Citation
Indian

Material Information

Title:
Indian
Creator:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Guantanamo Bay Cuba
Publisher:
U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Rights Management:
Copyright, The Indian. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Related Items

Succeeded by:
Sunday Supplement
Related Item:
Gitmo Review
Related Item:
Gitmo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Daily Gazette
Related Item:
Guantanamo Bay Gazette

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text









eQ


~7ca1't


Vol. III, No. 14


U. S..Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 April 1948


7 STATES TO VOTE ON
VETERANS BONUS

Veterans' bonuses, one proposed
to reach a maximum of $900, will be voted on in seven states in November elections. Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Wisconsin will present bonus legislation to the people, according to the Navy's Civil Readjustment section.
World War II bonuses have already been authorized b y nine states and the Territory of Alaska.
The bonus proposal in Maine was defeated in the 1946 elections while Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island and Vermont authorized payments to their
veterans.
Illinois' maximum bonus payment of $900 will be overshadowed by South Dakota's $900 maximum if the bill is approved in that state.
Iowa-$10 for each month domestic service, $12.50 for each month foreign service. Maximum payment $500. Requirements are: Legal residents six months prior to induction or enlistment, service between 16 Sept. 1940 and 2 Sept.
1945, honorable discharge or still Serving honorably. Amount d u e
would be paid surviving dependents in event of death, $500 paid to eligible survivor if death is
service-connected.
Minnesota-No rates fixed.
North Dakota-$27,000,000 proposed for bonus payments.
Pennsylvania - $10 for each
month domestic service with maximum payment of $500. Requirements: Legal residence of state at time of induction or enlistment, served 60 days or more between 7 Dec. 1941 and 2 Sept. 1945. If in service on VJ-Day time may be counted to 2 Mar. 1946. Eligible survivor would receive $500 in
event of death in service.
South Dakota-50 cents for each
day of domestic service and 75 cents for each day of foreign service. Requirements. L e g a l residence for six months prior to entry into service, served 90 days
between 7 Dec. 1941 and 2 Sept.
1945, discharge under conditions other than dishonorable. Payment
would be made by 31 Dec. 1950.


TRAINING FLEET SHIPS IN GTMO. TO INCREASE

The large number of ships of all types now in the harbor is not going to be a temporary state of affairs, a Base spokesman indicated today. During the next three months, no less than twenty-four destroyers, five cruisers, three carriers, plus the usual numbers of tugs, tankers, submarines, cargo ships and transports are due to arrive here for training. In addition, it is probable that other Fleet Units may still be scheduled to arrive during the same period.
Notable among the prospective arrivals will be the Midshipmen's Practice Squadron on 28 July. This Squadron will consist of the Battleship MISSOURI, the Cruiser MACON and a division of four destroyers. Another arrival of interest will be that of the carrier KEARSARGE on April 23rd, a frequent visitor of this Base in the past.
The training of such a large number of ships, which represent a substantial proportion of our naval strength in the Atlantic, once again indicates the importance of Guantanamo to our national security.

DEFECTIVE VEHICLES
CAUSE MAJOR WRECKS

The Honorable M. E. Andrews, acting Secretary of the Navy, has ordered into effect an instruction manual of great interest to Base Vehicle Drivers. Found in the manual are: "Even the best drivers cannot b e expected to operate faulty equipment continually without accident," and "Vehicles that are not in safe operating condition shall be placed out of commission until necessary repairs are made."
Activities are requested, by the order, to give special attention to brakes, steering, lights, tires and other safety essentials. Although the driver must provide the knowledge, skill and judgment needed a safe vehicle is also given great importance. The Police and Safety Records at Gtmo. show that bad brakes or steering were involved in five of the worst Base accidents this year. Intoxication (no judgement) figured in only three others.


SHIP'S STORE ASHORE TO
INSTITUTE IMPROVED
DELIVERY SERVICE

Commencing Thursday, 15 April, the Ship's Store Ashore will institute a new delivery service which it is hoped will guarantee rapid and reliable delivery twice a week to every area of the Base. A small area outside the front door of the store is being fenced off and an attendant assigned to it for the purpose of receiving groceries selected and purchased by the patrons as the patrons leave the store. The groceries will then be labeled with name and address of the customer. Delivery trips will leave this enclosure each half hour bound for the customers' homes.
In this way it is hoped that adequate delivery service can be given to those who must rely on buses to reach the store and have no means of carrying large boxes of groceries from bus stops to their homes. It is realized that some inconvenience may be experienced by those few who formerly ordered by telephone but it is considered that the new system will work for the best interests o f the greatest number.
The following districts of the Base are scheduled for deliveries as listed below:
The area from Deer Point to the Air Station inclusive - Mondays and Thursdays.
Newtown-Tuesday and Fridays.
Marine Site and Bargo PointWednesday and Saturdays.
Customers are requested to comment to the Ship's Store Ashore Officer on the efficiency of the new service and, in particular, are requested to make sure that either someone is at home to receive the groceries or that the door is unlocked when the delivery man arrives.

Payroll Savings pave the way To Prosperity and Security
Right now, the chance of your lifetime is waiting for you to come up and grab it by the hand. It's the easy, automatic, Payroll Savings Plan for the regular purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds-and you'll find it right where You work!








Par-e Two TEIDA


Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672
Saturday, 10 April 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr.
Commanding - Naval Station
B. M. Thomson-----------------Editor
Chap. E. E Bosserman----Staff Advisor
Reporters
LtCdr. R. E. Pearce Louis Kitchen--- Y2 Ensign R. E. Lent J. E. Sasser, DK3
Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough
Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
29 March, 1948.
Portsmouth, Virginia.
I was reading a copy of "The Indian," dated 6 March, 1948 and enjoyed it very much. Several of my friends a n d I are mutual friends of Charles August Richter, CBM, so since his picture was in your paper as "Chief of the Week," we have sent him fan mail.
If you have space in the next issue of your paper, we would like for you to add an editor's note, stating .. . You have heard rumors that Chief Charles August Richter has been receiving lots of fan mail
-and that the news of "Rick' being "Chief of the Week," has even reached "An Admirer" in Portsmouth, Virginia. Reports indicate that several chapters of the life of "Rick" have been left out of the article . . . one of the most important being the New York World's Fair in 1939.
Thanks for your kindness.
Indian Readers

RED CROSS CAMPAIGN
Chaplain Bosserman, Base Chairman of the Annual Red Cross Fund Drive, reports that a total collection of $636 has been turned in to date. The drive will close out next week and a final report of all collections tabulated by commands will appear in the next issue of the Indian.
Anyone who has not yet contributed and who wishes to do so should contact the Office of the Chaplain or Field Director.


FACTS ABOUT LEAVE

Many questions have arisen regarding how the day of depare and the day of return are counted on leave time. Reference is made to BuPers-BuSandA Joint Letter (NBD, 31 Aug. 1947).
Day of departure, regardless of the hour, is considered a day of duty. Day of return is a day of leave except when return is before forenoon quarters aboard ship or before the normal work hour at shore installations. In either of these exceptions the day of return is counted as a day of duty.
Example: A man starts eight days' leave at 0800, 13 May. He is due to return at 0800, 22 May. The first day is not counted as leave time. Leave actually starts at 0800, 14 May.

A baby gir I
was born Monday 5 April 1948
to LTJG Clifford a n d Mrs.
Anabell Smith.
At press time
the baby had not
yet been named.
LTJG Dalesio,
NO TE S f NC, USN h a s go ne to the
States on leave.
Mrs. D. Blackstock, civilian stenographer m the Personnel Office for the past several months, resigned and has returned to the States. Mrs. G. Davis has taken over the job.
The Hospital sent four men, Bolden, Brown, Ferry and Jones, with the ComNOB boxing squad to participate in the boxing tournament in Trinidad. The winners will represent ComTen in the Atlantic Fleet finals later in the season. CHPHAR Moore, also of this activity, is in charge of the squad.
Chaplain Bosserman gave an interesting and factual talk to the Navy and American civilian personnel at the hospital regarding the purchase of Savings Bonds via the allotment route. It is hoped that everyone will take advantage of this way of 'painless saving' thus helping themselves and the government at the same.
On Monday night the Hospital softball team defeated VU-10 by a score to 11-0. Sikorski's pitching was wild in spots but steady where it counted most. The highlight of the game came in the fifth when VU-10 had the bases loaded and none out. The Hospital team showed the stuff they are made of by executing as pretty a triple play as can be seen in any major league park. A grounder was hit down to Gehring at first, who threw to Cummins at the plate, to Johnson covering third. The rest of the game was anti-climax. The Hospital team has won four without a defeat.


CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY
Sunday, 11 April 1948 Catholic Masses
0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN
(Catholic)
Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR.







CHAPIAIWS CORNER
PEACE

There's a source of help and consolation for all of us in every trial if we would use it. Friendship seems to grow cold and we feel alone. Monotony creeps into our daily r o u t i n e. Work assigned doesn't meet our satisfaction. All of a sudden pleasant duty comes to an end. The words and the example of Christ are most encouraging then.
When He came into the world the angels heralded His coming, "Peace on earth." The night before He suffered and died He told His chosen Apostles, "My peace I leave with you." The very day He arose from the grave He appeared to the Apostles and His first words were, "Peace be to you." He came into the world to establish peace between God and man by atoning for sin. Hence this was the very theme of His life. It shows us the way to peace with ourselves.
Ignorance, obstinacy, prejudice lead to strife. Then through the hardship of personal quarrels or war itself man strives for peace. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could follow Jesus in patience, self denial and charity? How happy we could be using His help and consolation which most of the world refuses.

A chief entered a saloon with his wife and small boy. He ordered two drinks.
"Hey, pa!" queried the youngster. "Ain't ma drinking?"

Instructor: "What is a Lieutenant Commander?"
Boot: "A Lieutenant's wife."


THE INDIAN


Page Two








TIlE INDIAN Page Three


We b i d bon
voyage to SSgt.
R. A. McKewan, Cpl's R. C. Moran, M. C. 01son, S. A. Osmundsen and J.
F. Stevens, PFC

J. C. Frady, who have completed their tour of
duty at 'this post. They departed for the U. S. this past week on the PRESIDENT ADAMS.
A revision should be made to the old adage "Boys will be Boys" . . . sometimes full grown men act like that . . . namely C. E. Emrich, whose latest hobby is flying kites.
Another wave o f promotions took place this past week. Cpl's Wagner, Speck and Ksenies were promoted to the rank of sergeant and PFC's Stevens, Gorman, Stafford, Maiberger and McAlpine were promoted to corporal. "Congratulations."
Cpl. J. J. Kulakowski, the man who is very seldom seen on the Post when he isn't swathed in bandages, did it twice again this past week... the first accident being due to a screw-driver driven into his hand and the following day "Ski" fell off the scaffolding while working on the new movie area. Any day now he ought to be getting his B. A. degree from the school of hard knocks.
And we welcome aboard a new arrival. Cpl Joseph Maribile who is now attached to the Post Supply Department.

VU-10 increasedr its personnel
jr w this week after
oP receiving eleven
,new men, several o f which had tried the old
Q civilian life, but
I %I decided that Navy life w a s somewhat b e tter. Say men, don't you think we had better think twice before making the same mistake? ? ?
By the way, the men who cruised down to Kingston, Jamaica last weekend for liberty seemed to have had a pretty swell time from their appearance after their return on Monday morning.
The big question is why can't more of us turn out at our squadrons softball games, and build up the morale of our team? May be that would change our luck.
I am new at this sort of thing fellows, but with your cooperation I hope that I will soon be able to do this column justice as our old friend "Andy" McGroiv, did.
Joseph E. Sasser, DK3

Boot: "Excuse me, but you look like Helen Black."
Miss: "I know it, but I look worse in white."


A STORY OF SERVICE

By Ens. Lent
Seventy-three years is a lot of time in any man's outfit, and when one considers that these years were spent in service to the U.S. government by two men who are citizens of Cuba, it's probably one of the best examples of present day InterAmerican "Good Neighbor Policy" on record.
Antonio Robles, a naturalized Cuban, was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 and came to Santiago in 1888. From there he moved to Caimanera, where he has lived since 1913, when he began his long career on the Naval Base. Robles is a carpenter by trade and works for the Naval Supply Depot as a packer, specializing in the packing of Navy dependents' personal and household effects. He is now in his 35th year of service for the Depot as foreman in charge of the Packing Section.
Victor Prawl was born in Port Royal, Jamaica, in 1887, and came to Cuba in 1908 on his way to the United States. Victor never did reach the States, but has been working for the government since 1910. Prawl began his career as a coal crane operator at the old Island Base at Hospital Cay, coaling the old coal burners, and later helping in the construction of the original fuel storage tanks on the Base. After jobs as a machinist, leading man, and assistant foreman at the NSD Fuel Department, he is now the foreman.
Prawl has many yarns he delights to tell. One of his favorites concerns himself and Commander Cook, (now Adm. Cook) then C. 0. of Naval Station, who once picked him up in his boat at Boqueron and took him to Glorieta. From there they walked 11 miles, stopping at every river and stream in an effort to find a site for a fresh water pumping station to furnish the Base with water. This pumping station is now in operation on the Yateras River and supplies fresh water to the Base.
Prawl will also tell, though somewhat reluctantly, about the time a Spanish vessel was operating with the Spanish Fleet near Santiago in 1924. While fueling at the Naval Base, the Spaniard caught fire, and when the fire phone wouldn't work, Prawl grabbed a fire axe, chopped the lines loose and had a barge tow the burning ship away from the old wooden fuel pier. The ship was completely gutted by the fire and sank in one of the small bay inlets, where for many years it could be seen beneath the water. For Prawl's outstanding action and fast thinking he received a letter of commenda,tion.
Robles and Prawl could sit for hours and tell you "sea stories" about the old and the new Base; how they used to row back and


GIRL OF THE WEEK


The chic little creature with the pert smile belongs to Sgt. Joe Patziek Murphy, USMC.
She's Mary E. Gulla, a native of Rome, New York. Twenty-two years old, and a neat 5'1", Mary is a brunette, with eyes of the same snade. She makes the best spaghetti in Rome, says Murph.
- Murphy's been stationed in Gtmo. eight months, and up to press time, he's received no less than 182 letters from his smitten kitten, who starts her daily sugar reports "My old Sea Daddy."
forth across the bay to workseven miles-and how on a rough night they wouldn't make that seven miles until three in the morning. They'd like also to tell you about their twenty children-Prawl has 5 daughters and 5 boys, and Robles has 9 sons and 1 daughter.
They can tell you too about the Cuban rum, the effects of which could fill a book, nay a volume, and of the time an impromptu 21 gun gun salute was fired as a result of the rum's fabulous effects.
But their favorite story concerns "ol' John Simmons," and perhaps in a way expresses the government's gratitude for the work they and people like them have done for the United States. John Simmons was working on the old station when Prawl and Robles arrived, and all three were here on 20 February 1937 when John Simmons passed away. "It was a fine sendoff John got," they say, for the whole Base declared a non-working day, services were held, and "you've never seen so many cars" that were in the procession. John was buried out by Lighthouse Point. His excellent gravestone and the chain protecting the grave are still there for all to see-facing proudly to the vast expanse of the blue Caribbean.


THE INDIAN


Page Three








Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-s Apr 48-2500.


The highly anticipated game between TrGrp and NAS (contenders for the lead spotlight) came off Thursday, a week ago, and NAS won 3-0 in a display of fine pitching and team coordination. "Rip" Moore, experiencing one of his very few "pitcher's wild" nights, had difficulty in control and NAS tagged 2 homers in the third and an additional run in the fourth.
Monday, Naval Hospital, also a leading contender, won over VU-10 in a 10 - 0 score and brought their team out in a dual lead with NAS, who scored over the Marines 10-1 the same evening.
In Tuesday's battle between Naval Station and the American Civilians, the Sailors took an early lead scoring eleven in the first inning, with Abbot for the civilians giving up four walks and eight hits. The civilians scored once in the second, four more in the third, and one in the fourth, making their total runs batted in for the game five. The Sailors scored four in the fifth bringing their total to fifteen. Winning pitcher Walker; Losing, Abbot. Fleet Training Group won their game on the other field by forfeit from NSD.
Wednesday Naval Hospital and NAS slugged it out in the most interesting game so far in the league. NavHosp, in a display of unusually good ball-playing, held the game scoreless until the last of the fourth when NAS made home on an error. In a desperate attempt to make up and pull ahead, NavHosp pounded one far out into left field and two runs came in. The ball was ruled foul, however, after the "book" had been consulted and NavHosp had to make the play over, no score was tabulated. NAS pounded out seven runs in the sixth off relief pitcher Ghering. The seventh found NavHosp scoreless and NAS in a nine run lead.
On the other diamond, the Marines overran Naval Station by a score of ten to four. NavSta scored one in the second and two in the third to go ahead three to nothing. The Marines started the ball rolling in the last of the fourth scoring five runs on five walks and one hit. They went even further ahead in the fifth scoring five more on a single, three doubles, and three walks. Winning pitcher Graus; Losing, Newman. Total hits: NavSta nine; Marines seven.
League standings at press time: Standing at press time W. L. N. A. S. --------------- 6 0
Hospital -------------- 5 1
FltTraGrp ------------- 4 1
Marines ----------------- 3
NavSta --------------- 3 3
VU-10 ---------------- 1 4
Public Works ---------- 0 5 N. S. D. --------------- 0 5


CANDLE - DIPPING

A candle's but a simple thing; It starts with just a bit of string. Yet dipped and dipped with patient
hand,
It gathers wax upon the strand Until, complete and snowy white It gives at last a lovely light.
Life seems so like that bit of
string:
Each deed we do a simple thing; Yet day by day if on life's strand We work with patient heart and
hand,
It gathers joy, makes dark days
bright,
And gives at last a lovely light.
Clara Bell Thurston.




gliEST ION

Aft

By Ships' Editorial Association
Question: On 25 Oct 1945 I was discharged from the Navy as a CTM and had to take an S1 rate when I reenlisted in May 1947. Would it be possible for me to get my rate back?
Answer: The rate given you when you reenlisted in May 1947 was the only rate open to ex-CTMs with broken service at the time. You will have to regain your former rate by advancement.

Ever wish you were
someone e 1 s e ? Well, now's your chance! By SECURITY signing u p now for regular payroll s a ving right where you work YOU can be the kind of person who's bound to get ahead tomorrow because he's planned for it, saved for it, today. Every Savings Bond you buy and hold until that $4 for $3 payoff in just ten short years is a proof of your foresight, your awareness of your responsiblity for your family's future-and your own practical common sense.
Your Security is
America's Security!

Female Voice (to bus driver): "Gee! Can'tcha wait until I get all my clothes on?"
Fifty sailors twisted their necks around while the laundress got on the Gtmo. bus with her basket of clothes.

She: "Every time I come to Canada I have to change to my heavy undies. You know, I'm from Florida."
He: "That so? I'm from Missouri."


M~ o


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun., 10 April to Sat., 10 April
Sunday
MAGIC TOWN
James Stewart Jane Wyman
Monday
EXPOSED
Robert Scott Adele Mara
Tuesday
HONEYMOON
Guy Madison Shirley Temple
Wednesday
THE SECRET HEART
Walter Pidgeon Claudette Colbert
Thursday
A BELL FOR ADONO
John Hodiak Gene Tierney
Friday
THE UNFINISHED DANCE Cyd Charisse Margaret O'Brien
Saturday
THE WALLS CAME TUMBLING
DOWN
Lee Bowman Marguerite Chapman

GTMO. BOXERS LOSE
AT COMTEN BOUTS

All four of our boxers lost at the ComTen boxing bouts. Aniano of Roosevelt Roads eliminated Brown of Gtmo. in the Bantam Weight match - Lacero of Trinidad defeated Bolen of Gtmo. in the Light Weight match - Middle Weight match Jacobs of Gtmo. eliminated Bonin of Trinidad by a decision. Jacobs broke his right thumb in the first round thereby defaulting to Gillespi of Roosevelt Roads in the finals Light Heavy Weight won by Magee of Trinidad over Jones of Gtmo. Magee won by a default.


--- '' ,6,13
I iN i LLEAGVE .
Officer's League at press time W. L.
VU-10 ----------------22 - 8
Naval Station ---------22 - 11 Marines ---------------23 - 10
Civilian Club ----------16 - 11
Naval Supply Depot - 16 - 11
FltTraGrp ------------- 10 - 20
Hospital -------------- 7 - 20
N. A. S.----------------- 7 - 20
Officer's standings in League Hybiskie-------182 ---VU-10
Inferrera--------181--_Marines Mayfield-------178---VU-10
Ziz-----------175---Civ. Club
Ely-----------173 --Marines
Bonatta--------170 ---NavSta.

"My son's in the Navy. He's a writer."
"Does he write for money?"
"Yes indeed, in almost every letter."


U


Page Four


THE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-8 Apr 48--2500.




Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E14QE5HPV_MR1XSY INGEST_TIME 2015-10-14T20:10:34Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00009
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

U. S., Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 10 April 1948 7 STATES TO VOTE ON VETERANS BONUS Veterans' bonuses, one proposed to reach a maximum of $900, will be voted on in seven states in November elections. Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Wisconsin will present bonus legislation to the people, according to the Navy's Civil Readjustment section. World War II bonuses have already been authorized b y nine states and the Territory of Alaska. The bonus proposal in Maine was defeated in the 1946 elections while Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island and Vermont authorized payments to their veterans. Illinois' maximum bonus payment of $900 will be overshadowed by South Dakota's $900 maximum if the bill is approved in that state. Iowa-$10 for each month domestic service, $12.50 for each month foreign service. Maximum payment $500. Requirements are: Legal residents six months prior to induction or enlistment, service between 16 Sept. 1940 and 2 Sept. 1945, honorable discharge or still serving honorably. Amount d u e would be paid surviving dependents in event of death, $500 paid to eligible survivor if death is service-connected. Minnesota-No rates fixed. North Dakota-$27,000,000 proposed for bonus payments. Pennsylvania -$10 for each month domestic service with maximum payment of $500. Requirements: Legal residence of state at time of induction or enlistment, served 60 days or more between 7 Dec. 1941 and 2 Sept. 1945. If in service on VJ-Day time may be counted to 2 Mar. 1946. Eligible survivor would receive $500 in event of death in service. South Dakota-50 cents for each day of domestic service and 75 cents for each day of foreign service. Requirements. Lega 1 residence for six months prior to entry into service, served 90 days between 7 Dec. 1941 and 2 Sept. 1945, discharge under conditions other than dishonorable. Payment Would be made by 31 Dec. 1950. TRAINING FLEET SHIPS IN GTMO. TO INCREASE The large number of ships of all types now in the harbor is not going to be a temporary state of affairs, a Base spokesman indicated today. During the next three months, no less than twenty-four destroyers, five cruisers, three carriers, plus the usual numbers of tugs, tankers, submarines, cargo ships and transports are due to arrive here for training. In addition, it is probable that other Fleet Units may still be scheduled to arrive during the same period. Notable among the prospective arrivals will be the Midshipmen's Practice Squadron on 28 July. This Squadron will consist of the Battleship MISSOURI, the Cruiser MACON and a division of four destroyerd. Another arrival of interest will be that of the carrier KEARSARGE on April 23rd, a frequent visitor of this Base in the past. The training of such a large number of ships, which represent a substantial proportion of our naval strength in the Atlantic, once again indicates the importance of Guantanamo to our national security. DEFECTIVE VEHICLES CAUSE MAJOR WRECKS The Honorable M. E. Andrews, acting Secretary of the Navy, has ordered into effect an instruction manual of great interest to Base Vehicle Drivers. Found in the manual are: "Even the best drivers cannot b e expected to operate faulty equipment continually without accident," and "Vehicles that are not in safe operating condition shall be placed out of commission until necessary repairs are made." Activities are requested, by the order, to give special attention to brakes, steering, lights, tires and other safety essentials. Although the driver must provide the knowledge, skill and judgment needed a safe vehicle is also given great importance. The Police and Safety Records at Gtmo. show that bad brakes or steering were involved in five of the worst Base accidents this year. Intoxication (no judgement) figured in only three others. SHIP'S STORE ASHORE TO INSTITUTE IMPROVED DELIVERY SERVICE Commencing Thursday, 15 April, the Ship's Store Ashore will institute a new delivery service which it is hoped will guarantee rapid and reliable delivery twice a week to every area of the Base. A small area outside the front door of the store is being fenced off and an attendant assigned to it for the purpose of receiving groceries selected and purchased by the patrons as the patrons leave the store. The groceries will then be labeled with name and address of the customer. Delivery trips will leave this enclosure each half hour bound for the customers' homes. In this way it is hoped that adequate delivery service can be given to those who must rely on buses to reach the store and have no means of carrying large boxes of groceries from bus stops to their homes. It is realized that some inconvenience may be experienced by those few who formerly ordered by telephone but it is considered that the new system will work for the best interests o f the greatest number. The following districts of the Base are scheduled for deliveries as listed below: The area from Deer Point to the Air Station inclusive -Mondays and Thursdays. Newtown-Tuesday and Fridays. Marine Site and Bargo PointWednesday and Saturdays. Customers are requested to comment to the Ship's Store Ashore Officer on the efficiency of the new service and, in particular, are requested to make sure that either someone is at home to receive the groceries or that the door is unlocked when the delivery man arrives. Payroll Savings pave the way To Prosperity and Security Right now, the chance of your lifetime is waiting for you to come up and grab it by the hand. It's the easy, automatic, Payroll Savings Plan for the regular purchase of U. S. Savings Bonds-and you'll find it right where You .work! Vol. III, No. 14

PAGE 2

Page~ Two TEIDA Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 10 April 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasauts, USN Chief of Staff Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. Commanding -Naval Station B. M. Thomson ----------------Editor Chap. E. E Bosserman--Staff Advisor Reporters LtCdr. R. E. Pearce Louis Kitchen---Y2 Ensign R. E. Lent J. E. Sasser, DK3 Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise. LETTER TO THE EDITOR 29 March, 1948. Portsmouth, Virginia. I was reading a copy of "The Indian," dated 6 March, 1948 and enjoyed it very much. Several of my friends a n d I are mutual friends of Charles August Richter, CBM, so since his picture was in your paper as "Chief of the Week," we have sent him fan mail. If you have space in the next issue of your paper, we would like for you to add an editor's note, stating ..You have heard rumors that Chief Charles August Richter has been receiving lots of fan mail -and that the news of "Rick' being "Chief of the Week," has even reached "An Admirer" in Portsmouth, Virginia. Reports indicate that several chapters of the life of "Rick" have been left out of the article ...one of the most important being the New York World's Fair in 1939. Thanks for your kindness. Indian Readers RED CROSS CAMPAIGN Chaplain Bosserman, Base Chairman of the Annual Red Cross Fund Drive, reports that a total collection of $636 has been turned in to date. The drive will close out next week and a final report of all collections tabulated by commands will appear in the next issue of the Indian. Anyone who has not yet contributed and who wishes to do so should contact the Office of the Chaplain or Field Director. FACTS ABOUT LEAVE Many questions have arisen regarding how the day of departure and the day of return are counted on leave time. Reference is made to BuPers-BuSandA Joint Letter (NBD, 31 Aug. 1947). Day of departure, regardless of the hour, is considered a day of duty. Day of return is a day of leave except when return is before forenoon quarters aboard ship or before the normal work hour at shore installations. In either of these exceptions the day of return is counted as a day of duty. Example: A man starts eight days' leave at 0800, 13 May. He is due to return at 0800, 22 May. The first day is not counted as leave time. Leave actually starts at 0800, 14 May. A baby girl was born Monday 5 April 1948 to LTJG Clifford and Mrs. Anabell Smith. At press time the baby had not yet been named. LTJG Dalesio, NOTES NC, USN has go ne to the States on leave. Mrs. D. Blackstock, civilian stenographer in the Personnel Office for the past several months, resigned and has returned to the States. Mrs. G. Davis has taken over the job. The Hospital sent four men, Bolden, Brown, Ferry and Jones, with the ComNOB boxing squad to participate in the boxing tournament in Trinidad. The winners will represent ComTen in the Atlantic Fleet finals later in the season. CHPHAR Moore, also of this activity, is in charge of the squad. Chaplain Bosserman gave an interesting and factual talk to the Navy and American civilian personnel at the hospital regarding the purchase of Savings Bonds via the allotment route. It is hoped that everyone will take advantage qf this way of 'painless saving' thus helping themselves and the government at the same. On Monday night the Hospital softball team defeated VU-10 by a score to 11-0. Sikorski's pitching was wild in spots but steady where it counted most. The highlight of the game came in the fifth when VU-10 had the bases loaded and none out. The Hospital team showed the stuff they are made of by executing as pretty a triple play as can be seen in any major league park. A grounder was hit down to Gehring at first, who threw to Cummins at the plate, to Johnson covering third. The rest of the game was anti-climax. The Hospital team has won four without a defeat. CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 11 April 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN (Catholic) Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR. CHAPItS CORKER PEACE There's a source of help and consolation for all of us in every trial if we would use it. Friendship seems to grow cold and we feel alone. Monotony creeps into our daily routin e. Work assigned doesn't meet our satisfaction. All of a sudden pleasant duty comes to an end. The words and the example of Christ are most encouraging then. When He came into the world the angels heralded His coming, "Peace on earth." The night before He suffered and died He told His chosen Apostles, "My peace I leave with you." The very day He arose from the grave He appeared to the Apostles and His first words were, "Peace be to you." He came into the world to establish peace between God and man by atoning for sin. Hence this was the very theme of His life. It shows us the way to peace with ourselves. Ignorance, obstinacy, prejudice lead to strife. Then through the hardship of personal quarrels or war itself man strives for peace. Wouldn't it be wonderful if we could follow Jesus in patience, self denial and charity? How happy we could be using His help and consolation which most of the world refuses. A chief entered a saloon with his wife and small boy. He ordered two drinks. "Hey, pa!" queried the youngster. "Ain't ma drinking?" Instructor: "What is a Lieutenant Commander?" Boot: "A Lieutenant's wife." THE INDIAN Page Two

PAGE 3

THE INDIAN Page Three We bid bon voyage to SSgt. R. A. McKewan, Cpl's R. C. Moran, M. C. Olson, S. A. OsUmundsen and J. F. Stevens, PFC J. C. Frady, who have completed their tour of duty at this post. They departed for the U. S. this past week on the PRESIDENT ADAMS. A revision should be made to the old adage "Boys will be Boys" sometimes full grown men act like that ...namely C. E. Emrich, whose latest hobby is flying kites. Another wave o f promotions took place this past week. Cpl's Wagner, Speck and Ksenics were promoted to the rank of sergeant and PFC's Stevens, Gorman, Stafford, Maiberger and McAlpine were promoted to corporal. "Congratulations." Cpl. J. J. Kulakowski, the man who is very seldom seen on the Post when he isn't swathed in bandages, did it twice again this past week. the first accident being due to a screw-driver driven into his hand and the following day "Ski" fell off the scaffolding while working on the new movie area. Any day now he ought to be getting his B. A. degree from the school of hard knocks. And we welcome aboard a new arrival. Cpl Joseph Maribile who is now attached to the Post Supply Department. VU-10 increased its personnel this week after receiving eleven new men, several of which had tried the old civilian life, but decided that Navy life w as somewhat be tter. Say men, don't you think we had better think twice before making the same mistake ? ? ? By the way, the men who cruised down to Kingston, Jamaica last weekend for liberty seemed to have had a pretty swell time from their appearance after their return on Monday morning. The big question is why can't more of us turn out at our squadrons softball games, and build up the morale of our team? May be that would change our luck. I am new at this sort of thing fellows, but with your cooperation I hope that I will soon be able to do this column justice as our old friend "Andy" McGroiv, did. Joseph E. Sasser, DK3 Boot: "Excuse me, but you look like Helen Black." Miss: "I know it, but I look worse in white." A STORY OF SERVICE By Ens. Lent Seventy-three years is a lot of time in any man's outfit, and when one considers that these years were spent in service to the U.S. government by two men who are citizens of Cuba, it's probably one of the best examples of present day InterAmerican "Good Neighbor Policy" on record. Antonio Robles, a naturalized Cuban, was born in Malaga, Spain, in 1881 and came to Santiago in 1888. From there he moved to Caimanera, where he has lived since 1913, when he began his long career on the Naval Base. Robles is a carpenter by trade and works for the Naval Supply Depot as a packer, specializing in the packing of Navy dependents' personal and household effects. He is now in his 35th year of service for the Depot as foreman in charge of the Packing Section. Victor Prawl was born in Port Royal, Jamaica, in 1887, and came to Cuba in 1908 on his way to the United States. Victor never did reach the States, but has been working for the government since 1910. Prawl began his career as a coal crane operator at the old Island Base at Hospital Cay, coaling the old coal burners, and later helping in the construction of the original fuel storage tanks on the Base. After jobs as a machinist, leading man, and assistant foreman at the NSD Fuel Department, he is now the foreman. Prawl has many yarns he delights to tell. One of his favorites concerns himself and Commander Cook, (now Adm. Cook) then C. 0. of Naval Station, who once picked him up in his boat at Boqueron and took him to Glorieta. From there they walked 11 miles, stopping at every river and stream in an effort to find a site for a fresh water pumping station to furnish the Base with water. This pumping station is now in operation on the Yateras River and supplies fresh water to the Base. Prawl will also tell, though somewhat reluctantly, about the time a Spanish vessel was operating with the Spanish Fleet near Santiago in 1924. While fueling at the Naval Base, the Spaniard caught fire, and when the fire phone wouldn't work, Prawl grabbed a fire axe, chopped the lines loose and had a barge tow the burning ship away from the old wooden fuel pier. The ship was completely gutted by the fire and sank in one of the small bay inlets, where for many years it could be seen beneath the water. For Prawl's outstanding action and fast thinking he received a letter of commenda,tion. Robles and Prawl could sit for hours and tell you "sea stories" about the old and the new Base; how they used to row back and GIRL OF THE WEEK The chic little creature with the pert smile belongs to Sgt. Joe Patziik Murphy, USMC. She's Mary E. Gulla, a native of Rome, New York. Twenty-two years old, and a neat 5'1", Mary is a brunette, with eyes of the same snade. She makes the best spaghetti in Rome, says Murph. Murphy's been stationed in Gtmo. eight months, and up to press time, he's received no less than 182 letters from his smitten kitten, who starts her daily sugar reports "My old Sea Daddy." forth across the bay to workseven miles-and how on a rough night they wouldn't make that seven miles until three in the morning. They'd like also to tell you about their twenty children-Prawl has 5 daughters and 5 boys; and Robles has 9 sons and 1 daughter. They can tell you too about the Cuban rum, the effects of which could fill a book, nay a volume, and of the time an impromptu 21 gun gun salute was fired as a result of the rum's fabulous effects. But their favorite story concerns "ol' John Simmons," and perhaps in a way expresses the government's gratitude for the work they and people like them have done for the United States. John Simmons was working on the old station when Prawl and Robles arrived, and all three were here on 20 February 1937 when John Simmons passed away. "It was a fine sendoff John got," they say, for the whole Base declared a non-working day, services were held, and "you've never seen so many cars" that were in the procession. John was buried out by Lighthouse Point. His excellent gravestone and the chain protecting the grave are still there for all to see-facing proudly to the vast expanse of the blue Caribbean. THE INDIAN Paxe Three

PAGE 4

Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. nay-s Apr 48-2500. The highly anticipated game between TrGrp and NAS (contenders for the lead spotlight) came off Thursday, a week ago, a4d NAS won 3-0 in a display of fine pitching and team coordination. "Rip" Moore, experiencing one of his very few "pitcher's wild" nights, had difficulty in control and NAS tagged 2 homers in the third and an additional run in the fourth. Monday, Naval Hospital, also a leading contender, won over VU-10 in a 10 -0 score and brought their team out in a dual lead with NAS, who scored over the Marines 10-1 the same evening. In Tuesday's battle between Naval Station and the American Civilians, the Sailors took an early lead scoring eleven in the first inning, with Abbot for the civilians giving up four walks and eight hits. The civilians scored once in the second, four more in the third, and one in the fourth, making their total runs batted in for the game five. The Sailors scored four in the fifth bringing their total to fifteen. Winning pitcher Walker; Losing, Abbot. Fleet Training Group won their game on the other field by forfeit from NSD. Wednesday Naval Hospital and NAS slugged it out in the most interesting game so far in the league. NavHosp, in a display of unusually good ball-playing, held the game scoreless until the last of the fourth when NAS made home on an error. In a desperate attempt to make up and pull ahead, NavHosp pounded one far out into left field and two runs came in. The ball was ruled foul, however, after the "book" had been consulted and NavHosp had to make the play over, no score was tabulated. NAS pounded out seven runs in the sixth off relief pitcher Ghering. The seventh found NavHosp scoreless and NAS in a nine run lead. On the other diamond, the Marines overran Naval Station by a score of ten to four. NavSta scored one in the second and two in the third to go ahead three to nothing. The Marines started the ball rolling in the last of the fourth scoring five runs on five walks and one hit. They went even further ahead in the fifth scoring five more on a single, three doubles, and three walks. Winning pitcher Graus; Losing, Newman. Total hits: NaySta nine; Marines seven. League standings at press time: Standing at press time W. L. N. A. S. -------------6 -0 Hospital -------------5 -1 F1tTraGrp ------------4 -1 Marines --------------3 -3 NavSta --------------3 -3 VU-10 -------1 -4 Public Works ---------0 -5 N. S. D. ---------------5 CANDLE -DIPPING A candle's but a simple thing; It starts with just a bit of string. Yet dipped and dipped with patient hand, It gathers wax upon the strand Until, complete and snowy white It gives at last a lovely light. Life seems so like that bit of string: Each deed we do a simple thing; Yet day by day if on life's strand We work with patient heart and hand, It gathers joy, makes dark days bright, And gives at last a lovely light. Clara Bell Thurston. qUSTIO N By Ships' Editorial Association Question: On 25 Oct 1945 I was discharged from the Navy as a CTM and had to take an S1 rate when I reenlisted in May 1947. Would it be possible for me to get my rate back? Answer: The rate given you when you reenlisted in M1 ay 1947 was the only rate open to 'x-CTMs with broken service at 'the time. You will have to regain your former rate by advancement. Ever wish you were someone else? Well, now's your chance! By SECURITY signing u p now for regular payroll s a ving right where you work YOU can be the kind of person who's bound to get ahead tomorrow because he's planned for it, saved for it, today. Every Savings Bond you buy and hold until that $4 for $3 payoff in just ten short years is a proof of your foresight, your awareness of your responsiblity for your family's future--and your own practical common sense. Your Security is America's Security! Female Voice (to bus driver): "Gee! Can'tcha wait until I get all my clothes on?" Fifty sailors twisted their necks around while the laundress got on the Gtmo. bus with her basket of clothes. She: "Every time I come to Canada I have to change to my heavy undies. You know, I'm from Florida." He: "That so? I'm from Missouri." NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun., 10 April to Sat., 10 April Sunday MAGIC TOWN James Stewart Jane Wyman Monday EXPOSED Robert Scott Adele Mara Tuesday HONEYMOON Guy Madison Shirley Temple Wednesday THE SECRET HEART Walter Pidgeon Claudette Colbert Thursday A BELL FOR ADONO John Hodiak Gene Tierney Friday THE UNFINISHED DANCE Cyd Charisse Margaret O'Brien Saturday THE WALLS CAME TUMBLING DOWN Lee Bowman Marguerite Chapman GTMO. BOXERS LOSE AT COMTEN BOUTS All four of our boxers lost at the ComTen boxing bouts. Aniano of Roosevelt Roads eliminated Brown of Gtmo. in the Bantam Weight match -Lacero of Trinidad defeated Bolen of Gtmo. in the Light Weight match -Middle Weight match Jacobs of Gtmo. eliminated Bonin of Trinidad by a decision. Jacobs broke his right thumb in the first round thereby defaulting to Gillespi of Roosevelt Roads in the finals Light Heavy Weight won by Magee of Trinidad over Jones of Gtmo. Magee won by a default. Officer's League at press time W. L. VU-10 ------------22 -8 Naval Station -------22 -11 Marines --------------23 -10 Civilian Club ---------16 -11 Naval Supply Depot16 -11 FltTraGrp -------------10 -20 Hospital ---------------7 -20 N. A. S.---------------7 -20 Officer's standings in League Hybiskie------182--VU-10 Inferrera------181 -Marines Mayfield-------178---VU-10 Ziz----------175----Civ. Club Ely-----------173.--Marines Bonatta-------170---NavSta. "My son's in the Navy. He's a writer." "Does he write for money?" "Yes indeed, in almost every letter." M xv.Pop U S Page Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-8 Apr 48-2500.


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EFN0JB56R_LQRRKV INGEST_TIME 2015-05-14T20:04:47Z PACKAGE AA00031277_00009
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES