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Indian

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Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay Cuba
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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Vol. III, No. 16 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 24 April 1948


BASE FIRE EQUIPMENT LOANED TO CAIMANERA

Upon request of Lieutenant Daniel Rebollar of the Cuban Navy, Captain of the port of Caimanera, the Base has loaned valuable firefighting equipment to protect the homes of the citizens of that town, and in particular, of those citizens who are employed at this Base. It is hoped that the five-hundred gallon per minute pumper, together with a large quantity of hose, will be able to extinguish quickly any conflagration which may occur in any section of the town and thus prevent disastrous fires such as occurred in June 1946 and in March of this year.
On Wednesday, April 1st, an LCM from the Fleet Boat Pool drew up smartly at the State Pier in Caimanera and lowered its bow ramp. The Base Fire Marshal, Boatswain A. M. Christiansen, U. S. N., drove his jeep with the firefighting equipment in tow onto the pier amid the cheers of the local populace. Brief ceremonies, then took place during which Commander Robertson, in the name of the Base Commander presented the equipment to the town and demonstrated its effectiveness by pumping two heavy streams of water.

THE LOW DOWN ON
ARTIFICIAL RAIN

Many people have been inquiring, half jokingly, half seriously, why someone doesn't take a plane up and drop some dry ice to relieve the drought on the Base. In view of the definite interest everyone has about rain these days it may be "seeding" a cloud with dry ice.
Dry ice does not "create" rainit merely causes the moisture present to condense into drops large enough to fall. For man-made rain, it is absolutely necessary to have clouds with liquid water droplets colder than 32 degrees fahrenheit in the upper levels.
A plane must fly into or over the cloud above the freezing level and scatter small pellets of dry ice. Five pounds of dry ice ground up into the size of peas will seed about
(Continued on Page Three)


EDUCATION ON WHEELS

A new mobile unit, now touring Army, Navy and Marine Corps Bases in the southern section of the country, is equipped to render complete USAFI services. The mobile unit has all ready made two stops. At Scott Field, St. Louis, Mo. and enrolled 259 men in two days and at Memphis, Tenn., 403 were en- rolled in three days.
The units consists of a sedan, tractor-truck and trailer, carrying complete courses in history, mathematics, and foreign languages with over a hundred or so other subjects.
At the present more than 200,000 servicemen and women are enrolled in USAFI.

T h e Spring Communion
Service f o r United Thank I I Offering Members will be held in the Base Chapel on Thursday morning April 29th at
1000.


UOU FiGURE BETTER.
WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS.


Nrk.


FAMOUS CUBAN LIBERATOR DIES
On April 15, Enrique Thomas y Thomas, Colonel of the Cuban Army of Liberation, a renowned patriot, died at the age of eightyeight. All Cuba paid homage to their great leader of the War of Cuban Independence.
On 16 July 1860, Colonel Thomas was born of a humble family in little town of El Cobre, Cuba. At the age of six, he was left an orphan. He attended a private school "Don Miguel Gonzalez" at Santiago, Cuba. A great patriot he joined the revolutionary committee in Santiago which was conspiring against the Spanish Government.
Later he moved to Guantanamo City, where he intensified his revolutionary activities.
On 5 July 1895, he joined General Perico Perez in a revolutionary movement in the hills of El Caney near Santiago where he distinguished himself by personally blowing up an important bridge. As a result, he was promoted to the rank of colonel in the forces of General Antonio Maceo. At San Fernando, Colonel Thomas was attacked on two occasions and was forced to retreat under heavy attack by the superior Spanish forces.
On 19 April 1898, a joint resolution was made by the Congress of the United States to the effect that "Cuba should be free and independent" and war against the Spanish Government was declared. By this time the Cuban Revolutionists had taken possesion of most of the area around Guantanamo Bay and Colonel Thomas was in command of a Cuban regiment whose field headquarters were at the mouth of what is now known as the Fresh Water River. When the American Cruiser MARBLEHEAD steamed in Guantanamo Bay, Colonel Thomas went aboard to confer with Admiral McCalla who was in command of the United States forces destined to capture this Base. Colonel Thomas' regiment fought valiantly in subsequent landings at Cuzco Beach and McCalla Hill and were invaluable to the Americans in those two
(Continued on Page Four)


L








Pare TwoTHE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672
Saturday, 24 April 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasant, USN
Chief of Staff
Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr.
Commanding - Naval Station
B. M. Thomson-----------------Editor
Chap. E. E Bosserman-- Staff Advisor
Reporters
LtCdr. R. E. Pearce J. E.Sasser, DK3 En.ign a. E. Lent R. E. McCullough Sgt. Murphy E. B. Shelton, AF3
Louis Kitchen, Y2 R. E. welch, YN2
I. Iseman, YN3
Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and -republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of APS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise.


ATTENTION HOUSEWIVES
MORE EGGS

On the 8th of May, the YP-629 will bring to our shores 1200 New Hampshire Red hens not to mention 25 roosters. The NOB, Chicken Farm will be able to double it's output of eggs to about 100 dozen a day. It is hoped to start the hens producing as soon as possible so
just be patient housewives you will soon be bringing baskets of eggs home with you.
VU-10 NOTES
Very much to our surprise we learned in the past week that two of our men are signing up for two more years, they are: R. D. Jones AN, and E. B. Dorsey AL2.
Ens. 0. H. Oberg, has returned to the States for a short period of temporary duty. It seems we are still loosing our badly needed men, nine more left for Jacksonville, on Wednesday to be discharged.
A question that has been in many fellows minds for sometime, and has been greatly discussed, is why the squadron does not have more parties? ? ? I can not answer that but maybe some one will for you.
On Thursday Norman E. Sweeney AD3, and Henry J. Poltack AK1 left for the States on leave. We all envy. them, the lucky stiffs!
We are all glad to have R. T. Peel, BM3, back at the hanger after being on duty with The Base Police for sometime.


Two baeb ies
w we re born at
(1100 I[A L t h i s Hospital during the past
, week. Lawrence
D avid Martin
born t o Willa

and C a r e n ce

NOTES USN on Monday
0 0 ES 19 April. Carolyn Jane Rice
born on Wednesday 21 April to Mary and 'Bud' Rice, ACC.
D. B. Bruton, CSC and R. J. Scherer, HM2, have reenlisted for another two years.
O'Brien, HM1 has just been informed of the birth of a son at U.S. Naval Hospital, Brooklyn o 1 15 April. The baby has been named Robert.
The Hospital Softball team got itself back in the winning column on 15 April by defeating the Naval Station 6-5. The score, tied at 3 - 3, in the fifth inning and two men on base, Dufler stepped up to the plate and blasted out a double hat scored two runs. From then on it was the Hospital's game O'Brien's brillant shoe-string catch in left field robbed the Naval Station of a possible home run.
The Forrestal Committee and Medical Services of the Armed Forces arrived at noon Monday 19 April. After a luncheon at the Officer's Club, a tour to all medical facilities of the Base, including the site for the proposed new Hospital, was made. At 1700 Admiral Swanson, Surgeon General, U. S. Navy General Bliss, Surgeon General, U. S. Army; and Admiral Rault, Head of Dental Division, U. S. Navy; spoke to all medical personnel at the Hospital movie site. Captain Battle, Commander Naval Operating Base entertained the committee with a dinner at the Officer's Club that night. The committee departed the next morning for Washington, via Bermuda.

BOOK NOTES


The following best sellers arrived in the NOB, library this week. The librarians say they are ready for circulation today. If you are too late they will be glad to put you on their waiting list: Private Enterprise by Angela Thirkell, City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal, That Winter by Merle Miller, Ides of March by Thornton Wilder, The Pearl by John Steinback, Other Voices Other Rooms by Truman Capota, and for the who did it fans, The Whip by Sara Mason, Your Shot Darling by Berquist and Moore, Might Cry by William L. Stuart a n d Always Muder a Friend b y Margaret Scherf.
When children are seen crossing the road a stop should always be made.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 25 April 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1746-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1810
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN
(Catholic)
Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR.




CP7


CHAPLAII(S CORit4ER
NO CROSS - NO CROWN
If we can really value a thing we will work to procure it, strive to maintain it, or attempt to perfect it. We could be working and saving for a new car. Some are fixing their yards and planting their gardens. Others plan every day to make their homes more pleasant. If a thing is worth while it's worth the effort.
That's the rule of faith for the follower of Christ. Ever since Almighty God promised man a Redeemer, man anxiously awaited His coming. The Cross of Calvary opened a new era. The right to the crown of heaven had been lost to man through sin. Now he was
bought back from that state by God's only Son. Were there no death on the Cross there would still be no heavenly crown for man to anticipate.
Our Lord has said, "If any man will come after Me, let him take up his cross daily and follow Me." Here is a constant reminder that we are striving to imitate Him each day. The world offers material goods and riches. It can add temporal pleasure and false praise. Based on Jesus' example these things are fleeting. Following Him there are things far more important for us. There's the cherished home, the devotion of father and mother, and the love of the children. There's the satisfaction that comes from knowing that doing good we are pleasing God no matter what the cost. Through the sacrifices we make, in the eyes of the world, we are missing something. We know that through each daily cross we are working toward the crown of heaven.


Pagre Two


THE INDIAN








THE INDIAN e e


DRY DOCK CHATTER

"It all counts on Twenty" - is a common saying among most of us, but with "Nick Nack's" we hear a repeated "It all counts on 4 months 25 days." How about it fellas, any one giving odds he will "Ship Over"? ?
The proud papa around here this week is Strevel of the AFDL-1. How about -it Lloyd, do you really enjoy those long walks across the living room floor? ? How about his career, have you decided to make him a boatswain's mate too? ?
For the past several months, one of the diesel engines aboard the AFDL-47 has undergone complete overhaul. "Woody" says he doesn't want to be around when they "light it off." Why not "Woody," after all, you did the repair job, (or is that why?)
An Army barge, BC-1292, was docked in the AFDL-47 this week, for a new paint job, and the way I see it from here, it sure needed it.


*



IS'S


T h e Savings Bond Drive was going full blast this week. The ten men delegated to give pep talks and take the na m e s of prospective customers did a fine job . . .


when all the returns are in we ought to have a pretty good percentage of the Post.
Our softball team lost a tough
game last Monday night to Fleet Training Group by a close score of 4 to 3. Parmentier pitched for the Marines and Moore for Fleet
Training Group.
First Sergeant Kinsey just returned from a ten day leave in the States and from all reports he evidently had a good time. Kinsey claims the fishing is excellent but
the beer is lousy.
Tryouts for the Tenth Naval District Marine Rifle Team will take place at the Marine Barracks Rifle Range this coming week with men from Gtmo., Bermuda, and San Juan competing for places on the team. The team selected will go to Camp Lejeune, N.C., for the Southeastern Division matches.
Sgt. John J. McCullough received
a permanent citation for the bronze star medal he earned while serving with the Fourth Marine Division on
Saipan in 1944.
Congratulations to J. 0. Esterline. Joe was promoted to the rank
of Sergeant this past week.

lstWave: "I wrote a confession
* story once."
2nd Wave: Was is bought?
1st Wave: "No, but the editor
came all the way from New York
to see me."


N., A. S. SLIPSTREAM

Gather 'round Airdale Sailors, and lend an ear, for this is the column for you and yours, with the latest on the Air Station, it's activities and personnel, to keep you up to date on all Chit-Chat that is in the breeze.
Came the 20th of April our Exec., Commander E. C. Asman, informed the Personnel Officer that space was available for the "FlyBirds" to have an official source of what's happening to your Buddy. Without wasting time, Lt(jg) Dalton immediately set forth to bring you this first column. Yours Truly officiated as the first reporter, so beware, 'cause I have a pencil in one hand and a camera in the other.
Just a staff alone can't make a good show, so I am asking the assistance of All Hands and Organizations aboard Gtmo.-Air to give me a buzz if anything interesting has happened or will happen, such as Chief Dilbert's wife having another accident or Grandpa Pettybone spins a new yarn. The phone is 818 or drop around to the Photo Lab and give it direct. I am looking forward to hearing from you, to make our efforts worth while.
This Past Week.-The Hangar area was busy like a Bee Hive on Monday around noon, with Corpsmen in their Best White Canvas and the Doctors of Naval Hospital Gtmo. in their keenly pressed uniforms. They were nervously awaiting the arrival of an Army Air Transport laden with the ranking "Gold" of both Army and Navy Medical Departments of Washington, D. C. Many persons have probably seen the flashy "Coming and Going" Studebaker that has made an appearance aboard the "Naval Air Acres." The proud owner is Chief Rushing AFC of the Photo Lab.
Speaking of the Photo Lab brings the thought to mind that two of our Native Sons are leaving in the near future. Joe "Spaggetti" Dayhia AF2, who is taking wings on the return leg to his Squadron's Home Base at Quonset Point, R. I., followed by our good friend B. Lesko, AF3, who is "Sweating" Photo School when he is to be reassigned. Good luck to both and may every tour be as pleasant as this.
Well, Guy's and Gals, I have no more "Dope" for the present, so don't forget that I am around to give the Station the "Air" at 818 a must in every Airdale Phone Book.
Wave: "Do you believe in love at first sight?"
S2d: "I believe in love at the first opportunity."

He mumbled a few words in church; he was married.
He mumbled a few words in his sleep; he was divorced.


GIRL OF THE MONTH

For our girl of the month, the spotlight turns to pretty Jeanne Ritter who hails from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Jeanne is five feet four inches, hazel eyes, brunette and is attending the University of Oklahoma.
Incidently she is the private property of W. E. Walker, HM of the Naval Hospital. According to Walker the big event takes place on June 9th. Walker says he has been courting Jeanne for five years and that they were high school sweethearts. Let it be known that she plays a mean game of Gin Rummy and tennis.

ARTIFICIAL RAIN
(Continued from Page One)
two miles of clouds. These pellets, at 35 degrees below zero, cause super-cooled cloud droplets to crystalize, and still other droplets condense around these artificially produced nucleii while falling to the earth, gradually growing into a rain drop.
If any appreciable amount of rain is to fall from a seeded cloud, the humidity of the air below the cloud must be high, or else the rain will evaporate before reaching the ground. There must also be a continuing supply of moisture flowing into the affected region to continue the rain. A cloud a mile thick has only enough water in it for .15 inches of rain.
Since the freezing level in this area is about 15,000 feet, it would take a high altitude flight to accomplish the mission. Unfortunately when rain is needed to relieve a drought, there is often nothing but day after day of nearly cloudless skies over the effected region.
It's not as easy as it sounds.
(Editor's Note: This article was written for last week's INDIAN)


THE INDIAN


P Th


e








Pare Four TEIDA to a-2Arl4-50


THE FACTS OF LIFE

Today, 7% of all Americans are over 65 years old. Out of 10 million Americans, over 65 years of age, less than 1 million have independent incomes. Three and one-half million still have to work to eat. The rest must look to the charity of relatives for food, clothing and a place to live.
Not a pretty picture, is it? You don't like the thoughts of facing it, do you? Well, what are you doing for YOURSELF and your family to help insure their security? Are acting or just thinking and hoping?
Regular purchases of United States Savings Bonds through the Payroll Deductions Plan is the best way to be sure you won't have to accept charity or keep on working when you are old. Buy Bonds For Yourself-Hold Onto Them while you are able to work, then, when you must-or just plain want to stop working, the income from those bonds will let you do it without worry.

FAMOUS CUBAN
(Continued from Page One)
actions. The Cuban and American forces captured 22 prisioners, wounded 70 and killed 30 Spaniards at Cuzco Beach and in the space of a very few days gained complete control of what is now the present Base. The war ended on 23 June 1898. Admiral McCalla ordered a review of American troops and invited Colonel Thomas and his troops.
After the war, Colonel Thomas returned to his home in Santiago. He was actively engaged in the organization of the Veterans of the Spanish-American War and was later appointed to it's presidency. Founder of the First Veteran's Center in Santiago which was soon followed as a pattern in the organization of others. Colonel Thomas was the first Chief of Police of Santiago and the first Cuban to be appointed Chief of the Provincial Secret Police. ,
In 1918 he returned to Guantanamo City where he founded the Liberal Party of Cuba. He also was founder of the National Red Cross of that city. Colonel Thomas to his last day was still fighting for ideals of democracy and liberty. His ideals are of those who were supported by the great men of his day: Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Winston Churchill.
"See that girl? That's my girl." "Uh-huh. Good looking fur coat she's wearing."
"Yeah, I gave her that."
"Boy, what a sparkler she's wearing."
"Yeah, I gave her that."
"And say, that's a cute little boy she has with her."
"That's her brother."


mMy p J;G


Thursday of last week saw the Hospital and Naval Station clash on Diamond No. 1, with the Hospital coming out on the big end of a 6-5 score. It was nip and tuck all the way; but the Naval Station lads, with their usual bad inning, fell before some nice ballplaying of the Hospital Nine. Over on the other diamond NAS trounced VU-10 by a score of 13-4. NAS, the league leaders at press time, played their usual good game. Training Group and the Marines slugged it out Monday in a suspense packed* game that had all spectators on their feet and cheering as it came to its exciting climax. The Gyrenes, trailing in a 3-1 count through the fourth, and a 4-1 score when Moore hit a long drive into left field scoring McCall, went three up and three down until the last of the'seventh. With three on and no outs, a long hit scored two bringing the score to 4-3, but the rally was short-lived. The Marines, in perfect position for winning runs, again loaded the bases, but to no avail. Moore, in beautiful pitching form, retired the side to win, 4-3. The Hospital won by forfeit from NSD.
Tuesday night, the games between Naval Station vs VU-10, and Naval Air Station vs the American Civilians were rained out but will be made up in the near future.
The Hospital trimmed the Marines in an exciting game on Wednesday night by a score of 7-2. On the other diamond Naval Station fell before an onslaught of hits and runs at the hands of a powerful TraGrp team, losing 13-4.

SOFTBALL
League standings at press time: W. L.
N. A. S-------------- 8 0
N. A. S. ------------- 8 0


FltTraGrp. ----------- 9
Hospital ------------- 8
Marines ------------- 5
NavSta -------------- 4
VU-10 --------------- 2
Public Works -------- 1 N. S. D. - ------------- 0
BOWLING LEAGUE
Officer's League at press time:


1
2
5
5
6
7
9


W. L.
VU-10 --------------- 27 9
Marines ------------- 26 10
NavSta -------------- 27 12
Civilian Club --------- 19 14 Naval Supply Depot--- 14 22
FltTraGrp ------------11 22
Hospital ------------- 7 23
N. A. S -------------- 8 25
Officer's standings in League: Inferrera-------182- Marines Hybiskie.-------179_- VU-10
Mayfield-------.175_- VU-10
Ely -----------172---Marins
Bonatta --------- 171 - NavSta


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun., 25 April to Sat., 30 April
Sunday
VOICE OF THE TURTLE
Ronald Reagan Eleanor Parker
Monday
RIDE THE PINK HORSE
R. Montgomery Wanda Hendrix
Tuesday
THE HIGH WALL
Robert Taylor Audrey Totter
Wednesday
HUMORESQUE
John Garfield Joan Crawford
'hursday
DOWN TO EARTH
Larry Parks Rita Hayworth
Friday
THE BISHOP'S WIFE
Gary Grant Loretta Young
Saturday
LOUISIANA


Jimmie Davis


Margaret Lindsay


-LE E T Training Grp.
Ship riders are
a getting down
to real business on the ships un4 der-going training here. The fol- lowing ships are
here for RefreshTRAIN ING er Training: Missouri BB63; Fargo CL-106; Juneau CLAA-119; Putman DD-757; W. Keith, DD-557, J. C. Owens, DD-776; Ships under I. S. E. (Independent Ship Exercises) are Columbus CA-74 and Huntington CL; Kearsarge, CV-33 will be a acompanied by the Dyess DD-780.
The lil' man who types the Shiprider list is none other than YN3 Lenzi. He guarantee confusion at it's climax.
The Training Group must be an appealing tour of duty as is indicated by the constant number of sailors shipping over this duty. The.. last converts were Lenzi YNe, McCollum, FCC, Baker, QMC, Melton, SK3. The spearhead of the recruiting program has been Trefery who is waiting only for the chance.
Do you Know "Gold dust" Trefery .. . "Double-duty" Lakey, and "Quick-silver" Rugur and can you imagine Ward not on the "Gulf" course on Sundays.
Ironic sight is to see "Wheels" McAndrew at a bus stop pleadingly hoping that someone will spare him from the torture of riding on a bus.
Is the "Guinea" really going on leave ? ? ? The consensus is that Allen will "crack-up" if he doesn't.


I1


Pa
g
e Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay--22 April 48--2500.




Full Text

PAGE 1

Vol. III, No. 16 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 24 April 1948 BASE FIRE EQUIPMENT LOANED TO CAIMANERA Upon request of Lieutenant Daniel Rebollar of the Cuban Navy, Captain of the port of Caimanera, the Base has loaned valuable firefighting equipment to protect the homes of the citizens of that town, and in particular, of those citizens 4# who are employed at this Base. It is hoped that the five-hundred gallon per minute pumper, together with a large quantity of hose, will be able to extinguish quickly any conflagration which may occur in any section of the town and thus prevent disastrous fires such as occurred in June 1946 and in March of this year. On Wednesday, April 1st, an LCM from the Fleet Boat Pool drew up smartly at the State Pier in Caimanera and lowered its bow ramp. The Base Fire Marshal, Boatswain A. M. Christiansen, U. S. N., drove his jeep with the firefighting equipment in tow onto the pier amid the cheers of the local populace. Brief ceremonies, then took place during which Commander Robertson, in the name of the Base Commander presented the equipment to the town and demonstrated its effectiveness by pumping two heavy streams of water. THE LOW DOWN ON ARTIFICIAL RAIN Many people have been inquiring, half jokingly, half seriously, why someone doesn't take a plane up and drop some dry ice to relieve the drought on the Base. In view of the definite interest everyone has about rain these days it may be "seeding" a cloud with dry ice. Dry ice does not "create" rainit merely causes the moisture present to condense into drops large enough to fall. For man-made rain, it is absolutely necessary to have clouds with liquid water droplets colder than 32 degrees fahrenheit in the upper levels. A plane must fly into or over the .cloud above the freezing level and scatter small pellets of dry ice. Five pounds of dry ice ground up into the size of peas will seed about (Continued on Page Three) EDUCATION ON WHEELS A new mobile unit, now touring Army, Navy and Marine Corps Bases in the southern section of the country, is equipped to render complete USAFI services. The mobile unit has all ready made two stops. At Scott Field, St. Louis, Mo. and enrolled 259 men in two days and at Memphis, Tenn., 403 were enrolled in three days. The units consists of a sedan, tractor-truck and trailer, carrying complete courses in history, mathematics, and foreign languages with over a hundred or so other subjects. At the present more than 200,000 servicemen and women are enrolled in USAFI. T h e Spring Communion Service f or United Thank Offering Members will be held in the Base Chapel on Thursday morning April 29th at I 1000. QOU FIGURE BETTER WITH PAYROLL SAVINGS. FAMOUS CUBAN LIBERATOR DIES On April 15, Enrique Thomas y Thomas, Colonel of the Cuban Army of Liberation, a renowned patriot, died at the age of eightyeight. All Cuba paid homage to their great leader of the War of Cuban Independence. On 16 July 1860, Colonel Thomas was born of a humble family in little town of El Cobre, Cuba. At the age of six, he was left an orphan. He attended a private school "Don Miguel Gonzalez" at Santiago, Cuba. A great patriot he joined the revolutionary committee in Santiago which was conspiring against the Spanish Government. Later he moved to Guantanamo City, where he intensified his revolutionary activities. On 5 July 1895, he joined General Perico Perez in a revolutionary movement in the hills of El Caney near Santiago where he distinguished himself by personally' blowing up an important bridge. As a result, he was promoted to the rank of colonel in the forces of General Antonio Maceo. At San Fernando, Colonel Thomas was attacked on two occasions and was forced to retreat under heavy attack by the superior Spanish forces. On 19 April 1898, a joint resolution was made by the Congress of the United States to the effect that "Cuba should be free and independent" and war against the Spanish Government was declared. By this time the Cuban Revolutionists had taken possesion of most of the area around Guantanamo Bay and Colonel Thomas was in command of a Cuban regiment whose field headquarters were at the mouth of what is now known as the Fresh Water River. When the American Cruiser MARBLEHEAD steamed in Guantanamo Bay, Colonel Thomas went aboard to confer with Admiral McCalla who was in command of the United States forces destined to capture this Base. Colonel Thomas' regiment fought valiantly in subsequent landings at Cuzco Beach and McCalla Hill and were invaluable to the Americans in those two (Continued on Page Four)

PAGE 2

Pair TwoTHE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 24 April 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. Commanding -Naval Station B. M. Thomson ----------------Editor Chap. E. E Bosserman.--Staff Advisor Reporters LtCdr. R. E. Pearce J. E.Sasser, DK3 Ensign R. E. Lent R. E. McCullough Sgt. Murphy E. B. Shelton, AF3 Louis Kitchen, Y2 R. E. Welch, YN2 I. Iseman, YN3 Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise. ATTENTION HOUSEWIVES MORE EGGS On the 8th of May, the YP-629 will bring to our shores 1200 New Hampshire Red hens not to mention 25 roosters. The NOB, Chicken Farm will be able to double it's output of eggs to about 100 dozen a day. It is hoped to start the hens producing as soon as possible so just be patient housewives you will soon be bringing baskets of eggs home with you. VU-10 NOTES Very much to our surprise we learned in the past week that two of our men are signing up for two more years, they are: R. D. Jones AN, and E. B. Dorsey AL2. Ens. 0. H. Oberg, has returned to the States for a short period of temporary duty. It seems we are still loosing our badly needed men, nine more left for Jacksonville, on Wednesday to be discharged. A question that has been in many fellows minds for sometime, and has been greatly discussed, is why the squadron does not have more parties? ? ? I can not answer that but maybe some one will for you. On Thursday Norman E. Sweeney AD3, and Henry J. Poltack AK1 left for the States on leave. We all envy. them, the lucky stiffs! We are all glad to have R. T. Peel, BM3, back at the hanger after being on duty with The Base Police for sometime. Two babies were born at this Hospital during the past week. Lawrence David Martin born t o Willa and C 1 aren ce Martin, CSF, USN on Monday NOTE $ 19 April. Carolyn Jane Rice born on Wednesday 21 April to Mary and 'Bud' Rice, ACC. D. B. Bruton, CSC and R. J,. Scherer, HM2, have reenlisted for another two years. O'Brien, HM1 has just been informed of the birth of a son at U.S. Naval Hospital, Brooklyn o'1 15 April. The baby has been named Robert. The Hospital Softball team got itself back in the winning column on 15 April by defeating the Naval Station 6-5. The score, tied at 3 -3, in the fifth inning and two men on base, Dufler stepped up to the plate and blasted out a double hat scored two runs. From then on it was the Hospital's game O'Brien's brillant shoe-string catch in left field robbed the Naval Station of a possible home run. The Forrestal Committee and Medical Services of the Armed Forces arrived at noon Monday 19 April. After a luncheon at the Officer's Club, a tour to all medical facilities of the Base, including the site for the proposed new Hospital, was made. At 1700 Admiral Swanson, Surgeon General, U. S. Navy General Bliss, Surgeon General, U. S. Army; and Admiral Rault, Head of Dental Division, U. S. Navy; spoke to all medical personnel at the Hospital movie site. Captain Battle, Commander Naval Operating Base entertained the committee with a dinner at the Officer's Club that night. The committee departed the next morning for Washington, via Bermuda. BOOK NOTES The following best sellers arrived in the NOB, library this week. The librarians say they are ready for circulation today. If you are too late they will be glad to put you on their waiting list: Private Enterprise by Angela Thirkell, City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal, That Winter by Merle Miller, Ides of March by Thornton Wilder, The Pearl by John Steinback, Other Voices Other Rooms by Truman Capota, and for the who did it fans, The Whip by Sara Mason, Your Shot Darling by Berquist and Moore, Might Cry by William L. Stuart and Always Muder a Friend by Margaret Scherf. When children are seen crossing the road a stop should always be made. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 25 April 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0646-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Piotestant) Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN (Catholic) Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR. CHAPLAtIS CORNER NO CROSS -NO CROWN If we can really value a thing we will work to procure it, strive to maintain it, or attempt to perfect it. We could be working and saving for a new car. Some are fixing their yards and planting their gardens. Others plan every day to make their homes more pleasant. If a thing is worth while it's worth the effort. That's the rule of faith for the follower of Christ. Ever since Almighty God promised man a Redeemer, man anxiously awaited His coming. The Cross of Calvary opened a new era. The right to the crown of heaven had been lost to man through sin. Now he was bought back from that state by God's only Son. Were there no death on the Cross there would still be no heavenly crown for man to anticipate. Our Lord has said, "If any man will come after Me, let him take up his cross daily and follow Me." Here is a constant reminder that we are striving to imitate Him each day. The world offers material goods and riches. It can add temporal pleasure and false praise. Based on Jesus' example these things are fleeting. Following Him there are things far more important for us. There's the cherished home, the devotion of father and mother, and the love of the children. There's the satisfaction that comes from knowing that doing good we are pleasing God no matter what the cost. Through the sacrifices we make, in the eyes of the world, we are missing something. We know that through each daily cross we are working toward the crown of heaven. $ 9 Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN DRY DOCK CHATTER "It all counts on Twenty" -is a common saying among most of us, but with "Nick Nack's" we hear a repeated "It all counts on 4 months 25 days." How about it fellas, any one giving odds he will "Ship Over"?? The proud papa around here this week is Strevel of the AFDL-1. How about -it Lloyd, do you really enjoy those long walks across the living room floor? ? How about his career, have you decided to make him a boatswain's mate too? ? For the past several months, one of the diesel engines aboard the AFDL-47 has undergone complete overhaul. "Woody" says he doesn't want to be around when.they "light it off." Why not "Woody," after all, you did the repair job, (or is that why?) An Army barge, BC-1292, was S docked in the AFDL-47 this week, for a new paint job, and the way I see it from here, it sure needed it. The Savings Bond Drive was going full blast this week. The ten men dele-gated to givepep talks and take the names of prospective customers did a fine job when all the returns are In we ought to have a pretty good percentage of the Post. Our softball. team lost a tough game last Monday night to Fleet Training Group by a close score of 4 to 3. Parmentier pitched for the Marines and Moore for Fleet Training Group. First Sergeant Kinsey just returned from a ten day leave in the States and from all reports he evidently had a good time. Kinsey claims the fishing is excellent but the beer is lousy. Tryouts for the Tenth Naval District Marine Rifle -Team will take place at the Marine Barracks Rifle Range this coming week with men from Gtmo., Bermuda, and San Juan competing for places on the team. The team selected will go to Camp Lejeune, N.C., for the Southeastern Division matches. Sgt. John J. McCullough received a permanent citation for the bronze star medal he earned while serving with the Fourth Marine Division on Saipan in 1944. Congratulations to J. 0. Esterline. Joe was promoted to the rank of Sergeant this past week. 1stWave: "I wrote a confession .story once." 2nd Wave: Was is bought? 1st Wave: "No, but the editor came all the way from New York to see me." N., A. S. SLIPSTREAM Gather 'round Airdale Sailors, and lend an ear, for this is the column for you and yours, with the latest on the Air Station, it's activities and personnel, to keep you up to date on all Chit-Chat that is in the breeze. Came the 20th of April our Exec., Commander E. C. Asman, informed the Personnel Officer that space was available for the "FlyBirds" to have an official source of what's happening to your Buddy. Without wasting time, Lt(jg) Dalton immediately set forth to bring you this first column. Yours Truly officiated as the first reporter, so beware, 'cause I have a pencil in one hand and a camera in the other. Just a staff alone can't make a good show, so I am asking the assistance of All Hands and Organizations aboard Gtmo.-Air to give me a buzz if anything interesting has happened or will happen, such as Chief Dilbert's wife having another accident or Grandpa Pettybone spins a new yarn. The phone is 818 or drop around to the Photo Lab and give it direct. I am looking forward to hearing from you, to make our efforts worth while. This Past Week.-The Hangar area was busy like a Bee Hive on Monday around noon, with Corpsmen in their Best White Canvas and the Doctors of Naval Hospital Gtmo. in their keenly pressed uniforms. They were nervously awaiting the arrival of an Army Air Transport laden with the ranking "Gold" of both Army and Navy Medical Departments of Washington,.D. C. Many persons have probably seen the flashy "Coming and Going" Studebaker that has made an appearance aboard the "Naval Air Acres." The proud owner is Chief Rushing AFC of the Photo Lab. Speaking of the Photo Lab brings the thought to mind that two of our Native Sons are leaving in the near future. Joe "Spaggetti" Daylia AF2, who is taking wings on the return leg to his Squadron's Home Base at Quonset Point, R. I., followed by our good friend B. Lesko, AF3, who is "Sweating" Photo School when he is to be reassigned. Good luck to both and may every tour be as pleasant as this. Well, Guy's and Gals, I have no more "Dope" for the present, so don't forget that I am around to give the Station the "Air" at 818 a must in every Airdale Phone Book. Wave: "Do you believe in love at first sight?" S2d: "I believe in love at the first opportunity." He mumbled a few words in church; he was married. He mumbled a few words in his sleep; he was divorced GIRL OF THE MONTH For our girl of the month, the spotlight turns to pretty Jeanne Ritter who hails from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Jeanne is five feet four inches, hazel eyes, brunette and is attending the University of Oklahoma. Incidently she is the private property of W. E. Walker, HM of the Naval Hospital. According to Walker the big event takes place on June 9th. Walker says he has been courting Jeanne for five years and that they were high school sweethearts. Let it be known that she plays a mean game of Gin Rummy and tennis. ARTIFICIAL RAIN (Continued from Page One) two miles of clouds. These pellets, at 35 degrees below zero, cause super-cooled cloud droplets to crystalize, and still other droplets condense around these artificially produced nucleii while falling to the earth, gradually growing into a rain drop. If any appreciable amount of rain is to fall from a seeded cloud, the humidity of the air below the cloud must be high, or else the rain will evaporate before reaching the ground. There must also be a continuing supply of moisture flowing into the affected region to continue the rain. A cloud a mile thick has only enough water in it for .15 inches of rain. Since the freezing level in this area is about 15,000 feet, it would take a high altitude flight to accomplish the mission. Unfortunately when rain is needed to relieve a drought, there is often nothing but day after day of nearly cloudless skies over the effected region. It's not as easy as it sounds. (Editor's Note: This article was written for last week's INDIAN) .--age re P Th e

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Pare Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Hay-22 April 48-2500. THE FACTS OF LIFE Today, 7% of all Americans are over 65 years old. Out of 10 million Americans, over 65 years of age, less than 1 million have independent incomes. Three and one-half million still have to work to eat. The rest must look to the charity of relatives for food, clothing and a place to live. Not a pretty picture, is it? You don't like the thoughts of facing it, do you? Well, what are you doing for YOURSELF and your family to help insure their security? Are acting or just thinking and hoping? Regular purchases of United States Savings Bonds through the Payroll Deductions Plan is the best way to be sure you won't have to accept charity or keep on working when you are old. Buy Bonds For Yourself-Hold Onto Them while you are able to work, then, when you must-or just plain want to stop working, the income from those bonds will let you do it without worry. FAMOUS CUBAN (Continued from Page One) actions. The Cuban and American forces captured 22 prisioners, wounded 70 and killed 30 Spaniards at Cuzco Beach and in the space of a very few days gained complete control of what is now the present Base. The war ended on 23 June 1898. Admiral McCalla ordered a review of American troops and invited Colonel Thomas and his troops. After the war, Colonel Thomas returned to his home in Santiago. He was actively engaged in the organization of the Veterans of the Spanish-American War and was later appointed to it's presidency. Founder of the First Veteran's Center in Santiago which was soon followed as a pattern in the organization of others. Colonel Thomas was the first Chief of Police of Santiago and the first Cuban to be appointed Chief of the Provincial Secret Police. In 1918 he returned to Guantanamo City where he founded the Liberal Party of Cuba. He also was founder of the National Red Cross of that city. Colonel Thomas to his last day was still fighting for ideals of democracy -and liberty. His ideals are of those who were supported by the great men of his day: Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. "See that girl? That's my girl" "Uh-huh. Good looking fur coat she's wearing." "Yeah, I gave her that." "Boy, what a sparkler she's wearing." "Yeah, I gave her that." "And say, that's a cute little boy she has with her." "That's her brother." Thursday of last week saw the Hospital and Naval Station clash on Diamond No. 1, with the Hospital coming out on the big end of a 6-5 score. It was nip and tuck all the way; but the Naval Station lads, with their usual bad inning, fell before some nice ballplaying of the Hospital Nine. Over on the other diamond NAS trounced VU-10 by a score of 13-4. NAS, the league leaders at press time, played their usual good game. Training Group and the Marines slugged it out Monday in a suspense packed' game that had all spectators on their feet and cheering as it came to its exciting climax. The Gyrenes, trailing in a 3-1 count through the fourth, and a 4-1 score when Moore hit a long drive into left field scoring McCall, went three up and three down until the last of the'seventh. With three on and no outs; a long hit scored two bringing the score to 4-3, but the rally was short-lived. The Marines, in perfect position for winning runs, again loaded the bases, but to no avail. Moore, in beautiful pitching form, retired the side to win, 4-3. The Hospital won by forfeit from NSD. Tuesday night, the games between Naval Station vs VU-10, and Naval Air Station vs the American Civilians were rained out but will be made up in the near future. The Hospital trimmed the Marines in an exciting game on Wednesday night by a score of 7-2. On the other diamond Naval Station fell before an onslaught of hits and runs at the hands of a powerful TraGrp team, losing 13-4. SOFTBALL League standings at press time: W. L. N. A. S-------------8 0 N. A. S. -------------8 0 F1tTraGrp. -----------9 1 Hospital --------------8 2 Marines --------------5 5 NavSta --------------4 5 VU-10 ---------------2 6 Public Works ---------1 7 N. S. D. -------------0 9 BOWLING LEAGUE Officer's League at press time: W. L. VU-10 --------------27 9 Marines ------------26 10 NavSta -------------27 12 Civilian Club --------19 14 Naval Supply Depot14 22 FltTraGrp ----------11 22 Hospital ------------7 23 N. A. S. -------------8 25 Officer's standings in League: Inferrera------182Marines Hybiskie-------.179-VU-10 Mayfield -------.175 -VU-10 Ely----------172Marins Bonatta-------171NavSta NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun., 25 April to Sat., 30 April Sunday VOICE OF THE TURTLE Ronald Reagan Eleanor Parker Monday RIDE THE PINK HORSE R. Montgomery Wanda Hendrix Tuesday THE HIGH WALL Robert Taylor Audrey Totter Wednesday HUMORESQUE John Garfield Joan Crawford Thursday DOWN TO EARTH Larry Parks Rita Hayworth Friday THE BISHOP'S WIFE Gary Grant Loretta Young Saturday LOUISIANA Jimmie Davis Margaret Lindsay P L E E T Training Grp. Shipriders are 3 getting down V1 to real business on the ships un4 der-going training here. The fol-.lowing ships are here for RefreshTRAIN ING er Training: Missouri BB63; Fargo CL-106; Juneau CLAA-119; Putman DD-757; W. Keith, DD-557, J. C. Owens, DD-776; Ships under I. S. E. (Independent Ship Exercises) are Columbus CA-74 and Huntington CL; Kearsarge, CV-33 will be a acompanied by the Dyess DD-780. The lil' man who types the Shiprider list is none other than YN3 Lenzi. He guarantee confusion at it's climax. The Training Group must be an appealing tour of duty as is indicated by the constant number of sailors shipping over this duty. The last converts were Lenzi YN3; McCollum, FCC, Baker, QMC, Melton, SK3. The spearhead of the recruiting program has been Trefery who is waiting only for the chance. Do you Know "Gold dust" Trefery .."Double-duty" Lakey, and "Quick-silver" Rugur and can you imagine Ward not on the "Gulf" course on Sundays. Ironic sight is to see "Wheels" McAndrew at a bus stop pleadingly hoping that someone will spare him from the torture of riding on a bus. Is the "Guinea" really going on leave? ? ? The consensus is that Allen will "crack-up" if he doesn't. S Nxffia,'v Pae Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-22 April 48-2500.


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