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Indian
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Vol. III, No. 19 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 15 May 1948


NAS OFFICER DEVISES
NEW MACHINE

By Edwin B. Shelton, AF3
This past Sunday, PACT A. R.
Benton, USN, Naval Air Station Assistant Supply Officer, demonstrated his invention to some fifteen persons. This is the first of its kind ever to utilize the motion of the ocean's surface to produce energy that is beneficial to the
Navy and mankind.
The idea for this equipment was
first thought of by Mr. Benton around two years ago while planning a cheap source of power that could be used in farming. The idea was finally put to action when an observation of the expense of operating a gasoline driven boat and the effect of the waves in the water surface on the small craft was observed. He noticed that the craft would rise and decline as it passed over the wake of another boat. With this thought in mind he immediately rigged equipment to measure the rise and fall of the sea swells as well as their rate of travel. Convinced that his idea was useful, he checked with LCDR R. E.
Pearce, the Aerology Officer, for S regularity of the action on a year
round basis. With confirmation, that the source of power was dependable, the first machine was constructed, modified and abandoned.
After many changes in the original, the second machine was constructed with the help of Mr. Grover.
Scrap lumber and metal set wheels into motion by water action and was employed to generate electrical current. Having spent some three hundred spare time hours in the construction of his machine, Mr.
Benton was rewarded by the acclaims of all persons that witnessed its operation. Lieutenant E.
H. Cavanaugh, Ships Repair Division, Naval Station, said, "This is the most practical and cheap source
of power ever witnessed by me."
The experiment was recommended
for submission to Washington for screening by the Naval Department of Research and Invention.

See y o u r Disbursing Officer
about the Bond Allotment PlanToday.


HONOLULU COUPLE

SEARCH FOR MISSING
AIRCRAFT

By Edwin B. Shelton AF3
A Navy PBY was reported missing last Sunday morning, after departure from NAS Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico for Key West, Fla. The aircraft carrying twelve persons, was first reported missing at three A.M. Sunday morning, after failure to arrive at it's destination.
Captain W. 0. Gallery, USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station disclosed yesterday, an "all-out" effort is being made to find the missing PBM that took off from Roosevelt Roads, P. R.
The crew including, as Pilot, Commander T. L. Watkins, Executive Officer of Roosevelt Roads, and LCDR. P. S. Ravey, Operations Officer of the same activity. LCDR. Helen Marie Coen, USNR was aboard as passenger. Other persons were, A. Leopard, AD2; Boston E. Johns, AETM2; H. R. Smith, ADI; L. R. Trottier, AD2; H. T. Campbell, SKV3; J. T. Christoffersen, AETM3; F. R. Grimes, FN; Airman Jack Hummel and Corporal Farrel Adkins, USA. This information was released by Washington, and the next of kin notified.
An all-out air-search was organized to rescue the downed aircraft, which included the Utility Squadron of this Station, along with the 5th Rescue Squadron USAF, and Naval Patrol Squadrons of the Eastern Coastal and Caribbean Areas. Participating Air units were VP-ML-5 with 5 planes from Roosvelt Roads; Coco Solo Squadrons: furnishing three PBM's from Trinidad; with VP-AM-4, PBY Squadron of Norfolk. The Air Force representation of two B-17's from Ramey Field, P. R., and the two CA-10's (PBY) were sent from McGill Field, Fla. Flying vigilant round-the-clock patrols, the airmen of the 31 aircraft have covered an area exceeding 1000 square miles of Ocean and Island territory, finding only the wreckage of an airplane of a crash around a year ago.


ON BAHAMA ISLAND
Doctor and Mrs. Kaye of Honolulu came to the United States and drove across the continent to Miami, Florida where a 37y2 foot ketch named "Lady" was purchased. The doctor and his wife had planned a trip from Miami to Honolulu. On the 20th day of April, the Lady set sail for the Bahamas. Last Saturday, the 8th of May, a stop was made at a small lagoon at Lee Stocking Island, one of the Bahamas group. The couple had received radio reports of rough weather ahead and this anchorage seemed like a perfect spot for the night. This small lagoon is surrounded by land on three sides and opens to the north. Saturday night the couple was awakened by the huge waves that were breaking against their little ketch. The wind had changed to a north wind which left them directly in the path of the storm. Dragging anchor considerably, another anchor was hurriedly dropped, but still they continued to drag. Starting the engines, hoping to get to the open sea, the mouth of the lagoon was missed and their little boat was run aground. The Lady was almost totally wrecked on rocky reefs that abound here at this point.
Fresh Water Problem
The couple's greatest problem was their water supply as salt water had gotten into their fresh water tanks and left them with but seven gallons of fresh water that was held in an emergency tank. This, and food was unloaded by use of a breeches buoy, as well as other supplies that were being carried on the boat. Marooned on the island, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the couple was sighted by a Navy PBM from Naval Air Station, Guantanamo, which was on patrol, looking for the missing Roosevelt Roads PBM. The Air Station PBM dropped a note telling the doctor and his wife that if they needed medical attention, to wave an American flag and medical supplies would be dropped, if not to lay on the beach and await further instructions. The (Continued on Page Four)


SEARCH PARTY FINDS STRANDED








Page Two TEIDA


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672

Saturday, 15 May 1948

U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr.
Commanding - Naval Station
B. M. Thomson--------------------Editor
Chap. E. E. Bosserman--__..Staff Advisor LtCdr. R. E. Pearce J. E.Sasser, DK3 Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough
Louis Kitchen, Y2 E. B. Shelton, AFS G. B. Vaughn, RD3 R. E. Welsh, YN2
Photos by Courtesy NAS Photo Lab. THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPF. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise.

IN APPRECIATION

At the recent funeral of the great Cuban patriot Enrique Thomas y Thomas, Colonel of the Cuban Army of Liberation, the Naval Operating Base sent ten sailors and ten marines with Lieutenant Comnmander Van Wolkenten as officerin-charge. The flag was flown at half mast one hour that day. The following letter of appreciation was received from the late colonel's daughter: "Sir, These lines will serve as sincere testimony and deep feeling of gratitude for the gentility shown by you and your subordinate personnel during the illness and death of my unforgetable father, Colonel of the Liberator Army, Enrique Thomas y Thomas.
"I fail to find words to express in the name of my entire family and myself, our most profound recognition of the kind attentions extended and I desire to express to all those who, including yourself, had honored us with their condescension, the testimony of our undying gratitude."
The letter was addressed to Captain C. E. Battle, USN, Commander, Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

His Boss: "Dodson, I found this long blonde hair on the back seat of my limousine. My wife's hair is black."
Chauffeur: "I'll give you an ex,planation, Sir."
Boss: Explanation nothing! What I want is an introduction!"


Business is
r e a 1 picking
0 L up in the Baby
D epa r tmen t.
Four have been
born since t h e
last edition o f
the Indian:
Joseph Vincente
N born 5 May to
TES to MoM3 Joseph
L. and Mrs. Vincente, USCG; Terese Ann Shearin born 7 May to APic John and Mrs. Shearin, VU-10; Shirley Jeanne Vinson born 8 May to Lt. Jack and Mrs. Vinson, USN; Thomas Andrew Goff born 9 May to AMM1c Donald and Mrs. Goff, USN.
Lt(jg) Albert J. Kukral has received orders and will leave with his family via NATS 19 May for separation from the Service. It has really been nice having you around here, Doctor, and our very best wishes for a happy and successful civilian life go with you!
As a result of the reports of the District Medical Officer and the Forrestal Committee on Hospital and Medical Services, after their inspections of this activity, Mr. 0. R. Emory, Fire Protection Coordinator, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and Mr. B. E. Rice, Fire Fighter (General), 10th Naval District, recently made a fire protection inspection of the Hospital. They were amazed that such a fire hazard could exist in a modern Navy and it is hoped that their reports will produce prompt action in the construction of that new Hospital which has been in the 'talking stage' for so long.
Monday night the Hospital softball team again defeated the team from the USS DIABLO. The game started out badly with the Diablo taking a 7 to 1 lead in the first inning. However, the Hospital boys soon got all the errors out of their system and settled down to playing good ball. The tying and winning runs were pushed over in the last of the seventh. Mitchell, HMC, surprised some of us with his prowess as a pitcher and his base running was out of this world. We feel sure that he established a record of some kind in the amount of time consumed in going from third to home - he was forced in when a man was walked with the bases loaded. Mitchell took a lot of kidding from the Diablo team and from the stands, but he was a grand sport through it all and enjoyed the game more than anyone else. It's too bad he waited until the end of the season to make an appearance.

"Everyone in town is talking," reported the wife, "about t h e Smith's quarrel. Some are taking her part and some his."
"And," replied the husband, "I suppose a few eccentric individuals are minding their own business."


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 16 May 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0640-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN
(Catholic)
Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR







CHAPAItS CORNER
"WELL DONE?"
Sooner or later new orders come. When they do there's anxiety for one or many. Thoughts of leaving, awaiting relief, plans for leave, packing and departing fill one's mind. New duty enlivens ambition. New surroundings and friends add interest to the job. With perseverance through the days and weeks one performs his duties assigned. When he does this conscientiously on the completion of his tour he deserves the "well done" that his shipmates readily offer.
It was the same way during the war when every minor operation was most important to those who participated in them. Men planned and prayed. Men worked and hoped. For their untiring efforts they then deserved the praise they received on each separate occasion.
Life is like a longer tour. We're qualified for duty by our very existence. Then it's up to us to use our God-given talents in serving Him and performing the duties of our state in life. It takes perseverance, patience, and prayer to endure the trials that arise. It takes fortitude and conviction to overcome the obstacles of unbelief and lack of hope. With these, on its completion, w e anticipate t h e words of Our Master, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant; because thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will set thee over many things: enter thou into the joy of the Lord."
FOR SALE: - 1938 4 door Buick
Sedan with 61,000 miles of satisfactory service. Call 373 during working hours - 5-113 after
working hours.


Page Two


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN Page Three


P'L E E T Still smokin,'
b u t simmering
down from peak
of activity ... .
t h e Training
G Z. Group once
again approache s a breathin'
spell. However,
TRAI N JNG this slack period finds us losing
several of our officers who certainly could have used a rest but instead find themselves faced with the ol' movin' problems. Heading the list of change of duty orders is Captain L. W. Creighton departing about the 29th of June ... CDR. L J. Bellis, who is heading for a course in Logistics at the War College, Newport, R. I. . . . also heading for the same . destination is CDR. R. R. Joerg, III, who'll be burning the mid-nite oil in the Junior course. Gone is LCDR Reinhardt of the ASW department who is reporting to PhibBase, Little Creek, Va. After about four modifications to his basic orders, Lt. L.
Moore, leaving today, will report to Annapolis, Md. for a course in the Post Graduate School. Another propective loss is Ltjg. "Chuck"
Harding who'll be catching a tour of duty aboard the USS GEARING (DD-710). We'll be lookin' forward to seeing' him here for refresher training in the future. Last on the slate is ChMach Collins who in our opinion gets the choicest duty, he'll be reporting to the USS ATA
98 (in Pearl Harbor).
From the wit department . .. The
son of one of our officers asking his daddy "if Mr. Stevenson winds his car up" . . . subject officer is one of Crosby station wagon set.
Three Chiefs the other nite lifting Ryan's "one lung Austin" over a match that someone had carelessly
dropped.
Miscellaneous Musings. "Wheels
McAndrew's loss of "Lucy" Mc Nulty, his right arm, to the Damage Control department was their gain.
However, "Ack Ack" Aquaviva we are sure can fill the gap . . . Three more of the training Group Shipriders are going north for added education . . . and stateside liberty in the city of brotherly love . . .
lucky three are Johnson BMC . . .
Blythe DCC . . . and Wall FP1.
What happened to those frequent, but frequent, trips to the Ship's Service that Christian FC3 used to make? ? ? I wonder what would happen to Devane if he ever came down with laryngitis? ? Does Allen known that Lenzi is cutting his leave short . .. couldn't stand being away so long. We are sure we've got the ace salesman on the Base ... jus' try and get past the Supply Office without buying a bond . . . . Lt. Reinhold sure rates a vote
of thanks for the results he's getting towards that 100%. Question: What is the percentage who play
the 19th as to those that play 18.


NAS SLIPSTREAM

This is the "Old Windsock" bringing you the Scoop of the Week for Naval Air Station, this week I have much to tell.
Wedding bells rang out on Saturday, May 8th for M. A. Shelton AD3 of the TDD Unit when he took the final steps with Miss Rosalee Richardson of Caimanera at three P.M. that date. The couple were united in Holy Matrimony by Chaplain Elmer E. Bosserman in the NOB Chapel. With the firing of flash bulbs the couple departed from the Station on their honeymoon.
Big news item this week is the gentle noise that is arising from the NAS Ball Club. This past Thursday they pulled their usual trick of trampling their opponents in the Sport of Softball. This week they beat the Naval Station with a score of 13 - 0 which closes the season and the Naval Air Station team proudly takes the title of the Naval Operating Base Champions. The first time, in this sport of softball for the Naval Air Station. The game was a real showing of fine ball playing on the Naval Air Station's part. NAS starting the game off with five runs in the first inning, followed by Gadomski tripling with bases loaded in the fifth. He also held his usual good pitching arm by allowing only three hits by the Naval Station during the game. The season's score set Naval Air Station in the lead with twelve games won and none lost. Thanks, Team for putting Naval Air Station on the map in the "World of Sports"!

DRY DOCK CHATTER

The fellas on Bay Hill have a right to be envious of the crew on the AFDL-47. There is hot water in abundance on the large dry dock, so no wonder they shower and shave on board.
The AFDL-1 docked the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter PONDORA this week, and the AFDL-47 undocked the M.S. PONCE, on Thursday. The Ponce undocking operation was delayed due to minor trouble encountered during the docking period.
Martin and Abbott, will soon be holding their heads high, as soon as they test out their newly designed "Chain Tumbler." (That is if the contraption works!)
"Porky", "Red" and Poncho have finished decorating their workshop, and from here it doesn't look bad at all. Pretty snazzy boys.
Gyuro, president of the "Portside Social Athletic Club," has located his new clubhouse office in the boiler room. It is not quite furnished in the executive manner befitting a president, but Gyuro says it is OK.


In t h e past
w e e k t h e offic e r s' bowling team of VU-10 def eated all ot h e r officers' bowling t e a ms
- on the Base,
\-1IT with the help of
their Coach Lt.
( j g ) Mayfield
who hit a high score of 642. They also were challanged by the Chiefs' league but the Chiefs were defeated.
Philip R. Liberty, left for the States last Saturday for a course o f instruction at t h e Yeoman School, NTS, Norfolk, Va. Upon completion of his training he will return to the Squadron.
We take this time to congratulate John R. Disman, who made AM3 recently.
Gather around all you eager beavers and I will tell you something you have been waiting to hear for a long time. From all reports, we are, going to have a Squadron Party very soon and I believe there will be some beautiful damsels from Guantanamo City. Will try and give you more dope about the party next week.

ELECTRONICS NEWS

"Duky" (Coupling Capacitor) Mann, has f o u n d a mate for "Sparky," the Electronic pooch. She stands about 6" high, blonde, and brown eyes. Before you know it, we may have a whole bunch of electronic pooches. Who knows? ?
"Shorty" was all set for a nice, big, cold, juicy slice of pineapple last Sunday night, only to find out that he was locked out of the shop. That's 0. K. "Shorty," that walk to the Barracks and back was good for you.
Have you noticed the way Lance and Fritz have been acting lately? They are due to be civilians in about 60 days. The fellows in the shop have them believing they should ship over. How about it boys? ? Fritz hasn't made it public, but it is rumored that he is seriously considering staying with us after he is discharged, to act in the capacity as Electronic Engineer at the shop.
Don't forget to give your congratulations to Chase. He has just taken the fatal step. They say he spent his honeymoon at Glenmore Lake Estates, New York. Tell us Chase, has she gotten you trained pretty well yet? ?
Lance refuses to study down at the shop recently. He says it is too hot at the shop. It could be the weather, but me thinks it is probably "Irish's" "hot" love letters that George objects to. How about it boys?? (They say "Irish" can really use his Imagination when it comes to "hot" love letters, just in case any of you need advice.)


THE INDIAN


Pagze Three







Poe *rWri THE INDIANGtoBa-SMy4-0.


HOSPITAL NOSED OUT BY
TRAGRP - SCORE 2 - 0
Wednesday night t h e Fleet Training Group defeated the Naval Hospital by a score of 2 - 0 to take possession of second place in the Base Softball league.
It was a well-played, thrilling game throughout. The Hospital had a couple of tough breaks which might have cost them runs, but with Moore's steady pitching had the breaks been in their favor, the Hospital couldn't have gotten many runs. O'Brien in left field played a really stellar game. With three catches of fly balls in one inning, and the stopping of a ground ball that looked like a sure home run which held the runner to a double, his play was almost a one-man defense.
The staff of the Hospital are well pleased with the showing the team has made all season. Much credit i s due Captain Robbins, MOIC, for the support he has given the team and his efforts in getting personnel out to see the games.

WAS THE CANE AND DOG
REALLY NECESSARY?
Mr. J. C. Johnson, American citizen employee and umpire extraordinary on Wednesday night of this week, put on a little extra entertainment for the benefit of the players and fans at the Hospital - F 1 e e t Training Group game. Promptly at 1930 with all hands set for the game to begin, Mr. Johnson wearing dark glasses, carrying a white cane and lead by a seeing-eye dog, strolled out to the plate, tapped around with his cane until he found home plate and then in a lusty voice cried 'Play ball!"
Needless to say, the act was well received by the crowd. A sense of humor is one of the prime requisites of a good umpire and Mr. Johnson certainly showed that his is not lacking. During the entire season he has done much to add to the enjoyment of game for players and fans alike. Our hats are off to Mr. Johnson, Mr. C. B. Merge and all the other umpires for their help in making the Softball season the success it was.

ALL-NAVY TENNIS
(SEA) - The All-Navy tennis tournament will b e held at the Naval Academy during the week beginning 11 July to select a team to represent the Navy when it meets the' Army and Air Force for the annual Leech Trophy.
Eliminations are now being conducted throughout fleet and shore activities to send finalists to Annapolis, Maryland.
The Leech Cup matches will be played in the Washington D. C., area on 31 July.


AIR STATION COPS BASE TITLE WITH 2-0 VICTORY

The mighty Naval Air Station nine came though beautifully downing all opponents to become the new Base Softball Champions. With the flawless fielding and beautiful pitching by Gadomski, they slugged their way through to really earn the title.
In the last game of the league, Naval Hospital and Fleet Training Group played off their tie for second honors in the hard fought game. Training Group emerged the victor in a 2-0 shut-out score. Moore, pitching for Training Group and Sikorski for the Naval Hospital, displayed their best in an effort to bring their games through. With an outstanding lack of errors and excellent coordination of plays, both teams struggled furiously, and can well be proud of the fine show of sportsmanship of all concerned.
With the completion of the league play, the editor and staff of the Indian wish to extend to all teams who participated a hearty "Well Done."

SHIPWRECKED COUPLE
(Continued from Page One)
PBM landed in unusually rough water and dropped anchor in the small lagoon.
A small life boat that was carried on the Lady soon came alongside despite the two small holes in the bottom of it, carrying the doctor and his wife. Although the water was unusually rough, and great difficulty was encountered, the shipwrecked couple were soon hauled aboard.
Doctor and Mrs. Kaye, although uninjured, were flown to the Naval Air Station where they received care and clothing. The couple departed Thursday morning via Government Air to Nassau where they plan to salvage as much as possible from the wreck and continue their journey as planned.

CANADIAN DESTROYER TO VISIT GUANTANAMO

The Canadian destroyer, H.M.C. S. "Athabaska" will steam into Guantanamo B a y sometime o n Monday 24th of May. The visit will be informal.
Under the command of Commander J. S. Davis, R. C. N. The 2,745 ton destroyer has a crew of approximately 20 officer and 220 enlisted personnel.
The "Athabaska" is being transferred from the Atlantic to the Pacific command.
We bid the Commander and the crew of his ship "Welcome" and hope their stay at Guantanamo will be a very pleasant one.


40TH ANNIVERSARY OF
THE NAVY NURSE CORPS

Thursday the 13th of May was the fortieth anniversary o f the Navy Nurse Corps.
Although the Nurse Corps is a relatively young branch of the Navy, a Navy Surgeon in 1811 (9 years before the birth of, Florence Nightingale) recommended to the Secretary of the Navy that nurses be provided at Naval hospitals. The Navy Surgeon was Doctor W. P. C. Barton the first Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, but it wasn't until the 20th Century that the Navy was less reluctant to receive women into the Navy. Meanwhile, Navy doctors had only the assistance pf men assigned to them.
In 1898, the Hospital Corps was authorized to provide an organization of well trained men. By this time Navy nurses had developed the nursing profession in the Navy to the point of being indispensable. Florence Nightingale was the first to overcome the opposition of military leaders to women in t h e armed services. Four months after her arrival in Crimea, the death rate in military hospitals dropped from 42% to 2%.
The first Navy trained nurses, though not an official unit, were employed at the Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va., in 1896, to care for the Spanish-American War wounded.
Nurse Corps Created
Finally, in 1908, the Nurse Corps was a permanent establishment of the Navy. The first group of nurses consisted of a Superintendent, Chief Nurse and 18 nurses. With forty years of service to look back on the Corps has grown to 11,054 strong, serving the largest and strongest Navy in history.
The Navy Nurse of today holds the rank of a Commissioned Naval Officer and serves hospitals, dispensaries, hospital ships and hospital planes throughout the Navy. They have achieved a proud record in only forty years of service. Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz wrote in 1944:
"Officers of t h e Navy Nurse Corps are serving aboard hospital ships operating with forces of the Pacific Fleet and in hospitals at the rear and advanced bases in the Pacific Ocean areas.
"These nurses bring to the hospital organizations in the Pacific War Theatre the high standard of nursing service provided in the Naval Hospitals i n the United States. Their specialized knowledge and training and their devotion to duty are invaluable in providing the excellent hospital care given our sick and wounded. To the nurses who have volunteered their services wherever they may be required, we give our heartfelt thanks for duty well done."


S




















e


Gtmo. Bay--13 May 48--2500.


P Fur


T HE INDIAN




Full Text

PAGE 1

~~ca1't Vol. III, No. 19 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 15 May 1948 NAS OFFICER DEVISES NEW MACHINE By Edwin B. Shelton, AF3 This past Sunday, PACT A. R. Benton, USN, Naval Air Station Assistant Supply Officer, demonS strated his invention to some f ifteen persons. This is the first of its kind ever to utilize the motion of the ocean's surface to produce energy that is beneficial to the Navy and mankind. The idea for this equipment was first thought of by Mr. Benton around two years ago while planning a cheap source of power that could be used in farming. The idea was finally put to action when an observation of the expense of operating a gasoline driven boat and the effect of the waves in the water surface on the small craft was observed. He noticed that the craft would rise and decline as it passed over the wake of another boat. With this thought in mind he immediately rigged equipment to measure the rise and fall of the sea swells as well as their rate of travel. Convinced that his idea was useful, he checked with LCDR R. E. Pearce, the Aerology Officer, for regularity of the action on a year round basis. With confirmation, that the source of power was dependable, the first machine was constructed, modified and abandoned. After many changes in the original, the second machine was constructed with the help of Mr. Grover. Scrap lumber and metal set wheels into motion by water action and was employed to generate electrical current. Having spent some three hundred spare time hours in the construction of his machine, Mr. Benton was rewarded by the acclaims of all persons that witnessed its operation. Lieutenant E. H. Cavanaugh, Ships Repair Division, Naval Station, said, "This is the most practical and cheap source of power ever witnessed by me." The experiment was recommended for submission to Washington for screening by the Naval Depart.ment of Research and Invention. See y o u r Disbursing Officer about the Bond Allotment PlanToday. HONOLULU COUPLE SEARCH FOR MISSING AIRCRAFT By Edwin B. ,Shelton AF3 A Navy PBY was reported missing last Sunday morning, after departure from NAS Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico for Key West, Fla. The aircraft carrying twelve persons, was first reported missing at three A.M. Sunday morning, after failure to arrive at it's destination. Captain W. 0. Gallery, USN, Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Station disclosed yesterday, an "all-out" effort is being made to find the missing PBM that took off from Roosevelt Roads, P. R. The crew including, as Pilot, Commander T. L. Watkins, Executive Officer of Roosevelt Roads, and LCDR. P. S. Ravey, Operations Officer of the same activity. LCDR. Helen Marie Coen, USNR was aboard as passenger. Other persons were, A. Leopard, AD2; Boston E. Johns, AETM2; H. R. Smith, AD1; L. R. Trottier, AD2; H. T. Campbell, SKV3; J. T. Christoffersen, AETM3; F. R. Grimes, FN; Airman Jack Hummel and Corporal Farrel Adkins, USA. This information was released by Washington, and. the next of kin notified. An all-out air-search was organized to rescue the downed aircraft, which included the Utility Squadron of this Station, along with the 5th Rescue Squadron USAF, and Naval Patrol Squadrons of the Eastern Coastal and Caribbean Areas. Participating Air units were VP-ML-5 with 5 planes from Roosvelt Roads; Coco Solo Squadrons: furnishing three PBM's from Trinidad; with VP-AM-4, PBY Squadron of Norfolk. The Air Force representation of two B-17's from Ramey Field, P. R., and the two CA-10's (PBY) were sent from McGill Field, Fla. Flying vigilant round-the-clock patrols, the airmen of the 31 aircraft have covered an area exceeding 1000 square miles of Ocean and Island territory, finding only the wreckage of an airplane of a crash around a year ago. ON BAHAMA ISLAND Doctor and Mrs. Kaye of Honolulu came to the United States and drove across the continent to Miami, Florida where a 37% foot ketch named "Lady" was purchased. The doctor and his wife had planned a trip from Miami to Honolulu. On the 20th day of April, the Lady set sail for the Bahamas. Last Saturday, the 8th of May, a stop was made at a small lagoon at Lee Stocking Island, one of the Bahamas group. The couple had received radio reports of rough weather ahead and this anchorage seemed like a perfect spot for the night. This small lagoon is surrounded by land on three sides and opens to the north. Saturday night the couple was awakened by the huge waves that were breaking against their little ketch. The wind had changed to a north wind which left them directly in the path of the storm. Dragging anchor considerably, another anchor was hurriedly dropped, but still they continued to drag. Starting the engines, hoping to get to the open sea, the mouth of the lagoon was missed and their little boat was run aground. The Lady was almost totally wrecked on rocky reefs that abound here at this point. Fresh Water Problem The couple's greatest problem was their water supply as salt water had gotten into their fresh water tanks and left them with but seven gallons of fresh water that was held in an emergency tank. This, and food was unloaded by use of a breeches buoy, as well as other supplies that were being carried on the boat. Marooned on the island, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, the couple was sighted by a Navy PBM from Naval Air Station, Guantanamo, which was on patrol, looking for the missing Roosevelt Roads PBM. The Air Station PBM dropped a note telling the doctor and his wife that if they needed medical attention, to wave an American flag and medical supplies would be dropped, if not to lay on the beach and await further instructions. The (Continued on Page Four) SEARCH PARTY FINDS STRANDED c

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Page Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 15 May 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. Commanding -Naval Station B. M. Thomson-----------------Editor Chap. E. E. Bosserman-Staff Advisor LtCdr. R. E. Pearce J. E.Sasser, DK3 Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough Louis Kitchen, Y2 E. B. Shelton, AF3 G. B. Vaughn, RD3 R. E. Welsh, YN2 Photos by Courtesy NAS Photo Lab. THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise. IN APPRECIATION At the recent funeral of the great Cuban patriot Enrique Thomas y Thomas, Colonel of the Cuban Army of Liberation, the Naval Operating Base sent ten sailors and ten marines with Lieutenant Commander Van Wolkenten as officerin-charge. The flag was flown at half mast one hour that day. The following letter of appreciation was received from the late colonel's daughter: "Sir, These lines will serve as sincere testimony and deep feeling of gratitude for the gentility shown by you and your subordinate personnel during the illness and death of my unforgetable father, Colonel of the Liberator Army, Enrique Thomas y Thomas. "I fail to find words to express in the name of my entire family and myself, our most profound recognition of the kind attentions extended and I desire to express to all those who, including yourself, had honored us with their condescension, the testimony of our undying gratitude." The letter was addressed to Captain C. E. Battle, USN, Commander, Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. His Boss: "Dodson, I found this long blonde hair on the back seat of my limousine. My wife's hair is black." Chauffeur: "I'll give you an explanation, Sir." Boss: Explanation nothing! What I want is an introduction!" Business is re ally picking up in the Baby Department. Four have been born since t he last edition of the Indian: Joseph Vincente NOTE born 5 May to N T S to MoM3 Joseph L. and Mrs. Vincente, USCG; Terese Ann Shearin born 7 May to APIc John and Mrs. Shearin, VU-10; Shirley Jeanne Vinson born 8 May to Lt. Jack and Mrs. Vinson, USN; Thomas Andrew Goff born 9 May to AMM1c Donald and Mrs. Goff, USN. Lt(jg) Albert J. Kukral has received orders and will leave with his family via NATS 19 May for separation from the Service. It has really been nice having you around here, Doctor, and our very best wishes for a happy and successful civilian life go with you! As a result of the reports of the District Medical Officer and the Forrestal Committee on Hospital and Medical Services, after their inspections of this activity, Mr. 0. R. Emory, Fire Protection Coordinator, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and Mr. B. E. Rice, Fire Fighter (General), 10th Naval District, recently made a fire protection inspection of the Hospital. They were amazed that such a fire hazard could exist in a modern Navy and it is hoped that their reports will produce prompt action in the construction of that new Hospital which has been in the 'talking stage' for so long. Monday night the Hospital softball team again defeated the team from the USS DIABLO. The game started out badly with the Diablo taking a 7 to 1 lead in the first inning. However, the Hospital boys soon got all the errors out of their system and settled down to playing good ball. The tying and winning runs were pushed over in the last of the seventh. Mitchell, HMC, surprised some of us with his prowess as a pitcher and his base running was out of this world. We feel sure that he established a record of some kind in the amount of time consumed in going from third to home -he was forced in when a man was walked with the bases loaded. Mitchell took a lot of kidding from the Diablo team and from the stands, but he was a grand sport through it all and enjoyed the game more than anyone else. It's too bad he waited until the end of the season to make an appearance. "Everyone in town is talking," reported the wife, "about t h e Smith's quarrel. Some are taking her part and some his." "And," replied the husband, "I suppose a few eccentric individuals are minding their own business." Em-.* CHURCH SERVICES SUONDAY Sunday, 16 May 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 090-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN (Catholic) Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR I CHAPI.AltS CORNER "WELL DONE?" Sooner or later new orders come. When they do there's anxiety for one or many. Thoughts of leaving, awaiting relief, plans for leave, packing and departing fill one's mind. New duty enlivens ambition. New surroundings and friends add interest to the job. With perseverance through the days and weeks one performs his duties assigned. When he does this conscientiously on the completion of his tour he deserves the "well done" that his shipmates readily offer. It was the same way during the war when every minor operation was most important to those who participated in them. Men planned and prayed. Men worked and hoped. For their untiring efforts they then deserved the praise they received on each separate occasion. Life is like a longer tour. We're qualified for duty by our very existence. Then it's up to us to use our God-given talents in serving Him and performing the duties of our state in life. It takes perseverance, patience, and prayer to endure the trials that arise. It takes fortitude and conviction to overcome the obstacles of unbelief and lack of hope. With these, on its completion, we anticipate t h e words of Our Master, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant; because thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will set thee over many things: enter thou into the joy of the Lord." FOR SALE: -1938 4 door Buick Sedan with 61,000 miles of satisfactory service. Call 373 during working hours -5-113 after working hours. Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN Page Three "L E T Still smokin,' b u t simmering down from peak of activity ... th e Training Group once again approaches a breathin' spell. However, TRAIN ING this slack period finds us losing several of our officers who certainly could have used a rest but instead find themselves faced with the ol' movin' problems. Heading the list of change of duty orders is Captain L. W. Creighton departing about the 29th of June ...CDR. L J. Bellis, who is heading for a course in Logistics at the War College, Newport, R. I. ...also heading for the same. destination is CDR. R. R. Joerg, III, who'll be burning the mid-nite oil in the Junior course. Gone is LCDR ReinS hardt of the ASW department who is reporting to PhibBase, Little Creek, Va. After about four modifications to his basic orders, Lt. L. Moore, leaving today, will report to Annapolis, Md. for a course in the Post Graduate School. Another propective loss is Ltjg. "Chuck" Harding who'll be catching a tour of duty aboard the USS GEARING (DD-710). We'll be lookin' forward to seeing' him here for refresher training in the future. Last on the slate is ChMach Collins who in our opinion gets the choicest duty, he'll be reporting to the USS ATA 98 (in Pearl Harbor). From the wit department ..The son of one of our officers asking his daddy "if Mr. Stevenson winds his car up" ...subject officer is one of Crosby station wagon set. Three Chiefs the other nite lifting Ryan's "one lung Austin" over a match that someone had carelessly dropped. Miscellaneous Musings. "Wheels McAndrew's loss of "Lucy" Mc Nulty, his right arm, to the Damage Control department was their gain. However, "Ack Ack" Aquaviva we are sure can fill the gap ...Three more of the training Group Shipriders are going north for added education ...and stateside liberty in the city of brotherly love ... lucky three are Johnson 1fMC Blythe DCC ...and Wall FP1. What happened to those frequent, but frequent, trips to the Ship's Service that Christian FC3 used to make??? I wonder what would happen to Devane if he ever came down with laryngitis? ? Does Allen known that Lenzi is cutting his leave short ..couldn't stand being away so long. We are sure we've got the ace salesman on the Base jus' try and get past the Supply Office without buying a bond ....Lt. Reinhold sure rates a vote of thanks for the results he's getting towards that 100%. Question: What is the percentage who play the 19th as to those that play 18. NAS SLIPSTREAM This is the "Old Windsock" bringing you the Scoop of the Week for Naval Air Station, this week I have much to tell. Wedding bells rang out on Saturday, May 8th for M. A. Shelton AD3 of the TDD Unit when he took the final steps with Miss Rosalee Richardson of Caimanera at three P.M. that date. The couple were united in Holy Matrimony by Chaplain Elmer E. Bosserman in the NOB Chapel. With the firing of flash bulbs the couple departed from the Station on their honeymoon. Big news item this week is the gentle noise that is arising from the NAS Ball Club. This past Thursday they pulled their usual trick of trampling their opponents in the Sport of Softball. This week they beat the Naval Station with a score of 13 -0 which closes the season and the Naval Air Station team proudly takes the title of the Naval Operating Base Champions. The first time, in this sport of softball for the Naval Air Station. The game was a real showing of fine ball playing on the Naval Air Station's part. NAS starting the game off with five runs in the first inning, followed by Gadomski tripling with bases loaded in the fifth. He also held his usual good pitching arm by allowing only three hits by the Naval Station during the game. The season's score set Naval Air Station in the lead with twelve games won and none lost. Thanks, Team for putting Naval Air Station on the map in the "World of Sports"! DRY DOCK CHATTER The fellas on Bay Hill have a right to be envious of the crew on the AFDL-47. There is hot water in abundance on the large dry dock, so no wonder they shower and shave on board. The AFDL-1 docked the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter PONDORA this week, and the AFDL-47 undocked the M.S. PONCE, on Thursday. The Ponce undocking operation was delayed due to minor trouble encountered during the docking period. Martin and Abbott, will soon be holding their heads high, as soon as they test out their newly designed "Chain Tumbler." (That is if the contraption works!) "Porky", "Red" and Poncho have finished decorating their workshop, and from here it doesn't look bad at all. Pretty snazzy boys. Gyuro, president of the "Portside Social Athletic Club," has located his new clubhouse office in the boiler room. It is not quite furnished in the executive manner befitting a president, but Gyuro says it is OK. In the past wee k the offic e r s' bowling team of VU-10 defeated all < other officers' bowling tea ms ( on the Base, with the help of their Coach Lt. ( j g ) Mayfield who hit a high score of 642. They also were challanged by the Chiefs' league but the Chie fs were defeated. Philip R. Liberty, left for the States last Saturday for a course o f instruction at t h e Yeoman School, NTS, Norfolk, Va. Upon completion of his training he will return to the Squadron. We take this time to congratulate John R. Disman, who made AM3 recently. Gather around all you eager beavers and I will tell you something you have been waiting to hear for a long time. From all reports, we are. going to have a Squadron Party very soon and I believe there will be some beautiful damsels from Guantanamo City. Will try and give you more dope about the party next week. ELECTRONICS NEWS "Duky" (Coupling Capacitor) Mann, has found a mate for "Sparky," the Electronic pooch. She stands about 6" high, blonde, and brown eyes. Before you know it, we may have a whole bunch of electronic pooches. Who knows? ? "Shorty" was all set for a nice, big, cold, juicy slice of pineapple last Sunday night, only to find out that he was locked out of the shop. That's 0. K. "Shorty," that walk to the Barracks and back was good for you. 1 Have you noticed the way Lance and Fritz have been acting lately? They are due to be civilians in about 60 days. The fellows in the shop have them believing they should ship over. How about it boys? ? Fritz hasn't made it public, but it is rumored that he is seriously considering staying with us after he is discharged, to act in the capacity as Electronic Engineer at the shop. Don't forget to give your congratulations to Chase. He has just taken the fatal step. They say he spent his honeymoon at Glenmore Lake Estates, New York. Tell us Chase, has she gotten you trained pretty well yet? ? Lance refuses to study down at the shop recently. He says it is too hot at the shop. It could be the weather, but me thinks it is probably "Irish's" "hot" love letters that George objects to. How about it boys?? (They say "Irish" can really use his Imagination when it comes to "hot" love letters, just in case any of you need advice.) THE INDIAN Paze Three

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eTHE INDIAN HOSPITAL NOSED OUT BY TRAGRP -SCORE 2 -0 Wednesday night t h e Fleet Training Group defeated the Naval Hospital by a score of 2 -0 to take possession of second place in the Base Softball league. It was a well-played, thrilling game throughout. The Hospital had a couple of tough breaks which might have cost them runs, but with Moore's steady pitching had the breaks been in their favor, the Hospital couldn't have gotten many runs. O'Brien in left field played a really stellar game. With three catches of fly balls in one inning, *and the stopping of a ground ball that looked like a sure home run which held the runner to a double, his play was almost a one-man defense. The staff of the Hospital are well pleased with the showing the team has made all season. Much credit is due Captain Robbins, MOIC, for the support he has given the team and his efforts in getting personnel out to see the games. WAS THE CANE AND DOG REALLY NECESSARY? Mr. J. C. Johnson, American citizen employee and umpire extraordinary on Wednesday night of this week, put on a little extra entertainment for the benefit of the players and fans at the Hospital -F 1 e e t Training Group game. Promptly at 1930 with all hands set for the game to begin, Mr. Johnson wearing dark glasses, carrying a white cane and lead by a seeing-eye dog, strolled out to the plate, tapped around with his cane until he found home plate and then in a lusty voice cried 'Play ball!" Needless to say, the act was well received by the crowd. A sense of humor is one of the prime requisites of a good umpire and Mr. Johnson certainly showed that his is not lacking. During the entire season he has done much to add to the enjoyment of game for players and fans alike. Our hats are off to Mr. Johnson, Mr. C. B. 1Nergen and all the other umpires for their help in making the softball season the success it was. ALL-NAVY TENNIS (SEA) -The All-Navy tennis tournament will be held at the Naval Academy during the week beginning 11 July to select a team to represent the Navy when it meets the' Army and Air Force for the annual Leech Trophy. Eliminations are now being conducted throughout fleet and shore activities to send finalists to Annapolis, Maryland. The Leech Cup matches will be played in the Washington D. C., area on 31 July. AIR STATION COPS BASE TITLE WITH 2-0 VICTORY The mighty Naval Air Station nine came though beautifully downing all opponents to become the new Base Softball Champions. With the flawless fielding and beautiful pitching by Gadomski, they slugged their way through to really earn the title. In the last game of the league, Naval Hospital and Fleet Training Group played off their tie for second honors in the hard fought game. Training Group emerged the victor in a 2-0 shut-out score. Moore, pitching for Training Group and Sikorski for the Naval Hospital, displayed their best in an effort to 'bring their games through. With an outstanding lack of errors and excellent coordination of plays, both teams struggled furiously, and can well be proud of the fine show of sportsmanship of all concerned. With the completion of the league play, the editor and staff of the Indian wish to extend to all teams who participated a hearty "Well Done." SHIPWRECKED COUPLE (Continued from Page One) PBM landed in unusually rough water and dropped anchor in the small lagoon. A small life boat that was carried on the Lady soon came alongside despite the two small holes in the bottom of it, carrying the doctor and his wife. Although the water was unusually rough, and great difficulty was encountered, the shipwrecked couple were soon hauled aboard. Doctor and Mrs. Kaye, although uninjured, were flown to the Naval Air Station where they received care and clothing. The couple departed Thursday morning via Government Air to Nassau where they plan to salvage as much as possible from the wreck and continue their journey as planned. CANADIAN DESTROYER TO VISIT GUANTANAMO The Canadian destroyer, H.M.C. S. "Athabaska" will steam into Guantanamo B a y sometime o n Monday 24th of May. The visit will be informal. Under the command of Commander J. S. Davis, R. C. N. The 2,745 ton destroyer has a crew of approximately 20 officer and 220 enlisted personnel. The "Athabaska" is being transferred from the Atlantic to the Pacific command. We bid the Commander and the crew of his ship "Welcome" and hope their stay at Guantanamo will be a very pleasant one. 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE NAVY NURSE CORPS Thursday the 13th of May was the fortieth anniversary of the Navy Nurse Corps. Although the Nurse Corps is a relatively young branch of the Navy, a Navy Surgeon in 1811 (9 years before the birth of, Florence Nightingale) recommended to the Secretary of the Navy that nurses be provided at Naval hospitals. The Navy Surgeon was Doctor W. P. C. Barton the first Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, but it wasn't until the 20th Century that the Navy was less reluctant to receive women into the Navy. Meanwhile, Navy doctors had only the assistance of men assigned to them. In 1898, the Hospital Corps was authorized to provide an organization of well trained men. By this time Navy nurses had developed the nursing profession in the Navy to the point of being indispensable. Florence Nightingale was the first to overcome the opposition of military leaders to women in t he armed services. Four months after her arrival in Crimea, the death rate in military hospitals dropped from 42% to 2%. The first Navy trained nurses, though not an official unit, were employed at the Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va., in 1896, to care for the Spanish-American War wounded. Nurse Corps Created Finally, in 1908, the Nurse Corps was a permanent establishment of the Navy. The first group of nurses consisted of a Superintendent, Chief Nurse and 18 nurses. With forty years of service to look back on the Corps has grown to 11,054 strong, serving the largest and strongest Navy in history. The Navy Nurse of today holds the rank of a Commissioned Naval Officer and serves hospitals, dispensaries, hospital ships and hospital planes throughout the Navy. They have achieved a proud record in only forty years of service. Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz wrote in 1944: "Officers of t h e Navy Nurse Corps are serving aboard hospital ships operating with forces of the Pacific Fleet and in hospitals at the rear and advanced bases in the Pacific Ocean areas. "These nurses bring to the hospital organizations in the Pacific War Theatre the high standard of nursing service provided in the Naval Hospitals i n the United States. Their specialized knowledge and training and their devotion to duty are invaluable in providing the excellent hospital care given our sick and wounded. To the nurses who have volunteered their services wherever they may be required, we give our heartfelt thanks for duty well done." Gtmo. Bay-13 May 48-2500. THE INDIAN P Four


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