Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

















Vol. III, No. 28 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 August 1948


Speedy Work By Macon Helicopter Saves


Flyer Who Cracks Up Near Caimanera


RATION ALLOWANCES
ARE INCREASED

(SEA)-Following the increase
in money allowance from 80 cents to $1.05 for general messes subsisting more than 150 men, a similar increase in commuted and leave rations has been effected.
Midshipmen, aviation midshipmen
and aviation cadets will receive $1.20. The hospital ration remains
unchanged at $1.05.
Increases were authorized by
AlNav 48-48 (NDB, 30 June 1948).

FLEET RESERVE ASS'N TO HOLD CONVENTION
(SEA)-The 21st national convention of the Fleet Reserve Association will be held at Dallas, Texas, from 30 August to 1 September.
There are approximately 112
branches of the organization located in various parts of the world.
Even the smallest branch does its utmost to send a delegate to this
convention.
Commanding officers, by BuPers.
Circ. Letr. 109-48 (NDB, 15 June 1948), are encouraged to grant regularly authorized leave, if practicable, to Fleet Reserve personnel
who desire to attend the meeting.

AIR PARCEL POST BEGINS
ON 1 SEPTEMBER


(SEA)-Servicemen within the U. S. and its possessions may avail themselves of the, first air parcel post service to be inaugurated 1 September.
Authorized by President Truman, the bill allows the mailing by air of parcels weighing from eight ounces up to 70 pounds. Postage rates will range from 55 to 80 cents for the first pound, depending on the zone of delivery.


NORTH CAROLINA IS OUT OF BOUNDS FOR NAVY
"In view of th~e public -health aspects of the outbreak of acute anterior poliomyetis in North Carolina, Commanding Officers are directed that until further notice, the State of North Carolina is restricted to Naval Personnel. Naval personnel issued permanent change of duty orders to activities within
-the State of North Carolina shall comply with their orders. Naval personnel of the Tenth Naval District desiring to visit areas requiring travel through the State of North Carolina by privately owned automobile or public conveyance, may do so only provided such travel is continuous."


!j TACK YOUR. JACK
WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS.





I,,\ I, . , /
. . . . ..

. . .. .. ..


...... ~ .. .. .


..... .....


Twenty-two Minutes After Crash
Pilot Has Medical Aid

Ensign Olaf C. Johnson, U. S. Navy, attached to the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt, received serious injuries while testing an AD-1, Navy plane. As he came out of a dive at 7,000 feet, the plane failed mechanically, and he was forced to bail out at about 3,000 feet. It is believed his right leg was struck by the tail assembly, while bailing out of the ill-fated plane, causing an amputation of his leg below the knee. Ensign Johnson landed ten miles North of McCalla Field, and his plane crashdd nearby.
Signal Tower Observes Jump
Men on duty in the Signal Tower at the Naval Air Station saw him bail out, and in less than two minutes the helicopter from the USS Macon was enroute to the scene of the crash. In the meantime, some natives had picked up Ensign Johnson and carried him to an open field where the helicopter landed, took him aboard, and brought him to the U. S. Naval Hospital here on the Naval Operating Base. Helicopter Lands In Small Field Lieut. William H. Shawcross, U. S. Navy, by his alertness and efficiency, can be credited with the saving of the life of Ensign Johnson, since he delivered him to the medical department twenty-two minutes after the crash. Except for the excellent job of Lieut. Shawcross and his helicopter, attached to the USS Macon of Task Force 84, it would have taken hours to have reached Ensign Johnson, and the results might have been disastrous.
Other than the serious injury to Ensign Johnson's right leg, remaining injuries were of comparatively minor nature, and it is with satisfaction that the Hospital states that his condition is steadily improving.








Pa2e Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library- Phone 672

Saturday 14 August 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
B. M. Thomson ------------------ Editor
Chaplain E. E. Bosserman-_Staff Advisor Sgt. Murphy J. E. Sasser, DKS Louis Kitchen, YN2 R. E. McCullough G. B. Vaughn, RD3 E. B. Shelton, AF3
R. E. Welsh,. YN2

THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on governmen1 equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45.
THE INDIAN is a memberlof the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated .otherwise.

DATES TO REMEMBER
IN AUGUST

By Ships' Editorial Association
6 Aug. 1945-=Sixty per cent of Hiroshima obliterated by atom
bomb.
8 Aug. 1942--U. S. Marines established Guadalcanal beachheads.
8 Aug. 1945-U. S. Air Force dropped atom bomb on Nagasaki. 9 Aug. 1942-U. S. cruisers Quincy, Astoria and Vincennes lost. 14 Aug. 1935-President Roosevelt
signed the Selective Service bill. 14 Aug. 1945-Japan surrendered
unconditionally to Allies.
15 Aug. 1935-Will Rogers, Wiley
Post killed in Alaskan air crash. 15 Aug. 1944-Allied forces invaded
southern coast of France.
19 Aug. 1812-Frigate Constitution
captured French ship Guerriere. 19 Aug. 1942-U. S. Army Rangers
made land raid on Dieppe, France. 23 Aug. 1944-Paris, France, liberated by Allied invasion troops. 23 Aug. 1942-Naval and Air Force
battle of the Eastern Solomons. 24 Aug. 1814 - White House in
Washington burned by British
troops.
-26 Aug. 1920-Woman suffrage effected by 19th Amendment.
27 Aug. 1945-Japan occupied for
first time in 1,000 years.


Three little boys
,~PI'ra. made their apV ER L pearance during
the past week.
William H e n r y Gavin, III, born 9 August to MMC W. H. and Mrs.
Gavin, Jr.; Ralph "C" Rosacker, II, born 11 August to Major Ralph
"C" and Mrs. Rosacker; Alexander Thomas, Jr,, born 10 August to SD2 Alexander Thomas and Mrs. Thomas. The Thomas baby is considered a true member of the hospital 'family as his father is attached to the Commissary Department at this activity.
J. C. Vaughn, CS1, and Hospitalmen, G. R. Bonnell, J. E. Reese, A. C. Brockman and M. E. Burris have all received orders for Stateside duty. Where is this thing going to stop-we're about to run out of personnel.
R. E. Gaskill, HM3, has just returned from the Movie Operator's School in Norfolk, Va. Navarette, HM3, who also took the Movie Operators course is expected back in a few days. With all this adddd knowledge, we should have a better showing of the movies.
Mrs. Gladys Harnig, civilian clerk, has been hired to replace J. B. Ferrer, who resigned.

MARINE QUITS AFTER 40 YEARS SERVICE

(SEA)-The senior enlisted man in the Marine Corps, Master Sergeant Hugh F. Deakins, at the age of 66 has decided to retire from active duty after rounding out better than 40 years of active service.
Deakins, whose last tour of duty was Quantico, Va., joined the Marines in 1907 and has served as Master Sergeant for the last 29 years-a record in itself.

SALT JUNK AND
HARD TACK

(SEA):--At one time the principal diet of seafaring men, "Salt Junk and Hard-Tack" was salted meat and sea biscuits. This expression is seldom heard today.
One who has eaten the old hardtack fully agrees with Charles XII, who said "It is not good, but it can be eaten." In old sea narratives mention is made of "lobscowse", a delicacy in its day, although easy to prepare-potatoes and salt beef hashed together.
Junk was originally a vegetable fiber from which rope was made. In time the word 'junk" was used in referring to old rope. The meat, in sailing ship days, was carried in the harness cask. Probably as a result of its resemblance to old rope, both in texture and stringiness, it was called "salt horse or salt junk".


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY."
Sunday, 15 August 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass.
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN
(Catholic)








VACATION TIME
Throughout our country, thousands of families are getting into their cars and starting out on vacation trips. Each person is looking for a change, something different, anything to take themselves away from the routine of their jobs, and homes.
The urge to get away from sights we know and people we see every day is basic in the make up of men and women. The mind and body becomes restless and craves new sights, new thoughts, and new experiences. The vacation is successful if the individual comes back to his home refreshed and relaxed
-ready to settle down for another year.
The condition in man's nature was recognized by Almighty God at the time of Creation in that He provided one day out of seven in which man was to rest, to know something different than the other six days of the week. In His plan for man's salvation, the Great Master provided a weekly escape valve for wrought up emotions, pent up feelings, mental tiredness, and that general "what-can-we-donow" feeling.
One hour in church on Sunday, if approached in the proper attitude, can serve as a weekly vacation into another world. Many people seek vacations only for the body and mind and never achieve their purpose. The spiritual body which belongs to God must be included. Give your spiritual life its weekly vacation by coming to God's House.
The individual who seeks to find God, through His Son Jesus Christ, will find "a peace of mind" and relaxation of the body which cannot be achieved in any other way.
Chaplain Bosserman


Paie Two


THE INDIAN







THE IDIANPage Three


In the past
week, the hangar has been
4 / !.in quite a dither L-- painting and
cleaning for the " big inspection
that is to take
place soon.
Time was
taken out for a
squadron party one afternoon last week. All officers and enlisted men were invited. Between beers, a softball game was played. The officers and chiefs played against the enlisted men. It was a great game and the enlisted men won by a high score. Everyone that attended seemed to have a jolly old time.
Those lucky people leaving for the States recently for a few days leave were: Leo Schramm, AD3; Victor Popika, AMI; John Vienna, AOAN, and Chief and Mrs. Storm who left from Guantanamo City on Monday. Chief Storm recently reenlisted for two more years.
Liberty, YNSA and Stott, YNSN, returned to the Squadron from the States this week after completing Yeoman School in Norfolk, Va. Welcome back fellows.

F* L E ET Reviewing the
7 7 latest scuttlebutt
,."Chesty Iseman"
has recovered
4 ae,. SN quite satisfactorily from his injuries: in fact
Well enough to TRAI N ING enjoy all the benefits of his latest model "Hot Rod". Nice goin' Ike!
-Congratulations to "Daddy O'Neill", who after many attempts for leave is homeward bound aboard the USS Whitiey. Also aboard is Sabadish, RM2 doing his last tour of sea duty before discharge.
Returning from emergency leave we find Swank, YN3. If you have noticed the bright gleam in his eye lately, it's due to the many nights he spent in a Stateside hospital, sitting up with a sick friend in all the traditional white of a nurse's uniform.
To an irritating but good friend,
we say farewell. Namely a feathered creature known as "Pete". To the buzzards of Guantanamo Bay,, we of the TraGrp bequeath one bottle of bicarbonate of soda. They will sure need it.
With a great deal of enthusiasm, the officers, chief petty officers and our other enlisted men are striving for a major victory in the coming bowling tournament. Good iuck to all of you.

A paratrooper is a soldier who climbs down from trees he never climbed up.


NEWS AND VIEWS
FROM WGBY
By J. L. H.
Yes, friend, there is an Armed Forces Radio Station in Gtmo. Though you may have searched all over your radio dial for us, to no avail-keep tryin' we're there. You might be lucky someday and pick us up-with this bitter note, we begin.
At this moment we are bowing low in humble apologies to you-all. We realize the unnecessary noises and occasionally, dead silences that have been accompanying our broadcasts of late are very annoying and not at all assets of good broadcasting. Believe me, we are working like madmen trying to keep things going in their present dilapidated condition. Here's the whole problem in a nutshell: our present equipment has served well and long, but its time is up and is way past its state of usefulness; to be blunt, it is rapidly falling apart! "There'll be some changes made," that's a song. you know, but down here it's our prayer. By way of assurance to you listeners and ourselves, too, we'll say thats "straight dope." There will be some changes made! Just when, we're not sure, but let's hope it will be soon. Here's some encouragement on the time angle; our new equipment is present and accounted for, but there are a few important details that have to be taken care of before installation of said gear is realizedhow soon?
Though we're at a standstill on the equipment problem, temporarily, other changes are already in effect. One that will interest you listeners is our change in schedule. Effective next week, it looks like a Stateside program now with the big shows (Jack Benny, Bob Hope, etc.) at their regular time. Said schedule will be attached to Friday's Papoose each week. Copies of it will be found at various counters at NOB Ship's Service, NAS Ship's Service and the Marine PX. Alsothere're free, too!
We've undergone several changes in staff in the past two months. Here's the gang to date, in case anyone is interested. "Benny" Bones and Barbara Johnson are still here, along with an additional civilian, Graham Abernathy. "Ab" is the boy who gets you up early in the morning. On the white hat side, we have Murray, "Useless" Grant, Lee Messa, Jim Herrington, and new-comer, Johnny Bell. Oh, yes, Useless is our new program director-along with the "Hawthorne Thing."
About the Hawthorne Thingwe've heard it, which justifies this warning: the Thing is on every Wednesday morning at 0900. If your nerves are up to par, listen to it some Wednesday.
Another item worthy of mention,


HOW TO MAKE YOUR
ChILD A JUVENILE
DELINQUENT

Of course, we do not know of anyone who would admit that he desires to do such a thing as this, but there are so many parents who develop delinquent children just as definitely as though they carefully planned to do so. In other words, they follow the five principles which one authority gives as the best means of making a child delinquent.
According to Lieutenant Ralph Brophy, head of the police juvenile bureau in Des Moines, Iowa, here are the rules to follow and juvenile delinquency will result:
1. Don't give your child any religious or spiritual training.
2. Don't let him discuss his plans, problems or pleasures, so he will not develop affection, security or trust in you.
3. Don't open your home to his companions; they will muss up the place. Don't be concerned where he spends his free time.
4. Never praise your child for his worthwhile effort because he might take advantage of your effort and try harder to please you in the future.
5. Just don't pay any attention to what your child does or says. He should be able to take care of himself in this day and age.
The lieutenant goes further and declares: "Boys and girls who attend Sunday School and church regularly are not likely to fall into the arms of the law as delinquent children." This statement was made following a bureau survey of children's activities during 1946.
At least 83 per cent of the 1946 delinquents were not regular attendants at any church or Sunday school and only few of the remaining 17 per cent attended church or Sunday school with any degree of regularity, s a i d Lieutenant Brophy.
The current crusade emphasis of church school attendance, therefore, is not a mere effort to get names added to a roll. One purpose is thus to make a material effort to reduce the appalling amount of juvenile delinquency everywhere so apparent. Good Sunday school and adequate playgrounds are the two best known deterrents of childhood misbehavior.

your ideas and suggestions-they are always welcome and greatly appreciated as it's your radio station. We are more than willing to give any local talent air time if you will let us know about it.
That's just about all from us for now. In the meantime, let's hear from you! Our phone number is 395, or better yet, 'pay us a visit at our studio in the Fleet Recreation Building.


ITHE INDIAN


Pa e Three







Page Four ~~~THE INDIAN Gm.By1 u 820


By Bud Johnson
At the Quantico Golf Club, Quantico, Va., on July 26, 27 and 28, four players from the 5th, 6th, 10th, 15th, Severn River Naval Command and the Potomac River Naval Command.
Potomac River Naval Command, host for the 72-hole medal play tournament, placed the first three men.followed by the 5th Naval District with one man. Only one man from the starting field of twentythree golfers managed to shoot better than 300 on the very tough course at Quantico. This was Sgt. Brovdas with a total of 296 and in doing so, he broke his own course record of 68 when he 3-putted the eighteenth green for a 67.
At the end of 36 holes, Lt. Kinder of the P R N C, one of the foremost golfers in the service, was leading the field with two subpar rounds. In second place by two strokes Was Chief North of VU-10 in spite of several three-put greens and two unplayable lies. Third place at the end of 36 was the very capable golfer, Major Condrad of Quantico, amd in spite of his very slow playing, he finished 2nd for the tournament.
The first three men, Lt. Kinder, Chief North and Major Conrad, started the final 36 holes on Wednesday, July 28. This was the turning point in the tournament, since most of the participants seem to think that without the slow playing of Major Conrad, Lt. Kinder and Chief North would have finished much better than 3rd and 6th respectively. LCdr. McWilliams, although off to a bad start, at the half way mark showed the Virginians what it takes to be a two time Georgia State Amateur Champion when he moved up from 8th to .5th place. Chief Marchel, also of VU-10 with only two years experience in the golfing field made a good showing when he finished in front of eleven other players.
The first four winners were as follows: Sgt. Brovdas, USMC, 296; Major Conrad, USMC, 300; Lt. Kinder, USN, 301; Lt.(jg) Lewis, USN, 303.
Congratulations Gtmo. golfers for your fine showing in the tournament.
The past week saw Guantanamo's championship hopes in two sports dashed against the rocks by stiff competition in both baseball and softball. The softball team fared better against ComTen competition, copping the title in four straight triumphs. The baseball team, on the other hand, lost its first game against Roosevelt Roads and fought a losing battle against the weather in an effort to complete its schedule. As a result, San Juan won the


An uneventful week is the plague of all reporters, and this past week has really been a quiet one. Big
iI news of the
week is the now familiar sight of Sgt. McCullough haunting the Sergeat Major's office in an attempt to extend for another two years of duty here in Guantanamo.
Bon voyage to 2ndLt. and Mrs. H. D. Elms and all the little Elms, and best wishes for a pleasant tour of duty in Washington.
A squad of thirty hopefuls has been cavorting around the diamond under the tutelage of SSgt. "Wolf" Wolfkeil, Post baseball coach. The team will miss the services of SSgt. Rose, SSgt. Kashmar and Corporal Parmentier, who have been mainstays of the local nine during the past two years, but who are now leading the Short Timers' roster. However, a lot of new talent has turned up, and if Wolf can develop a couple of first string chuckers, the Post team should be able to hold its own.
SSgt. Nordine, captain, coach, and ,anchor man of the Post Enlisted Bowling Team has been putting the boys through their paces, and will tell anyone willing to listen, that he has a chamiponship contender.
Sgt. Fallon is in charge of an ambitious project to convert all the local land-bound Leathernecks into the amphibious model. Each afternoon, the Post swimming pool is well populated with polliwogs attempting to win their water wings.

championship by virtue of a sixteen inning contest against Gtmo's conqueror, Roosevelt Roads. The score of the marathon game was 3-2.
In the Group Six eliminations for softball which was held in Charleston, Gtmo's sluggers fought their way to the semi-final round of the tournament before they finally went down in defeat. In spite of the loss, the team has a fine record against the best teams the Navy could field and they certainly represented the Base in fine style.
A measure of solace was given Gtmo's defeated baseball team w h e n transportation difficulties forced ComTen officials to forego sending its representative to the Group Six eliminations in New Orleans. It must have been a tough bit of news for the San Juan boys, but our team must have felt a little better knowing that they didn't miss anything anyway.
Welcome back boys and thanks for the fine representation you afforded the Base.


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun. 15 Aug. to Saturday 21 Aug.


Sunday
GREEN DOLPHIN STREET Lana Turner Van Heflin
Monday
CRIMINAL COURT
Tom Conway Martha O'Driscoll
Shorts: March of Time and
Community Sing
Tuesday
DRIFTWOOD
Walter Brennan Ruth Warwick
Wednesday
GOLDEN EARRINGS
Marlene Dietrich Ray Milland
Thursday
SHORT SUBJECT PROGRAM Friday
PERILS OF PAULINE
Betty Hutton John Lund
Saturday
CASS TIMBERLANE
Spencer Tracy Lana Turner

It's better for a sailor to get something in his eye and wink than to wink and get something in his eye.
To a destroyer whose light was visible at night, the convoy commander signaled: "Pardon me, but your ship is showing."
This gag made the rounds as the 7th Marine Regiment advanced on Jap cave strongholds. It was passed from man to man, shouted from behind boulders, whispered into ears in the underbrush.
"Gonna be tough sleddin' today."
"How come?"
"No snow."
"I'm Brave Hawk," said the Indian chief, introducing himself to a paleface. "This is my son, Fighting Bird," he continued, "and this is my grandson, Four-Engined Bomber."
A boot took the Chief's advice and put on a clean pair of socks every day. A week passed. "Where are your shoes?" growled the Chief. "I can't get them on over seven pairs of socks," replied the boot.
Foreign sailor: "Flag ship? Why the flag ship of our navy is so big the captain travels around the deck in an automobile." American sailor: "That's nothing. The galley of our flag ship is so big the cook has to go through the Irish stew in a submarine to see if the potatoes are done."

FOR SALE-Ten dresses, size 14.
Call 5-206.


Pare-Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-12 Aug 48--2500


IN




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EH5FGA3XC_9ACKYK INGEST_TIME 2015-10-14T20:08:43Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00021
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

Ida Vol. III, No. 28 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 14 August 1948 Speedy Work By Macon Helicopter Saves Flyer Who Cracks Up Near Caimanera RATION ALLOWANCES ARE INCREASED (SEA)-Following the increase in money allowance from 80 cents to $1.05 for general messes subsisting more than 150 men, a similar increase in commuted and leave rations has been effected. Midshipmen, aviation midshipmen and aviation cadets will receive $1.20. The hospital ration remains unchanged at $1.05. Increases were authorized by AlNav 48-48 (NDB, 30 June 1948). FLEET RESERVE ASS'N TO HOLD CONVENTION (SEA)-The 21st national convention of the Fleet Reserve Association will be held at Dallas, Texas, from 30 August to 1 September, There are approximately 112 branches of the organization located in various parts of the world. Even the smallest branch does its utmost to send a delegate to this convention. Commanding officers, by BuPers. Circ. Letr. 109-48 (NDB, 15 June 1948), are encouraged to grant regularly authorized leave, if practicable, to Fleet Reserve personnel who desire to attend the meeting. AIR PARCEL POST BEGINS ON 1 SEPTEMBER (SEA)-Servicemen within the U. S. and its possessions may avail themselves of the first air parcel post service to be inaugurated 1 September. Authorized by President Truman, the bill allows the mailing by air of parcels weighing from eight ounces up to 70 pounds. Postage rates will range from 55 to 80 cents for the first pound, depending on the zone of delivery. NORTH CAROLINA IS OUT OF BOUNDS FOR NAVY "In view of the public health aspects of the outbreak of acute anterior poliomyetis in North Carolina, Commanding Officers are directed that until further notice, the State of North Carolina is restricted to Naval Personnel. Naval personnel issued permanent change of duty orders to activities within the State of North Carolina shall comply with their orders. Naval personnel of the Tenth Naval District desiring to visit areas requiring travel through the State of North Carolina by privately owned automobile or public conveyance, may do so only provided such travel is continuous." ,,TACK YOUR JACK WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS. Twenty-two Minutes After Crash Pilot Has Medical Aid Ensign Olaf C. Johnson, U. S. Navy, attached to the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt, received serious injuries while testing an AD-1, Navy plane. As he came out of a dive at 7,000 feet, the plane failed mechanically, and he was forced to bail out at about 3,000 feet. It is believed his right leg was struck by the tail assembly, while bailing out of the ill-fated plane, causing an amputation of his leg below the knee. Ensign Johnson landed ten miles North of McCalla Field, and his plane crashed near by. Signal Tower Observes Jump Men on duty in the Signal Tower at the Naval Air Station saw him bail out, and in less than two minutes the helicopter from the USS Macon was enroute to the scene of the crash. In the meantime, some natives had picked up Ensign Johnson and carried him to an open field where the helicopter landed, took him aboard, and brought him to the U. S. Naval Hospital here on the Naval Operating Base. Helicopter Lands In Small Field Lieut. William H. Shawcross, U. S. Navy, by his alertness and efficiency, can be credited with the saving of the life of Ensign Johnson, since he delivered him to the medical department twenty-two minutes after the crash. Except for the excellent job of Lieut. Shawcross and his helicopter, attached to the USS Macon of Task Force 84, it would have taken hours to have reached Ensign Johnson, and the results might have been disastrous. Other than the serious injury to Ensign Johnson's right leg, remaining injuries were of comparatively minor nature, and it is with satisfaction that the Hospital states that his condition is steadily improving.

PAGE 2

Pare Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday 14 August 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Rear Admiral W. K. Phillips, USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff B. M. Thomson--------------------Editor Chaplain E. E. Bosserman-Staff Advisor Sgt. Murphy J. E. Sasser, DK3 Louis Kitchen, YN2 R. E. McCullough G. B. Vaughn, RD3 E. B. Shelton, AF3 R. E. Welsh, YN2 THE INDIAN is published weekly from appropriated funds, on government equipment, and complies with the provisions of NAVEXOS P-35, Rev. Nov. 45. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by THE INDIAN are official U. S. Navy pictures credited to the NAS Photo Lab. unless indicated otherwise. DATES TO REMEMBER IN AUGUST By Ships' Editorial Association 6 Aug. 1945--Sixty per cent of Hiroshima obliterated by atom bomb. 8 Aug. 1942-U. S. Marines established Guadalcanal beachheads. 8 Aug. 1945-U. S. Air Force dropped atom bomb on Nagasaki. 9 Aug. 1942-U. S. cruisers Quincy, Astoria and Vincennes lost. 14 Aug. 1935-President Roosevelt signed the Selective Service bill. 14 Aug. 1945-Japan surrendered unconditionally to Allies. 15 Aug. 1935-Will Rogers, Wiley Post killed in Alaskan air crash. 15 Aug. 1944-Allied forces invaded southern coast of France. 19 Aug. 1812-Frigate Constitution captured French ship Guerriere. 19 Aug. 1942-U. S. Army Rangers made land raid on Dieppe, France. 23 Aug. 1944-Paris, France, liberated by Allied invasion troops. 23 Aug. 1942-Naval and Air Force battle of the Eastern Solomons. 24 Aug. 1814 -White House in Washington burned by British troops. 26 Aug. 1920-Woman suffrage effected by 19th Amendment. 27 Aug. 1945-Japan occupied for first time in 1,000 years. Three little boys made their apI pearance during the past week. William Henr y Gavin, III, born 9 August to MMC W. H. and Mrs. Gavin, Jr.; Ralph "C" Rosacker, II, NOTES born 11 August to Major Ralph "C" and Mrs. Rosacker; Alexander Thomas, Jr., born 10 August to SD2 Alexander Thomas and Mrs. Thomas. The Thomas baby is considered a true member of the hospital family as his father is attached to the Commissary Department at this activity. J. C. Vaughn, CS1, and Hospitalmen, G. R. Bonnell, J. E. Reese, A. C. Brockman and M. E. Burris have all received orders for Stateside duty. Where is this thing going to stop-we're about to run out of personnel. R. E. Gaskill, HM3, has just returned from the Movie Operator's School in Norfolk, Va. Navarette, HM3, who also took the Movie Operators course is expected back in a few days. With all this added knowledge, we should have a better showing of the movies. Mrs. Gladys Harnig, civilian clerk, has been hired to replace J. B. Ferrer, who resigned. MARINE QUITS AFTER 40 YEARS SERVICE (SEA)-The senior enlisted man in the Marine Corps, Master Sergeant Hugh F. Deakins, at the age of 66 has decided to retire from active duty after rounding out better than 40 years of active service. Deakins, whose last tour of duty was Quantico, Va., joined the Marines in 1907 and has served as Master Sergeant for the last 29 years-a record in itself. SALT JUNK AND HARD TACK (SEA)-At one time the principal diet of seafaring men, "Salt Junk and Hard-Tack" was salted meat and sea biscuits. This expression is seldom heard today. One who has eaten the old hardtack fully agrees with Charles XII, who said "It is not good, but it can be eaten." In old sea narratives mention is made of "lobscowse", a delicacy in its day, although easy to prepare-potatoes and salt beef hashed together. Junk was originally a vegetable fiber from which rope was made. In time the word 'junk" was used in referring to old rope. The meat, in sailing ship days, was carried in the harness cask. Probably as a result of its resemblance to old rope, both in texture and stringiness, it was called "salt horse or salt junk". CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 15 August 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Naval Base Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) LtCdr. Carl A. Herold, USN (Catholic) CHAPLAIN'S CORNER. VACATION TIME Throughout our country, thousands of families are getting into their cars and starting out on vacation trips. Each person is looking for a change, something different, anything to take themselves away from the routine of their jobs, and homes. The urge to get away from sights we know and people we see every day is basic in the make up of men and women. The mind and body becomes restless and craves new sights, new thoughts, and new experiences. The vacation is successful if the individual comes back to his home refreshed and relaxed -ready to settle down for another year. The condition in man's nature was recognized by Almighty God at the time of Creation in that He provided one day out of seven in which man was to rest, to know something different than the other six days of the week. In His plan for man's salvation, the Great Master provided a weekly escape valve for wrought up emotions, pent up feelings, mental tiredness, and that general "what-can-we-donow" feeling. One hour in church on Sunday, if approached in the proper attitude, can serve as a weekly vacation into another world. Many people seek vacations only for the body and mind and never achieve their purpose. The spiritual body which belongs to God must be included. Give your spiritual life its weekly vacation by coming to God's House. The individual who seeks to find God, through His Son Jesus Christ, will find "a peace of mind" and relaxation of the body which cannot be achieved in any other way. Chaplain Bosserman Pane Two THE INDIAN

PAGE 3

THE INDIAN Page Three In the past week, the I hangar has been in quite a dither -painting and cleaning for the big inspection CT/ C' that is to take 9 place soon. Time was taken out for a squadron party one afternoon last week. All officers and enlisted men were invited. Between beers, a softball game was played. The officers and chiefs played against the enlisted men. It was a great game and the enlisted men won by a high score. Everyone that attended seemed to have a jolly old time. Those lucky people leaving for the States recently for a few days leave were: Leo Schramm, AD3; Victor Popika, AM1; John Vienna, AOAN, and Chief and Mrs. Storm who left from Guantanamo City on Monday. Chief Storm recently reenlisted for two more years. Liberty, YNSA and Stott, YNSN, returned to the Squadron from the States this week after completing Yeoman School in Norfolk, Va. Welcome back fellows. FL E ET Reviewing the latest scuttlebutt we find that "Chesty Iseman" has recovered 4. quite satisfactorily from his injuries; in fact well enough to TRAINING enjoy all the benefits of his latest model "Hot Rod". Nice goin' Ike! -Congratulations to "Daddy O'Neill", who after many attempts for leave is homeward bound aboard the USS Whitley. Also aboard is Sabadish, RM2 doing his last tour of sea duty before discharge. Returning from emergency leave we find Swank, YN3. If you have noticed the bright gleam in his eye lately, it's due to the many nights he spent in a Stateside hospital, sitting up with a sick friend in all the traditional white of a nurse's uniform. To an irritating but good friend, we say farewell. Namely a feathered creature known as "Pete". To the buzzards of Guantanamo Bay,, we of the TraGrp bequeath one bottle of bicarbonate of soda. They will sure need it. With a great deal of enthusiasm, the officers, chief petty officers and our other enlisted men are striving for a major victory in the coming bowling tournament. Good iuck to all of you. A paratrooper is a soldier who climbs down from trees he never climbed up. NEWS AND VIEWS FROM WGBY By J. L. H. Yes, friend, there is an Armed Forces Radio Station in Gtmo. Though you may have searched all over your radio dial for us, to no avail-keep tryin' we're there. You might be lucky someday and pick us up-with this bitter note, we begin. At this moment we are bowing low in humble apologies to you-all. We realize the unnecessary noises and occasionally, dead silences that have been accompanying our broadcasts of late are very annoying and not at all assets of good broadcasting. Believe me, we are working like madmen trying to keep things going in their present dilapidated condition. Here's the whole problem in a nutshell: our present equipment has served well and long, but its time is up and is way past its state of usefulness; to be blunt, it is rapidly falling apart! "There'll be some changes made," that's a song you know, but down here it's our prayer. By way of assurance to you listeners and ourselves, too, we'll say thats "straight dope." There will be some changes made! Just when, we're not sure, but let's hope it will be soon. Here's some encouragement on the time angle; our new equipment is present and accounted for, but there are a few important details that have to be taken care of before installation of said gear is realizedhow soon? Though we're at a standstill on the equipment problem, temporarily, other changes are already in effect. One that will interest you listeners is our change in schedule. Effective next week, it looks like a Stateside program now with the big shows (Jack Benny, Bob Hope, etc.) at their regular time. Said schedule will be attached to Friday's Papoose each week. Copies of it will be found at various counters at NOB Ship's Service, NAS Ship's Service and the Marine PX. Alsothere're free, too! We've undergone several changes in staff in the past two months. Here's the gang to date, in case anyone is interested, "Benny" Bones and Barbara Johnson are still here, along with an additional civilian, Graham Abernathy. "Ab" is the boy who gets you up early in the morning. On the white hat side, we have Murray, "Useless" Grant, Lee Messa, Jim Herrington, and new-comer, Johnny Bell. Oh, yes, Useless is our new program director-along with the "Hawthorne Thing." About the Hawthorne Thingwe've heard it, which justifies this warning: the Thing is on every Wednesday morning at 0900. If your nerves are up to par, listen to it some Wednesday. Another item worthy of mention, HOW TO MAKE YOUR CHILD A JUVENILE DELINQUENT Of course, we do not know of anyone who would admit that he desires to do such a thing as this, but there are so many parents who develop delinquent children just as definitely as though they carefully planned to do so. In other words, they follow the five principles which one authority gives as the best means of making a child delinquent. According to Lieutenant Ralph Brophy, head of the police juvenile bureau in Des Moines, Iowa, here are the rules to follow and juvenile delinquency will result: 1. Don't give your child any religious or spiritual training. 2. Don't let him discuss his plans, problems or pleasures, so he will not develop affection, security or trust in you. 3. Don't open your home to his companions; they will muss up the place. Don't be concerned where he spends his free time. 4. Never praise your child for his worthwhile effort because he might take advantage of your effort and try harder to please you in the future. 5. Just don't pay any attention to what your child does or says. He should be able to take care of himself in this day and age. The lieutenant goes further and declares: "Boys and girls who attend Sunday School and church regularly are not likely to fall into the arms of the law as delinquent children." This statement was made following a bureau survey of children's activities during 1946. At least 83 per cent of the 1946 delinquents were not regular attendants at any church or Sunday school and only few of the remaining 17 per cent attended church or Sunday school with any degree of regularity, s a i d Lieutenant Brophy. The current crusade emphasis of church school attendance, therefore, is not a mere effort to get names added to a roll. One purpose is thus to make a material effort to reduce the appalling amount of juvenile delinquency everywhere so apparent. Good Sunday school and adequate playgrounds are the two best known deterrents of childhood misbehavior. your ideas and suggestions-they are always welcome and greatly appreciated as it's your radio station. We are more than willing to give any local talent air time if you will let us know about it. That's just about all from us for now. In the meantime, let's hear from you! Our phone number is 395, or better yet, pay us a visit at our studio in the Fleet Recreation Building. THE INDIAN Page Three

PAGE 4

PaEe Four THE INDIAN Otmo. Bay-12 Aug 48-2500 By Bud Johnson At the Quantico Golf Club, Quantico, Va., on July 26, 27 and 28, four players from the 5th, 6th, 10th, 15th, Severn River Naval Command and the Potomac River Naval Command. Potomac River Naval Command, host for the 72-hole medal play tournament, placed the first three men.followed by the 5th Naval District with one man. Only one man from the starting field of twentythree golfers managed to shoot better than 300 on the very tough course at Quantico. This was Sgt. Brovdas with a total of 296 and in doing so, he broke his own course record of 68 when he 3-putted the eighteenth green for a 67. At the end of 36 holes, Lt. Kinder of the P R N C, one of the foremost golfers in the service, was leading, the field with two subpar rounds. In second place by two strokes was Chief North of VU-10 in spite of several three-put greens and two unplayable lies. Third place at the end of 36 was the very capable golfer, Major Condrad of Quantico, and in spite of his very slow playing, he finished 2nd for the tournament. The first three men, Lt. Kinder, Chief North and Major Conrad, started the final 36 holes on Wednesday, July 28. This was the turning point in the tournament, since most of the participants seem to think that without the slow playing of Major Conrad, Lt. Kinder and Chief North would have finished much better than 3rd and 6th respectively. LCdr. McWilliams, although off to a bad start, at the half way mark showed the Virginians what it takes to be a two time Georgia State Amateur Champion when he moved up from 8th to .5th place. Chief Marchel, also of VU-10 with only two years experience in the golfing field made a good showing when he finished in front of eleven other players. The first four winners were as follows: Sgt. Brovdas, USMC, 296; Major Conrad, USMC, 300; Lt. Kinder, USN, 301; Lt.(jg) Lewis, USN, 303. Congratulations Gtmo. golfers for your fine showing in the tournament. The past week saw Guantanamo's championship hopes in two sports dashed against the rocks by stiff competition in both baseball and softball. The softball team fared better against ComTen competition, copping the title in four straight triumphs. The baseball team, on the other hand, lost its first game against Roosevelt Roads and fought a losing battle against the weather in an effort to complete its schedule. As a result, San Juan won the championship by virtue of a sixteen inning contest against Gtmo's conqueror, Roosevelt Roads. The score of the marathon game was 3-2. In the Group Six eliminations for softball which was held in Charleston, Gtmo's sluggers fought their way to the semi-final round of the tournament before they finally went down in defeat. In spite of the loss, the team has a fine record against the best teams the Navy could field and they certainly represented the Base in fine style. A measure of solace was given Gtmo's defeated baseball team w h e n transportation difficulties forced ComTen officials to forego sending its representative to the Group Six eliminations in New Orleans. It must have been a tough bit of news for the San Juan boys, but our team must have felt a little better knowing that they didn't miss anything anyway. Welcome back boys and thanks for the fine representation you afforded the Base. An uneventful week is the plague of all reporters, and this past week has really been a quiet one. Big news of the week is the now familiar sight of Sgt. McCullough haunting the Sergeat Major's office in an attempt to extend for another two years of duty here in Guantanamo. Bon voyage to 2ndLt. and Mrs. H. D. Elms and all the little Elms, and best wishes for a pleasant tour of duty in Washington. A squad of thirty hopefuls has been cavorting around the diamond under the tutelage of SSgt. "Wolf" Wolfkeil, Post baseball coach. The team will miss the services of SSgt. Rose, SSgt. Kashmar and Corporal Parmentier, who have been mainstays of the local nine during the past two years, but who are now leading the Short Timers' roster. However, a lot of new talent has turned up, and if Wolf can develop a couple of first string chuckers, the Post team should be able to hold its own. SSgt. Nordine, captain, coach, and anchor man of the Post Enlisted Bowling Team has been putting the boys through their paces, and will tell anyone willing to listen, that he has a chamiponship contender. Sgt. Fallon is in charge of an ambitious project to convert all the local land-bound Leathernecks into the amphibious model. Each afternoon, the Post swimming pool is well populated with polliwogs attempting to win their water wings. NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 15 Aug. to Saturday 21 Aug. Sunday GREEN DOLPHIN STREET Lana Turner Van Heflin Monday CRIMINAL COURT Tom Conway Martha O'Driscoll Shorts: March of Time and Community Sing Tuesday DRIFTWOOD Walter Brennan Ruth Warwick Wednesday GOLDEN EARRINGS Marlene Dietrich Ray Milland Thursday SHORT SUBJECT PROGRAM Friday PERILS OF PAULINE Betty Hutton John Lund Saturday CASS TIMBERLANE Spencer Tracy Lana Turner It's better for a sailor to get something in his eye and wink than to wink and get something in his eye. To a destroyer whose light was visible at night, the convoy commander signaled: "Pardon me, but your ship is showing." This gag made the rounds as the 7th Marine Regiment advanced on Jap cave strongholds. It was passed from man to man, shouted from behind boulders, whispered into ears in the underbrush. "Gonna be tough sleddin' today." "How come?" "No snow." "I'm Brave Hawk," said the InS dian chief, introducing himself to a paleface. "This is my son, Fighting Bird," he continued, "and this is my grandson, Four-Engined Bomber." * A boot took the Chief's advice and put on a clean pair of socks every day. A week passed. "Where are your shoes?" growled the Chief. "I can't get them on over seven pairs of socks," replied the boot. Foreign sailor: "Flag ship? Why the flag ship of our navy is so big the captain travels around the deck in an automobile." American sailor: "That's nothing. The galley of our flag ship is so big the cook has to go through the Irish stew in a submarine to see if the potatoes are done." FOR SALE-Ten dresses, size 14. Call 5-206. Pare Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-12 Aug 48-2500


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EXY9KSE12_XCHNZJ INGEST_TIME 2015-05-14T20:01:32Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00021
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES