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Indian
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w
Vol. III, No. '30 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamio Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 August 1948


PAY GRADE 1A EXAMS TO
BE HELD 1 DECEMBER
(SEA)-Navy-wide competitive
examinations for advancement to pay grade 1A in all general service ratings will be conducted on 1 December.
Nominations of all men eligible
and recommended to take the examinations must reach the convening authority not later than 10 September, as directed by BuPers Circ. Ltr. 129-48 (NDB, 15 July
1948).
Examinations will be based on
qualifications outlined in BuPers "Manual of Qualifications for Advancement in Rating" (NavPers 180668) as changed by printed modifications to agree with the final approved current rating structure, as explained in BuPers Circ. Ltr.
106-48 (NDB, 15 June 1948).
Eligibility standards for advancement to pay grade 1A are contained in BuPers. Circ. Ltr. 191-46 (corrected) (AS&SL July-December 1946). Personnel who meet the requirements as of 1 December 1948, and those who normally may be expected to become eligible by 1 June
1949.
O MORE HOUSING UNITS
TO BE READY ON BARGO
Twenty-two new housing units
on Bargo Point should be ready by
1 September.
This will reduce the present housing list by one-third.
To our readers who have just reported aboard, Bargo Point is the latest housing project on the Base.
Bargo Point has come A long way since 9 January. Through the cooperation of the tenants and a lot of hard work, Bargo is becoming one of the beauty spots on the
Naval Operating Base.
There are some 146 housing units
on Bargo, including the 22 new
units.
The first daily newspaper in the
United States was printed in Penn' : sylvania, Sept. 21, 1784. There will
be good news right on through the years for all those wise sailors who have made an allotment of part of their pay lo purchase Savings Bonds each month.


NOB WELCOMES ABOARD
NEW MARINE C. 0.

Colonel John Ralph (Pat) Lanigan, USMC, the new Commanding Officer of Marine Site, was one of the outstanding Marine heroes in the Pacific War.
Holder of the Navy Cross for meritorious service on Iwo Jima, decorated with the Legion of Merit, and wearer of the Purple Heart for


a wound received against the enemy on Saipan.
Served with 4th Division
The Colonel's other medals include the China Service Ribbon, Nicaraguan Ribbon, Asiatic Pacfiic Ribbon, American Defense, and Presidential Unit (4th Division) Citation Ribbon with Star.
Born 16 April, 1902 in Washington, D. C., the Colonel attended the local schools. Upon graduation from the University of Maryland in 1926, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps, and since has continously served with the Marines.
In 1928, he was sent to Nicaragua. This was the beginning of many tours of foreign and off-shore duty for the Colonel.
Aboard the USS California from 1930 to 1932, Colonel Lanigan saw
(Continued on Page Four)


YP-629 CHANGES
DESIGNATOR TO YFR-1152

By Louis Kitchen, YN2, USN
The USS YP-629 is no more. She now bears the designator USS YFR-1152, and bears it well.
Around the Commissary Store, the word is--"Wonder when the 'Yipee' is returning?" Everyone knows her primary duty is supplying fresh and frozen foods for the Commissary Store here and at the U. S. Army Air Base, Vernam Field, Kingston, Jamaica.
The USS YP-629, 128-foot refrigerator cargo vessel, is one of thirty such ships completed by West Coast shipyards early in 1945 to meet increasing Navy demands for the handling of fresh and frozen provisions at advanced Pacific bases. This type of ship represents an effort toward greater efficiency and economy in the delivery of chilled and frozen products to Navy ships and shore -facilities, and followed the lead established by the tuna clippers which had been drafted for service during the early part of the war.
She was built at Seattle, Washington, and on the day of her commissioning, March 12, 1945, showed evidence of the highest degree of craftsmanship that proud Northwest workman could give, as well as an almost perfect outfitting record by the Naval Supply Depot.
After her shakedown cruise, she headed south for duty with Commander, Service Force, SEVENTH Fleet. She worked out of Leyte, Borneo, and later Samar, Philippine Islands.
In May, 1946, she returned to San Pedro, California, for decommissioning and was 95 per cent decommissioned when orders were received to place her in full commission and assignment to the Commandant, TENTH Naval District, for duty.
She has fulfilled her mission at this Base, to the present day, to a high degree of efficiency, keeping us well stocked in foods which are vitally needed.
The USS YRF-1152 is at present commanded by ChBosn H. C. Newell, a well known officer around this Base, and carries a crew of approximately fifteen men.







Page Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library- Phone 672
Saturday 28 August 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN,
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson ----------------- . Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman ... Staff Advisor Sgt. Stull J. E. Sasser, DK3 Louis Kitchen, YN2 R. E. McCullough G. B. Vaughn, RD3 E. B. Shelton, AF3
R. E. Welsh, YN2
THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise.

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Commodore Charlton E. Battle, USN (Ret.) and Mrs. Battle, announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Sylvia Battle, to Richard P. Brown, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Brown of Philadelphia, Pa.
Miss Battle is a graduate of the Mary C. Wheeler School in Providence, Rhode Island and attended Holmby Junior College in Bel Air, California, and the University of California, where she was a member "of the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority.
Mr. Brown graduated from the William Penn Charter School and Princeton University, class of 1942, and is a member of the Class of 1948 at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He served in World War II as a Lieutenant in the Naval Reserve.
DRY DOCK CHATTER
These last few weeks have brought about many changes down here on the Dry Dock. The main one is more men. You can't count the deck force on one hand any more. Both wings are getting the "New Look" with Coach and Ski supervising. O'Neil has about thirty-three days left down here to do. What are you going to do, Coach? Nick Nack should be leaving next week. Pardon me, Nick Nack, I mean Mister Nick Nack.
Port Side, S.A.C. has a new member. Total is now four. The Starboard Side had a baseball meeting last Saturday afternoon. The results are: Wood, guesses that he has enough for a baseball team now.


The baby girls
have just about
Been forgotten in
the Stork Race but during the past week they have made themselves known.
Three of them arrived. Bonnie Lee Homer, born 21 August to SOl Thomas and Mrs. Homer; Teresa Lavane Cornett born 22 August to ICC William and Mrs. Cornett; Ceryl Venczel born 24 August to CPR John and Mrs. Venctel.
Both the officers and enlisted men from the Hospital have teams in the bowling leagues, but from what this reporter can learn neither of them are setting any new records (at least not high ones). However, since things are just getting under way we can hope for better scores in the future.
Captain Robbins is in the States for several days on TAD.

TALENT WANTED

What about a Little Theatre in Gtmo. ? The Recreation Office thinks the time has come for some light comedy or heavy tragedy to strike at the hearts of the winter residents of the Base. They have some willing and interested workers but they will need a lot more if they're going to get the thing going.
First of all ... is there a Director in the house? And stage hands, carpenters, painters and all ye with a yen "to tread the boards" are wanted. Experience is not necessary. After all, a Little Theatre is for amateurs.
Some good ideas are cooking. "Three Men on a Horse" has been suggested or they might even tackle "Mr. Roberts." All that is needed is a response from you people on the Base and this includes you, you and you and your wife, sister and talking dog!
A meeting is being planned for the first week in September to organize the details, and if you would like to come, please call Lt. Keehn at 778 and leave your name and phone number.

113 MEN ARRIVE ON
THE ALBEMARLE

One hundred and thirteen men stepped ashore off the USS Albemarle (AV-5) for duty.
Inactive Floating Drydock receives 7 men; Fleet Boat Pool, 6
-men; AFDL-47, 15 men; U. S. Naval Hospital, 10 men, and the, Naval Station, 75 men.
For the majority of these men, this is their first duty in the Navy.
Welcome aboard men, we know you'll have a fine tour of duty here at Gtmo.


-


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 29 August 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses
Protestant Services
0930-Sunday' School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)






CHAPLAINtS CORNER
E. E. Bosserman, Chaplain Naval Operating Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Dear Chaplain
I thought you might be interested to know my daughter and I are safely back home again. We left the Base August 9th and were at home in Dearborn, Michigan, August 12th. "
I want you to know and those with whom I had the pleasure to associate what a wonderful summer I had with you fine people. It was a vacation I never want to forget.
I will always be glad I attended church every Sunday while I was there, the services were beautiful.
You people back there with so few worries surely must be grateful. Here, so close to a great *industrial city, there is restlessness, turmoil and worry continually it seems. Food and clothing prices are very high; every one needs or wants a new car and can't afford it; others need a home and can't afford the exhorbitant prices, yet there are no places to rent. Some children I khow have met with accidents this summer, others have been striken with rheumatic fever or polio. This involves great expense and hardship for the parents. Several of the factories have not worked steady this summer. That has caused more worry and suffering for many families. Winter will be here soon and with it will come the need for warm clothing and expensive fuel.
I think you people are very lucky to be *here you are. I would like very much to be back there with you..
Respectfully yours,
Lila E. Briggs


S


Pare Two


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN Pt he


CHIME YUND AT .$1786.00

* Last February 2., !948jA te. first
offering for the Chapel Chime Fund was taken at the 1100 church service,. Since that time, offerings and contributions have rolled in so that today we have $1,786.00. The cost
of the chimes is $3200.00.
Last week a church bulletin was
found in the Chapel with a twenty dollar bill enclosed. On the bulletin were these words: "For the Chimes,
may they help other to find Him."
Sunday morning, Sergeant Speck,
who is in charge of the Marine Brig, brought in a twenty dollar contribution from the Marine
Guard at the Brig.
The very fine spirit behind these
gifts cannot be praised too highly.
To all concerned, we hope to have the Chimes- installed for the Christmas .Season.
Am The home going details are
still front page
news at the Marine Barracksespecially to the
short timers.
Last week saw
the departure of
Sgt. Clifford L.
Metzger and
PFC Howard W. -Graus, while MSgt. "Red" Ludington,, Motor Transport Chief, is bemoaning, the impending transfer of five of his truck driving, "sweethearts"; Setgeants James 0. Esterline and Thomas F. Maiburger, and Corporals Louis F. Parmentier, Francis T. McAlpine and Charles W. Lisa.
Congratulations to SSgt. Richard
T. Martin, Post Communications Chief, who joined the ranks of the
third pay grade last Wednesday.
Our two Post Bowling Teams are
bracketing their respective leagues, with the Enlisted.team in first place and the Officer's' squad holding up
the opposite end.
The big All-Post 'dance scheduled
for tonight promises-to'be a gala affair. Committees from the NCO Club and the Privates' Club have cooperated to provide everything necessary- for, a pleasant evening.
lstLt. L. M. Patterson is keeping
things hot on the Post Small Bore Range, getting all hands rounded into top form for re-qualification
firing next month.
MSgt. L. P. Stroud, impressario
of the Post Mess Hall, is seriously considering changing his Classification Specialty to Life Guard Chief. Sgt. Stroud can be located most any afternoon at the Post Pool .picking up the mysteries of the merman are under the tutelage
of, Swimming Instructor Fallon.
Labor Day promises to be a "Little Olympiad" with a touch football.
* game, softball game and swimming meet already on the agenda. Full details will be :forthcoming next
week.


ELECTRONICS NEWS
By "Irish"
"The day' is coming,"' we are constantly informed, "when 'every minor chore will be accomplished by electronics . ; . simply by pushing a button, the grass may he mowed, the dishes dried, 'even the dog walked." Yea, man! Doing. his bit to hasten that day is our boy, Jack Niebell. Jack has a device that will make the entire engineering and scientific world sit up and take notice. It's called the "Smoker's Delight." Thoughtful Jack, who doesn't smoke himself, was troubled by the thought of weary motorists struggling to light a cigarette while driving. With this device, you just push a button and a lighted cigarette' is shot into your mouth. Of course, there are a few "bugs" to be ironed out, (at present, the cigarette flies into your mouth . . . lighted end first) but with the aid and financial backing of the Kansas City banker, Bob "Yeoman" Welsh, Jack hopes to be able to market it soon. Along with this gadget, Jack- is working on a Bass - Boost -for-bass -happy-people. His pet peeve is the person that thinks he has a fine radio just because it has a lot of bass tone. He's a regular "poor man's Edison."
Fishing is a great sport . ... Pm a fan myself. But pity the poor individuals that have to live -with an eccentric fisherman. I refer to a rather odious incident that drove many people 'away from the neighborhood of the Shop this weekend. "Shorty" and "Willie" made themselves a spear gun and went out to the, beach to see if they could find one of my 'famous abolones. Instead, they returned With a small octupus. The.question now is, who told them to lay the' thing out on a board to dry? (Reward) That is why the Electronics 'Shop at NOB, Gtmo. smells like the East Side fish market on bargain'day.
We understand that "cold solder
joint" Herrington has been making disparaging remarks about the men here in this shop over his radio show. Of course, we can't prove that accusation, as none of us ever listen to Herrington's programs... even if we could pick up WGBY on our dial.
Surprising, yet pleasing is the increase of traffic by the fair' sex through our Shop -lately. . . morale is soaring! Just the other day while sweating over a Navy radio,- a sweet, soft voice spoke from behind my shoulder and asked plaintively, if I wouldn't please take a look. 'at her radio. I turned to find a pert, little 'blonde holding in her hand what had been a radio. Yeh, men, I "took a look at it" . . . I draw my pay on pay day, too!
-Two psychoanalysts met on the street. Said one to the other, "You feel fine today. How do I feel ?"


QRDNANCE STUFF
By Alston Jones
The Ordnance Department wishes to welcome aboard Lt. T. J. Laubacher, USN, who reported 'on the Base in July 1948,. and was assigned the duties of Ordnance Officer.
Lt. Laubacher relieves Lt. R. F. St. John, USN, who has completed his tour of duty down here and. is expected to leave soon. Mrs. T. .J. Laubacher joined her husband on 3 August, 1948,. arriving aboard the Pres. Hayes. They now reside at Quarters 624A on Radio Point.
Best wishes for a pleasant tour of duty here.
"The Naval Magazine trucks are all over the place" was 'a remark that was overheard a few days ago. Frankly speaking, that is the truth; these trucks 'and the personnel of the Ordnance Department are literally all over the place. The Department is a very busy place these days and it is not just make believe.
Up until a few weeks ago, Operation "Mothball" was- in full swing, keeping everybody, civilians, enlisted personnel and'offieersv alike on the go for a full. eight' hour day, each day. Then- came -ammunition handling, which involves more than one would ordinarily think, receiving, transporting, stowing, re-gtowing, headaches, etc., and the tropical sun adds its share of blisters and sunburn.
The Ordnance Repair Facilities are being re-organized to aid the 'Ships -Repair -Department ,and Training Group in the repair and overhaul of Fire "Control Equip, ment, Power Drives, etc., aboard ships undergoing training in this area. The complement of qualified personnel for such work is not yet up to par, but it is expected that in the near future this condition will be remedied.
E. R. Cary, SN, USN, left for State-side last Sunday, 15 August on a much longed for leave. Best wishes for a fine time is extended by the Ordnance Department.
F. Stewart, GMC, USN is hospitalized since the 1st week of thYs month with a 'broken ankle. The Ordnance Department extends it� sympathy and best wishes for a speedy recovery.
"So now you and your son are carrying on the business together?"
"Not exactly. I run the business and my son does the carrying on."
Brown has a lovely baby girl,
The stork left her witha flutter; Brown named her Oleomargine,
For he hadn't any but her.
Mrs: "How 4o you suppose those dozens and dozens of empty bottles got in the cellar?"
Mr.: "I'm, sure I don't' know, I never bought an empty bottle in my life."


THE INDIAN


Pawe Three







Pag~ Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-26 Aug 48-2600


By Bud Johnson
Of interest to softball fans is the result of the Atlantic Fleet Softball Finals which were completed 23 August. In a game to choose the Atlantic Fleet's representative to the inter-group tournament, PhibLant defeated SubLant by the convincing score of 8-3. The PhibLant team journeyed to Norfolk for the inter-group finals which started 24 August.
On the local sports stage, the spotlight falls on the Bowling League which began its schedule recently. The ten-team league has had a fine turn out for the scheduled games and all Commands are cheering for their respective representatives to come out on top. After a glance at the fine trophies which will be awarded for high single, high triple, high average and high team, I can see that there is plenty of incentive to roll up a big score.
In the quest for the trophies, Nordine of the Marines with a 232 has high single game and Pulnik, BMC of the NOB team is leading both in high triple total with 580 and high average with 183. No doubt these marks will fall when the bowlers get their eyes on that head pin, but the leaders will be improving their games too. It's just another case where all we can say is, "May the best man win."

DON'T TAKE SAFETY FOR
GRANTED
Most workers have the idea that Safety slows production. On the contrary, it speeds up your work. If you have the proper guards on your machines, or if you are wearing the proper clothing, you don't have to stop or slow down to see whether you are going to be caught in a moving machine.
Attitude: Your attitude toward safety means a lot. Safety is not to be laughed at, because it is something that protects you. If you take the right attitude toward safety, then your fellow workers will also.
First Aid: Our Medical Department plays an important part in Safety, here on NOB. You are cautioned to report all injuries, no matter how small, to the Dispensaries or the Naval Hospital.
Effort: If you make only a small effort to work safely, you'll have accomplished something. It only takes a small amount of effort to get in the habit of obeying Safety Rules and doing your job the safe way.
You: You are the determining factor in whether Safety in your area is a success or a failure. The final responsibility rests on your shoulders.


COLONEL LANIGAN
(Continued from Page One)
service in 'both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet.
The Colonel was stationed in China in 1935 when the Japanese invaded China; He was with the Fourth Marines at Shanghai, while there he was promoted to Captain.
After returning to the States, in 1937, the Colonel was assigned to duty with the 2nd Battalion, Fifth Marines at Quantico, with them he participated in the Puerto Rican maneuvers of 1938.
Instructor at Basic School
Upon graduation from Marine Corps School, Quantico, in 1939, he was assigned duty as instructor on the staff of the Marine Corps Basic School at Philadelphia.
In 1941 the Colonel was promoted to .the rank of major.
In August 1942, he was ordered to New River, North Carolina, as commander of the, 3rd Battalion, 23rd Marines (reinforced). On the 17th of August he was elevated to lieutenant colonel. The 23rd Marines were the back-bone of the famous 4th Division.
Appointed executive officer of the 23rd Regiment on December 2, 1943, the Colonel fought at Roi Namur in the Marshalls, and 'at Saipan and Tinian..
Although wounded at Saipan, Colonel Lanigan was able to make the following operation on neighboring Tinian. His Legion of Merit was awarded for his humane, successful effort to save the lives of military and civilians who might otherwise have been killed on Tinian, second island in the Marianas chain to fall to American forces.
On 1 August, 1944 he was promoted to full colonel.
Directed 25th on Iwo Jima
At Iwo Jima, Colonel Lanigan reorganized the 25th's assault unit, heavily punished during the landing and directed from an advanced observation post, without regard for his personal safety, the capture of an almost impregnably fortified cliff on the starboard flank of the beach. This action won for him his Navy Cross.
In October 1945, the Colonel returned to the States and was ordered as Officer-in-Charge of the Southern Recruiting Division.
To the men he is known as Stonewall Lanigan and that he is just one of the boys. The Colonel considers this the highest compliment an enlisted man can pay to any officer.
The Colonel's wife, the former Ann L. White of Washington, D. C., and sons John Dennis, Michael Anthony and Patrick Timothy now reside at Marine Site IA.
The Colonel and his family reported aboard the 25th of July as Colonel Joseph C. Burger's relief.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 29 Aug. to Sat. 5 Sept.
Sunday
DAISY KENYON
Joan Crawford Dana Andrews
Monday
BURY ME DEAD
Cathy O'Donnell Hugh Beaymont
Tuesday
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE James Stewart Donna Reed
Wednesday
ROAD TO RIO
Bing Crosby Dorothy Lamour
Thursday
VARIETY GIRL
Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Caulfield
Friday
MOSS ROSE
Peggy Cummings Victor Mature
Saturday
THEY PASS THIS WAY
Joel McCrea Frances Dee


MESSAGE FROM THE
JUDGE ADVOCATE

The Legal Assistance program has completed five years of service to the men and women of the Navy since it was first established by the Secretary of the Navy on 26 June 1943. Those who have had a part 1 this work can point to its accom ments with deserved prid6 ,
The e years have br6ught about', e development of sound procedures and have furnished a demonstration of the valuable contribution toward high morale which can be made by the Legal Assistance of an important position in the Navy law organization.
In the future, the value of Legal Assistance to the men and women of the Navy will de 'entirely upon the thought Wn . which each one of you #egto the, performance of your work. You are assured that the results of your efforts will be watched with continuing interest.
Sincerely
George L. Russell,
Rear Admiral, USN
Doctor: "The best thing for you is to give up smoking and drinking, get up early every morning and go to bed early every night."
Patient: "You know, somehow, doctor, I don't feel that I deserve the best. What's second best?"
During an inspection of a galley, the inspecting officer turned to the mess cook and said, "Everything seems to be in good order except there are too many flies around."
"Yes, sir," replied the cook. "How many flies am I allowed?"


U


Pagqe Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-26 Aug 48-2500




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PAGE 1

U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 28 August 1948 PAY GRADE 1A EXAMS TO BE HELD 1 DECEMBER (SEA)-Navy-wide competitive examinations for advancement to pay grade 1A in all general service ratings will be conducted on 1 December. 'Nominations of all men eligible and recommended to take the examinations must reach the convening authority not later than 10 September, as directed by BuPers Circ. Ltr. 129-48 (NDB, 15 July 1948). Examinations will be based on qualifications outlined in BuPers "Manual of Qualifications for Advancement in Rating" (NavPers 180668) as changed by printed modifications to agree with the final approved current rating structure, as explained in BuPers Circ. Ltr. 106-48 (NDB, 15 June 1948). Eligibility standards for advancement to pay grade 1A are contained in BuPers. Circ. Ltr. 191-46 (corrected) (AS&SL July-December 1946). Personnel who meet the requirements as of 1 December 1948, and those who normally may be expected to become eligible by 1 June 1949. MORE HOUSING UNITS TO BE READY ON BARGO Twenty-two new housing units on Bargo Point should be ready by 1 September. This will reduce the present housing list by one-third. To our readers who have just reported aboard, Bargo Point is the latest housing project on the Base. Bargo Point has come a long way since 9 January. Through the cooperation of the tenants and a lot of hard work, Bargo is becoming one of the beauty spots on the Naval Operating Base. There are some 146 housing units on Bargo, including the 22 new units. The first daily newspaper in the United States was printed in Pennsylvania, Sept. 21, 1784. There will be good news right on through the years for all those wise sailors who have made an allotment of part of their pay to purchase Savings Bonds each month. NOB WELCOMES ABOARD NEW MARINE C. 0. Colonel John Ralph (Pat) Lanigan, USMC, the new Commanding Officer of Marine Site, was one of the outstanding Marine heroes in the Pacific War. Holder of the Navy Cross for meritorious service on Iwo Jima, decorated with the Legion of Merit, and wearer of the Purple Heart for a wound received against the enemy on Saipan. Served with 4th Division The Colonel's other medals include the China Service Ribbon, Nicaraguan Ribbon, Asiatic Pacflic Ribbon, American Defense, and Presidential Unit (4th Division) Citation Ribbon with Star. Born 16 April, 1902 in Washington, D. C., the Colonel attended the local schools. Upon graduation from the University of Maryland in 1926, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps, and since has continously served with the Marines. In 1928, he was sent to Nicaragua. This was the beginning of many tours of foreign and off-shore duty for the Colonel. Aboard the USS California from 1930 to 1932, Colonel Lanigan saw (Continued on Page Four) YP-629 CHANGES DESIGNATOR TO YFR-1152 By Louis Kitchen, YN2, USN The USS YP-629 is no more. She now bears the designator USS YFR-1152, and bears it well. Around the Commissary Store, the word is-"Wonder when the 'Yipee' is returning?" Everyone knows her primary duty is supplying fresh and frozen foods for the Commissary Store here and at the U. S. Army Air Base, Vernam Field, Kingston, Jamaica. The USS YP-629, 128-foot refrigerator cargo vessel, is one of thirty such ships completed by West Coast shipyards early in 1945 to meet increasing Navy demands for the handling of fresh and frozen provisions at advanced Pacific bases. This type of ship represents an effort toward greater efficiency and economy in the delivery of chilled and frozen products to Navy ships and shore facilities, and followed the lead established by the tuna clippers which had been drafted for service during the early part of the war. She was built at Seattle, Washington, and on the day of her commissioning, March 12, 1945, showed evidence of the highest degree of craftsmanship that proud Northwest workman could give, as well as an almost perfect outfitting record by the Naval Supply Depot. After her shakedown cruise, she headed south for duty with Commander, Service Force, SEVENTH Fleet. She worked out of Leyte, Borneo, and later Samar, Philippine Islands. In May, 1946, she returned to San Pedro, California, for decommissioning and was 95 per cent decommissioned when orders were received to place her in full commission and assignment to the Commandant, TENTH Naval District, for duty. She has fulfilled her mission at this Base, to the present day, to a high degree of efficiency, keeping us well stocked in foods which are vitally needed. The USS YRF-1152 is at present commanded by ChBosn H. C. Newell, a well known officer around this Base, and carries a crew of approximately fifteen men. Vol. III, No. 30

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Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday 28 August 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson ----------------.Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman. Staff Advisor Sgt. Stull J. E. Sasser, DK3 Louis Kitchen, YN2 R. E. McCullough G. B. Vaughn, RD3 E. B. Shelton, AF3 R. E. Welsh, YN2 THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED Commodore Charlton E. Battle, USN (Ret.) and Mrs. Battle, announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss Sylvia Battle, to Richard P. Brown, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Brown of Philadelphia, Pa. Miss Battle is a graduate of the Mary C. Wheeler School in Providence, Rhode Island and attended Holmby Junior College in Bel Air, California, and the University of California, where she was a member of the Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority. Mr. Brown graduated from the William Penn Charter School and Princeton University, class of 1942, and is a member of the Class of 1948 at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He served in World War II as a Lieutenant in the Naval Reserve. DRY DOCK CHATTER These last few weeks have brought about many changes down here on the Dry Dock. The main one is more men. You can't count the deck force on one hand any more. Both wings are getting the "New Look" with Coach and Ski supervising. O'Neil has about thirty-three days left down here to do. What are you going to do, Coach? Nick Nack should be leaving next week. Pardon me, Nick Nack, I mean Mister Nick Nack. Port Side, S.A.C. has a new member. Total is now four. The Starboard Side had a baseball meeting last Saturday afternoon. The results are: Wood, guesses that he has enough for a baseball team now. The baby girls oSP~rTl have just about L been forgotten in the Stork Race but during the past week they have made themselves k no w n. Three of them arNrived. Bonnie Lee "OT E S Homer, born 21 August to S01 Thomas and Mrs. Horner; Teresa Lavane Cornett born 22 August to ICC William and Mrs. Cornett; Ceryl Venczel born 24 August to CPR John and Mrs. Venczel. Both the officers and enlisted men from the Hospital have teams in the bowling leagues, but from what this reporter can learn neither of them are setting any new records (at least not high ones). However, since things are just getting under way we can hope for better scores in the future. Captain Robbins is in the States for several days on TAD. TALENT WANTED What about a Little Theatre in Gtmo.? The Recreation Office thinks the time has come for some light comedy or heavy tragedy to strike at the hearts of the winter residents of the Base. They have some willing and interested workers but they will need a lot more if they're going to get the thing going. First of all ...is there a Director in the house? And stage hands, carpenters, painters and all ye with a yen "to tread the boards" are wanted. Experience is not necessary. After all, a Little Theatre is for amateurs. Some good ideas are cooking. "Three Men on a Horse" has been suggested or they might even tackle "Mr. Roberts." All that is needed is a response from you people on the Base and this includes you, you and you and your wife, sister and talking dog! A meeting is being planned for the first week in September to organize the details, and if you would like to come, please call Lt. Keehn at 778 and leave your name and phone number. 113 MEN ARRIVE ON THE ALBEMARLE One hundred and thirteen men stepped ashore off the USS Albemarle (AV-5) for duty. Inactive Floating Drydock receives 7 men; Fleet Boat Pool, 6 men; AFDL-47, 15 men; U. S. Naval Hospital, 10 men, and the Naval Station, 75 men. For the majority of these men, this is their first duty in the Navy. Welcome aboard men, we know you'll have a fine tour of duty here at Gtmo. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 29 August 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1810 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAP.AlttS CORNER E. E. Bosserman, Chaplain Naval Operating Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Dear Chaplain I thought you might be interested to know my daughter and I are safely back home again. We left the Base August 9th and were at home in Dearborn, Michigan, August 12th. I want you to know and those with whom I had the pleasure to associate what a wonderful summer I had with you fine people. It was a vacation I never want to forget. I will always be glad I attended church every Sunday while I was there, the services were beautiful. You people back there with so few worries surely must be grateful. Here, so close to a great industrial city, there is restlessness, turmoil and worry continually it seems. Food and clothing prices are very high; every one needs or wants a new car and can't afford it; others need a home and can't afford the exhorbitant prices, yet there are no places to rent. Some children I khow have met with accidents this summer, others have been striken with rheumatic fever or polio. This involves great expense and hardship for the parents. Several of the factories have not worked steady this summer. That has caused more worry and suffering for many families. Winter will be here soon and with it will come the need for warm clothing and expensive fuel. I think you people are very lucky to be where you are. I would like very much to be back there with you., Respectfully yours, Lila E. Briggs Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Pr he CHIME FUND AT $1786.00 Last February 22, 1948,. the. first offering for the Chapel Chime Fund was taken at the 1100 church service. Since that time, offerings and contributions have rolled in so that today we have $1,786.00. The cost of the chimes is $3200.00. Last week a church bulletin was found in the Chapel with a twenty dollar bill enclosed. On the bulletin were these words: "For the Chimes, may they help other to find Him." Sunday morning, Sergeant Speck, who is in charge of the Marine Brig, brought in a twenty dollar contribution from the Marine Guard at the Brig. The very fine spirit behind these gifts cannot be praised too highly. To all concerned, we hope to have the Chimes installed for the Christmas Season. The home going details are Still front page news at the Marine Barracksespecially to the short timers. Last week saw the departure of Sgt. Clifford L. Metzger and PFC Howard W. Graus, while MSgt. "Red" Ludington,, Motor Transport Chief, is bemoaning the impending transfer of five of his truck driving "sweethearts"; Sergeants James 0. Esterline and Thomas F. Maiburger, and Corporals Louis F. Parmentier, Francis T. McAlpine and Charles W. Lisa. Congratulations to SSgt. Richard T. Martin, Post Communications Chief, who joined the ranks of the third pay grade last Wednesday. Our two Post Bowling Teams are bracketing their respective leagues, 90 with the Enlisted team in first place and the Officers' squad holding up the opposite end. The big All-Post dance scheduled for tonight promises to be a gala affair. Committees from the NCO Club and the Privates' Club have cooperated to provide everything necessary for a pleasant evening. 1stLt. L. M. Patterson is keeping things hot on the Post Small Bore Range, getting all hands rounded into top form for re-qualification firing next month. MSgt. L. P. Stroud, impressario of the Post Mess Hall, is seriously considering changing his Classification Specialty to Life Guard Chief. Sgt. Stroud can be located most any afternoon at the Post Pool picking up the mysteries of the merman are under the tutelage of, Swimming Instructor Fallon. Labor Day promises to be a "Little Olympiad" with a touch football game, softball game and swimming meet already on the agenda. Full details will be forthcoming next week. ELECTRONICS NEWS By "Irish" "The day is coming," we are constantly informed, "when every minor chore will be accomplished by electronics .simply by pushing a button, the grass may be mowed, the dishes dried, even the dog walked." Yea,.man! Doing his bit to hasten that day is our boy, Jack Niebell. Jack has a device that will make the entire engineering and scientific world sit up and take notice. It's called the "Smoker's Delight." Thoughtful Jack, who doesn't smoke himself, was troubled by the thought of weary motorists struggling to light a cigarette while driving. With this device, you just push a button and a lighted cigarette is shot into your mouth. Of course, there are a few "bugs" to be ironed out, (at present, the cigarette flies into your mouth ...lighted end first) but with the aid and financial backing of the Kansas City banker, Bob "Yeoman" Welsh, Jack hopes to be able to market it soon. Along with this gadget, Jack is working on a Bass -Boost -for-bass-happy-people. His pet peeve is the person that thinks he has a fine radio just because it has a lot of bass tone. He's a regular "poor man's Edison." Fishing is a great sport ..Pm a fan myself. But pity the poor individuals that have to live with an eccentric fisherman. I refer to a rather odious incident that drove many people away from the neighborhood of the Shop this weekend. "Shorty" and "Willie" made themselves a spear gun and went out to the beach to see if they could find one of my famous abolones. Instead, they returned with a small octupus. The.question now is, who told them to lay the thing out on a board to dry? (Reward) That is why the Electronics 'Shop at NOB, Gtmo. smells like the East Side fish market on bargain day. We understand that "cold solder joint" Herrington has been making disparaging remarks about the men here in this shop over his radio show. Of course, we can't prove that accusation, as none of us ever listen to Herrington's programs even if we could pick up WGBY on our dial. Surprising, yet pleasing is the increase of traffic by the fair sex through our Shop lately ...morale is soaring! Just the other day while sweating over a Navy radio, a sweet, soft voice spoke from behind my shoulder and asked plaintively, if I wouldn't please take a look at her radio. I turned to find a pert, little blonde holding in her hand what had been a radio. Yeh, men, I "took a look at it" ...I draw my pay on pay day, too! Two psychoanalysts met on the street. Said one to the other, "You feel fine today. How do I feel?" QRDNANCE STUFF By Alston Jones The Ordnance Department wishes to welcome aboard Lt. T. J. Laubacher, USN, who reported on the Base in July 1948, and was assigned the duties of Ordnance Officer. Lt. Laubacher relieves Lt. R. F. St. John, USN, who has completed his tour of duty down here and. is expected to leave soon. Mrs. T. J. Laubacher joined her husband on 3 August, 1948, arriving aboard the Pres. Hayes. They now reside at Quarters 624A on Radio Point. Best wishes for a pleasant tour of duty here. "The Naval Magazine trucks are all over the place" was a remark that was overheard a few days ago. Frankly speaking, that is the truth; these trucks and the personnel of the Ordnance Department are literally all over the place. The Department is a very busy place these days and it is not just make believe. Up until a few weeks ago, Operation "Mothball" was in full swing, keeping everybody, civilians, enlisted personnel and-officers alike on the go for a full. eight hour day, each day. Then came ammunition handling, which involves more than one would ordinarily think, receiving, transporting, stowing, re-stowing, headaches, etc., and the tropical sun adds its share of blisters and sunburn. The Ordnance Repair Facilities are being re-organized to aid the Ships Repair Department and Training Group in the repair and overhaul of Fire 'Control Equipment, Power Drives, etc., aboard ships undergoing training in this area. The complement of qualified personnel for such work is not yet up to par, but it is expected that in the near future this condition will be remedied. E. R. Cary, SN, USN, left for State-side last Sunday, 15 August on a much longed for leave. Best wishes for a fine time is extended by the Ordnance Department. F. Stewart, GMC, USN is hospitalized since the 1st week of thys month with a broken ankle. The Ordnance Department extends it sympathy and best wishes for a speedy recovery. "So now you and your son are carrying on the business together?" "Not exactly. I run the business and my son does the carrying on." Brown has a lovely baby girl, The stork left her with a flutter; Brown named her Oleomargine, For he hadn't any but her. Mrs: "How do you suppose those dozens and dozens of empty bottles got in the cellar?" Mr.: "I'm sure I don't know, I never bought an empty bottle in my life." THE INDIAN Pace Three

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Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-26 Aug 48-2500 .By Bud Johnson Of interest to softball fans is the result of the Atlantic Fleet Softball Finals which were completed 23 August. In a game to choose the Atlantic Fleet's representative to the inter-group tournament, PhibLant defeated SubLant by the convincing score of 8-3. The PhibLant team journeyed to Norfolk for the inter-group finals which started 24 August. On the local sports stage, the spotlight falls on the Bowling League which began its schedule recently. The ten-team league has had a fine turn out for the scheduled games and all Commands are cheering for their respective representatives to come out on top. After a glance at the fine trophies which will be awarded for high single, high triple, high average and high team, I can see that there is plenty of incentive to roll up a big score. In the quest for the trophies, Nordine of the Marines with a 232 has high single game and Pulnik, BMC of the NOB team is leading both in high triple total with 580 and high average with 183. No doubt these marks will fall when the bowlers get their eyes on that head pin, but the leaders will be improving their games too. It's just another case where all we can say is, "May the best man win." DON'T TAKE SAFETY FOR GRANTED Most workers have the idea that Safety slows production. On the contrary, it speeds up your work. If you have the proper guards on your machines, or if you are wearing the proper clothing, you don't have to stop or slow down to see whether you are going to be caught in a moving machine. Attitude: Your attitude toward safety means a lot. Safety is not to be laughed at, because it is something that protects you. If you take the right attitude toward safety, then your fellow workers will also. First Aid: Our Medical Department plays an important part in Safety, here on NOB. You are cautioned to report all injuries, no matter how small, to the Dispensaries or the Naval Hospital. Effort: If you make only a small effort to work safely, you'll have accomplished something. It only takes a small amount of effort to get in the habit of obeying Safety Rules and doing your job the safe way. You: You are the determining factor in whether Safety in your area is a success or a failure. The final responsibility rests on your Shoulders. COLONEL LANIGAN (Continued from Page One) service in'both the Atlantic and Pacific Fleet. The Colonel was stationed in China in 1935 when the Japanese invaded China. He was with the Fourth Marines at Shanghai, while there he was promoted to Captain. After returning to the States, in 1937, the Colonel was assigned to duty with the 2nd Battalion, Fifth Marines at Quantico, with them he participated in the Puerto Rican maneuvers of 1938. Instructor at Basic School Upon graduation from Marine Corps School, Quantico, in 1939, he was assigned duty as instructor on the staff of the Marine Corps Basic School at Philadelphia. In 1941 the Colonel was promoted to the rank of major. In August 1942, he was ordered to New River, North Carolina, as commander of the 3rd Battalion, 23rd Marines (reinforced). On the 17th of August he was elevated to lieutenant colonel. The 23rd Marines were the back-bone of the famous 4th Division. Appointed executive officer of the 23rd Regiment on December 2, 1943, the Colonel fought at Roi Namur in the Marshalls, and at Saipan and Tinian. Although wounded at Saipan, Colonel Lanigan was able to make the following operation on neighboring Tinian. His Legion of Merit was awarded for his humane, successful effort to save the lives of military and civilians who might otherwise have been killed on Tinian, second island in the Marianas chain to fall to American forces. On 1 August, 1944 he was promoted to full colonel. Directed 25th on Iwo Jima At Iwo Jima, Colonel Lanigan reorganized the 25th's assault unit, heavily punished during the landing and directed from an advanced observation post, without regard for his personal safety, the capture of an almost impregnably fortified cliff on the starboard flank of the beach. This action won for him his Navy Cross. In October 1945, the Colonel returned to the States and was ordered as Officer-in-Charge of the Southern Recruiting Division. To the men he is known as Stonewall Lanigan and that he is just one of the boys. The Colonel considers this the highest compliment an enlisted man can pay to any officer. The Colonel's wife, the former Ann L. White of Washington, D. C., and sons John Dennis, Michael Anthony and Patrick Timothy now reside at Marine Site 1A. The Colonel and his family reported aboard the 25th of July as Colonel Joseph C. Burger's relief. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 29 Aug. to Sat. 5 Sept. Sunday DAISY KENYON Joan Crawford Dana Andrews Monday BURY ME DEAD Cathy O'Donnell Hugh Beaymont Tuesday IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE James Stewart Donna Reed Wednesday ROAD TO RIO Bing Crosby Dorothy Lamour Thursday VARIETY GIRL Barbara Stanwyck, Joan Caulfield Friday MOSS ROSE Peggy Cummings Victor Mature Saturday THEY PASS THIS WAY Joel McCrea Frances Dee MESSAGE FROM THE JUDGE ADVOCATE The Legal Assistance program has completed five years of service to the men and women of the Navy since it was first established by the Secretary of the Navy on 26 June 1943. Those who have had a part i this work can point to its accomp ments with deserved pride. i Thel" five years have brought about the development of sound procedures and have furnished a demonstration of the valuable contribution toward high morale which can be made by the Legal Assistance of an important position in the Navy law organization. In the future, the value of Legal Assistance to the men and women of the Navy will de entirely upon the thought n W gy which each one of you i e to the, performance of your work. You are assured that the results of your efforts will be watched with continuing interest. Sincerely George L. Russell, Rear Admiral, USN Doctor: "The best thing for you is to give up smoking and drinking, get up early every morning and go to bed early every night." Patient: "You know, somehow, doctor, I don't feel that I deserve the best. What's second best?" During an inspection of a galley, the inspecting officer turned to the mess cook and said, "Everything seems to be in good order except there are too many flies around." "Yes, sir," replied the cook. "How many flies am I allowed?" Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-26 Aug 48-2500


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