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Indian

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Indian
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Publisher )
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Guantanamo Bay Cuba
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U.S. Naval Operating Base ( Guantanamo Bay, Cuba )
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English

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University of Florida
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Vol. III, No. 13 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 April 1948


PRIZE OFFERED FOR I
BEST BARGO YARD

argo Point residents no
longer have just personal
pride as an incentive to cultivate their plots of ground.
Naval Station is holding a contest (anyone on Bargo may enter) to see who will have the best looking yard
by 1 July.
Cash Prizes To Be Awarded
Fifty dollars is offered as
first prize, $25 as second, and $10 as third award. The judges will be Captain A. L.
Pleasants, Chief of Staff, Cdr. S. H. Pierce, Ships Repair Officer, and Chaplain
E. E. Bosserman.
Some of the yards on Bargo Point may have a head start, but the lawns will be judged for quality, not quan-9 tity of grass. Anyone who'll give his yard proper care has a chance to share in the prize
money.



CAPT. ROBBINS NAMED BASE DIRECTOR OF NAVY
MUTUAL AID ASS'N.

Captain J. H. Robbins, Medical Officer in Command, has been designated as a Non-Resident Director of the Navy Mutual Aid Association at this Base for the current year.
Every eligible Navy Officer should, in fairness to himself and family, include the Navy Mutual Aid Association as part of his insurance program. At age 60 Navy Mutual Aid membership matures, at which time you may elect paidup insurance protection or a cash refund of money paid in, plus interest.
Besides protection, the Association also gives invaluable service to dependents of deceased members in securing allowances and pensions to which they are entitled.
For detailed information, contact Captain Robbins at 215.


NEW BUS SCHEDULE
IN EFFECT

A new bus schedule was put into effect on 1 April providing buses for officers and other Base personnel. It is believed that this will vastly improve the situation of transportation.
The Route of the Officers' Bus will be: NAS Ship's Service, entrance Oil Point, Transportation Pool, Radio Point, Civic Center, Chapel, Golf Course, Officers' Club, Marine Site 3 and return the same route.
Buses will start running at 0900 and secure at 2330, with the following points scheduled: East (towards Marine Site 3)-NAS on the hour; Transportation Pool-5 minutes after the hour; Civic Center
-15 minutes after the hour; Officers' Mess-25 minutes after the hour; Marine Site 3-on the half hour.
The schedule of the western run (towards NAS) begins with the bus leaving Marine Site 3 on the half hour; Officers' Mess- 25 min-


NEW ASS'T REC OFFICER
HAS UNIQUE DUTY

Lt.(jg) A.-E. Rasimas, SC, USN, who recently reported here as Treasurer of the Enlisted Men's Club, holds what is believed to be a unique position in the history of the Supply Corps.
Recreation Department's physical assets are almost $200,000 and its gross receipts for 1947 were nearly $300,000. The detail and accounting of these transactions made it necessary to request an officer to be custodian of Recreation funds. Accordingly, Mr. Rasimus, whose last duty station was USMCAS, El Toro, California, was sent here on 23 March by BuPers. He is also serving as Assistant Recreation Officer.

utes of the hour; Civic Center-15 minutes of the hour; Transportation Pool-5 minutes of the hour; NAS Ship's Service-on the hour.
The Route of the Base Bus starts the Eastern run (towards Newtown) from NAS Ship's Serv(Continued on Page Three)


This photo gives an aerial view of the devastation caused by the recent Caimanera holocaust. This shot, taken by Photo Pilot P. T. Dietz off the CORAL SEA, shows how completely a major part of the business district was leveled. The burned out section is in the center.









WHITE HAT OF THE WEEK



CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Editorial Office, NOB Library - Phone 672 Q.nA. A A.;I 1042
.CundaIJ 4 i14


Saturday, 3 April 1948
U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN
Commander
Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN
Chief of Staff
Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr.
Commanding - Naval Station
Phil Leininger------------------Editor
Chap. E. E Bosserman-....-..Staff Advisor
Reporters
LtCdr. R. E. Pearce Louis Kitchen..Y2 Ensign R. E. Lent A. F. McGrow, SKD3 Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough
Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA.
THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise.

EDITORIALLY SPEAKING

One of the many conveniences of the Payroll Savings Plan is the fact that only a few minutes are required to fill out the necessary forms for a bond deduction.
Once the initial authorization is made by the person wishing a bond allotment, nothing further is required. Trips to a bank are eliminated, no bank books or checkbooks are issued, and the bonds are automatically mailed to the purchaser or held in safekeeping for him when full payment is realized.
There is a little point in arguing which is the better, cash or bonds, Navy officials have stated. Bonds, if lost, are replaceable. They may be cashed only by the owner and they are not subject to the fluctuations of the stock market.
The Navy is showing intense interest in the Payroll Savings Plan. One reason may be that the Navy was the first to employ payroll deductions as a method of purchasing bonds. The system, inaugurated in January 1942, met with immediate favor and the plan was soon adopted by civilian concerns.
The peak of payroll deductions by Naval presonnel was reached in June 1945 when more than 60 per cent were enrolled in the Payroll Savings Plan. YOUR security is America's security.
Recruit: "Barber, do you have another razor?"
P. X. Barber: "Sure. Why?"
Recruit: "I'd like to defend myself."


LOUIS MANINT
For this edition the Naval Supply Depot supplies us with the first married White Hat of the Week. He's Louis (Snake) Manint, SKD1 of Disbursing.
Manint, a native of Mandeville, Louisana, enlisted September 14, 1938, at New Orleans, and after boots went aboard the old battlewagon ARKANSAS.
After a year on the ARKANSAS he was sent aboard the four stacker destroyer USS LEARY. On North Atlantic patrol duty one frigid morning, the LEARY made contact with a German submarine between Newfoundland and Iceland. When GQ sounded, Manint was showering. Jerking on a pair of trousers and shirt, our hero ran up to his gun station, suds and all. The LEARY's depth charges jammed in their racks and Snake stood like an ice statue for several hours. They never determined whether the sub went to the bottom.
Louis reported to ComDesLant in Poston and served there 'til June 1944. He was then sent to Little Creek, Virginia to go aboard an LSM attached to amphibious forces. He shipped out to the Pacific at once and took part in the invasion of the Philippines.
At the war's end, Louis was transferred to the USS WALKE (DD-723) and was on that vessel at the A-bomb test, Operation Crossroads. M a n i n t remembers that before the historic blast, the XVALKE tested water around Bikini and then laid about 16 miles off the atoll. A few minutes before the flash, the crew members were ordered to cover their eyes, but when the explosion occurred they still saw the blinding light, like one can see lightning even though his eyes are covered. They felt the heat too-16 miles distant. On the second test, the LEARY moved


Catholic Masses
0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass
0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services
0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830
Chaplains at this Activity
LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN
(Protestant)
Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN
(Catholic)
Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR.




AN


ICHAPLAIrNtS CORWERJ
EGGS
The rolling of Easter eggs, egg hunts and decorating them on Easter have become traditional. From the White House lawn to Newtown, children joyously joined the fun. Someone might ask, "Why eggs at Easter".
It seems that it all goes back to an ancient custom of using eggs as a sign of new life. Now Spring had returned. Everything was taking on new life. Things lifeless in the dead of Winter were now replaced by things returning to life.
For the Christian there was an added significance. Easter was the day of Jesus' Resurrection from the Dead. Now He had paid the price of man's redemption from sin and eternal death. Fallen man was now capable of newness of life in his immortal soul. His right to heaven, once lost through sin, was now regained.
It's beautiful that the the joy we gain from doing things that come and go so quickly, can remind us of a permanent joy -in heaven which will not end.

up to within 10 miles, pretty close foi comfort, Snake recalls. When this A-bomb was dropped, the light was intense, but the only sensation Manint remembers was that "it looked very pretty." When they took off their special goggles it appeared as if the whole Bikini lagoon had been wiped out. The atoll was covered with gigantic waves, which receded in a short while. It was five days before any ship could enter the lagoon, and then scamper out again because of radioactivity.


at


Page Two


THE INDIAN








A' A,t zXIXt THE INDIANI'eThe


SOUUU PIG!!

Are you aware that we have a farm, complete with hogs, chickens, truck garden and all the other essentials right here on the station? And did you know that soon this farm will be supplying the Commissary with fresh pork, is already supplying it with fresh eggs at the rate of 50 dozen per day, and all kinds of vegetables.
The photo above gives a part view of the hog farm, located at Randolph Ranch, five miles southwest of the NOB golf course. Those are Poland-China hogs, 17 strong, charging out of their pens for the benefit of the photographer.
The farm was an idea originated by Cdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr., C. 0. of Naval Station, who last February appointed CBM Thomas, Master Equestrian of NOB, to set the machinery rolling. In six short weeks Thomas had the large pen in the picture built, four acres of land cleared off and fenced in, and 16 sows plus one boar imported.
At present, the hatchery consists of two large chicken coops, each housing 1200 white leghorns. Their output of 50 dozen eggs per day gives quite a boost to the Commissary's stocks. Chief Thomas now has several incubators and expects the first hatch of chicks next week.
Not far from the hatchery is the truck garden. A rural sailor would get "right homesick" just looking at it. Growing there are king-sized carrots, lettuce, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, beets, peppers, and all the other varieties of produce grown in the States. The Commissary is regularly replenished with this one acre yield of green things, and more land will be under cultivation soon.
As we go to press, Chief Thomas is being made Mr. Thomas. He's going out on twenty, but plans to remain on at Gtmo. as foreman of the Corral and Farm.


The hospital increased its own
0 personnel by the
birth of Norma
Kay Jacoby. Her parents are BK R 1 Norman and Kathleen JaScoby; the proud papa is attached
NOTE S to the hospital
commissary department.
The Enlisted Men's Bowling Team was defeated by the CPOs, which undoubtedly comes as a surprise to no one. The only consolation we can derive is that we did manage to win one game from a heretofore undefeated team.
The hospital softball team opened its season Tuesday 23 March with a close victory over the Naval Station team. Behind the steady pitching of Sikorski the "Docs" needled out a 10 to 8 victory. O'Brien's timely two run hit broke an 8-8 tie giving the hospital its first win. The hospital repeated its winning ways on 24 March against NSD when Bolden held them hitless for over 5 innings. Final score 9-0. They did it again 29 March against the Marines with Sikorski pitching. DesRosier's home run blast into deep right center with one on tied the score 5-5, and then with Gehring on third the Marine pitcher and catcher decided to hold a conference, but forgot that little technicality of calling time, and Gehring raced home with the winning run.. Great stuff, boys-keep up the good work.

"May I kiss you?"
(Silence)
"May I please kiss you?"
(Silence)
"Say, are you deaf?"
"No, are you paralyzed?"


In and Around the Depot ... On the sick list a few days last week, Mrs. Keith is home from the hospital now and feeling better ... Also on the mend after her collision with a swinging golf club is lil' Margo Peach, getting used to her "shiner" too . . . Travelers this past week - Ens. McGovern, who journeyed to the States to have a look at that new Chevy of his, and Ens. Sprague, who took a hop to Panama on a "just to look around" trip . . . The Depot said goodbye this week to LCDR Loy, who's been at NSD for his annual two weeks Reserve Training . . . Personnel working in the main office are becoming accustomed to the sounds of a construction gang working on an extension that will aad a spacious, air-conditioned office . . . Several titles this week Ensign J. T. (I'm out of gas again) Hindes ... Chief (Like to have you meet my friend) Garn . . . and Chief (the key's in the mail box) Guinn . . . More next week.

NEW BUS SCHEDULE
IN EFFECT
(Continued from Page One)
ice then to McCalla Hill; Transportation Pool, NOB Civic Center, Fleet Recreation, Marine Sitds 1, 2, and 3; Bargo Point and Newtown.
The Western route will be the same except that buses will not go through but stop at the entrance only off Bargo Point.
The buses are scheduled to start running at 0600 from the Transportation Pool and secure at night on the last trip passing by Transportation Pool nearest 2400.
The Eastern route schedule (towards Newtown) starts from NAS Ship's Service at 10 minutes after the hour, on the half hour and 10 minutes of the hour; Transportation Pool- 20 minutes after the hour, 20 minutes of and on the hour, Marine Site 2-25 minutes of the hour, 5 minutes of the hour, and 15 minutes after the hour; enter 5th Ave., Newtown-15 minutes of the hour, 5 minutes after and 25 minutes after.
The Western Route (towards NAS) 1st Ave., Newtown-15 minutes after the hour, 25 minutes of and 5 minutes of the hour; Marine Site 1-25 minutes after the hour, 15 minutes of the hour and 5 minutes after the hour; Transportation Pool-20 minutes of the hour, on the hour and 20 minutes after the hour; NAS Ship's Service-10 minutes of the hour, 10 minutes after the hour and on the half hour.


Sgr j /yg //'


THE INDIAN


Pave Three








Pare Four ~~~THE INDIAN t.Ba-Mr4-20


Monday, starting the second week of the Softball League, found FltTraGrp vs. NavSta on Diamond No. 2 and the Marines vs. NavHosp on Diamond No. 1. With a muddy field handicapping both teams, TraGrp slipped and slid to a 6-2 win. A 2-1 TraGrp lead held from the first to 3rd innings, when NavSta tied it up 2-2. The top half of the fourth found TraGrp again in the lead 4-2; two more runs in the fifth and a scoreless sixth and seventh left the Naval Station trailing with two losses and one win-TraGrp out in front with three wins and no losses. Winning pitcher was "Juggler" Moore; losing, Newman.
Over on the other Diamond, the Naval Hospital came through to win 6-5 over the Marines. The Marines led 5-2 in the last half of the seventh, when Desrocher of the Hospital hit a beautiful homer with two aboard-tieing the score. With the Hospital at bat in the last of the eighth, the Marines started an impromptu conference without calling "time" and a Naval Hospital man stole from third for the winning run.
Tuesday night fans witnessed two very lopsided games when NAS overran NSD 23-2 and VU-10 over ran American Civilians 14-2. Everyone agreed the teams were badly matched and good ball playing at a minimum. Gadowski was in good pitching form for Naval Air Station.
VU-10 lost to the Marines Wednesday in a comedy of errors which accounted for the majority of runs scored. The Marines tallied 23 runs with several good hits and had considerable good fielding to their credit; while VU-10 was not up to the previous night's showing, racking up only 3 runs. On Diamond No. 1, Naval Station-trounced NSD by a score of 12-4. The NavSta ttam was sparked by the powerful slugging of Gus Noll (two homers for three trips to the plate), and some beautiful pitching by Paul.
League Standings at Press time: Won Lost
Fleet Training Group 3 0 Naval Air Station - 3 0 Naval Hospital ----- 3 0 Naval Station ------ 2 2 Marines ----------- 2 2
VU-10 ------------- 1 3
American Civilians -_ 0 3 Naval Supply Depot - 0 4
S1/c: "Would you call for help if I tried to kiss you?"
Girl: "Do you need help?"

Y3c: "Where did you get that date? Buck teeth, cross-eyed, bowlegged, bleached hair . . ."
SK2c: "You needn't whisper ... she's deaf, too."


Two more poStential "30 year
over this past week . . . Sergeant Leo M.
McCraryka n d PFC Jack F.
Stevens. McCrary immediately left on a
thirty-day furlough.
The latest scuttlebutt says that one of our telephone operators put in a request to get married to a telephone operator from Caimanera . . . could be he fell in love on the 12 to 4 watch ? ? ?
Guard Company held a Beach Beer Party and Picnic last Monday for one platoon and another on Tuesday for the other platoon. An excellent chicken dinner was served plus plenty of refreshments and a pretty rugged touch football game . . . no casualties resulting.
And we forgot to mention that we have a new arrival on the Post ... Mrs. Theodore Griffin and son, who are living in quarters on Marine Site No. la with her husband, SSgt T. A. Griffin.
In just a few days we will all miss the smiling face of our Corpsman, "Doc" Reuss; he's leaving for the States on a well earned furlough . . . Don't know if the Doc will be back, but we all hope so.


-dA"- C/K/4/MN















"You. ierac1&4med 7%.;gh At #-Rde,


do '4h/ee akca A'MJ A wAhoitfMOWLNQLEAGUE.
Officers League at Press time: Won Lost
VU-10-------------- 21 6
Marines-------------21 9
Naval Station --------20 10 0. C. C.- ------------ 16 11
N. S. D.- ------------ 13 11
FltTraGrp-----------10 20
Hospital ------------ 7 20
N. A. S - ------------7 20


M'v pm -* RJ


NAVAL STATION LYCEUM
Sun., 4 April to Sat., 10 April
Sunday
CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA Dick Haymes Vera Ellen
Monday
THE TRAP
Sidney Toler Victor Sen Young
Tuesday
COPACABANA
Carmen Miranda Steve Cochran
Wednesday
THE LADY CONFESSES
Mary B. Hughes Hugh Beaumont
Thursday
I LOVE TROUBLE
Janet Blair Janis Carter
Friday
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY
Clark Gable Charles Laughton
Saturday
CANYON PASSAGE
Dana Andrews Susan Hayward

CDR. ROBERTSON BEATS
PRO IN NET MATCH

Cdr. E. L. Robertson, Base tennis champion, showed a score of onlockers Saturday afternoon how he hohis that ttlc by beating Mr. George Guadet, tennis professional of Miami, in a three-set match,
1.6, 6-3, 6-3.
Mr. Gaudet made short work of ti:e first set, utilizing his near perfect form to chop out a 6-1 win. In the second set, Cdr. Robertson got his big serve hopping right and drove to a grueling 6-3 victory. Mr. Gaudte showed signs of tiring in the final set and went down under Cdr. Robertson's terrific vollies to a 6-3 defeat.
The handful of spectators at the match were rewarded for their interest by witnessing a battle between two completely different types of tennists. Mr. Gaudet, a slightly built man of perhaps fifty, is agile enough but prefers a defensive game, playing the base lines to good advantage. Cdr. Robertson, quite the opposite, uses his height and powerful forehand drive to back opponents against the fence.
Mr. Gaudet gave tennis instruction to officers, enlisted men, and dependents on Friday and Saturday. He left for Miami Sunday morning, but stated that because of the interest shown, he would have liked to have remained here longer.

"I wish to marry your daughter, sir."
"Do you drink, young man?" "Thanks, but let's get this other matter settled first."


it


Pare Four


T HE INDIAN


Gtmo. Bay-31 Mar 48-2500




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PAGE 1

Vol. III, No. 13 U. S. Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Saturday, 3 April 1948 PRIZE OFFERED FOR I BEST BARGO YARD Bargo Point residents no longer have just personal pride as an incentive to cultivate their plots of ground. Naval Station is holding a contest (anyone on Bargo may enter) to see who will have the best looking yard by 1 July. Cash Prizes To Be Awarded Fifty dollars is offered as first prize, $25 as second, and $10 as third award. The judges will be Captain A. L. Pleasants, Chief of Staff, Cdr. S. H. Pierce, Ships Repair Officer, and Chaplain E. E. Bosserman. .Some of the yards on Bargo Point may have a head start, but the lawns will be judged for quality, not quantity of grass. Anyone who'll give his yard proper care has a chance to share in the prize money. CAPT. ROBBINS NAMED BASE DIRECTOR OF NAVY MUTUAL AID ASS'N. Captain J. H. Robbins, Medical Officer in Command, has been designated as a Non-Resident Director of the Navy Mutual Aid Association at this Base for the current year. Every eligible Navy Officer should, in fairness to himself and family, include the Navy Mutual Aid Association as part of his insurance program. At age 60 Navy Mutual Aid membership matures, at which time you may elect paid-. up insurance protection or a cash refund of money paid in, plus interest. Besides protection, the Association also gives invaluable service to dependents of deceased members in securing allowances and pensions to which they are entitled. For detailed information, contact Captain Robbins at 215. NEW BUS SCHEDULE IN EFFECT A new bus schedule was put into effect on 1 April providing bises for officers and other Base personnel. It is believed that this will vastly improve the situation of transportation. The Route of the Officers' Bus will be: NAS Ship's Service, entrance Oil Point, Transportation Pool, Radio Point, Civic Center,, Chapel, Golf Course, Officers' Club, Marine Site 3 and return the same route. Buses will start running at 0900 and secure at 2330, with the following points scheduled: East (towards Marine Site 3)-NAS on the hour; Transportation Pool-5 minutes after the hour; Civic Center -15 minutes after the hour; Officers' Mess-25 minutes after the hour; Marine Site 3-on the half hour. The schedule of the western run (towards NAS) begins with the bus leaving Marine Site 3 on the half hour; Officers' Mess25 minNEW ASS'T REC OFFICER HAS UNIQUE DUTY Lt.(jg) A. E. Rasimas, SC, USN, who recently reported here as Treasurer of the Enlisted Men's Club, holds what is believed to be a unique position in the history of the Supply Corps. Recreation Department's physical assets are almost $200,000 and its gross receipts for 1947 were nearly $300,000. The detail and accounting of these transactions made it necessary to request an officer to be custodian of Recreation funds. Accordingly, Mr. Rasimus, whose last duty station was USMCAS, El Toro, California, was sent here on 23 March by BuPers. He is also serving as Assistant Recreation Officer. utes of the hour; Civic Center-15 minutes of the hour; Transportation Pool-5 minutes of the hour; NAS Ship's Service-on the hour. The Route of the Base Bus starts the Eastern run (towards Newtown) from NAS Ship's Serv(Continued on Page Three) This photo gives an aerial view of the devastation caused by the recent Caimanera holocaust. This shot, taken by Photo Pilot P. T. Dietz off the CORAL SEA, shows how completely a major part of the business district was leveled. The burned out section is in the center.

PAGE 2

Pare Two THE INDIAN WHITE HAT OF THE WEEK Editorial Office, NOB Library -Phone 672 Saturday, 3 April 1948 U. S. NAVAL OPERATING BASE Guantanamo Bay, Cuba Captain C. E. Battle, Jr., USN Commander Captain A. L. Pleasants, USN Chief of Staff Comdr. E. L. Robertson, Jr. Commanding -Naval Station Phil Leininger------------------Editor Chap. E. E Bosserman.Staff Advisor Reporters LtCdr. R. E. Pearce Louis Kitchen---Y2 Ensign R. E. Lent A. F. McGrow, SKD3 Sgt. Murphy R. E. McCullough Photos by Courtesy Fleet Camera Party THE INDIAN is published weekly at no cost to the government, using government equipment and complying with the Navy Department directives governing the publication of Navy newspapers. THE INDIAN is a member of the Ship's Editorial Association and republication of credited material is prohibited without permission from SEA. THE INDIAN uses Armed Forces Press Service Material, which may not be reprinted without permission of AFPS. All Photographs used by the INDIAN are Official U. S. Navy pictures unless credited otherwise. EDITORIALLY SPEAKING One of the many conveniences of the Payroll Savings Plan is the fact that only a few minutes are required to fill out the necessary forms for a bond deduction. Once the initial authorization is made by the person wishing a bond allotment, nothing further is required. Trips to a bank are eliminated, no bank books or checkbooks are issued, and the bonds are automatically mailed to the purchaser or held in safekeeping for him when full payment is realized. There is a little point in arguing which is the better, cash or bonds, Navy officials have stated. Bonds, if lost, are replaceable. They may be cashed only by the owner and they are not subject to the fluctuations of the stock market. The Navy is showing intense interest in the Payroll Savings Plan. One reason may be that the Navy was the first to employ payroll deductions as a method of purchasing bonds. The system, inaugurated in January 1942, met with immediate favor and the plan was soon adopted by civilian concerns. The peak of payroll deductions by Naval presonnel was reached in June 1945 when more than 60 per cent were enrolled in the Payroll Savings Plan. YOUR security is America's security. Recruit: "Barber, do you have another razor?" P. X. Barber: "Sure. Why?" Recruit: "I'd like to defend myself." CHURCH SERVICES SUNDAY Sunday, 4 April 1948 Catholic Masses 0700-Air Station Chapel 0900-Naval Base Chapel 1745-Naval Base Chapel Daily Mass 0645-Naval Base Chapel Confessions before all Masses Protestant Services 0930-Sunday School at Schoolhouse 1100-Naval Base Chapel 1900-Newtown Recreation Hall Protestant Choir rehearsal each Thursday at 1830 Chaplains at this Activity LtCdr. E. E. Bosserman, USN (Protestant) Lieut. John J. O'Neill, USN (Catholic) Church Organist: Cdr. S. H. Pierce, USNR. LOUIS MANINT For this edition the Naval Supply Depot supplies us with the first married White Hat of the Week. He's Louis (Snake) Manint, SKD1 of Disbursing. Manint, a native of Mandeville, Louisana, enlisted September 14, 1938, at New Orleans, and after boots went aboard the old battlewagon ARKANSAS. After a year on the ARKANSAS he was sent aboard the four stacker destroyer USS LEARY. On North Atlantic patrol duty one frigid morning, the LEARY made contact with a German submarine between Newfoundland and Iceland. When GQ sounded, Manint was showering. Jerking on a pair of trousers and shirt, our hero ran up to his gun station, suds and all. The LEARY's depth charges jammed in their racks and Snake stood like an ice statue for several hours. They never determined whether the sub went to the bottom. Louis reported to ComDesLant in Poston and served there 'til June 1944. He was then sent to Little Creek, Virginia to go aboard an LSM attached to amphibious forces. He shipped out to the Pacific at once and took part in the invasion of the Philippines. At the war's end, Louis was transferred to the USS WALKE (DD-723) and was on that vessel at the A-bomb test, Operation Crossroads. M a n in t remembers that before the historic blast, the WV ALKE tested water around Bikini and then laid about 16 miles off the atoll. A few minutes before the flash, the crew members were ordered to cover their eyes, but when the explosion occurred they still saw the blinding light, like one can see lightning even though his eyes are covered. They felt the heat too-16 miles distant. On the second test, the LEARY moved CHAPItit'S CORtiER EGGS The rolling of Easter eggs, egg hunts and decorating them on Easter have become traditional. From the White House lawn to Newtown, children joyously joined the fun. Someone might ask, "Why eggs at Easter". It seems that it all goes back to an ancient custom of using eggs as a sign of new life. Now Spring had returned. Everything was taking on new life. Things lifeless in the dead of Winter were now replaced by things returning to life. For the Christian there was an added significance. Easter was the day of Jesus' Resurrection from the Dead. Now He had paid the price of man's redemption from sin and eternal death. Fallen man was now capable of newness of life in his immortal soul. His right to heaven, once lost through sin, was now regained. It's beautiful that the the joy we gain from doing things that come and go so quickly, can remind us of a permanent joy in heaven which will not end. up to within 10 miles, pretty close fol comfort, Snake recalls. When this A-bomb was dropped, the light was intense, but the only sensation Manint remembers was that "it looked very pretty." When they took off their special goggles it appeared as if the whole Bikini lagoon had been wiped out. The atoll was covered with gigantic waves, which receded in a short while. It was five days before any ship could enter the lagoon, and then scamper out again because of radioactivity. a Pare Two THE INDIAN

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(, ?AeA1"THE INDIAN 'eThe SOUUU PIG!! Are you aware that we have a farm, complete with hogs, chickens, truck garden and all the other essentials right here on the station? And did you know that soon this farm will be supplying the Commissary with fresh pork, is already supplying it with fresh eggs at the rate of 50 dozen per day, and all kinds of vegetables. The photo above gives a part view of the hog farm, located at Randolph Ranch, five miles southwest of the NOB golf course. Those are Poland-China hogs, 17 strong, charging out of their pens for the benefit of the photographer. The farm was an idea originated by Cdr. E. L. Robertson, ,Jr., C. 0. of Naval Station, who last February appointed CBM Thomas, Master Equestrian of NOB, to set the machinery rolling. In six short weeks Thomas had the large pen in the picture built, four acres of land cleared off and fenced in, and 16 sows plus one boar imported. At present, the hatchery consists of two large chicken coops, each housing 1200 white leghorns. Their output of 50 dozen eggs per day gives quite a boost to the Commissary's stocks. Chief Thomas now has several incubators and expects the first hatch of chicks next week. Not far from the hatchery is the truck garden. A rural sailor would get "right homesick" just looking at it. Growing there are king-sized carrots, lettuce, corn, tomatoes, potatoes, beets, peppers, and all the other varieties of produce grown in the States. The Commissary is regularly replenished with this one acre yield of green things, and more land will be under cultivation soon. As we go to press, Chief Thomas is being made Mr. Thomas. He's going out on twenty, but plans to remain on at Gtmo. as foreman of the Corral and Farm. The hospital ino ~ creased its own OduAL personnel by the birth of Norma Kay Jacoby. Her parents are B K R 1 Norman and Kathleen Jacoby; the proud papa is attached NOTE S to the hospital 1 commissary department. The Enlisted Men's Bowling Team was defeated by the CPOs, which undoubtedly comes as a surprise to no one. The only consolation we can derive is that we did manage to win one game from a heretofore undefeated team. The hospital softball team opened its season Tuesday 23 March with a close victory over the Naval Station team. Behind the steady pitching of Sikorski the "Does" needled out a 10 to 8 victory. O'Brien's timely two run hit broke an 8-8 tie giving the hospital its first win. The hospital repeated its winning ways on 24 March against NSD when Bolden held them hitless for over 5 innings. Final score 9-0. They did it again 29 March against the Marines with Sikorski pitching. DesRosier's home run blast into deep right center with one on tied. the score 5-5, and then with Gehring on third the Marine pitcher and catcher decided to hold a conference, but forgot that little technicality of calling time, and Gehring raced home with the winning run. Great stuff, boys-keep up the good work. "May I kiss you?" (Silence) "May I please kiss you?" (Silence) "Say, are you deaf?" "No, are you paralyzed?" In and Around the Depot On the sick list a few days last week, Mrs. Keith is home from the hospital now and feeling better Also on the mend after her collision with a swinging golf club, is lil' Margo Peach, getting used to her "shiner" too ...Travelers this past week -Ens. McGovern, who journeyed to the States to have a look at that new Chevy of his, and Ens. Sprague, who took a hop to Panama on a "just to look around" trip ...The Depot said goodbye this week to LCDR Loy, who's been at NSD for his annual two weeks Reserve Training Personnel working in the main office are becoming accustomed to the sounds of a construction gaig working on an extension that will acid a spacious, air-conditioned office ...Several titles this week Ensign J. T. (I'm out of gas again) Hindes .Chief (Like to have you meet my friend) Garn ...and Chief (the key's in the mail box) Guinn ...More next week. NEW BUS SCHEDULE IN EFFECT (Continued from Page One) ice then to McCalla Hill; Transportation Pool, NOB Civic Center, Fleet Recreation, Marine Sites 1, 2, and 3; Bargo Point and Newtown. The Western route will be the same except that buses will not go through but stop at the entrance only off Bargo Point. The buses are scheduled to start running at 0600 from the Transportation Pool and secure at night on the last trip passing by Transportation Pool nearest 2400. The Eastern route schedule (towards Newtown) starts from NAS Ship's Service at 10 minutes after the hour, on the half hour and 10 minutes of the hour; Transportation Pool20 minutes after the hour, 20 minutes of and on the hour, Marine Site 2-25 minutes of the hour, 5 minutes of the hour, and 15 minutes after the hour; enter 5th Ave., Newtown-15 minutes of the hour, 5 minutes after and 25 minutes after. The Western Route (towards NAS) 1st Ave., Newtown-15 minutes after the hour, 25 minutes of and 5 minutes of the hour; Marine Site 1-25 minutes after the hour, 15 minutes of the hour and 5 minutes after the hour; Transportation Pool-20 minutes of the hour, on the hour and 20 minutes after the hour; NAS Ship's Service-10 minutes of the hour, 10 minutes after the hour and on the half hour. 547 yf/,e. 1/f THE INDIAN Pare Three

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Pare Four ~~~THE INDIAN Gm.By3 a 820 Monday, starting the second week of the Softball League, found FitTraGrp vs. NavSta on Diamond No. 2 and the Marines vs. NavHosp on Diamond No. 1. With a muddy field handicapping both teams, TraGrp slipped and slid to a 6-2 win. A 2-1 TraGrp lead held from the first to 3rd innings, when NaySta tied it up 2-2. The top half of the fourth found TraGrp again in the lead 4-2; two more runs in the fifth and a scoreless sixth and seventh left the Naval Station trailing with two losses and one win-TraGrp out in front with three wins and no losses. Winning pitcher was "Juggler" Moore; losing, Newman. Over on the other Diamond, the Naval Hospital came through to win 6-5 over the Marines. The Marines led 5-2 in the last half of the seventh, when Desrocher of the Hospital hit a beautiful homer with two aboard-tieing the score. With the Hospital at bat in the last of the eighth, the Marines started an impromptu conference without calling "time" and a Naval Hospital man stole from third for the winning run. Tuesday night fans witnessed two very lopsided games when .NAS overran NSD 23-2 and VU-10 over ran American Civilians 14-2. Everyone agreed the teams were badly matched and good ball playing at.a minimum. Gadowski was in gpod pitching form for Naval Air Station. VU-10 lost to the Marines Wednesday in a comedy of errors which accounted for the majority of runs scored. The Marines tallied 23 runs with several good hits and had considerable good fielding to their credit; while VU-10 was not up to the previous night's showing, racking up only 3 runs. On Diamond No. 1, Naval Station-trounced NSD by a score of 12-4. The NavSta team was sparked by the powerful slugging of Gus Noll (two homers for three trips to the plate), and some beautiful pitching by Paul. League Standings at Press time: Won Lost Fleet Training Group 3 0 Naval Air Station __ 3 0 Naval Hospital ------3 0 Naval Station -----2 2 Marines ----------2 2 VU-10 ___ -----1 3 American Civilians 0 O 3 Naval Supply Depot 0 4 S 1/c: "Would you call for help if I tried to kiss you?" Girl: "Do you need help?" Y3c: "Where did you get that date? Buck teeth, cross-eyed, bowlegged, bleached hair .." SK2c: "You needn't whisper .. she's deaf, too." Two more potential "30 year mern" shipped over this past .geant Leo M. McCrary and PFC Jack F. Stevens. MeCrary immediately left on a thirty-day furlough. The latest scuttlebutt says that one of our telephone operators put in a request to get married to a telephone operator from Caimanera could be he fell in love on the 12 to 4 watch ? ? ? Guard Company held a Beach Beer Party and Picnic last Monday for one platoon and another on Tuesday for the other platoon. An excellent chicken dinner was served plus plenty of refreshments and a pretty rugged touch football game ...no casualties resulting. And we forgot to mention that we have a new arrival on the Post .Mrs. Theodore Griffin and son, who are living in quarters on Marine Site No. la with her husband, SSgt T. A. Griffin. In just a few days we will all miss the smiling face of our Corpsman, "Doc" Reuss; he's leaving for the States on a well earned furlough ...Don't know if the Doc will be back, but we all hope so. Offiu. cr Leag atj ress Atile 4h Weone ostfe VU-10 .21 6 Mai8mrine a 21r 9A 4'oeab/e ~ avu~ya /Ao47 Chew." Officers League at Press time: Won Lost VU-10-------------21 6 Marines-------------21 9 Naval Station -------20 10 0. C. C. -----------16 11 N. S. D.-.----13 11 FltTraGrp --------10 20 Hospital ----------7 20 N. A. S. ----------7 20 NAVAL STATION LYCEUM Sun., 4 April to Sat., 10 April Sunday CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA Dick Haymes Vera Ellen Monday THE TRAP Sidney Toler Victor Sen Young Tuesday COPACABANA Carmen Miranda Steve Cochran Wednesday THE LADY CONFESSES Mary B. Hughes Hugh Beaumont Thursday I LOVE TROUBLE Janet Blair Janis Carter Friday MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY Clark Gable Charles Laughton Saturday CANYON PASSAGE Dana Andrews Susan Hayward CDR. ROBERTSON BEATS PRO IN NET MATCH Cdr. E. L. Robertson, Base tennis champion, showed a score of onlookers Saturday afternoon how he holds that t.tl. by beating Mr. George Guadet, tennis professional of Miami, in a three-set match, 1-6, 6-3, 6-3. Mr. Gaudet made short work of tihe first set, utilizing his near perfect form to chop out a 6-1 win. In the second set, Cdr. Robertson got his big serve hopping right and drove to a grueling 6-3 victory. Mr. Gaudte showed signs of tiring in the final set and went down under Cdr. Robertson's terrific vollies to a 6-3 defeat. The handful of spectators at the match were rewarded for their interest by witnessing a battle between two completely different types of tennists. Mr. Gaudet, a slightly built man of perhaps fifty, is agile enough but prefers a defensive game, playing the base lines to good advantage. Cdr. Robertson, quite the opposite, uses his height and powerful forehand drive to back opponents against the fence. Mr. Gaudet gave tennis instruction to officers, enlisted men, and dependents on Friday and Saturday. He left for Miami Sunday morning, but stated that because of the interest shown, he would have liked to have remained here longer. "I wish to marry your daughter, sir." "Do you drink, young man?" "Thanks, but let's get this other matter settled first." at i L Pare Four THE INDIAN Gtmo. Bay-31 Mar 48-2500