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Vol. III, No. 15 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 17 April 1948


MARINES AT GTMO. BAY
1898 - 1948 1

The first landing on Cuba made
by the Marines was early in June 1898, when a regiment of United States Marines from Key West under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Huntington, USMC, arrived in Guantanamo Bay on the transport Panther. They landed at Fisherman's Point, burned the village and established a camp. With the aid of the Cubans under Colonel Thomas they succeeded in driving the Spaniards out of the territory
as far east as Cuzco Beach.
A number of casualties were incurred by both the Marines and the insurgents, especially in the battle
for McCalla Hill.
On the highest point of McCalla
Hill and only 50-yds. from the Naval Air Station Administration Building is mounted an elaborately engraved bronze muzzle-loading cannon, and on the mount of this gun is an engraved plaque in commemoration of the Marines who were
killed there..
Marines in force, varying from
small detachments to Brigades, have been ashore in Cuba on nu. merous occasions since 1903. Their
number and use have been determined by the current situation which has often changed with bewildering rapidity. A detachment ordered ashore from the nearest U. S. naval vessel, for the purpose of protecting American lives and property, when requested by Cuban authorities, the American Minister, or other authority might be just large enough to protect a sugar estate. But the landings often aroused the anger of natives, politically involved or in revolt for one reason or another, making additional troops necessary. These again would make others necessary, so that a landing party of one company sometimes grew into a regiment, its elements widely scattered in outposts, or even a brigade.
Usually Guantanamo Bay has
been the funnel through which Marines have been transferred to many Cuban outposts, and by which they have been returned to previous duties, have relieved Marines at Guantanamo due to return to the
(Continued on Page Three)


COMMITTEE STUDIES HOSPITAL SERVICES

Major General Paul R. Hawley formerly Chief Medical Officer of the Veterans Administration and his committee will arrive Guantanamo Bay, 1200 Monday, 19 April. General Hawley and his committee, appointed by Secretary of Defense James Forrestal, are inspecting all medical and dental installations of the Military Establishment in the Caribbean Area.
The object of the committee is to familiarize its members, as a group, with the facilities used by each of the Armed Forces. The committee has no authority to order changes, it's mission is merely to report it's findings and recommendations to Secretary Forrestal.
The General's committee is: Rear Admiral Paul M. Albright (MC), USN, Assistant Chief for Planning and Logistics, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Major General Thomas L. Smith, DC, USA, Chief, Dental Division, Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army; Rear Admiral C. V. Rault
(DC), USN, Assistant Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Colonel George R. Kennebeck, DC, USA, Chief, Dental Division, Office of the Air Surgeon, U. S. Air Force; Colonel Earle Standlee, MC, USA, Deputy for Plans, Office of the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, and member, Executive Committee to the Committees on Medical and Hospital Services of the Armed Forces; Captain C. C. Myers (MC), USN, Planning Division, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy, and member, Executive Committee to the Committee on Medical and Hospital Services of the Armed Forces; Captam 0. L. Burton (MC), USN, Chief Preventive Medicine Division, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Colonel T. F. Whayne, MC, USA, Chief, Preventive Medicine Division, Office of The Surgeon General, U. S. Army; Colonel William D. Graham, MC, USA, Chief, Hospital Division, Office of the Surgeon General, U. S. Army; Captain Nellie J. Dewitt (NC), USN, Superintendent, Navy Nurse Corps and Colonel Mary C. Phillips, ANC,


BOND CAMPAIGN BEGINS 15 APRIL
As a measure to combat inflation and encourage saving for the future, a new and intensified savings bond drive will be conducted, with the Navy taking an active part. The campaign, to be known as the Security Loan Drive, fired its opening salvos on 15 April and will continue through 30 June.
Navy personnel are purchasing savings bonds at the rate of more than 3,000,000 a month. At the end of February, figures showed that approximately one-third of the total personnel of the Navy were buying bonds.
Navy Department savings bond officials stated that nearly 25,000,000 bonds have been purchased by Naval Personnel. Sales are now being watched closely to determine the purchaser of number 25 million. It is expected that this figure will be reached during the coming drive, and when it does the buyer of that bond is in for some wide-scale publicity.
An official survey showed a variety of reasons why servicemen are buying and holding savings bond. Among them were educational funds, home building, the establishment of a business, future security and retirement.
Savings bond allotments may be made for as little as $6.25 a month. With this type allotment a $25 bond is realized every three months. Familiar to nearly everyone is the fact that for every three dollars invested in savings bonds four dollars are returned in 10 years.
Another savings bond convenience was pointed out. A savings bond means ready cash on hand when it is needed. Many instances have been cited where savings bonds have come to the rescue when financial assistance became necessary.
Personnel are urged to give special consideration to the benefits to be gained by making a savings bond allotment.

USA, Chief, Army Nurse. Corps.
The Committee will depart from Guantanamo Bay, Tuesday, 20 April for Washington, D. C.







Pare Two THE INDIAN


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672
Saturday, 17 April 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr.
Commanding - Naval Station
B. M. Thomson-----------------Editor
Chap. E. E Bosserman--..Staff Advisor
Reporters
LtCdr. R. E. Pearce Louis Kitchen---Y2 Ensign R. E. Lent J. E. Sasser, DK3
Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough
Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise.

BASE TO FEATURE DRIVER TRAINING

To hold the rapid gains made in Vehicle Accident Prevention this year, the Base Safety, Police and Transportation Staffs have organized training classes for Navy Vehicle Drivers. Training is designed to help inexperienced drivers or those having failed official examination.
The school is believed to be the only one operated in the 10th Naval District, and exceeds those of many comparable state side activities. Class time is about two hours discussion and lecturing with one hour of actual demonstration. Applicants will not be given driver training at government expense except by order of their respective commands. Other groups may attend Saturday, classes.
Trainees for Private Vehicle Driver's Permits will be allowed to attend classes as soon as Navy Vehicle Driver training is completed.
For many this will be the only available opportunity to learn to drive safely the "Navy Way."

Daisy: "So you had a date with a sailor?"
Mae: "No, I tore my dress on a nail."

Two pretty girls were walking down the street. Two young sailors whistled at them.
"The nerve of them," said one the damsels, "whistling at us two days before pay day."


DR. C. H. WINGERT TO
VISIT GTMO.

Dr. Calvin H. Wingert, Representative of the General Commission, Army and Navy Chaplains, accompanied by Chaplain (Lt.Col.) Kenneth M. Sowers, Headquarters, United States Army Caribbean, will arrive on this Base Monday, 19 April (to call on) Commander, T\OB, and to confer with Chaplain E. E. Bosserman, and a visit of Chapel facilities. Doctor Wingert and Chaplain Sowers will depart Tuesday, 20 April, for Jacksonville, Florida.

COMPETITION

So you think the Navy has it's twenty year men? Granted, they do. According to a recent release from the Twenty Year Service Club of the B. F. Goodrich Company, a total of 3,371 men and women have completed 20 years of continuous company service since December 1939.
I1 the same period 992 employees have received awards for 30 years of employment, 103 for 40 years and five rounded out a half century of service with the Akron Company.
But then take heart, ye careerists of the Navy. Who ever heard of having to put in 40 or 50 years?

Baby boy Wesley Ray Strevel
was born in this Hospital 10 Apr.
1948 to B M 2
Lloyd R. and
Mrs. Bertha
Strevel.
1Cmdr. J. Alan Fields, MC,
NO E S USN is in San
Juan for a few
days temporary additional duty'
Lt. E. L. Battin, Chief Nurse, has received orders transferring her to USNH, Portsmouth, Virginia. However, she will remain aboard until the reporting of her relief the latter part of June.
On Wednesday 12 April the Hospital softball team suffered defeat at the hands of the Fleet Training Group in a close game, which ended by a score of 2-1. The game went scoreless for five innings when the TrgGrp scored their two runs; the 'Does' came back with one in the sixth. Both Sikorski and Moore pitched good ball all the way.
The Bravest Man on the Base:
That patient who went to the ball game Wednesday night with the Hospital rooting party, sat behind the MOIC and spent the evening cheering for the FltTrgGrp.

"What brought me here," asked the rosebud.
"The stalk," answered the rose.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 18 April 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN
(Catholic)
Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR.


ir7
CHAPLh(S CORNER
- OUR JOURNEY
It's 1700 Wednesday in Santiago. The crash boat shoves off for home. In the harbor all is calm. The closer we get to the open sea the rougher it becomes. Then we begin to pitch and toss. For the first hour it isn't bad. Then we wonder how we can survive. There is always a consoling thought, no matter how rough, no matter how sick we may become, we rely on the capable skipper to bring us through. Three hours later we have finished the trip and reached home safely.
It is about the same in our Christian life. We set out on the journey of life in the shelter of our home. Life has a purpose for our goal is the eternal home of heaven. The farther we go on the journey the more frequent trials and temptations beset us. The world places obstacles in our struggle for holiness. Our course which was mapped in accord with God's law becomes difficult for us. We can and do offend Him, Who has given us all. The sea of life becomes stormy with failures, sufferings, and sorrow. At times we seem almost overcome. That is when we remember Our Blessed Lord. He has said, "Without Me you can do nothing." Relying o n Him w e look forward to reaching home safely for He also said "My grace is sufficient for Thee."

FOR SALE: 1 youth's bed and
matching wardrobe; 1 baby's small maple stained crib; 1 baby carriage; Christmas decorations.
Please call at 633, Newtown.

Don't Smoke in Magazine Area


U1


Page Two


THE INDIAN







THE INDIAN


54. : i





.. L....


MARINES AT GTMO. BAY
(Continued from Page One)
States, or where they have received advance training for war or for landing operations in Caribbean waters in conjunction with the Navy.
During the days just prior to the occupation of Haiti, and of Santo Domingo, and at intervals during the occupation of each of those two countries, Marines were occasionally drawn from the garrison at Guantanamo to act in some emergency; Guantanamo Marines thus


acted as a permanent mobile reserve for Marine and Naval forces operating outside Cuba in Caribbean waters.
Thus for thirty-six years, Guantanamo Bay, as far as the Marines were concerned, was used as a resting ground, a jumping off place for expeditions of various sizes and a reserve area for expeditions needing such reserves.
In the latter part of 1940 and the beginning of 1941, the First Marine Division, which was later to become famous in many battles


against the Japanese in the Pacific, was formed here.
Their training took place around the vicinity of Caravella Point where they were bivouacked, and their landing operations were held around Windmill Beach and combined practice landings with the Navy at Culebra, Puerto Rico.
The Marines who were down with the original First Division and recently returned for a tour of duty at "Gtmo" were surprised at the great many changes that have taken place.


TH I Nage re


............ M . -W


P Th


..... ..... .














NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun., 18 April to Sat., 24 April
Sunday
THIS TIME FOR KEEPS
Lauritz Melchior Esther Williams
Monday
THE CHINESE RING
Warren Douglas Roland Winters
Tuesday
DESERT FURY
John Hodiak Lizabeth Scott
Wednesday
THE HUCKSTERS
Clark Gable Deborah Kerr


CHIEFS CLUB
Situated in the center of the Base, both as to location and importance, is the Chief Petty Officer's Mess. This is the focal point around which the lives of nearly all chiefs on this station revolve.
The building to which so much importance is attached has had an interesting history and background nearly as much so as some of the Chiefs who u s e i t s facilities. Briefly looking back we find that the building was erected in 1913 at a cost of about $25,000 and was intended as a recreational building for enlisted personnel. During the years 1913 thru to 1941 it served in that capacity, offering a reading room, library, billards, and four bowling alleys. In 1940 and 1941 with the ever increasing reality of war and the expansion of the Base, the Fleet Recreational Center was built and the old building was given to Ship's Service to be operated as a Chief's Club. Having proved that the Chief Petty Officer's were capable of organizing a mess and realizing the needs for it, the Club was re-organized in 1944 as a Chief Petty Officer's Mess (Open). The government and organization of the "Club," as it is commonly called, is vested in a President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Board of Governors. The Officers of the Club are elected each quarter for a period of three months, however, the members of the Board of Governors are appointed by the President to serve until they either resign or are transferred. Handling the daily administration of the Mess as well as acting as front man is the Manager, who sits in with the Officer's and and Board Members at their weekly meetings and is directly responsible for the good will and prestige the Club now enjoys.
The aim of the Chief's Club, and all those connected with its administration, is to be able to amply


provide all the recreational facilities necessary f o r relaxation; further t o provide a common gathering place for Chiefs where the talk will revolve around topics common to their understanding or interests; and to provide a fellowship which tends to bind them and theirs together to a common cause.
As -is true with many clubs, both service and others, the social and athletic aims of the Club are many and varied, thus catering to the many likes of the members. Currently the Club is throwing its support behind the bowling team, which is undefeated and in the lead for their second championship of the Base.
The Club also sponsored in the past, a baseball team, softball team, and a golf team, all of which preformed with credit. On the strictly social side, the Club has dances weekly, occasional picnics, buffet dinner's and frequent banquets on occasions.
It has been said that "sooner or later you'll meet someone you know if you stay around Guantanamo long enough," for truly this is the cross roads of the world as far as the Navy is concerned. With renovations continuing all the time and with the spirit that is felt around the Club, the Chiefs of the Base feel that they have the finest club of it's kind. Just mention (the local beer) and Guantanamo Bay, to any Chief in the Navy and you see a wistful smile and a far-a-way look come into his eyes.

RED CROSS FUND DRIVE
NOB -------------- $ 55.00
Naval Station ------ $201.00 Naval Air Station _ $ 35.85 Naval Supply Depot_ $ 32.39 FltTraGrop -------- $ 35.00 Naval Hospital --- $ 71.00 VU-10 ------------- $161.00
Marine Barracks -__ $ 22.45 NOB School-------- $ 55.00
Cable Co. - ---------- $ 19.00
Total---------- $691.29


Thursday MR. HEX Leo Gorcey


Huntz Hall


Friday
IT HAD TO BE YOU
Cornel Wilde Ginger Rogers
Saturday
THUNDER MOUNTAIN
Tim Holt Richard Martin




The TraGrp took a close victory over the Hospital on Monday, with Sabadish of the Ship Riders smashing a homer with one aboard, winning 2 - 1. With Moore giving his usual good pitching and backed by his enthusiastic teammates, fans saw a real game of softball with each team giving their best. NavHosp showed high spirits and good sportsmanship and put a valiant fight to keep their second place lead, but bowed to a close defeat. On the other diamond, the Marines took an easy victory over the American Civilians.
On diamond No. 1 Tuesday night, VU-10 won by forfeit from NSD, but over on the other diamond it was nip and tuck all the way with NAS beating the NavSta nine by a score of 4 - 1. NAS collected a total of four hits off Newman of Naval Station, scoring one earned run and three more on errors. NavSta tallied ten hits, but was only able to score once in the seven innings of play.
Wednesday night, the American Civilians, having lost all their games with the exception of one win by forfeit, but still in there plugging, put up an unusually good show against TraGrp. Moore, in excellent pitching and hitting form accounted directly and indirectly for five of TraGrp's seven runs. McCall and Betcher, as well as the entire TraGrp team, played fine ball against a valiant group of sports. Admiration was expressed by many observers of the sportsmanship and never-say-die attitude of the American Civilians.


*


of


Gtmo. Bay-15 Apr. 48-2500.


Paze Four


T HE INDIAN




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PAGE 1

Vol. III, No. 15 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 17 April 1948 MARINES AT GTMO. BAY 1898 -1948 The first landing on Cuba made by the Marines was early in June 1898, when a regiment of United States Marines from Key West under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Huntington, USMC, arrived in Guantanamo Bay on the transport Panther. They landed at Fisherman's Point, burned the village and established a camp. With the aid of the Cubans under Colonel Thomas they succeeded in driving the Spaniards out of the territory as far east as Cuzco Beach. A number of casualties were incurred by both the Marines and the insurgents, especially in the battle for McCalla Hill. On the highest point of McCalla Hill and only 50-yds. from the Naval Air Station Administration Building is mounted an elaborately engraved bronze muzzle-loading cannon, and on the mount of this gun is an engraved plaque in commemoration of the Marines who were killed there. Marines in force, varying from small detachments to Brigades, have been ashore in Cuba on numerous occasions since 1903. Their number and use have been determined by the current situation which has often changed with bewildering rapidity. A detachment ordered ashore from the nearest U. S. naval vessel, for the purpose of protecting American lives and property, when requested by Cuban authorities, the American Minister, or other authority might be just large enough to protect a sugar estate. But the landings often aroused the anger of natives, politically involved or in revolt for one reason or another, making additional troops necessary. These again would make others necessary, so that a landing party of one company sometimes grew into a regiment, its elements widely scattered in outposts, or even a brigade. Usually Guantanamo Bay has been the funnel through which Marines have been transferred to many Cuban outposts, and by which they have been returned to previous duties, have relieved Marines at Guantanamo due to return to the (Continued on Page Three) COMMITTEE STUDIES HOSPITAL SERVICES Major General Paul R. Hawley formerly Chief Medical Officer of the Veterans Administration and his committee will arrive Guantanamo Bay, 1200 Monday, 19 April. General Hawley and his committee, appointed by Secretary of Defense James Forrestal, are inspecting all medical and dental installations of the Military Establishment in the Caribbean Area. The object of the committee is to familiarize its members, as a group, with the facilities used by each of the Armed Forces. The committee has no authority to order changes, it's mission is merely to report it's findings and recommendations to Secretary Forrestal. The General's committee is: Rear Admiral Paul M. Albright (MC), USN5 Assistant Chief for Planning and Logistics, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Major General Thomas L. Smith, DC, USA, Chief, Dental Division, Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army; Rear Admiral C. V. Rault (DC), USN, Assistant Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Colonel George R. Kennebeck, DC, USA, Chief, Dental Division, Office of the Air Surgeon, U. S. Air Force; Colonel Earle Standlee, MC, USA, Deputy for Plans, Office of the Surgeon General, U. S. Army, and member, Executive Committee to the Committees on Medical and Hospital Services of the Armed Forces; Captain C. C. Myers (MC), USN, Planning Division, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy, and member, Executive Committee to the Committee on Medical and Hospital Services of the Armed Forces; Captain 0. L. Burton (MC), USN, Chief Preventive Medicine Division, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, U. S. Navy; Colonel T. F. Whayne, MC, USA, Chief, Preventive Medicine Division, Office of The Surgeon General, U. S. Army; Colonel William D. Graham, MC, USA, Chief, Hospital Division, Office of the Surgeon General, U. S. Army; Captain Nellie J. Dewitt (NC), USN, Superintendent, Navy Nurse Corps and Colonel Mary C. Phillips, ANC, BOND CAMPAIGN BEGINS 15 APRIL As a measure to combat inflation and encourage saving for the future, a new and intensified savings bond drive will be conducted, with the Navy taking an active part. The campaign, to be known as the Security Loan Drive, fired its opening salvos on 15 April and will continue through 30 June. Navy personnel are purchasing savings bonds at the rate of more than 3,000,000 a month. At the end of February, figures showed that approximately one-third of the total personnel of the Navy were buying bonds. Navy Department savings bond officials stated that nearly 25,000,000 bonds have been purchased by Naval Personnel. Sales are now being watched closely to determine the purchaser of number 25 million. It is expected that this figure will be reached during the coming drive, and when it does the buyer of that bond is in for some wide-scale publicity. An official survey showed a variety of reasons why servicemen are buying and holding savings bond. Among them were educational funds, home building, the establishment of a business, future security and retirement. Savings bond allotments may be made for as little as $6.25 a month. With this type allotment a $25 bond is realized every three months. Familiar to nearly everyone is the fact that for every three dollars invested in savings bonds four dollars are returned in 10 years. Another savings bond convenience was pointed out. A savings bond means ready cash on hand when it is needed. Many instances have been cited where savings bonds have come to the rescue when financial assistance became necessary. Personnel are urged to give special consideration to the benefits to be gained by making a savings bond allotment. USA, Chief, Army Nurse. Corps. The Committee will depart from Guantanamo Bay, Tuesday, 20 April for Washington, D. C.

PAGE 2

Page Two THE INDIAN Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 17 April 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. Commanding -Naval Station B. M. Thomson-----------------Editor Chap. E. E Bosserman-.Staff Advisor Reporters LtCdr. R. E. Pearce Louis Kitchen---Y2 Ensign R. E. Lent J. E. Sasser, DK3 Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise. BASE TO FEATURE DRIVER TRAINING To hold the rapid gains made in Vehicle Accident Prevention this year, the Base Safety, Police and Transportation Staffs have organized training classes for Navy Vehicle Drivers. Training is designed to help inexperienced drivers or those having failed official examination. The school is believed to be the only one operated in the 10th Naval District, and exceeds those of many comparable state side activities. Class time is about two hours discussion and lecturing with one hour of actual demonstration. Applicants will not be given driver training at government expense except by order of their respective commands. Other groups may attend Saturday, classes. Trainees for Private Vehicle Driver's Permits will be allowed to attend classes as soon as Navy Vehicle Driver training is completed. For many this will be the only available opportunity to learn to drive safely the "Navy Way." Daisy: "So you had a date with a sailor?" Mae: "No, I tore my dress on a nail." Two pretty girls were walking down the street. Two young sailors whistled -at them. "The nerve of them," said one the damsels, "whistling at us two days before pay day." DR. C. H. WINGERT TO VISIT GTMO. Dr. Calvin H. Wingert, Representative of the General Commission, Army and Navy Chaplains, accompanied by Chaplain (Lt.Col.) Kenneth M. Sowers, Headquarters, United States Army Caribbean, will arrive on this Base Monday, 19 April (to call on) Commander, NOB, and to confer with Chaplain E. E. Bosserman, and a visit of Chapel facilities. Doctor Wingert and Chaplain Sowers will depart Tuesday, 20 April, for Jacksonville, Florida. COMPETITION So you think the Navy has it's twenty year men? Granted, they do. According to a recent release from the Twenty Year Service Club of the B. F. Goodrich Company, a total of 3,371 men and women have completed 20 years of continuous company service since December 1939. In the same period 992 employees have received awards for 30 years of employment, 103 for 40 years and five rounded out a half century of service with the Akron Company. But then take heart, ye careerists of the Navy. Who ever heard of having to put in 40 or 50 years? Baby boy Wesley Ray Strevel was born in this Hospital 10 Apr. 1948 to B M 2 Lloyd R. and Mrs. Bertha Strevel. Cmdr. J. Allan Fields, MC, NOTES USN is in San Juan for a few days temporary additional duty. Lt. E. L. Battin, Chief Nurse, has received orders transferring her to USNH, Portsmouth, Virginia. However, she will remain aboard until the reporting of her relief the latter part of June. On Wednesday 12 April the Hospital softball team suffered defeat at the hands of the Fleet Training Group in a close game, which ended by a score of 2-1. The game went scoreless for five innings when the TrgGrp scored their two runs; the 'Docs' came back with one in the sixth. Both Sikorski and Moore pitched good ball all the way. The Bravest Man on the Base: That patient who went to the ball game Wednesday night with the Hospital rooting party, sat behind the MOIC and spent the evening cheering for the FltTrgGrp. "What brought me here," asked the rosebud. "The stalk," answered the rose. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 18 April 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN (Catholic) Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR. CHAPlAlitS CORNER OUR JOURNEY It's 1700 Wednesday in Santiago. The crash boat shoves off for home. In the harbor all is calm. The closer we get to the open sea the rougher it becomes. Then we begin to pitch and toss. For the first hour it isn't bad. Then we wonder how we can survive. There is always a consoling thought, no matter how rough, no matter how sick we may become, we rely on the capable skipper to bring us through. Three hours later we have finished the trip and reached home safely. It is about the same in our Christian life. We set out on the journey of life in the shelter of our home. Life has a purpose for our goal is the eternal home of heaven. The farther we go on the journey the more frequent trials and temptations beset us. The world places obstacles in our struggle for holiness. Our course which was mapped in accord with God's law becomes difficult for us. We can and do offend Him, Who has given us all. The sea of life becomes stormy with failures, sufferings, and sorrow. At times we seem almost overcome. That is when we remember Our Blessed Lord. He has said, "Without Me you can do nothing." Relying o n Him w e look forward to reaching home safely for He also said "My grace is sufficient for Thee." FOR SALE: 1 youth's bed and matching wardrobe; 1 baby's small maple stained crib; 1 baby carriage; Christmas decorations. Please call at 633, Newtown. Don't Smoke in Magazine Area U1 Page Two THE INDIAN

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THE INDIAN MARINES AT GTMO. BAY (Continued from Page One) States, or where they have received advance training for war or for landing operations in Caribbean waters in conjunction with the Navy. During the days just prior to the occupation of Haiti, and of Santo Domingo, and at intervals during the occupation of each of those two V countries, Marines were occasionally drawn from the garrison at Guantanamo to act in some emergency; Guantanamo Marines thus acted as a permanent mobile reserve for Marine and Naval forces operating outside Cuba in Caribbean waters. Thus for thirty-six years, Guantanamo Bay, as far as the Marines were concerned, was used as a resting ground, a jumping off place for expeditions of various sizes and a reserve area for expeditions needing such reserves. In the latter part of 1940 and the beginning of 1941, the First Marine Division, which was later to become famous in many battles against the Japanese in the Pacific, was formed here. Their training took place around the vicinity of. Caravella Point where they were bivouacked, and their landing operations were held around Windmill Beach and combined practice landings with the Navy at Culebra, Puerto Rico. The Marines who were down with the original First Division and recently returned for a tour of duty at "Gtmo" were surprised at the great many changes that have taken place. TH IDINage ree P Th

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NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun. 18 April to Sat., 24 April Sunday THIS TIME FOR KEEPS Lauritz Melchior Esther Williams Monday THE CHINESE RING Warren Douglas Roland Winters Tuesday DESERT FURY John Hodiak Lizabeth Scott Wednesday THE HUCKSTERS Clark Gable Deborah Kerr CHIEFS CLUB Situated in the center of the Base, both as to location and importance, is the Chief Petty Officer's Mess. This is the focal point around which the lives of nearly all chiefs on this station revolve. The building to which so much importance is attached has had an interesting history and background, nearly as much so as some of the Chiefs who u s e i t s facilities. Briefly looking back we find that the building was erected in 1913 at a cost of about $25,000 and was intended as a recreational building for enlisted personnel. During the years 1913 thru to 1941 it served in that capacity, offering a reading room, library, billards, and four bowling alleys. In 1940 and 1941 with the ever increasing reality of war and the expansion of the Base, the Fleet Recreational Center was built and the old building was given to Ship's Service to be operated as a Chief's Club. Having proved that the Chief Petty Officer's were capable of organizing a mess and realizing the needs for it, the Club was re-organized in 1944 as a Chief Petty Officer's Mess (Open). The government and organization of the "Club," as it is commonly called, is vested in a President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Board of Governors. The Officers of the Club are elected each quarter for a period of three months, however, the members of the Board of Governors are appointed by the President to serve until they either resign or are transferred. Handling the daily administration of the Mess as well as acting as front man is the Manager, who sits in with the Officer's and and Board Members at their weekly meetings and is directly responsible for the good will and prestige the Club now enjoys. The aim of the Chief's Club, and all those connected with its administration, is to be able to amply provide all the recreational facilities necessary f o r relaxation; further t o provide a common gathering place for Chiefs where the talk will revolve around topics common to their understanding or interests; and to provide a fellowship which tends to bind them and theirs together to a common cause. As is true with many clubs, both service and others, the social and athletic aims of the Club are many and varied, thus catering to the many likes of the members. Currently the Club is throwing its support behind the bowling team, which is undefeated and in the lead for their second championship of the Base. The Club also sponsored in the past, a baseball team, softball team, and a golf team, all of which preformed with credit. On the strictly social side, the Club has dances weekly, occasional picnics, buffet dinner's and frequent banquets on occasions. It has been said that "sooner or later you'll meet someone you know if you stay around Guantanamo long enough," for truly this is the cross roads of the world as far as the Navy is concerned. With renovations continuing all the time and with the spirit that is felt around the Club, the Chiefs of the Base feel that they have the finest club of it's kind. Just mention (the local beer) and Guantanamo Bay, to any Chief in the Navy and you see a wistful smile and a far-a-way look come into his eyes. RED CROSS FUND DRIVE NOB -------.----$ 55.00 Naval Station ----$201.00 Naval Air Station $ 35.85 Naval Supply Depot $ 32.39 F1tTraGrop ---------$ 35.00 Naval Hospital .$ 71.00 VU-10 -------------$161.00 Marine Barracks $ 22.45 NOB School------$ 55.00 Cable Co. ----------$ 19.00 Total ----------$691.29 Thursday MR. HEX Leo Gorcey Huntz Hall Friday IT HAD TO BE YOU Cornel Wilde Ginger Rogers .Saturday THUNDER MOUNTAIN Tim Holt Richard Martin The TraGrp took a close victory over the Hospital on Monday, with Sabadish of the Ship Riders smashing a homer with one aboard, winning 2 -1. With Moore giving his usual good pitching and backed by his enthusiastic teammates, fans saw a real game of softball with each team giving their best. NayHosp showed high spirits and good sportsmanship and put a valiant fight to keep their second place lead, but bowed to a close defeat. On the other diamond, the Marines took an easy victory over the American Civilians. On diamond No. 1 Tuesday night, VU-10 won by forfeit from NSD, but over on the other diamond it was nip and tuck all the way with NAS beating the NavSta nine by a score of 4 -1. NAS collected a total of four hits off Newman of Naval Station,. scoring one earned run and three more on errors. NaySta tallied ten hits, but was only able to score once in the seven innings of play. Wednesday night, the American Civilians, having lost all their games with the exception of one win by forfeit, but still in there plugging, put up an unusually good show against TraGrp. Moore, in excellent pitching and hitting form accounted directly and indirectly for five of TraGrp's seven runs. McCall and Betcher, as well as the entire TraGrp team, played fine ball against a valiant group of sports. Admiration was expressed by many observers of the sportsmanship and never-say-die attitude of the American Civilians. U I Gtmo. Bay-15 Apr. 48-2500. Paee Four THE INDIAN