it. This will probably be some time this week. At that time our frequency will change from 1550 to 1450 kes. So much for our troubles, let's preview some of this week's programs. The 8:00 p. m. Monday spot, which usually brings you Amos and Andy, now features that great comedian, Bill Bendix and his "Life of Riley" show, with Junior, Digger O'Dell and the rest of his cast. Should be pretty good ...Command Performance (7:30 p. m., Tuesday), looks very promising this week, featuring music by Lina Romay and comedy by Garry Moore ...due to the many complaints about the music emanating from WGBY, our slightly boppish "5:30 Club" has been replaced by a half hour taken from our symphonic popular files, entitled, "Make Mine Music." Should aid the digestion some Henry Morgan fans may listen and enjoy the Morgan wit each Wednesday evening at 9:00 Hawthorne makes strange noises on Wednesday morning at 9:00 on this "Thing". This week's guest stars are: Johnny, the mud turtle and Pete the penguin, singing TuHu-Wa-Hi-La-Tu-Wa-Hu-Wa-I, or the Hawaiian War Hogan (oh well). Calling all Bobby Soxers, young and ancient! Frank Sinatra appears on this week's Jack Benny show (Sunday, 7:30 p. m.) listen and swoon. Speaking of music, as we weren't, those of you with classical tastes can hear the music you enjoy on Sundays at 1:00 p. m. until 2:00. At this time we present one hour with the Philadelphia Symphony. This week it features Miss Margo Rabao, soprano. On this program, she sings the Concerto for Voice and Orchestra. The orchestra presents Vivaldi's Second Violin Concerto. It should be excellent music. Also Monday, Wednesday and Friday of this week, yours truly puts on the Long Hair's Review. This is a classical music disc jockey show. By the way, how about some requests? Jazz fans will welcome the appearance of Woody Herman on Thursday's "One Night Stand" at 9:30 p. m. I just don't seem to have space enough in this column to tell you of all the fine programs that we present for your enjoyment. For further information, check with the WGBY Radio Schedule attached to Friday's Papoose, or pick up a copy at either of the Ship's Service Stores, the Commissary or the Marine PX. Page Three THE INDIAN i

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Page Wnui THE INDIAN $1,500 TOP PRIZE IN ESSAY CONTEST (SEA)-Not less than $500 and up to $1,500 is being offered by the U. B. Naval Institute as.top award in its 1948 annual essay contest for service personnel and civilians. A gold medal and a life membership in the Institute also will be awarded for the best essay. Monetary and other awards will be commensurate with the degree of merit of the entry as adjudged by the Institute's Board of Control. In addition to the first award, to be known as the "Prize," essays may win honorable mentions or special awards. Each essay awarded an honorable mention will win $100 for its author as well as the regular page compensation for publication. Essays must pertain to any subject on the naval profession and must not exceed 8,000 words. Deadline for receipt by the secretary-treasurer of the U. S. Naval Institute, Annapolis, Md., is 1 January 1949. All entries must be sent in a sealed envelope marked "Prize Essay Contest." The name of the competitor shall not appear on the essay, but each essay must have a motto and must be accompanied by a separate sealed envelope with the motto written on the outside and the name of the competitor and the motto inside. This envelope will not be opened until the Board of Control, voting by ballot without knowledge of the names of the competitors, has made the awards. All essays must be typewritten, double spaced, on paper 8%"x11", and must be submitted in triplicate, each copy complete in itself. Essays awarded the "Prize," "Honorable Mention," or "Special Award" are for publication in the Naval Institute Proceedings. Essays not awarded a prize may be published at the discretion of the Board, and the writers of such essays shall be compensated at the rate established for articles not submitted in competition. All awards will be made known and presented to successful competitors as soon as practicable after the February meeting of the Board. The Institute's annual essay competition exclusively for enlisted personnel, concluded in August. Enlisted personnel discharged after less than three years service are being informed that they are subject to the Selective Service law, and may be returned to service by their local boards, unless otherwise exempt. (SEA)-Rear Admiral John J. Manning, USN, Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, is a trustee of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, N. Y., and president of the Alumni Association. APPRECIATION FROM THE U.S.S. ROAN _______ On departure of this vessel from the Guantanamo area after five weeks of operations, I wish to express my thanks and sincere appreciation for the services performed by the Naval Operating Base during our stay. The facilities of the Naval Station, Naval Supply Depot, Fleet Training Group, Utility Squadron Ten, and all the other subordinate commands have been freely extended, and their assistance has been extremely helpful. The rapid and expert repairs made on the Roan's damaged bow by the Repair Facilities of the Naval Station is only one example of this. It has been a pleasure to be in contact with a Base where all the officers and men have worked with the basic idea of serving the fleet. W. N. Deragon Commanding AIN'T SCIENCE GRANDDROP THAT COAL SHOVEL (AFPS)-A Massachusetts scientist disclosed here recently that the rays of the sun can be trapped, stored and used in winter for heating homes in place of the conventional oil and coal units. The method was described to the American Association for the Advancement of Science by the developer of the system, Dr. Maria Tflekes of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who declared she planned to move into a sunheated house for the winter. Dr. Telkes estimated that the house will cost $20,000 when it is finished, about $3,000 of this for the solar unit. The scientist believes that mass construction of such a house will be feasible in the near future and will be an important step in the elimination of coal, oil and gas as sources of heat j r private homes. The heating unit will be built into the roof of the house in the form of a collector of sun-rays consisting of an 800-square foot black metal sheet behind two glass plates acting as a heat trap. Air is circulated behind the metal sheet in ducts, and when warmed is conducted to "heat bins" at strategic points throughout the house, each connected to registers and each capable of serving two rooms. Warm air is blown from the heat bins through the registers into the rooms. .The device will enable heat to be stored for 10 days, with heat available at all times-even on days when bad weather cuts down the availability of sun rays. If the heating system lives up to expectations, it will cost virtually nothing to operate, will last indefinitely and will save an annual average fuel expense of $150. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 10 Oct. to Sat. 16 Oct. Sunday IT HAPPENED ON 5TH AVENUE Don DeFore Ann Harding Monday DANGEROUS MILLIONS Kent Taylor Donna Drake Tuesday NOB HILL George Raft Vivian Blaine Wednesday BIG TOWN Phillip Reed Hillary Brooks Thursday THIS LOVE OF OURS Merle Oberon Charles Korvin Friday THE FUGITIVE Dolores Del Rio Henry Fonda Saturday MAN FROM OKLAHOMA Roy Rogers Dale Evans RUSSIAN COLONEL ESCAPES SOVIET UNION (APFS) -Added to the evergrowing list of refugees from Soviet controlled countries is a Russian Army Colonel who escaped from the Soviet Union to seek asylum in England. Known as Citizen Tokaev, the Colonel is an engineer and rocket expert. His story was disclosed when he sent a 4,000 word declaration of reasons for his break with the Soviet regime to a New York newspaper. In his declaration, the Colonel said: "The first step I took is the highest crime in the U.S.S.R., and I do not have any illusions as to the consequences it may have for my friends, relatives and fellowworkers. I know in advance that they are going to be terrorized only for having met me and communicated with me." FASTEST ATTACK BOMBER PASSES TEST A new, bigger and faster attack bomber has passed its initial tests for the Navy. The new plane, classified as the XAJ-1, shapes up as the heaviest yet designed for use on carriers, it has been announced. It will carry more than three tons of bombs at a speed considerably faster than 350 miles an hour. A compromise between speed and distance, the new plane has two conventional engines for normal operations and one turbo-jet in the tail for sudden bursts of speed. THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-7 Oct 4s-25oo. Pa e Four