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Vol. III, No. 32 U. S.

BASE HOUSING CENSUS HAS BEEN COMPLETED

For the last couple of mouths, all of the dependents on the Base have been solicited with census forms and the housing phone has kept Welsh, the housing yeoman, busy receiving calls from cooperative donors of information. As a result, we have wound up with an accurate up to the minute census of dependents residing here.
We have the sum total of 601 family living units in our thriving community, with 1,329 women and children residing -here. The Base as a whold averages 1.216 children per family, but the Hospital informs us that the stork has been working overtime and may boost this average.
For all of you prospective occupants, Public Works has set a schedule for the completion of 30 more family'units by the first of the year.
The days of a waiting list of close to 300 hopefuls has gone, forever, we hope. Now we only have a few awaiting assignment in Newtown, and even less awaiting Bargo Point Housing.
There will be no. "Sad Sacks" among the new Army recruits, it was recently announced.
Listing the 41 items of personal clothing and ten pieces of equipment to be issued by the Quartermaster Corps, the Department of the Army said the new soldier would be "better clothed, better :outfitted, and will present a snappier appearance than his prototype of 1940 and 1941.

Norfolk, Va.-This little seaport town recently was the "objective" of a full-scale invasion.Climaxing the "Camid" war games, 147,000 ship tons of an amphibious force of the United States Navy's Atlhntic Fleet, aided by the Army, Air Force and Mariles, staged a landing in full war dress.
Navy Selection Boards to choose regular Navy' officers above the rank of ensign for promotion to the next higher grade, will convene this fall.


Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 September 1948


BASE WELCOMES
COMMANDER DAVIS

One of the key positions of the Naval Operating Base is that of the Base Public Works *Officer who is Commander Lewis M. Davis, CEC, USN.


Cdr. Lewis M. Davis, CEC, USN He attended New York University (College of Engineering) and is a Naval Academy Graduate of the Class of 1933. His first duties in the Naval Service were aboard the former Fleet Flagship, USS Pennsylvania, from 1933 to 1935 and on the destroyer, USS Wickes, from 1935 to 1936 as a line officer. In 1936 he was promoted to the rank of LTJG and transferred to CEC, attended the Rensselaer Poly Institute, Troy, New York, for the naval post graduate course in Civil Engineering. He obtained the degrees of Bachelor of Civil Engineering and Master of Civil Engineering. In July of 1939, he was ordered to the Navy Yard, Charleston, S. C., as Maintenance, Power, and Transportation Superintendent and in 1940 was promoted to the rank of lieutenant.
September 1941 was ordered to the Tenth Naval District Head(Continued on Page Four)


HISTORICAL PLAQUES
MAY BE DISPLAYED

(SEA)-Navy vessels are encouraged to display plaques detailing the historical records of the vessel as an added factor to morale building.
Pertinent data which may be listed on the plaques, should include the name of the ship, year of commissioning or acquisition of the first vessel to bear the name of the vessel, date the present vessel was commissioned, how many other vessels carried the name, battles and single-ship engagements with dates the ship, or her predecessors, took part, and, if applicable, the year the Presidential Unit Citation or Navy Citation was awarded the ship.
Specifications as to size, weight, material and location of the plaques will be issued by BuShips. Historical information must be cleared by the Chief of Public Relations (Navy History Division) to insure complete accuracy. The Navy History Division will also provide all available information concerning the vessel if such data is requested.
The plaques may be procured With ship's recreation funds, by popular subscription, or by ship's company subscription.

WORLD'S RECORD IS
EQUALLED BY MARINE

(SEA)-The existing world's record of�237 out of a possible 250 in Browning automatic rifle firing was equalled by Marine Corporal Henderson Barkley, III.
Barkley tied the world record set on Guam in 1945 by Pvt. Bill Ratliff, also of the Marine Corps.
From a prone position, Barklky tied at 200, 300 and 500 yards in both slow and rapid fire. The firing was part of the course of instruction given at Platoon Leaders' Class at the Marine Corps School, Quantico, Va.
The 19-year-old corporal, a resident of New Orleans, La.,, is a student at Tulane University from which he was selected for 6fficer training in the Marine Corps Reserve. He served in the Marines in 1946 and 1947.







Psure Two TEIDA


Editorial Office, NOB Library--Phone 672
Saturday, 11 September 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson -------------------- Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ---- Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN. is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

IN MEMORIAM

Word has only been recently received of the death of John J. Collins, who was for many years employed as telephone supervisor at this Base.
Although "Jack" has been called to his final resting place, he will long be remembered by his many friends here at Gtmo., -especially the boys from 0.. P. No. 8, and everybody joins in extending their belated but heartfelt condolences and expressing their deepest sympathies to his family.
We at this Base who knew him so well; believe that our deep feeling can best be expressed by quoting here a motto which was the guiding factor in Jack's life: "To live that when you die The poor, the sick, the friendless, Will mourn the passing of A friend."
To Jack then, we all shall say, "Adios y Hasta luego" (Go with God and 'til we meet).



SPECIAL NOTICE
The Nursery School or
lower Kindergarten (ages' 3,
years, 8 months to 4 years,
7 months, ineltisive) will not i open on 11 September. Due to the large enrollment and housing facilities, the unit of I
the Kindergarten will not open until further notice, probably within one or two weeks. Tuition rates will be adjusted accordingly.


A baby girl and
baby boy are
L the latest arrivals
at the Hospital.
Ellen Louise Goetz born Monday 6 September to CWO George
= and Mrs. Goetz;
. Thomas FalkenEi back born. Tuesday 7 � September to EMC Elmer and Mrs. Falkenback.
In a pre-season baseball game played Monday night against the USS Leyte, the Hospital team was defeated by a score of 9-3. We don't consider this an indication of what the regular season will bring, as we have some good material and with more practice feel sure that the Hospital team will be something to be reckoned with.
Mr. J. C. Johnson, civilian accountant in the Finance Dept. has returned from Dallas, Texas where he represented Guantanamo at the Annual, Convention of the Fleet Reserve Association. Texas is much too hot for Mr. Johnson and he's very glad to be back in dear old Gtmo.
Lt. P. H. Vonfraenkel, MC, USN, reported aboard this week to relieve Cdr. J. A. Fields. Cdr. Fields and family depart tomorrow on the USS Hayes for postgraduate training at USNH, Philadelphia.
Paresi, HMC and Zdziarski, HMC reported aboard for duty. Welcome aboard to all the new comers
-we hope you will enjoy your new duty.
The Enlisted Men's Bowling Team is holding it's own and the Officer's team is still in there, but this writer has been unable to pin anybody down as to just where they are.

SIX MILLION USO BUDGET
FOR 1949 APPROVED

The National Budget Committee, sponsored by the Community Chest, Councils of America and the National Social Welfare Assembly, recently announced the approval of a national budget of $6,650,000 for the United Service Organization.
The money will be used for USO operations during .1949. A national campaign goal 'of $4,650,000 also was approved. Assets of $2,000,000 are available from liquidation of the war-time USO.
USO funds are being used in 105 enterprises for members of the Armed Forces and the organizations also finance the Veteran's Canip Shows, Inc.

Captain at mast: "I want your explanation and I want the truth."
Sailor: "I'll gladly answer, sir. But can't you please make up your mind?"


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 12 September 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100--Naval Base Chapel' 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)


C HV I-A S COM4ER.
Christ Jesus the Son of God sows the seed of faith in our souls and hearts through His Holy Church. But the fruit of planting is .not always reaped as told in His parable: "The sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some seed fell by the wayside and was trodden under foot, and the birds of the air ate it up. And other seed fell upon the rock and as soon as it had sprung up it withered away, because it had no moisture. And other seed fell among thorns, and the thorns sprang up with it and choked it. And other seed fell upon good ground, and sprang up and yielded fruit a hundredfold." As He said these things He cried out, "He who has ears to hear let him hear!" . . . "Now the parable is this: the seed is the word of God. And those by the wayside are they who have heard; then the devil comes and takes away the word from their heart, that they may not believe and be saved. Now those upon the rock are they who, when they have heard, receive 'the word with joy; and these have no root, but believe for a while, and in time of temptation fall away. And that which fell among the thorns, these are they who have heard, and as they go their way are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life and their fruit does not ripen. But that upon good' ground, these are they who, with a fight and good heart, having heard the work, hold it fast, and bear fruit in patience."
C. A. HEROLD
Catholic Chaplain
Don't Smoke when you are passing through the Magazine Areas.


S


Pa 'e Two


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN Page Three


ORDNANCE STUFF
T By Alston Jones
Ten new seamen were assigned to the Ordnance Department on Friday, 27 August; and the sigh of relief could almost be felt. The men of the Sixth Division welcomed the new additions with open arms, for of course, some of the work load will fall on other shoulders. Somewhere along the line there will be fewer watches for everybody and a couple more hands to join with the hearts.
The new admissions to the happy and busy family are: G. D. Tillet; E. Veesemeyer; S. W. Markowitz; L. G. Stiles; F. R. Trim; J. R. Kirby; T. K. Webb; M. E. Thomas; S. Teator and W. R. Thompson. Welcome boys, and hope your stay here will be a pleasant and happy one. Don't worry too much about the heat, you'll have the rains to worry you, it's only about a month away,
. The civilian employees of the Ordnance Department have viewed with interest, the erection of the lighting system on the baseball diamond. Now that it is completed they are all wondering if civilians will be included in the league. Most of the more ardent baseball "addicts" and are keeping their fingers crossed, awaiting the start of the season.
One hears of all kinds, classes and "pedigrees" of competitions these days. As a fact, life is just one competitive factor after th9 other, tennis championships, baseball championships, ping pong championship, and a string so long it would take a mile of paper to list. But that's beside the point.
The competition that is worth while mentioning (which I should have done instead of beating around the bush) is the one that exists between Sr. Steele, our Ammunition Stock. Clerk, Sr. Knight, our able electrician and Sr. Horn, SN, USN. It's a question of pipes.
If you walked in the Ordnance Office looking for Sr. Steele, you need not ask. anybody for him. There's a fine collection of pipes on his desk; to be exact there is one for each hour of the day, well can't you take a hint? Messrs. Knight and Horn are trying to catch up with him and are doing a pretty good job, but Sr. Steele just always. keeps ahead. They don't know that he has a reserve stock.
J. Sentelik, YN3, USN, the Sixth Division Yeoman, went on weekend liberty to Santiago de Cuba on Friday, 3 September. He flew down commercial from Guantanamo, apparently to save as much time as possible. He says, that he had a wonderful time sightseeing and visiting and that the only thing that was wrong with the trip, was that the time was much too short.


INSIDE INFORMATION REGARDING OFFENSES

All offenses committed by persons belonging to the Navy which are not specified in the foregoing articles shall be punished as a court martial may direct.
Fraudulent enlistment and the receipt of any pay or allowance thereunder is hereby declared an offense against naval discipline and made punishable by a general court martial under this article. All offenses committed by persons belonging to the Navy while on shore shall be punished in the same manner as if they had been committed at sea.
No commander of a vessel shall inflict upon a commissioned or warrant officer any other punishment than private reprimand, suspension from duty, arrest, or confinement, and such suspension from duty, arrest, or confinement, shall not continue longer than 10 days unless a further period is necessary to bring the offender to trial by a court martial; nor shallhe inflict or cause to be inflicted upon any petty officer or person of inferior rating, or marine, for a single offense, or at any one time, any other than one of the following punishments, namely:
1. Reduction of any rating established by himself.
2. Confinement not exceeding 10 days, unless further confinement be necessary in the case of a prisoner to be tried by a court martial.
3. Solitary confinement, bread and water, not exceeding five days.
4. Solitary confinement not to exceed seven days.
5. Deprivation of liberty on shore.
6. Extra duty.
7. No other punishment shall be permitted aboard a vessel be-' longing to the Navy, except by sentence of a court martial. All punishment- inflicted by the commander, shall be fully entered upon the ship's log.
Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps who are authorized to order either general or summary court martials shall have the same authority to inflict minor punishments as is conferred by law upon the commander of a Naval vessel.
No officer who may command -by accident, or in the absence of the commanding officer, except when such commanding officer is absent for a time of leave shall inflict any other punishment, than confinement.
(Taken from the Articles for the Government of the Navy.)

"How did you get your husband to quit staying so late at the CPO Club ?"
"When he came in late, I called out, 'Is that you, Jack'?" "How did that stop him?"
"His name is Bill."


AUTHORITY FINDS
BAY OVERCROWDED

By R. E. McCullough
R. K. Gibson, BM1 of the Coast Guard Station,, the jolly fellow who scoots about fixing buoys, light,houses, etc., has reported one of the strangest battles ever fought over the occupancy of any residence. To steal a pun from Jack London, "it was a battle of tooth and fin." It would seem that some several weeks ago, a grown ray fish, very attractive in a ray's way, was wending its merry way round and round the Coast Guard dock, perhaps seeking the company of another ray. We shall never know, for just then a shark, violating every basic O.P.A. regulation, attempted to take possession of our ray's bay. Now we like rays although some people do call them Devil Fish and then disappear just to prove their argument that a manta ray will eat a man. Not for my money, it's like the story of what Noah said to the Whale. "If you had kept your big mouth shut, this wouldn't have happened."
But, on with the story. It seems that a giant hammerhead shark, so called for the construction of his head and for his intelligence, decided to encroach upon the part of the bay that our ray had chosen to be his very own. Not taking that from any finny ninny, our friend the ray objected and for over tep minutes, it was, dive, zoom, bank, turn, strike, and everything but an atomic attack. The watchers were spellbound by this battle of the giants. Both fishes are equipped with a ramming mechanism and a razor edge set of dentures. It was a battle of B-29 weight against the superior speed and maneuverability of the P-16. Twenty years ago the slugger ray would have 'won, that being the tactic of the day, but now with our age of speed, the favor naturally went to the shark. Spectators said the finish was cruel and bloody. The shark tore the' ray to pieces in a cold fury once the advantage had been won. In their world, its kill or be killed.
As I retire to my snug little cove in Newtown, I recall with some disdain the days when I too fought for chow at the churning mess line and for a bunk near a breath of air. Now and then, too, a drop of blood was shed when some line jumper made me see red. Please excuse the poetic license, I just bought a Hatuey for ten and five cents.
OOD: "What do you do when you hear the fire alarm ?"
QH: "Feel the bulkhead and-if it ain't hot I go back to sleep."
The Old Salt says: "A woman's idea of thrift is saving enough on one purchase to buy something else she doesn't' need."


THE INDIAN


Page Three







Pare Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-9 Sep 48-2500


0. P. No. 8

What is 0. P. No. 8? That is a question that very often is heard around here. Well, here's the answer. 0. P. No. 8 is the Bachelor Civilian Quarters located on Ordhance Point, and can be seen from' the road that goes by the Seaplane Ramp to the Air Station. It has been mistaken for the Air Station Ship's Service many a time, because of the sign just below where it is, that points to the building with the words "Ship's Service, Naval Air Station."
At 0. P. No. 8, most of the American civilian supervisors are domiciled. Speaking with some of the residents, the other day, I found out the Base functioning is more or less concentrated there, having supervisors of almost every department residing there, including electricians, plumbers, automotive repairs, telephones, etc. Conversations on off duty hours should be interesting to hear, with each person giving ancedotes of his day's work. Mr. Sheppard and Mr. Moore, both supervisors at the Electrical Department, when asked about their duty here, remarked: "It's wonderful and we hope to stay here for. quite a long time."
Congratulations to the men at 0. P. No. S for their contribution to the upkeep of the Base.


Pop's got his feet in the sand, not his head, because he's a payroll saver. He knows where his future vacations are coming from. There's no guesswork about his plans for security. Automatically every pay day, part of his pay goes into United States Savings Bonds which will pay him $4 for each $3 in ten short years. Security-future plans-will belong to other fellows like pop unless you count yourself in with United States Savings Bonds. So see Lieutenant Leidle, Bay Hill Barracks Four or see the' Disbursing Office, NOB Administration Building.


BITS FROM SHIPS REPAIR

With its thirty pieces of yard and district craft, over forty miscellaneous small boats, many fleet units, privately-owned ships flying British, Cuban and other foreign flags, plus an influx of ships repair work from San Juan- the Ships Repair Department of the Naval Station is maintaining its reputation as a veritable beehive of activity.
Two weeks ago, a large Navy tug, the YTB-328, arrived from San Juan for a major overhaul of both hull and machinery. Because the Ships Repair Department is the only major repair activity in the district, the Ships Repair Officer was requested to visit Roosevelt Roads for the purpose of planning and estimating the repair of various pieces of district craft at that activity. It is expected that, in the near future, drydocking and major overhauls of many Tenth Naval District craft will be scheduled along with those craft assigned to Guantanamo.
Not only are the Repair facilities here limited to direct Ship repair, since, hundreds of requests pour in from every Base department and command requesting assistance on everything from major mechanical repairs to equipment down to typewriter repairs and the manufacture of small parts for sewing machines. A list of the work turned out by the twenty shops which make up the Repair Department would be staggering to behold. The Machine Shop and related shops boast that they "can make anything," and to date this claim has not been disproven. Correspondingly, the Hull Division, in addition to performing the finest Shipwright work obtainable, recently undertook the complete renovation of the Commissary Store, while the Shipfitters, Welders, Pipefitters, etc., continue to turn out pallet racks, plant account tags, and hundreds of items for. Base-wide. use, when not engaged in their primary duty of repairing ships.
In the past few weeks some thirty enlisted men have reported for duty in Ships Repair. To these men we extend a hearty welcome, and hope thdir tour of duty here will be a happy one.
Accident reports promulgated by district headquarters disclose that accidents are on the increase. Ships Repair, With its many potential danger spots, has had its share of minor injuries. For this reason, a safety campaign is now underway throughout the department in an attempt to make all employees safety-conscious and through careful instruction of, supervisors, to eliminate accidents.

Health Hints-To avoid. that rundown feeling-be careful crossing streets.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 12 Sept. to Sat. 18 Sept.
Sunday
DEAR RUTH
Joan Caulfield Edward Arnold
Monday
WHISPERING CITY
Helmut Dantine Mary Anderson
Tuesday
TO THE VICTOR
Dennis Morgan Viveca Lindfors
Wednesday
WESTERN HERITAGE
Tim Holt Nan Leslie
Thursday
THE INSIDE STORY
Marsha Hunt Charles Winniger
Friday
CASBAH
Ivonne DeCarlo Tony Martin
Saturday
WYOMING
William Elliot Vera Ralston

COMMANDER DAVIS.
(Continued from Page One)
quarters as the Principal Assisant District Public Works Officer and Public Works Officer of the San Juan activities. In 1942 was promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander. In January of 1944 was promoted to the rank of commander and ordered to NCTC, Camp Peary, Va., as Officer in Charge of Officer Training and also held the same position at NCTC, Davisville, Rhode Island.
Late in 1944 was ordered to the Advanced Base Depot, Gu]fport, Miss., as Officer in Charge and in October of 1944, ordered toi the Army and Navy Staff College for a course of instruction. On graduation in June 1945, was ordered to the Staff of OinCPac and OinCPOA as Executive to the Construction Officer and in January of 1946 ordered to Special Board duty with the Army-Navy Staff College. In June of 1946 reported as Assistant Director of Administration and Personnel, Bureau Yards and Docks, where he received his orders as Base Public Works Officer here at Guantanamo.
The Commander's wife, the former Miss Rane A. White of Washington, D. C., and son Richard, 11 years old, daughter Priscilla, 9, now reside at Quarters 1107, Deer Point.
The Naval Operating Base wishes
the Commander and his family a superb duty here at Guantanamo.

Mother: "Well, what do you say to the nice lady who just gave you that big sweet orange?"
Tpps Junior: "Peel it."


Pare Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay--9 Sep 48-2500




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PAGE 1

ian Vol. III, No. 32 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 11 September 1948 BASE HOUSING' CENSUS HAS BEEN COMPLETED For the last couple of months, all of the dependents on the Base have been solicited with census forms and the housing phone has kept Welsh, the housing yeoman, busy receiving calls from cooperative donors of information. As a result, we have wound up with an accurate up to the minute census of dependents residing here. We have the sum total of 601 family living units in our thriving community, with 1,329 women and children residing here. The Base as a whold averages 1.216 children per family, but the Hospital informs us that the stork has been working overtime and may boost this average. For all of you prospective occupants, Public Works has set a schedule for the completion of 30 more family units by the first of the year. The days of a waiting list of close to 300 hopefuls has gone, forever, we hope. Now we only have a few awaiting assignment in Newtown, and even less awaiting Bargo Point Housing. There will be no "Sad Sacks" among the new Army recruits, it was recently announced. Listing the 41 items of personal clothing and ten pieces of equipment to be issued by the Quartermaster Corps, the Department of the Army said the new soldier would be "better clothed, better outfitted, and will present a snappier appearance than his prototype of 1940 and 1941. Norfolk, Va.-This little seaport town recently was the "objective" of a full-scale invasion. Climaxing the "Camid" war games, 147,000 ship tons of an amphibious force of the United States Navy's Atlhutic Fleet, aided by the Army, Air Force and Marines, staged a landing in full war dress. Navy Selection Boards to choose regular Navy officers above the rank of ensign for promotion to the next higher grade, will convene this fall. BASE WELCOMES COMMANDER DAVIS One of the key positions of the Naval Operating Base. is that of the Base Public Works Officer who is Commander Lewis M. Davis, CEC, USN. Cdr. Lewis M. Davis, CEC, USN He attended New York University (College of Engineering) and is a Naval Academy Graduate of the Class of 1933. His first duties in the Naval Service were aboard the former Fleet Flagship, USS Pennsylvania, from 1933 to 1935 and on the destroyer, USS Wickes, from 1935 to 1936 as a line officer. In 1936 he was promoted to the rank of LTJG and transferred to CEC, attended the Rensselaer Poly Institute, Troy, New York, for the naval post graduate course in Civil Engineering. He obtained the degrees of Bachelor of Civil Engineering and Master of Civil Engineering. In July of 1939, he was ordered to the Navy Yard, Charleston, S. C., as Maintenance, Power, and Transportation Superintendent and in 1940 was promoted to the rank of lieutenant. September 1941 was ordered to the Tenth Naval District Head(Continued on Page Four) HISTORICAL PLAQUES MAY BE DISPLAYED (SEA)-Navy vessels are encouraged to display plaques detailing the historical records of the vessel as an added factor to morale building. Pertinent data which may be listed on the plaques, should include the name of the ship, year of commissioning or acquisition of the first vessel to bear the name of the vessel, date the present vessel was commissioned, how many other vessels carried the name, battles and single-ship engagements with dates the ship, or her predecessors, took part, and, if applicable, the year the Presidential Unit Citation or Navy Citation was awarded the ship. Specifications as to size, weight, material and location of the plaques will be issued by BuShips. Historical information must be cleared by the Chief of Public Relations (Navy History Division) to insure complete accuracy. The Navy History Division will also provide all available information concerning the vessel if such data is requested. The plaques may be procured with ship's recreation funds, by popular subscription, or by ship's company subscription. WORLD'S RECORD IS EQUALLED BY MARINE (SEA)-The existing world's record of 237 out of a possible 250 in Browning automatic rifle firing was equalled by Marine Corporal Henderson Barkley, III. Barkley tied the world record set on Guam in 1945 by Pvt. Bill Ratliff, also of the Marine Corps. From a prone position, Barkley tied at 200, 300 and 500 yards in both slow and rapid fire. The firing was part of the course of instruction given at Platoon Leaders' Class at the Marine Corps School, Quantico, Va. The 19-year-old corporal, a resident of New Orleans, La., is a student at Tulane University from which he was selected for officer training in the Marine Corps Reserve. He served in the Marines in 1946 and 1947.

PAGE 2

Pake Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 11 September 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson-----------------.Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman_-_Staff Advisor THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. IN MEMORIAM Word has only been recently received of the death of John J. Collins, who was for many years employed as telephone supervisor at this Base. Although "Jack" has been called to his final resting place, he will long be remembered by his many friends here at Gtmo., especially the boys from 0. P. No. 8, and everybody joins in extending their belated but heartfelt condolences and expressing their deepest sympathies to his family. We at this Base who knew him so well; believe that our deep feeling can best be expressed by quoting here a motto which was the guiding factor in Jack's life: "To live that when you die The poor, the sick, the friendless, Will mourn the passing of A friend." To Jack then, we all shall say, "Adios y Hasta luego" (Go with God and 'til we meet). A baby girl and SP) a baby boy are Li'the latest arrivals at the Hospital. Ellen Louise Goetz born Monday 6 September to CWO George 'and Mrs. Goetz; -Thomas FalkenT TE back born Tuesday 7 September to EMC Elmer and Mrs. Falkenback. In a pre-season baseball game played Monday night against the USS Leyte, the Hospital team was defeated by a score of 9-3. We don't consider this an indication of what the regular season will bring, as we have some good material and with more practice feel sure that the Hospital team will be something to be reckoned with. Mr. J. C. Johnson, civilian accountant in the Finance Dept. has returned from Dallas, Texas where he represented Guantanamo at the Annual Convention of the Fleet Reserve Association. Texas is much too hot for Mr. Johnson and he's very glad to be back in dear old Gtmo. Lt. P. H. Vonfraenkel, MC, USN, reported aboard this week to relieve Cdr. J. A. Fields. Cdr. Fields and family depart tomorrow on the USS Hayes for post graduate training at USNH, Philadelphia. Paresi, HMC and Zdziarski, HMC reported aboard for duty. Welcome aboard to all the new comers -we hope you will enjoy your new duty. The Enlisted Men's Bowling Team is holding it's own and the Officer's team is still in there, but this writer has been unable to pin anybody down as to just where they are. SIX MILLION USO BUDGET FOR 1949 APPROVED The National Budget Committee, sponsored by the Community Chest, Councils of America and the National Social Welfare Assembly, recently announced the approval of a national budget of $6,650,000 for the United Service Organization. The money will be used for USO operations during 1949. A national campaign goal of $4,650,000 also was approved. Assets of $2,000,000 are available from liquidation of the war-time USO. USO funds are being used in 105 enterprises for members of the Armed Forces and the organizations also finance the Veteran's Camp Shows, Inc. Captain at mast: "I want your explanation and I want the truth." Sailor: "I'll gladly answer, sir. But can't you please make up your mind?" CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 12 September 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. .Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPLAINS CORNER Christ Jesus the Son of God sows the seed of faith in our souls and hearts through His Holy Church. But the fruit of planting is not always reaped as told in His parable: "The sower went out to sow his seed. And as he sowed, some seed fell by the wayside and was trodden under foot, and the birds of the air ate it up. And other seed fell upon the rock and as soon as it had sprung up it withered away, because it had no moisture. And other seed fell among thorns, and the thorns sprang up with it and choked it. And other seed fell upon good ground, and sprang up and yielded fruit a hundredfold." As He said these things He cried out, "He who has ears to hear let him hear!" ..."Now the parable is this: the seed is the word of God. And those by the wayside are they who have heard; then the devil comes and takes away the word from their heart, that they may not believe and be saved. Now those upon the rock are they who, when they have heard, receive the word with joy; and these have no root, but believe for a while, and in time of temptation fall away. And that which fell among the thorns, these are they who have heard, and as they go their way are choked by the cares and riches and pleasures of life and their fruit does not ripen. But that upon good ground, these are they who, with a 1ight and good heart, having heard the work, hold it fast, and bear fruit in patience." C. A. HEROLD Catholic Chaplain Don't Smoke when you are passing through the Magazine Areas. SPECIAL NOTICE The Nursery School or lower Kindergarten (ages 3 years, 8 months to 4 years, 7 months, incisive) will not open on 1$ September. Due to the large enrollment and housing facilities, the unit of the Kindergarten will not open until further notice, probably within one or two weeks. Tuition rates will be adjusted accordingly. I ,-.uaa-uu-nn-un-un-w-nn-an-un-ua. Page Two THE INDIAN I I

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THE INDIAN Page Three ORDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones Ten new seamen were assigned to the Ordnance Department on Friday, 27 August, and the sigh of relief could almost be felt. The men of the Sixth Division welcomed the new additions with open arms, for of course, some of the work load will fall on other shoulders. Somewhere along the line there will be fewer watches for everybody and a couple more hands to join with the hearts. The new admissions to the happy and busy family are: G. D. Tillet; E. Veesemeyer; S. W. Markowitz; L. G. Stiles; F. R. Trim; J. R. Kirby; T. K. Webb; M. E. Thomas; S. Teator and W. R. Thompson. Welcome boys, and hope your stay here will be a pleasant and happy one. Don't worry too much about the heat, you'll have the rains to worry you, it's only about a month away. The civilian employees of the Ordnance Department have viewed with interest, the erection of the lighting system on the baseball diamond. Now that it is completed they are all wondering if civilians will be included in the league. Most of the more ardent baseball "addicts" and are keeping their fingers crossed, awaiting the start of the season. One hears of all kinds, classes and "pedigrees" of competitions these days. As a fact, life is just one competitive factor after the other, tennis championships, baseball championships, ping pong championship, and a string so long it would take a mile of paper to list. But that's beside the point. The competition that is worth while mentioning (which I should have done instead of beating around the bush) is the one that exists between Sr. Steele, our Ammunition Stock Clerk, Sr. Knight, our able electrician and Sr. Horn, SN, USN. It's a question of pipes. If you walked in the Ordnance Office looking for Sr. Steele, you need not ask anybody for him. There's a fine collection of pipes on his desk, to be exact there is one for each hour of the day, well can't you take a hint? Messrs. Knight and Horn are trying to catch up with him and are doing a pretty good job, but Sr. Steele just always keeps ahead. They don't know that he has a reserve stock. J. Sentelik, YN3, USN, the Sixth Division Yeoman, went on weekend liberty to Santiago de Cuba on Friday, 3 September. He flew down commercial from Guantanamo, apparently to save as much time as possible. He says that he had a wonderful time sightseeing and visiting and that the only thing that was wrong with the trip, was that the time was much too short. INSIDE INFORMATION REGARDING OFFENSES All offenses committed by persons belonging to the Navy which are not specified in the foregoing articles shall be punished as a court martial may direct. Fraudulent enlistment and the receipt of any pay or allowance thereunder is hereby declared an offense against naval discipline and made punishable by a general court martial under this article. All offenses committed by persons belonging to the Navy while on shore shall be punished in the same manner as if they had been committed at sea. No commander of a vessel shall inflict upon a commissioned or warrant officer any other punishment than private reprimand, suspension from duty, arrest, or confinement, and such suspension from duty, arrest, or confinement, shall not continue longer than 10 days unless a further period is necessary to bring the offender to trial by a court martial; nor shall he inflict or cause to be inflicted upon any petty officer or person of inferior rating, or marine, for a single offense, or at any one time, any other than one of the following punishments, namely: 1. Reduction of any rating established by himself. 2. Confinement not exceeding 10 days, unless further confinement be necessary in the case of a prisoner to be tried by a court martial. 3. Solitary confinement, bread and water, not exceeding five days. 4. Solitary confinement not to exceed seven days. 5. Deprivation of liberty on shore. 6. Extra duty. 7. No other punishment shall be permitted aboard a vessel belonging to the Navy, except by sentence of a court martial. All punishment inflicted by the commander, shall be fully entered upon the ship's log. Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps who are authorized to order either general or summary court martials shall have the same authority to inflict minor punishments as is conferred by law upon the commander of a Naval vessel. No officer who may command -by accident, or in the absence of the commanding officer, except when such commanding officer is absent for a time of leave shall inflict any other punishment, than confinement. (Taken from the Articles for the Government of the Navy.) "How did you get your husband to quit staying so late at the CPO Club?" "When he came in late, I called out, 'Is that you, Jack'?" "How did that stop him?" "His name is Bill." AUTHORITY FINDS BAY OVERCROWDED By R. E. McCullough R. K. Gibson, BM1 of the Coast Guard Station, the jolly fellow who scoots about fixing buoys, lighthouses, etc., has reported one of the strangest battles ever fought over the occupancy of any residence. To steal a pun from Jack London, "it was a battle of tooth and fin." It would seem that some several weeks ago, a grown ray fish, very attractive in a ray's way, was wending its merry way round and round the Coast Guard dock, perhaps seeking the company of another ray. We shall never know, for just then a shark, violating every basic O.P.A. regulation, attempted to take possession of our ray's bay. Now we like rays although some people do call them Devil Fish and then disappear just to prove their argument that a manta ray will eat a man. Not for my money, it's like the story of what Noah said to the Whale. "If you had kept your big mouth shut, this wouldn't have happened." But, on with the story. It seems that a giant hammerhead shark, so called for the construction of his head and for his intelligence, decided to encroach upon the part of the bay that our ray had chosen to be his very own. Not taking that from any finny ninny, our friend the ray objected and for over ten minutes, it was, dive, zoom, bank, turn, strike, and everything but an atomic attack. The watchers were spellbound by this battle of the giants. Both fishes are equipped with a ramming mechanism and a razor edge set of dentures. It was a battle of B-29 weight against the superior speed and maneuverability of the P-16. Twenty years ago the slugger ray would have won, that being the tactic of the day, but now with our age of speed, the favor naturally went to the shark. Spectators said the finish was cruel and bloody. The shark tore the ray to pieces in a cold fury once the advantage had been won. In their world, its kill or be killed. As I retire to my snug little cove in Newtown, I recall with some disdain the days when I too fought for chow at the churning mess line and for a bunk near a breath of air. Now and then, too, a drop of blood was shed when some line jumper made me see red. Please excuse the poetic license, I just bought a Hatuey for ten and five cents. OOD: "What do you do when you hear the fire alarm?" QH: "Feel the bulkhead and if it ain't hot I go back to sleep." The Old Salt says: "A woman's idea of thrift is saving enough on one purchase to buy something else she doesn't need." THE INDIAN Page Three

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Pa~o Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-9 Sep 45-2500 0. P. No. 8 What is 0. P. No. 8? That is a question that very often is heard around here. Well, here's the answer. 0. P. No. 8 is the Bachelor Civilian Quarters located on Ordnance Point, and can be seen from the road that goes by the Seaplane Ramp to the Air Station. It has been mistaken for the Air Station Ship's Service many a time, because of the sign just below where it is, that points to the building with the words "Ship's Service, Naval Air Station." At 0. P. No. 8, most of the American civilian supervisors are domiciled. Speaking with some of the residents, the other day, I found out the Base functioning is more or less concentrated there, having supervisors of almost every department residing there, including electricians, plumbers, automotive repairs, telephones, etc. Conversations on off duty hours should be interesting to hear, with each person giving ancedotes of his day's work. Mr. Sheppard and Mr. Moore, both supervisors at the Electrical Department, when asked about their duty here, remarked: "It's wonderful and we hope to stay here for quite a long time." Congratulations to the men at 0. P. No. 8 for their contribution to the upkeep of the Base. Pop's got his feet in the sand, not his head, because he's a payroll saver. He knows where his future vacations are coming from. There's no guesswork about his plans for security. Automatically every pay day, part of his pay goes into United States Savings Bonds which will pay him $4 for each $3 in ten short years. Security-future plans-will belong to other fellows like pop unless you count yourself in with United States Savings Bonds. So see Lieutenant Leidle, Bay Hill Barracks Four or see the Disbursing Office, NOB Administration Building. BITS FROM SHIPS REPAIR With its thirty pieces of yard and district craft, over forty miscellaneous small boats, many fleet units, privately-owned ships flying British, Cuban and other foreign flags, plus an influx of ships repair work from San Juan -the Ships Repair Department of the Naval Station is maintaining its reputation as a veritable beehive of activity. Two weeks ago, a large Navy tug, the YTB-328, arrived from San Juan for a major overhaul of both hull and machinery. Because the Ships Repair Department is the only major repair activity in the district, the Ships Repair Officer was requested to visit Roosevelt Roads for the purpose of planning and estimating the repair of various pieces of district craft at that activity. It is expected that, in the near future, drydocking and major overhauls of many Tenth Naval District craft will be scheduled along with those craft assigned to Guantanamo. Not only are the Repair facilities here limited to direct Ship repair, since, hundreds of requests pour in from every Base department and command requesting assistance on everything from major mechanical repairs to equipment down to typewriter repairs and the manufacture of small parts for sewing machines. A list of the work turned out by the twenty shops which make up the Repair Department would be staggering to behold. The Machine Shop and related shops boast that they "can make anything," and to date this claim has not been disproven. Correspondingly, the Hull Division, in addition to performing the finest Shipwright work obtainable, recently undertook the complete renovation of the Commissary Store, while the Shipfitters, Welders, Pipefitters, etc., continue to turn out pallet racks, plant account tags, and hundreds of items for Base-wide. use, when not engaged in their primary duty of repairing ships. In the past few weeks some thirty enlisted men have reported for duty in Ships Repair. To these men we extend a hearty welcome, and hope thdir tour of duty here will be a happy one. Accident reports promulgated by district headquarters disclose that accidents are on the increase. Ships Repair, with its many potential danger spots, has had its share of minor injuries. For this reason, a safety campaign is now underway throughout the department in an attempt to make all employees safety-conscious and through careful instruction of supervisors, to eliminate accidents. Health Hints-To avoid that rundown feeling-be careful crossing streets. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 12 Sept. to Sat. 18 Sept. Sunday DEAR RUTH Joan Caulfield Edward Arnold Monday WHISPERING CITY Helmut Dantine Mary Anderson Tuesday TO THE VICTOR Dennis Morgan Viveca Lindfors Wednesday WESTERN HERITAGE Tim Holt Nan Leslie Thursday THE INSIDE STORY Marsha Hunt Charles Winniger Friday CASBAH Ivonne DeCarlo Tony Martin Saturday WYOMING William Elliot Vera Ralston COMMANDER DAVIS (Continued from Page One) quarters as the Principal Assistant District Public Works Officer and Public Works Officer of the San Juan activities. In 1942 was promoted to the rank of lieutenant commander. In January of 1944 was promoted to the rank of commander and ordered to NCTC, Camp Peary, Va., as Officer in Charge of Officer Training and also held the same position at NCTC, Davisville, Rhode Island. Late in 1944 was ordered to the Advanced Base Depot, Gulfport, Miss., as Officer in Charge and in October of 1944, ordered to the Army and Navy Staff College for a course of instruction. On graduation in June 1945, was ordered to the Staff of OinCPac and OinCPOA as Executive to the Construction Officer and in January of 1946 ordered to Special Board duty with the Army-Navy Staff College. In June of 1946 reported as Assistant Director of Administration and Personnel, Bureau Yards and Docks, where he received his orders as Base Public Works Officer here at Guantanamo. The Commander's wife, the former Miss Rane A. White of Washington, D. C., and son Richard, 11 years old, daughter Priscilla, 9, now reside at Quarters 1107, Deer Point. The Naval Operating Base wishes the Commander and his family a superb duty here at Guantanamo. Mother: "Well, what do you say to the nice lady who just gave you that big sweet orange?" Tops Junior: "Peel it." Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-9 Sep 48-2500 4*., IV