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Indian

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Indian
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Vol. III, No. 34


U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 25 September 1948


ADM. PHILLIPS INSPECTS
NAVAL HOSPITAL

By E. Richards
The Naval Hospital Command personnel gathered in front of the Hospital Administration Building at 0845 Saturday, 11 September 1948 and was inspected by Rear Admiral William K. Phillips. Commander Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
With the exception of nineteen men who were detailed to their respective departments, officers and men, all of them dressed in their white uniforms, appeared very impressive. When the order to uncover was given, fresh haircuts were exposed to the Admiral's scrutinizing eyes. The general appearance of all hands brought forth a "very well" oral commendation from the Admiral from time to time.
Accompanied by Captain A. L. Pleasants, Chief of Staff and Captain John H. Robbins, Medical Officer in Command; Admiral Phillips moved up and down the lines of neatly attired officers and men, including the Hospital's Nurses, standing at attention in the warm and crystal-clear morning, and on one or two occasions, he paused to emphasize the importance of military bearing, more so to bolster morale than individual reprimands.
The Naval Station Band furnished music throughout this phase of the inspection which lasted for about half an hour. But not until all outside facilities were thoroughly inspected did the "Set the Watch" procedure sound, and all hands could change back into the uniform of the day.

BERLIN (AFPS)-United States transport planes flying supplies into this Russian blockaded city, recently established two new records in the airlift operation when they flew in 3,120 tons of supplies on 408 flights.
The British brought in 1,716 tons on 286 flights, which gave Berliners a total of 4,836 tons, highest tonnage delivered since "Operation Vittles" began.


THE INDIAN SALUTES LCDR. H. B. MILLER USN
Every so often we have read of heroic action and unusual experiences of individuals during the past war, but very seldom do we get to meet such a one or be shipmates with him.


Lt. Cdr. Hugh Barr Miller, USN
Recently Lt. Cdr. Hugh Barr Miller, USN, reported aboard. The staff of the Indian discovered that Lt. Cdr. Miller has had one -of the most outstanding adventures of World War II.
The Indian quotes the citation of Admiral W. F. Halsey, USN, to Lt. Cdr. Miller when he was awarded the Navy Cross; which was presented by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt:
South Pacific Force
of the United States Pacific Fleet Headquarters of the Commander In the name of the President of the United States, the Commander, South Pacific Area and South Pacific Force takes pleasure in awarding the Navy Cross to Lt. Hugh Barr Miller, Jr., USNR for service as set forth in the following:
Citation
"For extraordinary heroism and
(Continued on Page Three)


ARMED FORCES PLANS LOYALTY CHECK

(AFPS)-A three point proposal at dealing with both suspected and proven cases of subversive or disloyal conduct in the Armed Forces was recently submitted to the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Treasury by the Armed Forces Personnel Board.
The plan is now before the secretaries for study and will be returned to the personnel of the Board in the near future, with comment and suggestions. The combined reaction of the two groups will then be submitted to Defense Secretary James V. Forrestal. (The proposal was submitted to the Secretary 6f the Treasury because he is the titular head of the Coast Guard.) The proposal sets forth three categories of disloyalty or subversion by Armed Forces personnel and recommends correspondingly severe penalties for each.
Categories
They are in order of severity: 1. Persons who have been found to have committed overt acts of disloyalty against the Service or the Government. fhis group, if found guilty by the appropriate Service body, will be subject either to court-martial or civil trial with dishonorable discharge as penalty.
2. Persons who, after a thorough investigation, are found to be disloyal or subversive without having committed an overt act placing them in group number one could be subject to "discharge other than honorable."
Such investigation, for example could determine that the suspected person is a member of the Communist Party or any of the other groups, totaling about 120, which the Department of Justice has describd as "totalitarian, fascist, communist or subverive."
3. Persons against whom there can be strong and reasonable suspicion, but no positive disloyalty proved. Persons in this group will not be punished and will not suffer discharge. They will, however, be kept under survelliance and out of "sensitive" jobs.'
These levels of discrimination between proven or suspected dis(Continued on Page Four)








Peon~~TH IPlt rn NDITAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672
Saturday, 25 September 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips. USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson------------------ Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman__--Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

NOB SCHOOL BOARD
ENTERTAINS TEACHERS
The Naval Operating Base School Board welcomed the teachers of the School aboard with a reception at the home of Captain and Mrs. John H. Lewis, last. Wednesday evening, 15 September.
Among the guests present were: Rear Admiral and Mrs. William K. Phillips; Captain and Mrs. Arthur L. Pleasants, Jr.; Commander and Mrs. L. P. Kimball; Chaplain and Mrs. Elmer E. Bosserman; Chaplain Carl A. Herold; Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. F. W. Weatherson; Mr. and Mrs. H. P. McNeal and Chief and Mrs. L. Lawrence.
The highlights of the evening were the refreshments served buffet style, under the stars, and were thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. It was a most auspicious beginning for the school year and one which gave the teachers and the school board members an opportunity to meet and know each other which of course makes for cooperation.
Among the other guests, were: Mr. John A. Permenter, Supervising ,Principal; Miss Ester M. Nelson, PhD; Mrs. Lucille Burke; Mrs. Alice Hayes; Mrs. Gladys Machtolff; Mrs. Madelyn Newell; 'Mrs. Nell Walker; Mrs. Carolyn Yates; Miss Sadele Durham; Miss Anita Feinstein; Mrs. Ruth Metzger; Mr. Edward Ondrasik; Miss Ada Schmidt and Mrs. Lela Souders.
We hope their stay here at Guantanamo will be a pleasant one with lots of good memories and new friends.

Barber: "Okay, that's it. Want some tonic on your hair?"
Recruit: "Yeah, squirt it on and sweep it up."


The old bird
with th6 long
S I bill swooped low over the
Base this week
and left five
bundles at the
at the Hospital:
Fitzhugh Lewis
Miller born 17
September t o
. LCDR' and Mrs. F. L. Miller; Carol Jean Anderson born 18 September to BTC and Mrs. Thomas J. Anderson; Marie Elain Scott born 19- September to ADC and Mrs. John P. Scot, Jr.; Charles Olan Kale, III born 21 September to YN2 and Mrs. Charles 0. Kale, Jr.; baby girl Gordon born 21 September to RM2 and Mrs. William Gordon.
The recent rains have put a crimp in the sports program, but the baseball team is squared off and ready to meet all comers when the field is again in condition for play.
The Officers' Bowling Team lost their match on Monday night to the Fleet Training Group 3-1. However, Dr. Ellestad rolled one impressive game of 224 which made everyone feel good, and raised their hopes that perhaps others might begin to click.
"Chuck" Cummins and Leon Duftler, both outstanding athletes, have just about finished their enlistments and will depart for the States and separation from the Service within the next few days. They will be missed, but our best wishes go with them.,

BACHELOR DINNER

Wednesday evening, 29 September at 1700 will see the first full scale "Bachelor Dinner" aboard the Naval Operating Base. Chaplain Herold and Chaplain Bosserman are organizing a home cooked dinner, with all the trimmings for all the non-rated single servicemen (including the U. S. Marine Corps) on the Base.
The dinner will include turkey, ham, roast beef, home cooked vegetables, pastries and dessert. Coke and beer will be served at the tables.
This great event will take place
outside the Naval Operating Base Chapel in the grove area. All ladies interested in bringing food, contact either Mrs. Gallery, 700 or Mrs. Bosserman, 629.
WILMINGTON (AFPS) -For the first time in the history of this State, a woman has been nominated for Governor. She is Mrs. Sarah G. Grance, a retired Philadelphia school teacher, now of New Castle, Del. If elected, Mrs. Grance will become the second woman Governor in I. S. history. The first was "Ma" Ferguson, who succeeded her husband as Governor of Texas.



CHURCH' SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 26 September 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-,Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel
*Confessions before all Msses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse. 1100-Naval Base Chapel. 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal, each Thursday
at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
L (Protestant)
LtCdr' Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)

CHARITY
Charity is love. Christian charity is love of man for his fellow man. Divine. Charity is love of God'for His creation of which man ist the most important part for man is made unto the image and *likeness of God. Man possesses a special dignity. Being a partaker of Divine Charity, man must manifest this love for his fellow man, according to the dignity he possesses.,
The higher man becomes in the eyes of his neighbor, the more authority and power he wields, the more exalted his position, so much more must man exercise love, toleirance and forgiveness. "'Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Not, "do others before they do you." The first holds the acme of clarity, the secnd contains the acme of selfishness, the enemy of charity.
Charity or love is a great power, can be a powerful stick wielded in the hands of the mighty so that all will be drawn by it, reverence its possessor and bless its donor. Lack of charity, the desire to crush W others, subjugate them to personal ambitions repells and makes odious the associations of man with man.
Today the world needs charity or love for God and for fellow man. We Americans must take the lead in exercising that love. Many leaders of nations of the earth are trying to bring to life the charity that exists in the human heart, mskny leaders of nations are trying to destroy the love -that exists among mankind. Wars are not conceived in charity. Wars are generated by greed and lust for power, the desire to crush and destroy.
Our part in distributing charity comes in opening our hearts to those whom we deal with in every day life. Life will be more worth while if we exercise this virtue in a practical manner, bring out the good within ourselves. Others- will certainly have more affection and respect for us.,
Carl A. Herold
Catholic Chaplain


V- n%__


TTTE TNDTAN







THE INDIAN Pare Three


NAS SLIPSTREAM

For - future historians, let it be
recorded the bowling alleys at NAS were 'officially opened, 21 Sept. 1948 at 1800. "Red" Schultz and Lt. (jg).
Hayden, Recreation officer, had the honor of tossing the first balls down the alley to the enthusiastic cries of "Tirmber" from the sidelines. In addition to pins-and balls acquired for the alleys, we understand "Red" on his recent jaunt to Jax picked up additional fishing tackle, baseball gear, model planes, and a few racers. All mighty fine news, say we, and our sincerest thanks 'nd appreciation to the officers and men whose efforts and interest made the bowling alley a
reality.
Welcome Aboard: 'Nelson, C. H.,
BMC, awarded the Army Distinguished Unit Badge with Oak Leaf Cluster. On 8 December 1941. Nelson was serving -in the USS Canopus. After Cavite was bombed out he was sent to Mariveles Bay and later to Corrigidor where he served with the 60th Coast Artillery and the'U. S. Fourth Marines.' Nelson was taken prisoner when Corrigidor fell and sent to Cabantuan. Two months later he was transferred to a prison camp on Palawan where he remained for 21 months, after which he was ,transferred to a prison camp in Japan. He was liberated on 15 August 1945, and returned home 15 September 1945., We also' welcome Lt. S. R. Wideberg, USN, who reported on board as the relief of Lt. J. N. Vinson, OinC, GCA Unit No. 29. Lt. Vinson is expected'to'- be detached some time in November. Another new arrival is Lt. (jg) 'J. C. Raines, USN who reported from NAS, Norfolk, Va. A former test pilot, Lt.
(jg) Raines will be of great 'help.
to this Station.
'Our greetings also to the dependents of Baber, ADI; DeYoung, ADC; Spielman, AKC; and Rushing, AFC. May their stay here be most pleasant and enjoyable.
We extend belated congratulations to' Lt.' (jg) E. J. Carroll, on his recent promotion. This congenial approach' controller of GCA Unit No. 29 and OinC, FltLogSupWingLant at Gtmo. is another officer.
expecting his orders. We'll b3 sorry to see him go but hope he' gets what he desires, Line School, Monterey, California.
The Officers' Bowling Team remains in second place by virtue of taking three straight (4 points)
from VU-10, Tuesday night.
'PACT Benton, Assistant Supply
and Commissary Officer is looking forward to the arrival of his re'lief, CHPCLK M, J. Schaub from 'NAS) Roosevelt Roads. He's been ' with us 36 months and his record
indicates that during his tour of duty in the Navy, 185 months, he has never had duty within the continental limits of the U. S. He


�LE ET Once again the
[ Ishipriders column
appears in the
INDIAN. With
this column we
Welcome some
new faces to fhe 'Training Group.
Leading the list
TRAIN ING are Lt. Cdr. Kendall who will ride
with the Damage Control Department, then comes LCDR Kriloff of ACW. The new officer you see around the Communications Department is Lt. (jg) Perry.Among the late comers, enlisted personnel, we have Kirkpatrick, EMC; Wright, GM2; and Prokolyshen, RM3. We hope you will all enjoy your stay with the Training Croup.
The list of departures recently, included Lt. Cdr. Newton and Lt. Cdr. Clark; Also leaving ui .for'a try at civilian life was "Ack Ack"' Acquaviva, GM2. Another one that will be missed by everyone was none other than the "Guinea" himself. He left for some of that Stateside duty at NAS Pensacola.
It seems the TraGrp bowling team just couldn't get started the other night or was it the alleys! They can always say, "look at the score the other team got" they were way off too. Those TraGrp Chiefs come along andwin a coulpe then lose about six. No percentage there, Chiefs.
The man passing out cigars the other day was none other than "Boom, Boom" Sheridan. How about that shiny crow!
When the Communication Department asked for help they needed two or three men-lastweek they got nine strikers. Just call him "Professor" Moore for awhile.
Suggestions Department-An indoor practice driving range for the gpolf addicts during the damp seasons.

The Armed Forces are seeking to recover approximately $32 million overpaid as family allowances during the war. A "hardship board" will review cases of veterans, in and out of service, on whom repayment would impose a difficult burden.
certainly rates some Stateside duty and we hope he gets it.
Jones, G., SN; and Malin, C. D., SN; are on the waiting list, for assignment to shore duty.
Attracting attention is BMC Deason's new '54 model, 4 h. p. Scooter. It's a scooterman s delight, rigged with colorful streamers and about three buckets of assorted accessories.
Surprised: Nielsen, SN, fishing off the Coast Guard Dock the other night almost found the usual procedure reversed. A three-foot barracuda did its best to land him � but-he got his fish and a picture to prove it.


LCDR. IL B. MILL1R,, USN

(Continued from Page One)
distinguished service while serving on board a destroyer which was sunk in Kula Gulf, British Solomon Islands on the night. of July 4-5, 1943, and during a period of fortythree days thereafter. Lt. Miller assisted in abandon ship operations, during which, with complete disregard for his own safety, he extricated two men who were entangled in: a line on the ship's side. He. remained with his ship until it sank, andi although injured, by exploding depth charges, supported two injured men in the water and placed them in a net. As senior officer of a group in two floater nets and two broken rafts ,he directed attempts to reach friendly shores for four days and finally succeeded in landing on a small islai~a close to enemy positions. Although weakened by his injuries, he continued to direct his party of one officer and four men in attempts to, escape capture by the enemy. When Lieutenant Miller could no longer proceed because of his injuries, he ordered the men to take all remaining equipment and to leave him behind. Thereafter, he lived on cocoanuts and water, and after being strafed and injured by a Japanese plane, succeeded in obtaining two hand grenades Xrom the bodies of dead Japanese with which he completely destroyed a five man enemy patrol which was pursuing him. On, three different nights, Lieutenant Miller attacked Japanese machine gun: parties with grenades he obtained from the enemy's dead. After thirty-nine days on the island he was rescued by friendly aircraft and subsequently furnished our forces with valuable information concerning Japanese positions and units. His gallant and courageous conduct was in keeping with the highest traditions of the 'United States Naval Service."
W. F. -alsey
Admiral, U. S. Navy
Graduate of Alabama
Lt. Cdr. Miller, former University of Alabama football star, attributes the fact that he is alive today to the mercy of God and the training he had in the swamps and woods during his youth. Admiral Halsey, in his book "Admiral Halsey's Story" praises the caiiber of this officer and states that he was responsible for the death of .25 of the enemy during his 43 days on Arundel. This incredible story has been written up in newspapers all over the world, in Life magazine, in True Magazine for Men, .and various Battle Story Comic Books.
Lt. Cdr. Miller reported to duty 20 October 1941 as Aide to the .Commandant, 7th Naval District, who also became ComGulfScaFrontier. On 3 June 1942 he 'received
(Continued on Page Four)


THE INDIAN


Pnee Three







Pag,. Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-25 5ep 48-2500


The heavy rains in the past week have kept the baseball league inactive but hasn't stopped the bowlers so this week I wili report on the Bowling League. The figures are up to but not including the 20th of September.
In the Enlisted Men's league, the NOB Chiefs are leading at the present time but hot competition is being given them by the VU-10 Chiefs and the Naval Air Station.Here are the standings as of the 20th but not including Monday's games:
Won Lost Pts.
NOB Chiefs ---- 18 6 24 VU-10 Chiefs 15 8 22 NAS ------------ 15 9 20
Marines --------- 1 11 18 FltTraGrp - - 13 12 16 FltTraGrp Chiefs 12' 12 15 VU-10 ----------12 12 15
Hospital ---------8 16 11
Naval Station ---- 8 16 11 NAS Chiefs ----- 7 17 9
High game, Nordine, SSGT Marines, 232; high triple game, 592, Pulnik, BMC, NOB Chiefs; high average, 180, Pulnik, BMC, NOB Chiefs.
Individual Averages for Ten
Highest Bowlers
Games Aver.
Lt. W. Keehn 15 i87.1 Mr. J. gerig ----------18 182.7
Lt. R. Haglund -------- 9 173.9
Lt. (jg) L. Bonata 15 173.6 Lt. R. Fowler --------- 11 173.4
Lt. Cdr. F. Weatherson_- 18 172.1. Cdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. 15 171.3 Ens. E. J. Carroll ------- 15 170.0
Mr. C. L. Ziz -------- _ 18 169.3
Ens. T. H. Hybiske --- 11 168.7 Individual high triple games: Mr. J. Serig, Naval Supply Depot, total pinfall, 658.
Individual high single game: Ens. O. Oberg, Utility Squadron 10, total pinfall, 243.
Team Averages
Naval Station -------------- 174.8
Utility Squadron Ten -------- 161.1 Naval Supply Depot -------- 159.5 Naval Air Station ---------- 153.5
Fleet Training Group -------- 149.8 Marines ------------------ 144.0
Naval Hospital ------------- 134.7
McClasham and his wife were doing a little fly hunting about the house.
"How many have you caught?" she asked after. a while.
"Six," replied her husband, three males and three females."
"Please don't be absurd!" says the wife. "How could you tell if they were :male or female?"
"Easy, my dear three were by the sugar and three were on the mirror."
LOST-One Reader and one Arithmetic, Fourth Grade. If found, please return to Red Cross Office
or call Phone 695.


LCDR. H. B. MILLER, USN

(Continued from Page Three)
orders to the USS Strong (DD467) under construction at Bath, Maine. The USS Strong was commissioned 7 August 1942 and after a short shake down in the Atlantic, participated in the initial invasion at Casablanca. After the invasion at' Casablanca, the Strong went to the South Pacific where she was one of the "Striking force" composed of the cruisers Helena; Honolulu, St. Louis and Nashville and the first division of this squadron of 2100ton destroyers built. The famous first division of this squadron was made up of the Nicholas who lived to transport the Japanese surrender party to the Missouri, the O'Bannon, which is, perhaps, the most famous destroyer in Naval history, and the Chevalier' and the Strong which were both sunk in the South Pacific after many engagements and causing heavy toll to the Japs.
The Strong was sunk on 4 July 1943, Lt. Cdr. Miller was behind the Jap lines until the 16th of August 1943, and then, spent many months in South Pacific hospitals.
He was restored to duty 4 January as Gunnery Officer and Head of Training at the AAT&TC, Dam Neck, Va. and the 15th of July 1944, Lt. Cdr. Miller was made Commanding Officer, AATC, Lido Beach, Long Island, New York and remained there until the end of the war.
Lt. Cdr. Miller later worked in the ReserveProgram in setting up reserve units in the Eighth Naval District until he was ordered to Washington, D. C. in March of 1947,' where he was the Assistant Chief of the General Law Division, Office of the JAG. It was here that orders arrived giving him the prize duty of the Navy-NOB, Guantanamo Bay.
We welcome Lt. Cdr. Miller and his family to the Base. Congratulations are in order. Mrs. Miller has just recently given birth to a fine healthy son, Fitzhugh Lewis Miller, which made the other Miller heir, 4-year-old Landon, very happy.
The. Indian reserves the privilege of further elaboration on this amazing story of Lt. Cdr. Miller.

Zeke, just freshly recruited, and from the mountains, walking into the orderly room and seeing an electric fan for the first time, exclaimed, "By golly that's a lively squirrel they g6t in that cage, hain't it?"
Some men are sure they understand women and some are only afraid they do.

Chief: "Where'S Jones today?" Yeoman: "Jones is AWOL." Chief: "Well, when will he be back ?"


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 26 Sep. to Sat. 2 Oct.
Sunday
BLUE SKIES
Bing Crosby Joan Caulfield
Monday
BOOMERANG
Dana Andrews Jane Wyatt
Tuesday
STATE AFFAIR
Dana Andrews Jeanne Crain
Wednesday
THE BEGINNING OF THE END Brian Donlevy Robert Walker
Thursday
THE WISTFUL WIDOW OF
WAGON GAP
Bud Abbot Lou Costello
Friday
SMASH UP
Susan Hayward Lee Bowman
Saturday
SONG OF THE DRIF IER
Jimmy Wakely Dub Taylor

LOYALTY CHECK
(Continued from Page One)
loyalty were proposed.by the Armed Forces Personnel Board "ends" for the separate Forces to seek in their efforts to keep disloyal, elements out. Appropriate action against individuals will be the responsibility of each branch of service it was said.
Unwarranted Queries Bad
Defense officials emphasized that the Personnel Board intends to implement safeguards against possible unwarranted suspicions. Unwarranted suspicions, investiga'tions and survelliance can create a serious morale problem among servicemen of unquestioned loyalty, it is felt. This is definitely not desired, the officials added.
The most effective safeguards, the Board believes-,and from the suspects' point of view, the most protective method of investigation
-is through fingerprinting, pictures and case histories, rather than through the police court system of interrogation.
The Armed Forces Personnel Board consists, of representatives of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Marine Corps. Its chairman is Vice Admiral W, M. Fechteler.

Chief: "What possessed you to choose lemon color for your new gown ?"
Mrs. Chief: "It was because I had such a job squeezing the money for it out of you."
* * *
Many a man never, notices his wife's new dress until the first of the month.


Page Four


THE INDIAN4


Gtmo. Bay--23 Sep 48--2500


1#3


- 1 0 0w




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PAGE 1

la/ Vol. III, No. 34 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 25 September 1948 ADM. PHILLIPS INSPECTS NAVAL HOSPITAL By E. Richards The Naval Hospital Command personnel gathered in front of the Hospital Administration Building at 0845 Saturday, 11 September 1948 and was inspected by Rear Admiral William K. Phillips. Commander Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. With the exception of nineteen men who were detailed to their respective departments, officers and men, all of them dressed in their white uniforms, appeared very impressive. When the order to uncover was given, fresh haircuts were exposed to the Admiral's scrutinizing eyes. The general appearance of all hands brought forth a "very well" oral commendation from the Admiral from time to time. Accompanied by Captain. A. L. Pleasants, Chief of Staff and Captain John H. Robbins, Medical Officer in Command; Admiral Phillips moved up and down the lines of neatly attired officers and men, including the Hospital's Nurses, standing at attention in the warm and crystal-clear morning, and on one or two occasions, he paused to emphasize the importance of military bearing, more so to bolster morale than individual reprimands. The Naval Station Band furnished music throughout this phase of the inspection which lasted for about half an hour. But not until all outside facilities were thoroughly inspected did the "Set the Watch" procedure sound, and all hands could change back into the uniform of the day. BERLIN (AFPS)-United States transport planes flying supplies into this Russian blockaded city, recently established two new records in the airlift operation when they flew in 3,120 tons of supplies on 408 flights. The British brought in 1,716 tons on 286 flights, which gave Berliners a total of 4,836 tons, highest tonnage delivered since "Operation Vittles" began. THE INDIAN SALUTES LCDR. H. B. MILLER USN Every so often we have read of heroic action and unusual experiences of individuals during the past war, but very seldom do we get to meet such a one or be shipmates with him. Lt. Cdr. Hugh Barr Miller, USN Recently Lt. Cdr. Hugh Barr Miller, USN, reported aboard. The staff of the Indian discovered that Lt. Cdr. Miller has had one of the most outstanding adventures of World War II. The Indian quotes the citation of Admiral W. F. Halsey, USN, to Lt. Cdr. Miller when he was awarded the Navy Cross; which was presented by Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt: South Pacific Force of the United States Pacific Fleet Headquarters of the Commander In the name of the President of the United States, the Commander, South Pacific Area and South Pacific Force takes pleasure in awarding the Navy Cross to Lt. Hugh Barr Miller, Jr., USNR for service as set forth in the following: Citation "For extraordinary heroism and (Continued on Page Three) ARMED FORCES PLANS LOYALTY CHECK (AFPS)-A three point proposal at dealing with both suspected and proven cases of subversive or disloyal conduct in the Armed Forces was recently submitted to the Secretaries of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Treasury by the Armed Forces Personnel Board. The plan is now before the secretaries for study and will be returned to the personnel of the Board in the near future, with comment and suggestions. The combined reaction of the two groups will then be submitted to Defense Secretary James V. Forrestal. (The proposal was submitted to the Secretary of the Treasury because he is the titular head of the Coast Guard.) The proposal sets forth three categories of disloyalty or subversion by Armed Forces personnel and recommends correspondingly severe penalties for each. Categories They are in order of severity: 1. Persons who have been found to have committed overt acts of disloyalty against the Service or the Government. This group, if found guilty by the appropriate Service body, will be subject either to court-martial or civil trial with dishonorable discharge as penalty. 2. Persons who, after a thorough investigation, are found to be disloyal or subversive without having committed an overt act placing them in group number one could be subject to "discharge other than honorable." Such investigation, for example could determine that the suspected person is a member of the Communist Party or any of the other groups, totaling about 120, which the Department of Justice has describd as "totalitarian, fascist, communist or subversive." 3. Persons against whom there can be strong and reasonable suspicion, but no positive disloyalty proved. Persons in this group will not be punished and will not suffer discharge. They will, however, be kept under survelliance and out of "sensitive" jobs.' These levels of discrimination between proven or suspected dis(Continued on Page Four)

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P0T0THE NDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 25 September 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson-----------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman_. Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. NOB SCHOOL BOARD ENTERTAINS TEACHERS The Naval Operating Base School Board welcomed the teachers of the School aboard with a reception at the home of Captain and Mrs. John H. Lewis, last Wednesday evening, 15 September. Among the guests present were: Rear Admiral and Mrs. William K. Phillips; Captain and Mrs. Arthur L. Pleasants, Jr.; Commander and Mrs. L. P. Kimball; Chaplain and Mrs. Elmer E. Bosserman; Chaplain Carl A. Herold; Lieutenant Commander and Mrs. F. W. Weatherson; Mr. and Mrs. H. P. McNeal and Chief and Mrs. L. Lawrence. The highlights of the evening were the refreshments served buffet style, under the stars, and were thoroughly enjoyed by everyone. It was a most auspicious beginning for the school year and one which gave the teachers and the school board members an opportunity to meet and know each other which of course makes for cooperation. Among the other guests, were: Mr. John A. Permenter, Snpervising Principal; Miss Ester M. Nelson, PhD; Mrs. Lucille Burke; Mrs. Alice Hayes; Mrs. Gladys Machtolff; Mrs. Madelyn Newell; Mrs. Nell Walker; Mrs. Carolyn Yates; Miss Sadele Durham; Miss Anita Feinstein; Mrs. Ruth Metzger; Mr. Edward Ondrasik; Miss Ada Schmidt and Mrs. Lela Souders. We hope their stay here at Guantanamo will be a pleasant one with lots of good memories and new friends. Barber: "Okay, that's it. Want some tonic on your hair?" Recruit: "Yeah, squirt it on and sweep it up." The old bird with the long bill swooped low over the Base this week and left five bundles at the at the Hospital: Fitzhugh Lewis NOT -S Miller born 17 0OTE S September to LCDR and Mrs. F. L. Miller; Carol Jean Anderson born 18 September to BTC and Mrs. Thomas J. Anderson; Marie Elain Scott born 19. September to ADC and Mrs. John P. Scott, Jr.; Charles Olan Kale, III born 21 September to YN2 and Mrs. Charles 0. Kale, Jr.; baby girl Gordon born 21 September to RM2 and Mrs. William Gordon. The recent rains have put a crimp in the sports program, but the baseball team is squared off and ready to meet all comers when the field is again in condition for play. The Officers' Bowling Team lost their match on Monday night to the Fleet Training Group 3-1. However, Dr. Ellestad rolled one impressive game of 224 which made everyone feel good, and raised their hopes that perhaps others might begin to click. "Chuck" Cummins and Leon Duftler, both outstanding athletes, have just about finished their enlistments and will depart for the States and separation from the Service within the next few days. They will be missed, but our best wishes go with them. BACHELOR DINNER Wednesday evening, 29 September at 1700 will see the first full scale "Bachelor Dinner' aboard the Naval Operating Base. Chaplain Herold and Chaplain Bosserman are organizing a home cooked dinner, with all the trimmings for all the non-rated single servicemen (including the U. S. Marine Corps) on the Base. The dinner will include turkey, ham, roast beef, home cooked vegetables, pastries and dessert. Coke and beer will be served at the tables. This great event will take place outside the Naval Operating Base Chapel in the grove area. All ladies interested in bringing food, contact either Mrs. Gallery, 700 or Mrs. Bosserman, 629. WILMINGTON (AFPS) -For the first time in the history of this State, a woman has been nominated for Governor. She is Mrs. Sarah G. Grance, a retired Philadelphia school teacher, now of New Castle, Del. If elected, Mrs. Grance will become the second woman Governor in U. S. history. The first was "Ma" Ferguson, who succeeded her husband as Governor of Texas. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 26 September 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal, each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHARITY Charity is love. Christian charity is love of man for his fellow man. Divine. Charity is love of God for His creation of which man is the most important part for man is made unto the image and likeness of God. Man possesses a special dignity. Being a partaker of Divine. Charity, man must manifest this love for his fellow man according to the dignity he possesses. The higher man becomes in the eyes of his neighbor, the more authority and power he wields, the more exalted his position, so much more must man exercise love, tolerance and forgiveness. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Not, "do others before they do you." The first holds the acme of clarity, the second contains the acme of selfishness the enemy of charity. Charity or love is a great power, can be a powerful stick wielded in the hands of the mighty so that all will be drawn by it, reverence its possessor and bless its donor. Lack of charity, the desire to crush others, subjugate them to personal ambitions repells and makes odious the associations of man with man. Today the world needs charity or love for God and for fellow man. We Americans must take the lead in exercising that love. Many leaders of nations of the earth are trying to bring to life the charity that exists in the human heart, many leaders of nations are trying to destroy the love that exists among mankind. Wars are not conceived in charity. Wars are generated by greed and lust for power, the desire to crush and destroy. Our part in distributing charity comes in opening our hearts to those whom we deal with in every day life. Life will be more worth while if we exercise this virtue in a practical manner, bring out the good within ourselves. Others will certainly have more affection and respect for us. Carl A. Herold Catholic Chaplain Pa e T o THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Pare Three NAS SLIPSTREAM For future historians, let it be recorded the bowling alleys at NAS were officially opened, 21 Sept. 1948 at 1800. "Red" Schultz and Lt. (jg) Hayden, Recreation Officer, had the honor of tossing the first balls down the alley to the enthusiastic cries of "Timber" from the sidelines. In addition to pins and balls acquired for the alleys, we understand "Red" on his recent jaunt to Jax picked up additional fishing tackle, baseball gear, model planes, and a few racers. All mighty fine news, say we, and our sincerest thanks and appreciation to the officers and men whose efforts and interest made the bowling alley a reality. Welcome Aboard: Nelson, C. H., BMC, awarded the Army Distin* guished Unit Badge with Oak Leaf Cluster. On 8 December 1941. Nelson was serving in the USS Canopus. After Cavite was bombed out he was sent to Mariveles Bay and later to Corrigidor where he served with the 60th Coast Artillery and the U. S. Fourth Marines. Nelson was taken prisoner when Corrigidor fell and sent to Cabantuan. Two months later he was transferred to a prison camp on Palawan where he. remained for 21 months, after which he was transferred to a prison camp in Japan. He was liberated on 15 August 1945, and returned home 15 September 1945. We also welcome Lt. S. R. Wideberg, USN, who reported on board as the relief of Lt. J. N. Vinson, OinC, GCA Unit No. 29. Lt. Vinson is expected to be detached some time in November. Another new arrival is Lt. (jg) J. C. Raines, USN who reported from NAS, Norfolk, Va. A former test pilot, Lt. (jg) Raines will be of great help to this Station. Our greetings also to the dependents of Baber, AD1; DeYoung, ADC; Spielman, AKC; and Rushing, AFC. May their stay here be most pleasant and enjoyable. We extend belated congratulations to Lt. (jg) E. J. Carroll, on his recent promotion. This congenial approach controller of GCA Unit No. 29 and OinC, F1tLogSupWingLant at Gtmo. is another officer expecting his orders. We'll be sorry to see him go but hope he, gets what he desires, Line School, Monterey, California. The Officers' Bowling Team remains in second place by virtue of taking three straight (4 points) from VU-10, Tuesday night. PACT Benton, Assistant Supply and Commissary Officer is looking forward to the arrival of his relief, CHPCLK M. J. Schaub from NAS, Roosevelt Roads. He's been with us 36 months and his record indicates that during his tour of duty. in the Navy, 185 months, he has never had duty within the continental limits of the U. S. He rLE ET Once again the shipriders column appears in the INDIAN. With this column we welcome some new faces to the Training Group. Leading the list TRAIN ING are Lt. Cdr. Kendall who will ride with the Damage Control Department, then comes LCDR Kriloff of ACW. The new officer you see around the Communications Department is Lt. (jg) Perry. Among the late comers, enlisted personnel, we have Kirkpatrick, EMC; Wright, GM2; and Prokolyshen, RM3. We hope you will all enjoy your stay with the Training Croup. The list of departures recently, included Lt. Cdr. Newton and Lt. Cdr. Clark. Also leaving us for a try at civilian life was "Ack Ack" Acquaviva, GM2. Another one that will be missed by everyone was none other than the "Guinea" himself. He left for some of that Stateside duty at NAS Pensacola. It seems the TraGrp bowling team just couldn't get started the other night or was it the alleys! They can always say, "look at the score the other team got" they were way off too. Those TraGrp Chiefs come along and win a coulpe then lose about six. No percentage there, Chiefs. The man passing out cigars the other day was none other than "Boom, Boom" Sheridan. How about that shiny crow! When the Communication Department asked for help they needed two or three men-last week they got nine strikers. Just call him "Professor" Moore for awhile. Suggestions Department-An indoor practice driving range for the golf addicts during the damp seasons. The Armed Forces are seeking to recover approximately $32 million overpaid as family allowances during the war. A "hardship board" will review cases of veterans, in and out of service, on whom repayment would impose a difficult burden. certainly rates some Stateside duty and we hope he gets it. Jones, G., SN; and Malin, C. D., SN; are on the waiting list for assignment to shore duty. Attracting attention is BMC Deason's new '54 model, 4 h. p. Scooter. It's a scooterman's delight, rigged with colorful streamers and about three buckets of assorted accessories. .Surprised: Nielsen, SN, fishing off the Coast Guard Dock the other night almost found the usual procedure reversed. A three-foot barracuda did its best to land him but-he got his fish and a picture to prove it. LCDR. H. B. MILLER,, USN (Continued from Page One) distinguished service while serving on board a destroyer which was sunk in Kula Gulf, British Solomon Islands on the night of July 4-5, 1943, and during a period of fortythree days thereafter. Lt. Miller assisted in abandon ship operations, during which, with complete disregard for his own safety, he extricated two men who were entangled in a line on the ship's side. He remained with his ship until it sank, and although injured by exploding depth charges, supported two injured men in the water and placed. them in a net. As senior officer of a group in two floater nets and two broken rafts ,he directed attempts to reach friendly shores for four days and finally succeeded in landing on a small islara close to enemy positions. Although weakened by his injuries, he continued to direct his party of one officer and four men in attempts to escape capture by the enemy. When Lieu'tenant Miller could no longer proceed because of his injuries, he ordered the men to take all remaining equipment and to leave him behind. Thereafter, he lived on cocoanuts and water, and after being strafed and injured by a Japanese plane, succeeded in obtaining two hand grenades from the bodies of dead Japanese with which he completely destroyed a five man enemy patrol which was pursuing him. On three different nights, Lieutenant Miller attacked Japanese machine gun parties with grenades he obtained from the enemy's dead. After thirty-nine days on the island he was rescued by friendly aircraft and subsequently furnished our forces with valuable information concerning Japanese positions and units. His gallant and courageous conduct was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service." W. F. Halsey Admiral, U. S. Navy Graduate of Alabama Lt. Cdr. Miller, former University of Alabama football star, attributes the fact that he is alive today to the mercy of God and the training he had in the swamps and woods during his youth. Admiral Halsey, in his book "Admiral Halsey's Story" praises the caliber of this officer and states that he was responsible for the death of 25 of the enemy during his 43 days on Arundel. This incredible story has been written up in newspapers all over the world, in Life magazine, in True Magazine for Men, and various Battle Story Comic Books. Lt. Cdr. Miller reported to duty 20 October 1941 as Aide to the Commandant, 7th Naval District, who also became ComGulfScaFrontier. On 3 June 1942 he received (Continued on Page Four) THE INDIAN Pate Three

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Pag~. Four THE INDIA 14 Gtmo. Bay-28 Sep 48-2500 The heavy rains in the past week have kept the baseball league inactive but hasn't stopped the bowlers so this week I will report on the Bowling League. The figures are up to but not including the 20th of September. In the Enlisted Men's league, the NOB Chiefs are leading at the present time but hot competition is being given them by the VU-10 Chiefs and the Naval Air Station. Here are the standings as of the 20th but not including Monday's games: Won Lost Pts. NOB Chiefs -18 6 24 VU-10 Chiefs 15 8 22 NAS -----------15 9 20 Marines --------13 11 18 F1tTraGrp ------13 12 16 F1tTraGrp Chiefs 12' 12 15 VU-10 ---------12 12 15 Hospital -------8 16 11 Naval Station 8 16 11 NAS Chiefs ------7 17 9 High game, Nordine, SSGT Marines, 232; high triple game, 592, Pulnik, BMC, NOB Chiefs; high average, 180, Pulnik, BMC, NOB Chiefs. Individual Averages for Ten Highest Bowlers Games Aver. Lt. W. Keehn ---------15 187.1 Mr. J. Serig ---------18 182.7 Lt. R. Haglund -------9 173.9 Lt. (jg) L. Bonatta .-15 173.6 Lt. R. Fowler ---------11 173.4 Lt. Cdr. F. Weatherson. 18 172.1 Cdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. 15 171.3 Ens. E. J. Carroll ------15 170.0 Mr. C. L. Ziz-------18 169.3 Ens. T. H. Hybiske11 168.7 Individual high triple games: Mr. J. Serig, Naval Supply Depot, total pinfall, 658. Individual high single game: Ens. 0. Oberg, Utility Squadron 10, total pinfall, 243. Team Averages Naval Station ------------174.8 Utility Squadron Ten------161.1 Naval Supply Depot -------159.5 Naval Air Station ---------153.5 Fleet Training Group -------149.8 Marines -----------------144.0 Naval Hospital ------------134.7 McClasham and his wife were doing a little fly hunting about the house. "How many have you caught?" she asked after a while. "Six," replied her husband, three males and three females." "Please don't be absurd!" says the wife. "How could you tell if they were male or female?" "Easy, my dear, three were by the sugar and three were on the mirror." LOST-One Reader and one Arithmetic, Fourth Grade. If found, please return to Red Cross Office or call Phone 695. LCDR. H. B. MILLER, USN (Continued from Page Three) orders to the USS Strong (DD467) under construction at Bath, Maine. The USS Strong was commissioned 7 August 1942 and after a short shake down in the Atlantic, participated in the initial invasion at Casablanca. After the invasion at Casablanca, the Strong went to the South Pacific where she was one of the "striking force" composed of the cruisers Helena, Honolulu, St. Louis and Nashville and the first division of this squadron of 2100ton destroyers built. The famous first division of this squadron was made up of the Nicholas who lived to transport the Japanese surrender party to the Missouri, the O'Bannon, which is, perhaps, the most famous destroyer in Naval history, and the Chevalier and the Strong which were both sunk in the South Pacific after many engagements and causing heavy toll to the Japs. The Strong was sunk on 4 July 1943, Lt. Cdr. Miller was behind the Jap lines until the 16th of August 1943, and then spent many months in South Pacific hospitals. He was restored to duty 4 January as Gunnery Officer and Head of Training at the AAT&'L, Dam Neck, Va. and the 15th of July 1944, Lt. Cdr. Miller was made Commanding Officer, AATC, Lido Beach, Long Island, New York and remained there until the end of the war. Lt. Cdr. Miller later worked in the Reserve. Program in setting up reserve units in the Eighth Naval District until he was ordered to Washington, D. C. in March of 1947, where he was the Assistant Chief of the General Law Division, Office of the JAG. It was hei e that orders arrived giving him the prize duty of the Navy-NOB, Guantanamo Bay. We welcome Lt. Cdr. Miller and his family to the Base. Congratulations are in order. Mrs. Miller has just recently given birth to a fine healthy son, Fitzhugh Lewis Miller, which made the other Miller heir, 4-year-old Landon, very happy. The Indian reserves the privilege of further elaboration on this amazing story of Lt. Cdr. Miller. Zeke, just freshly recruited, and from the mountains, walking into the orderly room and seeing an electric fan for the first time, exclaimed, "By golly that's a lively squirrel they got in that cage, hain't it?" Some men are sure they understand women and some are only afraid they do. Chief: "Where's Jones today?" Yeoman: "Jones is AWOL." Chief: "Well, when will he be back?" NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 26 Sep. to Sat. 2 Oct. Sunday BLUE SKIES Bing Crosby Joan Caulfield Monday BOOMERANG Dana Andrews Jane Wyatt Tuesday STATE AFFAIR Dana Andrews Jeanne Crain Wednesday THE BEGINNING OF THE END Brian Donlevy Robert Walker Thursday THE WISTFUL WIDOW OF WAGON GAP Bud Abbot Lou Costello Friday SMASH UP Susan Hayward Lee Bowman Saturday SONG OF THE DRIFTER Jimmy Wakely Dub Taylor LOYALTY CHECK (Continued from Page One) loyalty were proposed by the Armed Forces Personnel Board "ends" for the separate Forces to seek in their efforts to keep disloyal. elements out. Appropriate action against individuals will be the responsibility of each branch of service it was said. Unwarranted Queries Bad Defense officials emphasized that the Personnel Board intends to implement safeguards against possible unwarranted suspicions. Unwarranted suspicions, investigations and survelliance can create a serious morale problem among servicemen of unquestioned loyalty, it is felt. This is definitely not desired, the officials added. The most effective safeguards, the Board believes-and from the suspects' point of view, the most protective method of investigation -is through fingerprinting, pictures and case histories, rather than through the police court system of interrogation. The Armed Forces Personnel Board consists of representatives of the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Marine Corps. Its chairman is Vice Admiral W. M. Fechteler. Chief: "What possessed you to choose lemon color for your new gown?" Mrs. Chief: "It was because I had such a job squeezing the money for it out of you." Many a man never notices his wife's new dress until the first of the month. ff 16#4 Page Four THE INDIA14 Gtmo. Bay-23 Sep 48-2500


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