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Indian
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Vol. III, No. 35 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 2 October, 1948


BACHELOR DINNER WAS
A HUGE SUCCESS

Approximately 400 non - rated
servicemen feasted on the sumptuous home-cooked "Bachelor Dinner," which was served in the grove area outside the Naval Operat* ing Base Chapel on Wednesday evening, 29 September. The event, planned and organized by Chaplains Elmer E. Bosserman and Carl A.
Herold and approved by Rear Admiral William K. Phillips, Commander Naval Operating Base, was
a huge success.
The dinner, with all its trimmings, included a large variety of meats, - home - cooked vegetables, salads and pastries. Among the chief food items were 18 large turkeys, 100 pounds of roast beef, 80 pounds of baked ham, 32 casseroles of vegetables, 30 different salads, 9 kinds of rolls and muffins, about 50 pies - apple, pineapple, -mince, lemon, chocolate, banana, pecan, custard-15 different types
of cakes and chocolate eclairs.
The well-seasoned meats and
tasty home - cooked foods were placed together to form a continuous table about the length of the Chapel. Women volunteers, under the direction of Mrs. Margaret Bosserman and Mrs. Betty Gallery, furnished the home-cooked foods and served -the dinner in buffet
style.
Many seamen stared 'wide-eyed
as they gazed upon the wide assortments and large amounts of wellprepared food. Although few admitted that they were too excited to eat as much as they would like to do, most of them returned several times to the long serving tables where their plates were piled high
with "goodies".
To quench the thirst of the
hungry young men, more than 1,000 bottles of beer and 400 bottles of
coke were consumed.
Throughout the dinner, the
"Hungry Five" Band played lively popular music or catchy tunes. As the evening darkness approached and the lights were turned on, Mr.
* Donald Stuck led the boys in singing familiar songs.
"Great food and good people!"
exclaimed Robert J. Miller, SN
(continued on Page Three)


NAVY RELIEF TO BE ESTABLISHED ON NOB
Lieutenant Rosa A. Brannon,
(W), USNR, arrived via MATS Tuesday morning, 28 September.
Miss Brannon will be attached to Naval Operating Base on temporary duty for about one month. Her duties here on the Base will be to Commission the Navy Relief Society here on the Naval Operating Base.
Miss Brannon is attached to the Navy Relief Society Headquarters, Washington, D. C. and is in the group of Wave officers selected for the regular Navy.

HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS
EXPECTED AT NSD

Good newp for those people who have been anxiously awaiting their household effects. Information has just reached the Naval Supply Depot that the USS LST-1144 arriving in Gtmo. on 3 October has household effects for the following: Lt. Cdr. M. G. Kendall, Lt. Cdr. W. C. Manke, Lt. P. H. Von Fraenkel, Lt. J. F. Hardesty, Ens. 0. E. Smith, Ch. Carp. A. J. Lindgren, Lt. (jg) E. E. Darrow, Lt. (jg) F. M. Lalor, Jr., Sgt. Major T. Carcelli, BTC T. N. Little, ADC E. M. Bruce, HMC D. L. Phelps, AMC R. E. Scott, QMC A. J. Hayes, QMC W. E. Bundt, MEC L. H. Chitty, ENC R. I. O'Bryan, GMC F. Legg, ICC L. W. Settlemyer, ADI J. I. Miller, ADI D. H. Norman, A. E. Machtolff, S. N. J. DeYoung, H. Tausch and N. L. Smoop.
Arrangements should be made at the NSD Transit Shed for pick-up and delivery details prior to the 5th of October.

WASHINGTON, D. C. (AFPS)Navy Waves are being sent to overseas Bases under new policies recently announced. About 300 women members of the Service will be assigned. During World War II, Hawaii was the only overseas sta-, tion to which the Waves weie sent. At the present time, only one Wave, Lt. Mildred Stewart, is stationed outside of the United States. The Lieutenant is Public Information Officer at San Juan, Puerto Rico.


HEAVY RAINS DAMAGE
BASE ROADS


Recent heavy rainfall at Guantanamo Bay temporarily flooded some of the main Base roads, softened shoulders, and scarred portions of the patrol and magazine roads.
From 17 to 23 September, 12.7 inches of rainfall were recorded. This amounts to more than one third of the total average annual rainfall for the Base. On the 17th, the Base Public Works Officer alerted emergency crews which were detailed to work on an "around the clock, 7-day week" schedule to repair damage and maintain traffic on all reguarly used roads.
Bulldozers and other heavy earthmoving equipment, some of it hurriedly barged over from the Leeward Point runway project, are still at work, with road repair taking priority over all other operations.

LITTLE THEATER SLATES
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE

The new Gtmo. Little Theater opens up its fall program with a bang with the announcement that its first production will be that well known comedy, "Arsenic and Old Lace."
Try outs for the fourteen parts will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, October 5 and 6, at 1930 in the Board Room of the NAS Administration Building. The cast of characters includes three women and eleven men, and each iole is an important one. All hands are invited to come and read for any of the parts.
The Little Theater is also anticipating having its own stage, and anyone interested in building scenery or helping out the Stage Manager in any capacity is urged to attend one of these meetings or to call Lt. Keehn at 778.

The Marines are flaunting a "new look" in neckwear. Gone is the field scarf, replaced by mohair and cotton neckties.


.0 / j;







Paire Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672
Saturday, 2 October 1948
U. S. NAVAL ()PERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Riar Admiral W. K. PhlQiils,"U "T;
Commander
:Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson ------------------ . Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman-'-Staff Advisor
THE -INDIAN is published weekly from
appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of
NAVEXOS P-35. Rev. Nov. 46.
THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's
Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press
Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS.
All Photographs used by THE INDIAN
are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated
otherwise.

As the annual
small arms requal ficatio fring swings into
its final week at
the Marine Barracks, Private
First Class William H. DeLong's range
record score of
325 has still not been seriously
threatened.
The heartiest congratulations to
Second Lieutenant William A. Fiander, who, on September 18th, received his commission to that rank at a quiet ceremony held in the 'office- of Colonel. J. R. Lanigan.
On the 27th of September, after
taking a look at the cold, cruel, outside world, Private First Class Gerald J. Krygier shipped over for another three year's cruise in the
USMC.
Welcome aboard to Technical Sergeant Chester L. Lewis; Staff Sergeant William E. Harris; and Corporals James D. Hewby, Marvin L. Dwler, and William L. Schuene. mann; who, on 27th of September
reported aboard for duty. We hope your tour of duty here wil be a
pleasant one.
Post personnel are looking forward to the second monthly Post Dance, to be held. in the Rustic Pavilion on 8 October. Services of the "Hungry Five", Gtmo's most popular small musical combo, have been obtained for the event. The Post Exchange Restaurant is planning another elaborate refreshment
spread.
The Post Volley Ball League,
twice postponed due to the heavy rifle range schedule, will get under way Monday, October 4th, with-the the following teams participating:


Stork News
-there is none
Dr. and Mrs.
J. ,A. ocke,
daughter and
son in law of
C aptalr. and
Mrs. Robbins:
are on the Base
for a short visit.
Lt. (jg) E. F.
Jones,, DC, USN
arrived this weekfr duty at the Dental Clinic. Welcome aboard, Doctor, we all hope you will enjoy your new duty. Also, welcomed aboard were three Chiefs and eight Hospitalmen.
Lt. Cdr. R. S. Kibler has gone to the States on ten days leave.
The Enlisted Men's Bowling team is holding it's own under very adverse conditions, having lost two of their outstanding players; Holt, HM1, transferred to Treasure Island, and Meyers, SN, in the States on emergency leave.

NAS SLIPSTREAM
At approximately 0700, 29 September 1948, NAS Gtmo's OY plane crashed in the vicinity of the Boat Landing at Marine Site. The pilot, Rose, Edwin M., ADCNAP, although badly shaken up was able to walk away from the crash with only minor injuries apparent. The plane -was a4.complete wreck. Dr. R. W. Gilmore, attached to the U. S. Naval Hospital rendered firstaid at the scene of'the crash after which Rose was transferred to the Hospital for further medical treatment and observation. The OY, a plane familiar to most of us by sound, if not sight, was being operated in connection with insect and malaria control, pilots operating on a rotating schedule in the early morning and cvening hours. Eye-witnesses who saw the plane hook a high powered tension line near the NCO Club, cartwheeling it :down an embankment, immediately sounded the fire alarm. Luckily the plane did not 'catch on fire. Those who saw the crash, and those who viewed the remains of the'plane after it had been brought back to the Hangar Area are unanimously agreed that Rose wasvery, very, lucky. Congratulations, Rose, on your harrowing experience and escape, and may you have a speedy recovery. Also-a big bouquet to the U. S. Naval Hospital and the NOB and Marine Fire Departments. Its personnel deserve
(Continued on Page Four)

Officers, 1st Lt. B. G. Cass, eaptain; Staff NCO's, Sgt. Major T. Carcelli, captain; Headquarters Co., Supply, Corp. A. S. Brown, captain; 1st Plt. Guard Co., PFC P. E. Booker, captain; 2nd Plt. Guard Co., PFC E. T. Svancara, captain; Headquarters Co., Admin., Corp. D. D. Christiansen, captain.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Saturday, 25 September 1948 Catholic Masses �
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base.Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before' all Masses Protestant Services
0930--Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall
-Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday
at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)






CHAPIAIN(S CORR4ED
ONE HOUR FOR GOD
The easiest thing in the world
to do is to find an excuse for not attending church services. Some people blame their negligence in caring for their spiritual welfare upon their parents forcing- them--to Igo to church. Others don't like the service, the hymns, the hour of service, or the way the sermon is delivered. All these reasons salve the conscience and make it easy to stay in bed or else to plan recreational activities such. as golf, etc.
Have you ever considered what would happen to the moral standards in your community and :the world in general if the churches and their influence were suddenly taken away? The Church is the one motivating influence in upholding the sacred bond of marriage and the. true relationship between parent and child. Without the high moral teachings of the church in regard to man and his dealings with his fellowmen, the family life and loved ones would be constantly endangered so that there would be no peace of mind.
The Church was established by Jesus Christ to prepare men and women for the goal of their earthly existence which is Eternal Life. The man who thinks he doesn't need to attend church where this preparation is being taught is on dangerous ground.
Of all the time allotted to us on this earth, is One Hour a week too long to commune with Him in the Church which He has expressly provided for our spiritual needs? We must support it if we are to be a part of it. Think it over, mates, and then do something about it.
Elmer E. Bosserman Chaplain, U. S. Navy


THE INDIAN


Pa 'e Twn






2 Car lqeiA"


THE INDIAN


NAVSTA HOBBY SHOP,.
S IS PROVING POPL LAR:.
Are you interested in leaining a
hobby? The Naval Station Hobby Shop is a good. place to find new
interests and outlets for talents.
At the present the Hobby Shop
has two table saws,, one machine lathe, three band saws and assorted
equipment for wood crafts.
The Hobby Shop is undez the direction of Lieut. Walter Keehn, Naval Station Recreation Officer.
Walter N. Foster, DCC is the Chief
in Charge of the Hobby Shop.
For you camera fiends, there will
soon be a Photo Lab attached to the Hobby Shop for developing your own rolls of film.. (Watch for further details of developnments of this project in the columns of the
Indian.)
There is a slight fee for use of , materials such as wood, nails and
paints, etc.
The Hobby Shop is directly behind the Ship's Salvage Depot of the Naval Supply Depot in the Electronics and Repair Docking Area of the Naval Station.'You are welcome anytine to look over the
facilities.


Chief Foster, Chief in Charge of the Hobby Shop showing off a cabinet which was made in the shop. In'the foreground is one of the Shop's table saws.


A view of the work bench in the INaval itation Hobby lhop.


Chaplain: "Son, do you follow the Ten Commandments?"
SA: "'I don't know, sir. It's all I can do to keep up with the memos and orders."
She: "Sometimes my father takes things apart to see what makes them go."
He: "So what?" She: "So you'd better go."


SR: You know, I got put on report the other day.
Buddy: "Why, what were you doing ?"
SR: "Nothing, the trouble is the chief caught me at it."
The difference between a regular sailor and a Seabee: While the regular sailor is looking for a park bench, the Seebee builds one.


BACHELOR DINNER
(Continued from Page One)
from Kansas as he refilled hii plate a second time. "Swell chow!" iterated Alvis Lester, SA of San Angelo, Texas. "It's like a beach party at home," said Bill Dangerfield, SA from South Carolina. "Food reminds me of picnics at home," interrupted George Harast, YNSA of Illinois. "Swell for all the fellows' morale," continued Charles F. Smith of Deleware City, Deleware.
"Best chow I've had in a long time!" commented Al Summerville, SA from the Bronx, New York, as he munched on a large turkey leg. The Navy wives are mighty cooperative to help prepare such a grand meal for us," continued Howard Huey, SA from Indiana. "We sure appreciate it."
"This banquet will make the fellows have much better attitudetowards the people on the Base," said Robert Boyer, SA of Columbus, Ohio. "We fellows never knew the people here were so nice. It makes us feel that we are important and that something great has been done for us. If just makes us feel good inside."
"Reminds me of Liberation Day in the Philippines," reminisced Manuel B. Maycola, TESN from Manila, Philippine Islands. "Everyone welcomed everyone theie-just like they're doing here this evening. The food and the music reminds me of that great day in my country."
"It's great to have parties like this one, where we can meet the officers and their wives; it'll keep
(Continued on Page Four)


Page Three


THE INDIAN







Pas" Four THE INDIAN.....


NAS SLIPSTREAM
(Continued from Page Two)
a lot of credit for their speedy arrival at the scene.
New faces . . . Lt. (jg) R. W. Hardesty, USN, as the relief for Lt. (jg) E. J. Caroll, last station, NATTU, Olathe, Kansas. Lt. (jg) I Gebhart, USN, from FairWing Welcome aboard and may your tour of duty be most pleasant. : Belated greetings . . . to officers, men, and their dependents whose arrival passed unmentioned in this column. It wasn't intentional and we do welcome you aboard.
Week-ending at Santiago
Lt. Cdr. and Mrs. J. H. Graves, Lt. and Mrs. J. N. Vinson, Lt. (jg) and Mrs. A. J. Wellborn, and Mrs. F. M. Lalor.
Scuttlebutt? . . . The Enlisted Men's Club may have its face lifted sometime in the future. Plans are in progress to set aside an afternoon for dependents who want to take a turn on the bowling alleys. Women's shoes are plentiful, men's in lesser numbers, but rest assured, this deficiency will be overcome soon. For info, be it advised fees at the alley are 150 a line. P. S.The House pays the pin boy.
Leaving . . . Cassell, BMC, to the Coral Sea; Partlow, CMC, for Construction Battalion, NavSta, Port Hueneme, California. Radosh, AD3, Defibaugh, AD3, Fazakerley, AD2, all to NAS, Corpus Christi. Fowler, TD3, being discharged. Good luck!
Paging AGC Wells! Griffin, AGC who relieved Wells, stopped by last Monday and jokingly asked him for a weather prediction. He took a brief check of the overhead and without cracking a smile, said,
"Heavy showers for Tuesday." Heavy, showers did fall about 0300 Tuesday morning and now he's got us wondering-was he kidding or is he really that good? According to Aerology, wead a rainfall of almost 13" 'this month, most of which was ,oncentrated within the past two weeks. Damp-wasn't it?
Servicemen who have heid Natjoimlevice Life Insurance policies since 1940, may renew them for another five years-pon expiration, under Public Law 83>-. Insurance issued before January 1, 1946, was for an eight-year term. Policies issued after that date are for five years.
SEATTLE, .WASH. (AFPS)-A former Japanese Kamikaze (suicide) pilot arrived here recently to begin a college education financed with money bequeathed by an American soldier who died in the Philippines during World'War II. Robert Johnstone, of Do'Wlington, Pa., willed his $10,000 in Government insurance for the purpose of educating in the American way, one member of the enemy forces.


ORDNANCE STUFF

By Alston Jones
This past week was a lucky week for the Ordnance Department even though it rained so much. The long expected "on the double" routine of a busy ammunition week was nigh at, hand, and suddenly out of a dark cloudy sky, sixteen more seamen were assigned to the department.
The heavy rains set up a challenge to the Ordnance truck drivers by literally washing out all the roads to the magazines. Emergency repair work had to be done to make them fairly transitable, and still some of the magazines are inaccessible to our 12 ton trucks. A vote of thanks is extended to the Public Works Department for their cooperation in making the roads passable on such short notice.
It is well to say that the Ordnance lucky streak ran true and no more rain fell, giving the chance to accomplish the ,work program so far. It is not a boast (or is it), but we are proud of the guys who keep "dem dere" trucks rolling. In the area of No. 40 group of magazines it is almost necessary to gr6w "wings or fins" to get there, but if they have, to, our pilots, truck drivers I mean, are willing to navigate. U. S. Ammunition has to be stowed. The program was efficiently planned to fit the occasion, and everything is working as smoothly as ever. All hands turned out "en masse" even though it would be an exaggeration to saythat all hearts were there.
G. W. Wilson, SN, USN, who had been waiting anxiously for his orders, received them this week, and was a very happy man. His anxiety was due mostly to the fact that he wanted to join his wife and kids who left here a couple of weeks ago. Wilson will leave this Saturday (he hopes) and go to Charleston, South Carolina for two years shore duty. He enlisted in 1940 and after "boot camp" was sent to the USS Louisville, a heavy cruiser, for duty. During his tour on the Louisville, he went to South America, Hawaiian Islands and the Philippines. In 1942 he was sent to Australia where he spent three years, during which time he met and married a local belle. After his tour in Australia, he was sent aboard the USS Ausburne (DD570) and saw action in Okinawa and in and around gapan. In 1945 he returned to the States and was discharged in 1946, holding the rate of Chief Gunner's Mate. He reenlisted in 1947 as a seaman, because he had stayed out beyond the time limit.
The Ordnance Department wishes to extend their best wishes for a pleasant trip, and a pleasant tour of duty in Charleston.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 3 Oct. to Saturday 9 Oct.
Sunday
VOICE OF THE TURTLE
Ronald Reagan Eleanor Parker
Monday
TAKE MY LIFE
Greta Gynt Hugh Williams
Tuesday,
THE WOMAN IN WHITE
Alexis Smith Sydney Greenstreet
Wednesday
TARZAN AND THE
MERMAIDS
Johnny Weissmuller Brenda Joyce
Thursday ROCKY
Roddy McDonald Edgar Barrier
Friday
THE BRIDE GOES WILD
Van Johnson June Allyson
Saturday
CHEYENNE
Dennis Morgan Jane Wyman

BACHELOR DINNER
(Continued from Page Three)
up good spirit among the boys," said Robert Byington, SI of St. Louis, Missouri. " Great! Great! Nothing like it," emphasized Louis Burgoes from California. "I've'served in the Navy four years-2Y2 years in the Far East and the Pacific, and it's the best thing I've seen yet."
"The Chaplains are swell," was the general comment among the service men, 90 per cent who ranged in ages between 17 to 23. "The fellows are sure grateful to the two chaplains, because they do more for the boys than most people would do for seamen," commented Leonard G. Kitchens, SA of Kentucky and "The Chaplains are swell," said Jim McKinley, SA of Evansville, Indiana. "We fellows certainly appreciate this feast. Any time they could have these parties, it would be worthwhile."
"This is the best Base that I've ever been at and the scenery astounds me," said Storekeeper Striker John P. Rooney, a graduate of Fordham College in New York. "Functions like this one bring about a closer relationship between the officers and enlisted men. It's homelike. It's nice. It's like an outdoor picnic."
"Turned out great. Wonderful idea. Should hold more of these dinners," recommended Eugene Evans. SN of Miami, Florida.
Chaplains Bosserman and Herold wish to extend their appreciation for the fine cooperation of the ladies for making this dinner such a great success.


0


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-30 Sep 48--2500


Pa e Four


M id: *11Li;A1.130, 7"




Full Text

PAGE 1

/ I Vol. III, No. 35 BACHELOR DINNER WAS A HUGE SUCCESS Approximately 400 non -rated servicemen feasted on the sumptuous home-cooked "Bachelor Dinner," which was served in the grove area outside the Naval Operating Base Chapel on Wednesday evening, 29 September. The event, planned and organized by Chaplains Elmer E. Bosserman and Carl A. Herold and approved by Rear Admiral William K. Phillips, Commander Naval Operating Base, was a huge success. The dinner, with all its trimmings, included a large variety of meats, home -cooked vegetables, salads and pastries. Among the chief food items were 18 large turkeys, 100 pounds of roast beef, 80 pounds of baked ham, 32 casseroles of vegetables, 30 different salads, 9 kinds of rolls and muffins, about 50 pies -apple, pineapple, mince, lemon, chocolate, banana, pecan, custard-15 different types of cakes and chocolate eclairs. The well-seasoned meats and tasty home -cooked foods were placed together to form a continuous table about the length of the Chapel. Women volunteers, under the direction of Mrs. Margaret Bosserman and Mrs. Betty Gallery, furnished the home-cooked foods and served the dinner in buffet style. Many seamen stared wide-eyed as they gazed upon the wide assortments and large amounts of wellprepared food. Although few admitted that they were too excited to eat as much as they would like to do, most of them returned several times to the long serving tables where their plates were piled high with "goodies". To quench the thirst of the hungry young men, more than 1,000 bottles of beer and 400 bottles of coke were consumed. Throughout the dinner, the "Hungry Five" Band played lively popular music or catchy tunes. As the evening darkness approached and the lights were turned on, Mr. Donald Stuck led the boys in singing familiar songs. "Great food and good people!" exclaimed Robert J. Miller, SN (Continued on Page Three) U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba NAVY RELIEF TO BE ESTABLISHED ON NOB Lieutenant Rosa A. Brannon, (W), USNR, arrived via MATS Tuesday morning, 28 September. Miss Brannon will be attached to Naval Operating Base on temporary duty for about one month. Her duties here on the Base will be to Commission the Navy Relief Society here on the Naval Operating Base. Miss Brannon is attached to the Navy Relief Society Headquarters, Washington, D. C. and is in the group of Wave officers selected for the regular Navy. HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS EXPECTED AT NSD Good news for those people who have been anxiously awaiting their household effects. Information has just reached the Naval Supply Depot that the USS LST-1144 arriving in Gtmo. on 3 October has household effects for the following: Lt. Cdr. M. G. Kendall, Lt. Cdr. W. C. Manke, Lt. P. H. Von Fraenkel, Lt. J. F. Hardesty, Ens. 0. E. Smith, Ch. Carp. A. J. Lindgren, Lt. (jg) E. E. Darrow, Lt. (jg) F. M. Lalor, Jr., Sgt. Major T. Carcelli, BTC T. N. Little, ADC E. M. Bruce, HMC D. L. Phelps, AMC R. E. Scott, QMC A. J. Hayes, QMC W. E. Bundt, MEC L. H. Chitty, ENC R. I. O'Bryan, GMC F. Legg, ICC L. W. Settlemyer, ADI J. I. Miller, ADI D. H. Norman, A. E. Machtolff, S. N. J. DeYoung, H. Tausch and N. L. Smoop. Arrangements should be made at the NSD Transit Shed for pick-up and delivery details prior to the 5th of October. WASHINGTON, D. C. (AFPS)Navy Waves are being sent to overseas Bases under new policies recently announced. About 300 women members of the Service will be assigned. During World War II, Hawaii was the only overseas station to which the Waves were sent. At the present time, only one Wave, Lt. Mildred Stewart, is stationed outside of the United States. The Lieutenant is Public Information Officer at San Juan, Puerto Rico. Saturday, 2 October, 1948 HEAVY RAINS DAMAGE BASE ROADS Recent heavy rainfall at Guantanamo Bay temporarily flooded some of the main Base roads, softened shoulders, and scarred portions of the patrol and magazine roads. From 17 to 23 September, 12.7 inches of rainfall were recorded. This amounts to more than one third of the total average annual rainfall for the Base. On the 17th, the Base Public Works Officer alerted emergency crews which were detailed to work on an "around the clock, 7-day week" schedule to repair damage and maintain traffic on all reguarly used roads. Bulldozers and other heavy earthmoving equipment, some of it hurriedly barged over from the Leeward Point runway project, are still at work, with road repair taking priority over all other operations. LITTLE THEATER SLATES ARSENIC AND OLD LACE The new Gtmo. Little Theater opens up its fall program with a bang with the announcement that its first production will be that well known comedy, "Arsenic and Old Lace." Try outs for the fourteen parts will be held Tuesday and Wednesday, October 5 and 6, at 1930 in the Board Room of the NAS Administration Building. The cast of characters includes three women and eleven men, and each role is an important one. All hands are invited to come and read for any of the parts. The Little Theater is also anticipating having its own stage, and anyone interested in building scenery or helping out the Stage Manager in any capacity is urged to attend one of these meetings or to call Lt. Keehn at 778. The Marines are flaunting a "new look" in neckwear. Gone is the field scarf, replaced by mohair and cotton neckties. "c

PAGE 2

Pare Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 2 October 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral w. K. Phillips; USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson-----------------.Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman.-Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. As the annual small arms requalification firing swings into / its final week at the Marine Barracks, Private First Class William H. DeLong's range record score of 325 has still not been seriously threatened. The heartiest congratulations to Second Lieutenant William A. Fiander, who, on September 18th, received his commission to that rank at a quiet ceremony held in the office of Colonel J. R. Lanigan. On the 27th of September, after taking a look at the cold, cruel, outside world, Private First Class Gerald J. Krygier shipped over for another three year's cruise in the USMC. Welcome aboard to Technical Sergeant Chester L. Lewis; Staff Sergeant William E. Harris; and Corporals James D. Hewby, Marvin L. Dowler, and William L. Schuenemann; who, on 27th of September reported aboard for duty. We hope your tour of duty here will be a pleasant one. Post personnel are looking forward to the second monthly Post Dance, to be held in the Rustic Pavilion on 8 October. Services of the "Hungry Five", Gtmo's most popular small musical combo, have been obtained for the event. The Post Exchange Restaurant is planning another elaborate refreshment spread. The Post Volley Ball League, twice postponed due to the heavy rifle range schedule, will get under way Monday, October 4th, with the the following teams participating: Stork News ASPW-there is none! Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Cocke, daughter and son in law of Captair and Mrs. Robbins are on the Base NOT for a short visit. TE S Lt. (jg) E. F. Jones, DC, USN arrived this week for duty at the Dental Clinic. Welcome aboard, Doctor, we all hope you will enjoy your new duty. Also, welcomed aboard were three Chiefs and eight Hospitalmen. Lt. Cdr. R. S. Kibler has gone to the States on ten days leave. The Enlisted Men's Bowling team is holding it's own under very adverse conditions, having lost two of their outstanding players; Holt, HM1, transferred to Treasure Island, and Meyers, SN, in the States on emergency leave. NAS SLIPSTREAM At approximately 0700, 29 September 1948, NAS Gtmo's OY plane crashed in the vicinity of the Boat Landing at Marine Site. The pilot, Rose, Edwin M., ADCNAP, although badly shaken up was able to walk away from the crash with only minor injuries apparent. The plane was a-complete wreck. Dr. R. W. Gilmore, attached to the U. S. Naval Hospital rendered firstaid at the scene of the crash after which Rose was transferred to the Hospital for further medical treatment and observation. The OY, a plane familiar to most of us by sound, if not sight, was being operated in connection with insect and malaria control, pilots operating on a rotating schedule in the early morning and evening hours. Eye-witnesses who saw the plane hook a high powered tension line near the NCO Club, cartwheeling it down an embankment, immediately sounded the fire alarm. Luckily the plane did not catch on fire. Those who saw the crash, and those who viewed the remains of the'plane after it had been brought back to the Hangar Area are unanimously agreed that Rose wasvery, very, lucky. Congratulations, Rose, on your harrowing experience and escape, and may you have a speedy recovery. Also-a big bouquet to the U. S. Naval Hospital and the NOB and Marine Fire Departments. Its personnel deserve (Continued on Page Four) Officers, 1st Lt. B. G. Cass, eaptain; Staff NCO's, Sgt. Major T. Carcelli, captain; Headquarters Co., Supply, Corp. A. S. Brown, captain; 1st Plt. Guard Co., PFC P. E. Booker, captain; 2nd Plt. Guard Co., PFC E. T. Svancara, captain; Headquarters Co., Admin., Corp. D. D. Christiansen, captain. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Saturday, 25 September 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base.Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAA~ttIt CORNER ONE HOUR FOR GOD The easiest thing in the world to do is to find an excuse for not attending church services. Some people blame their negligence in caring for their spiritual welfare upon their parents forcing them to go to church. Others don't like the service, the hymns, the hour of service, or the way the sermon is delivered. All these reasons salve the conscience and make it easy to stay in bed or else to plan recreational activities such as golf, etc. Have you ever considered what would happen to the moral standards in your community and the world in general if the churches and their influence were suddenly taken away? The Church is the one motivating influence in upholding the sacred bond of marriage and the true relationship between parent and child. Without the high moral teachings of the church in regard to man and his dealings with his fellowmen, the family life and loved ones would be constantly endangered so that there would be no peace of mind. The Church was established by Jesus Christ to prepare men and women for the goal of their earthly existence which is Eternal Life. The man who thinks he doesn't need to attend church where this preparation is being taught is on dangerous ground. Of all the time allotted to us on this earth, is One Hour a week too long to commune with Him in the Church which He has expressly provided for our spiritual needs? We must support it if we are to be a part of it. Think it over, mates, and then do something about it. Elmer E. Bosserman Chaplain, U. S. Navy THE INDIAN Pare Two

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) ocF / ;~ THE INDIAN NAVSTA HOBBY SHOP IS PROVING POPULAR Are you interested in learning a hobby? The Naval Station Hobby Shop is a good place to find new interests and outlets for talents. At the present the Hobby Shop has two table saws, one machine lathe, three band saws and assorted equipment for wood crafts. The Hobby Shop is under the direction of Lieut. Walter Keehn, Naval Station Recreation Officer. Walter N. Foster, DCC is the Chief in Charge of the Hobby Shop. For you camera fiends, there will soon be a Photo Lab attached to the Hobby Shop for developing your own rolls of film. (Watch for further details of developments of this project in the columns of the Indian.) There is a slight fee for use of materials such as wood, nails and paints, etc. The Hobby Shop is directly behind the Ship's Salvage Depot of the Naval Supply Depot in the Electronics and Repair Docking Area of the Naval Station. You are welcome anytime to look over the facilities. Chief Foster, Chief in Charge of the Hobby Shop showing off a cabinet which was made in the shop. In the foreground is one of the Shop's table saws. A view of the work bench in the Naval nation Hobby :shop. Chaplain: "Son, do you follow the Ten Commandments?" SA: "I don't know, sir. It's all I can do to keep up with the memos and orders." She: "Sometimes my father takes things apart to see what makes them go." He: "So what?" She: "So you'd better go." SR: You know, I got put on report the other day. Buddy: "Why, what were you doing?" SR: "Nothing, the trouble is the chief caught me at it." The difference between a regular sailor and a Seabee: While the regular sailor is looking for a park bench, the Seebee builds one. BACHELOR DINNER (Continued from Page One) from Kansas as he refilled his plate a second time. "Swell chow!" iterated Alvis Lester, SA of San Angelo, Texas. "It's like a beach party at home," said Bill Dangerfield, SA from South Carolina. "Food reminds me of picnics at home," interrupted George Harast, YNSA of Illinois. "Swell for all the fellows' morale," continued Charles F. Smith of Deleware City, Deleware. "Best chow I've had in a long time!" commented Al Summerville, SA from the Bronx, New York, as he munch; d on a large turkey leg. The Navy wives are mighty cooperative to help prepare such a grand meal for us," continued Howard Huey, SA from Indiana. "We sure appreciate it." "This banquet will make the fellows have much better attitudes towards the people on the Base," said Robert Boyer, SA of Columbus, Ohio. "We fellows never knew the people here were so nice. It makes us feel that we are important and that something great has been done for us. If just makes us feel good inside." "Reminds me of Liberation Day in the Philippines," reminisced Manuel B. Maycola, TESN from Manila, Philippine Islands. "Everyone welcomed everyone there-just like they're doing here this evening. The food and the music reminds me of that great day in my country." "It's great to have parties like this one, where we can meet the officers and their wives; it'll keep (Continued on Page Four) Page Three

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Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-SO Sep 48-2500 NAS SLIPSTREAM (Continued from Page Two) a lot of credit for their speedy arrival at the scene. New faces ...Lt. (jg) R. W. Hardesty, USN, as the relief for -Lt. (jg) E. J. Caroll, last station, NATTU, Olathe, Kansas. Lt. (jg) H. Gebhart, USN, from FairWing II. Welcome aboard and may your tour of duty be most pleasant. Belated greetings ...to officers, men, and their dependents whose arrival passed unmentioned in this column. It wasn't intentional and we do welcome you aboard. Week-ending at Santiago Lt. Cdr. and Mrs. J. H. Graves, Lt. and Mrs. J. N. Vinson, Lt. (jg) and Mrs. A. J. Wellborn, and Mrs. F. M. Lalor. Scuttlebutt? ...The Enlisted Men's Club may have its face lifted sometime in the future. Plans are in progress to set aside an afternoon for dependents who want to take a turn on the bowling alleys. Women's shoes are plentiful, men's in lesser numbers, but rest assured, this deficiency will be overcome soon. For info, be it advised fees at the alley are 15 a line. P. S.The House pays the pin boy. Leaving ...Cassell, BMC, to the Coral Sea; Partlow, CMC, for Construction Battalion, NavSta, Port Hueneme, California. Radosh, AD3, Defibaugh, AD3, Fazakerley, AD2, all to NAS, Corpus Christi. Fowler, TD3, being discharged. Good luck! Paging AGC Wells! Griffin, AGC who relieved Wells, stopped by last Monday and jokingly asked him for a weather prediction. He took a brief check of the overhead and without cracking a smile, said, "Heavy showers for Tuesday." Heavy showers did fall about 0300 Tuesday morning and now he's got us wondering-was he kidding or is he really that good? According to Aerology, we-had a rainfall of almost 13" this month, most of which was concentrated within the past two weeks. Damp-wasn't it? Servicemen who have held National Service Life Insurance policies since 1940, may renew them for another five years upon expiration, under Public Law 83. Insurance issued before January 1, 1946, was for an eight-year term. Policies issued after that date are for five years. SEATTLE,. WASH. (AFPS)-A former Japanese Kamikaze (suicide) pilot arrived here recently to begin a college education financed with money bequeathed by an American soldier who died in the Philippines during World War II. Robert Johnstone, of Dotlington, Pa., willed his $10,000 in Government insurance for the purpose of educating in the American way, one member of the enemy forces. ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones This past week was a lucky week for the Ordnance Department even though it rained so much. The long expected "on the double" routine of a busy ammunition week was nigh at hand, and suddenly out of a dark cloudy sky, sixteen more seamen were assigned to the department. The heavy rains set up a challenge to the Ordnance truck drivers by literally washing out all the roads to the magazines. Emergency repair work had to be done to make them fairly transitable, and still some of the magazines are inaccessible to our 12 ton trucks. A vote of thanks is extended to the Public Works Department for their cooperation in making the roads passable on such short notice. It is well to say that the Ordnance lucky streak ran true and no more rain fell, giving the chance to accomplish the work program so far. It is not a boast (or is it), but we are proud of the guys who keep "dem dere" trucks rolling. In the area of No. 40 group of magazines it is almost necessary to grow "wings or fins" to get there, but if they have to, our pilots, truck drivers I mean, are willing to navigate. U. S. Ammunition has to be stowed. The program was efficiently planned to fit the occasion, and everything is working as smoothly as ever. All hands turned out "en masse" even though it would be an exaggeration to say that all hearts were there. G. W. Wilson, SN, USN, who had been waiting anxiously for his orders, received them this week, and was a very happy man. His anxiety was due mostly to the fact that he wanted to join his wife and kids who left here a couple of weeks ago. Wilson will leave this Saturday (he hopes) and go to Charleston, South Carolina for two years shore duty. He enlisted in 1940 and after "boot camp" was sent to the USS Louisville, a heavy cruiser, for duty. During his tour on the Louisville, he went to South America, Hawaiian Islands and the Philippines. In 1942 he was sent to Australia where he spent three years, during which time he met and married a local belle. After his tour in Australia, he was sent aboard the USS Ausburne (DD570) and saw action in Okinawa and in and around Japan. In 1945 he returned to the States and was discharged in 1946, holding the rate of Chief Gunner's Mate. He reenlisted in 1947 as a seaman, because he had stayed out beyond the time limit. The Ordnance Department wishes to extend their best wishes for a pleasant trip, and a pleasant tour of duty in Charleston. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 3 Oct. to Saturday 9 Oct. Sunday VOICE OF THE TURTLE Ronald Reagan Eleanor Parker Monday TAKE MY LIFE Greta Gynt Hugh Williams Tuesday THE WOMAN IN WHITE Alexis Smith Sydney Greenstreet Wednesday TARZAN AND THE MERMAIDS Johnny Weissmuller Brenda Joyce Thursday ROCKY Roddy McDonald Edgar Barrier Friday THE BRIDE GOES WILD Van Johnson June Allyson Saturday CHEYENNE Dennis Morgan Jane Wyman BACHELOR DINNER (Continued from Page Three) up good spirit among the boys," said Robert Byington, SN of St. Louis, Missouri. "Great! Great! Nothing like it," emphasized Louis Burgoes from California. "I've served in the Navy four years-2%2 years in the Far East and the Pacific, and it's the best thing I've seen yet." "The Chaplains are swell," was the general comment among the service men, 90 per cent who ranged in ages between 17 to 23. "The fellows are sure grateful to the two chaplains, because they do more for the boys than most people would do for seamen," commented Leonard G. Kitchens, SA of Kentucky and "The Chaplains are swell," said Jim McKinley, SA of Evansville, Indiana. "We fellows certainly appreciate this feast. Any time they could have these parties, it would be worthwhile." "This is the best Base that I've ever been at and the scenery astounds me," said Storekeeper Striker John P. Rooney, a graduate of Fordham College in New York. "Functions like this one bring about a closer relationship between the officers and enlisted men. It's homelike. It's nice. It's like an outdoor picnic." "Turned out great. Wonderful idea. Should hold more of these dinners," recommended Eugene Evans. SN of Miami, Florida. Chaplains Bosserman and Herold wish to extend their appreciation for the fine cooperation of the ladies for making this dinner such a great success. 1dI T *00 THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-30 Sep 48-2500 Page Four


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