Citation
K-5 Curriculum Maps Proposed for St. Bernard Parish Schools

Material Information

Title:
K-5 Curriculum Maps Proposed for St. Bernard Parish Schools
Creator:
Stevens, Sarah
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
College of Fine Arts; University of Florida
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
Project in lieu of thesis

Thesis/Dissertation Information

Degree:
Master's
Degree Grantor:
University of Florida
Committee Chair:
Bond, Vanessa L
Committee Co-Chair:
Webb, Richard S.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Music composition ( jstor )
Music education ( jstor )
Musical aesthetics ( jstor )
Musical improvisation ( jstor )
Musical instruments ( jstor )
Musical modes ( jstor )
Musical performance ( jstor )
Musical register ( jstor )
Musical rhythm ( jstor )
Vocal music ( jstor )

Notes

Abstract:
The purpose of this project was to address St. Bernard Parish School district’s need for a consistent, high-quality framework for elementary music education. Using the newly released National Core Music Standards as the organizing structure, the project consisted of curriculum maps for K-5 general music that were grounded in the latest research and best practices in music education. In addition to national, state, and local learning standards, each map provided teachers with vocabulary, assessment tasks, and strategies for teaching. Designed for practical use, the maps link to websites as well as other resources available to the teachers of this district. In addition, introductory materials explained significant movements in education such as Understanding by Design, 21st Century Skills, and Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy. It is the author’s intent that this pedagogically-sound and research-supported curriculum be piloted and reviewed by the district’s music teachers during the 2014- 2015 school year and revised and adopted the following year.
General Note:
Music Education terminal project

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida Institutional Repository
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright Sarah Stevens. Permission granted to the University of Florida to digitize, archive and distribute this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
1047962329 ( OCLC )

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS PROPOSED FOR ST. BERNARD PARISH SCHOOLS By SARAH STEVENS SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE: DR. VANESSA, L BOND, CHAIR DR. RICHARD, S WEBB, MEMBER A PROJECT IN LIEU OF THESIS PRESENTED TO THE COLLEGE OF THE ARTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF MUSIC UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2014

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 2 Abstract consistent, high quality framework for elementary music education. Using the newly released National Core Music Standards as the organizing structure, the p roject consisted of curriculum maps for K 5 general music that were grounded in the latest research and best practices in music education. In addition to national, state, and local learning standards, each map provided teachers with vocabulary, assessment tasks, and strategies for teaching. Designed for practical use, the maps link to websites as well as other resources available to the teachers of this district. In addition, introductory materials explained significant movements in education such as Und erstanding by Design, 21st Century Skills . It is the intent that this pedagogically sound and research supported curriculum be piloted and 2015 school year a nd revised and adopted the following year.

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 3 K 5 Curriculum Maps Proposed for St. Bernard Parish Schools Need for the Project The St. Bernard Parish school district is a traditional public school system compri sed of six elementary schools that feed into two middle schools and one high school. Each school has schedule. Although devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 200 5 , the district rebuilt all of its schools and even added a state of the art Cultural Arts Center to be utilized by students for performances, dance classes, and various productions . In addition , each elementary school music program was equipped with a class set of digital keyboards and other instruments that ( vary ing somewhat by school ) include classroom percussion inst ruments, recorders, guitars , violins and band instruments. The presence of these resources in the wake of such a massive reconstructi on is a testament to the value this community places on music. St. Bernard is, after all, a part of the Greater New Orleans region . Despite these provisions, however, there was, and still is, a key component missing from the music programs: a common curr iculum. The leadership and community value music education, but do not seem to understand what exactly it is or what it could be, especially at the elementary level . The goal of this project was not to follow in the footsteps of the highly prescriptive uni ts or tests that have been dictated to other classroom teachers, but rather to provide a common framework for the music teachers that is steeped in the most current research, best practices, and standards for music education. It is my belief that this proj ect has the potential to increase student learning, elevate the role of music at the elementary level, further build upon the partnerships present among all of the music teachers, and be a model for other districts in Louisiana as they begin to explore the National Core Music Standards.

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 4 Purpose of the Project The purpose of this project wa s to address the need for a cohesive music curriculum framework in the St. Bernard Parish elementary schools. This project was not created to sit on a shelf. Rather, it w as designed to be useful to the music teachers of St. Bernard Parish as a resource and basis for professional discussion and development. The K 5 curriculum maps draw upon the recent standards created by leading music educators across the nation, current r esearch rigorous, but developmentally appropriate; comp rehensive, but not prescriptive; and detailed, but user friendly. By cross referencing content from the National Co re Music Standards, Louisiana Department of Education, and St. Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations for music, I intended for this work to have local and national merit. By referencing 21 st Century Skills and Understanding by Design, I anticipate that this project will influence the quality of music education offered to our students in the present and future. Lastly, by presenting this work to the school board, I hope to bolster the community elementary school music. Context It is an exciting time to be a music educator in the United States, but fo r many, it is an uncertain time as well. As decision makers and the public demand teacher accountability , the single most important measure of success has become standardized test scores. As a result, advocates for subjects such as social studies, science, and the arts find themselves begging for funds or cut completely ( Harken, 2003) . Even schools that fina ncially protect their music programs still often operate under a brand of subject hierarchy in which the arts and physical

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 5 education sink to the bottom while math and English rise to the top. This is most easily observed in scheduling decisions, especially when diagnostic testing, school assemblies, speech Conversely , the collection of research findings that support the arts has never been more expansive or more co nvincing. In particular, advances in brain imaging now justify claims that , 1996 , p. 7). The same imaging has also debunked the notion that music and/or creativity are f ound in only the right hemisphere of the brain (Sawyer, 2012). Together, these and other findings offer music study to increased achievement in other subject areas. At the end of the day, music remains not only a social and emotionally empowering activity, but also one that is complex, activating and exercising the brain in profound and lasting ways. Music and Culture In addition to the cognitive benefits of music education, its role as a purveyor of culture and a constructive artistic outlet should not be overlooked. In St. Bernard Parish and the surrounding area of New Orleans, musical traditions are celebrated in many unique ways. It is appropriate, then, to have a music curriculum in place that draws upon these traditions, allowing students to connect the music they hear in their homes and in their communities with their study of music in school. On a more individualized level, music has also been found t o benefit students, especially those with difficult home lives, as they learn to manage stress and emotions (McNally, 2013). By including many opportunities for students to make decisions, express opinions, and select their own music and draw upon student

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 6 maps are steeped in the general principles of culturally relevant teaching ( Ladson Billings, 2009 ). To fully achieve this goal, however, the documents compose only the seed. For this to grow, teachers have a planning lessons, choosing music, and leading discussions ( Ladson Billings, 2009 ). In addition, teachers should pay mind to choose music from credible sources, to discuss all cult ures with dignity and to invite culture bearers from the community as often as possible. Understanding By Design Understanding by Design (UbD) is a conceptual framework that has gained wide recognition and application since it was first proposed by Wiggins and McTighe in their seminal publication in 1998 (Wiggins & McTighe). As a testament to th reaching appeal, the book is owned by over 250,000 educators and used in education courses in over one hundred universities across the United States ( What is UbD ). Furthermore, an ever growing number of states and districts have outlined goals and/or designed curricula for music programs using this framework. Perhaps the reason for this wide acceptance is the fundamental challenge UbD poses to educators to teach in a manner that students will truly grasp and remember. This is in direct contrast to the fill in the bubble education practices that have become all too common in the United States. In order to make such learning happen, th e authors of UbD have presented a template to guide teachers to backwards plan. In doing so, teachers identify overarching goals and desired results, create authentic assessments and lastly, plan learning experiences that challenge nterpret, apply, shift perspective, empathize, and self UbD ). Summary of Underlying Theory and Research , a diverse body of research

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 7 leads to significantly higher student achievement. For these reasons and in order to create a document founded on current best practices in education, I chose to use UbD strategies and components in designing the present curriculum maps. The most visible component s of UbD in each map are the Essential Questions and Essential Understandings. Included in the opening pages of each grade level, these overarching points of inquiry were created after a thorough review of previously published music curricula. These inc l uded: Greenwich Public Schools ( Greenwich Public ), South Brunswick School District ( South Brunswick ) , Catlin Gabel School ( Curriculum Map ) , Bluewater District School Board ( Enduring Understandings ) , New Jersey Department of Education (Standards Clarificati on) , Delaware Department of Ed ucation ( Delaware Recommended ) , Beverly Public Schools ( Beverly Public ), Osceola County School District ( Clickable Index ) , and Wallingford Public Schools ( Enduring Understandings ) . As a designer, I followed the UbD planning pr ocess in the development of the maps as well as created strategies for teaching and assessments that drew ally contextualized tasks. 21 st Century Skills and Louisiana Foundation Skills Founded in 2002, the Partnership for 21 st Century Skills brought together business, education, and policy leaders with the common goal of addressing the disconnect between the skills and knowledge students learned in school and those necessary for the workforce (Our Mission). In this effort, the group identified what they call the 4Cs: critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation (Our Mission). When joined with academic content, which they call the 3Rs, the group claims the school/workplace gap can be eliminated. Alt hough their efforts are certainly not over , the ir impact on the landscape of education across the United States has been significant .

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 8 In Louisiana, for instance, there is currently an effort to address the 3 Rs and 4 Cs in a review and revision of Standards, Benchmarks, and Grade Level Expectations (GLEs) (21 st Century Skills). As one part of this process, a Standards Advisory Committee has been crafted to revisit the Foundation Skills and Competencies that ar e currently published alongside all Louisiana standards (21 st Century Skills). For a snapshot of what this comparison includes, see Table 1 below. Table 1 Comparison of the Four Cs and Louisiana Foundation Skill s Louisiana Foundation Skills 1. Communication 2. Problem solving 3. Resource access and utilization 4. Linking and generating knowledge 5. Citizenship I mage from http://zulama.com/education trends/four cs 21st century skills/#.U4zmka1dUZ8 C ontent from p21.org The curriculum maps that follow reference the Louisiana Foundation Skills directly as parenthetical numbers in the same way they are currently included in the Louisiana Benchmark Stand ards. Alt hough the 4Cs are not referenced directly, their influence can be clearly detected in teaching strategies and assessment tasks included, many of which involve students in creative group projec ts.

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 9 1956. Authored by educational psychologist Benjamin Bloom and a group of educators, the develop a method of classification for thinking behaviors that . Alt hough seemingly simple in its most common pyramid format, the group charged with addressing the cognitive domain worked dutifully on this task for eight years before publication. Their work has since been distributed throughout the world and is utilized and cited by a multitude of educators (Forehand, 2005). In 2001, Lorin Anderson, a former student of Bloom, published a revised vers ion of the original taxonomy (Churches, 2008). See the figure 1 below for a comparison as well as a chart of verbs for each level of the most recent version. Figure 1 1956 2001 Images retrieved from: http://ww2.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/bloomstaxonomy.htm which refers to the increasingly complex cognitive tasks required of students as they engage in ta omy of Learning Domains). Alt hough

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 10 t widely accepted ( Clark, 2014 ; Seddon, 1978 ). In many ways, this i s a victory for music education in which the most common activities (playing an instrument or singing) fall in the application level, while composition and improvisation are clearly acts of creating, the highest tier of the model ( Hanna, 2007). As Hanna explained , th allows music educators to translate their intuitive understandings and tacit knowledge of cognitive processes (Hanna, 2007). In line with this rec ommendation, the following curriculum maps utilize the National Core Arts Standards The National Core Arts Standards, published June 4, 2014, include standards for dance, media arts, theatre, visual art and music (National Core Arts Standards). Approximately 100 individuals with more than 1800 years of experience teaching PreK 12 music composed the music writing team, with past NAfME president Scott Shuler as one of the chief writers (Shuler, 2014). In addition, the standards underwent three rounds of public feedback, which resulted in comments from more than 6,000 educators (Shuler, 2014). The structure and content of the work was informed by multiple research studies conducted by members of the National Coaliti on for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) and the College Board (National Core Arts Standards). This structure drew upo n the three artistic processes: creating, performing, and responding. An additional process, called connecting, was also added to address the important society, culture, and art .

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 11 In using these standards as the framework of the following curriculum maps, it is the t that is useful locally, but that also has national application . These documents should be immediately useful to the educators of St. Bernard Parish and remai n useful for many years to come as we continue to learn and grow in our craft. These standards r epresent the rich experience of thousands of educators, are supported by national and international research, and will certainly influence all curricular efforts in music in the near future.

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 12 References 21st century skills in L ouisiana. ( n.d.). Partnership for 21 st Century S kills . Retrieved from http://route21.p21.org/images/stories/states/la_2pager.pdf Beverly public schools elementary music c urriculum. (2008). Beverly Public S chools . Retrieved from http://www.beverlyschools. org/district/files/Curriculum&Instruction/K 5%20Music%20Curriculum%20Map.pdf Harken, J. V. (2003, August 20). Budgets Cut Student Experience. CNN . Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2003/EDUCATION/08/13/sprj.sch.cuts/ Classroom Technology News . Retrieved from http://www.techlearning.com/studies in ed tech/0020/blooms taxonomy blooms digitally/44988 y of learning domains. Performance Juxtaposition . Retrieved from http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html Clickable index of curriculum framework of music k 5 next generation sunshine state s tandards. (Aug. 2012). Osceola Elementary Music Curriculum Framework . Retrieved from http://www.pe.osceola.k12.fl.us/elementarymusic/OsceolaElementaryMusicCurriculum Framework.html#id.j0dyrw3a9ne5 Curriculum m ap. (2014). Catlin Gabel S chool . Retrieved from http://www.catlin.edu/about/curriculum map D augherty, James F. (1996). Why music matters: The cognitive personalism of R eimer and Elliott. Australian Journal of Music Education , 1, 29 37.

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 13 Delaware r e commended c urriculum. (n.d.). State of Delaware Department of E ducation . Retrieved from https://www.doe.k12.de.us/infosuites/staff/ci/content_areas/files/vpa/MusicGLEPLE092 007.pdf Enduring understandings & essential questions m usic. (2013). Bluewater District S chool Board . Retrieved from http://www.bwdsb.on.ca/assessment/EU_EQ_AMU Enduring u nderstandings and essential questions music k 12 . (Nov. 2005). Wallingford Public S chools . Retrieved from http://www.wallingford.k12.ct.us/uploaded/Curriculum/M USIC_k 12/MUSIC_EUs_and_EQs_Music_K 12_12 1 04__2_.pdf Forehand , M. (2005). Bloom's taxonomy: o riginal and revised. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and techn ology. Retrieved from http://epltt.coe.uga.edu/index.php?title=Bloom%27s_Taxonomy Greenwich public schools core music c urriculum. (n.d.). Greenwich Public S chools . Retrieved from http://www.greenwichschools.org/uploaded/district/curriculum/the_arts/Music/Curriculu m _ _GM_PK 5.pdf Hanna, W. (20 07). The new bloom's taxonomy: I mplications for music e ducation. Arts Education Policy Review , 108 (4), 7 16. Kraus, N., & Chandrasekaran, B. (2010). Musi c training for the development of auditory s kills. Nature Reviews Neuroscience , 11 (8), 599 605. Ladson Billings, G. (2009). The dream k eepers : S uccessful teachers of African A merican children . San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass.

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 14 Mcanally, E. A. (2013). General music and children living in p overty. General music T oday , 26 (3), 25 31. Mctighe, J., & Seif, E. (2003). Teaching for meaning and understanding: A summary of underlying theory and r esearch. Pennsylvania Educational Leadership , 24 (1), 6 14. N ational core arts standards: A conceptual framework for arts l earning (2014, February 18). Retrieved from the National Coalition for Core Arts Standards Wiki: https://nccas.wikispaces.com/Conceptual+Framework Our mission the partnership for 21st century s kills. (n.d.). The Partnership for 21st Century Skills . Retrie ved , from http://www.p21.org/about us/our mission Sawyer, R. K. (2012). Explaining creativity the science of human i nnovation (2nd ed.). New York , NY : Oxford University Press. Shuler, Scott. (2014). Standards explanation for nafme m embers . Retrieved from http://vimeo.com/98255816 cognitive d omain. Review of Educational Research , 48 (2), 303 323. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/1170087 Sout h brunswick school district parent guide to m usic. (Aug. 2014). South Brunswick School D istrict . Retrieved from http://www.sbschools.org/departments/curriculum/parent_guides/docs/Music_K 12_Parent_Guide.pdf Standards clarification project: All content areas grades k 12. (n.d.). State of New Jersey Department of Education . Retrieved from http://nj.gov/education/aps/njscp/Phase1allAreas.pdf

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 15 Authentic Education . Retrieved from http://www.authenticeducation.org/ubd/ub d.lasso Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by d esign . Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

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16 Kinde rgarten Music Curriculum Map proposed for St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana by Sarah Stevens 2014

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17 Introduction In k indergarten , students learn to focus their listening ears to hear sounds all around them. Through active listening and performing , they begin to compare different features of music such as tempo and dynamics as well as how different sound sources affect what is heard (e.g., metal, wooden) . Through improvisation and compositio n, students also begin to make mu sical choices and understand that making quality music takes hard work and practice . When responding, they begin to consider the purpose of the music. They also learn to keep a steady beat through playing instruments, chants, and moving their bodies. Established Goals Students will: Identify and perform opposites (loud/soft, fast/slow, high/low, short/long). Use their singing voices to echo sing accurately (sol, mi, and la). Keep a steady beat . Recognize when music is the same or different.

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18 Kindergarten Essential Understandings Essential Questions Creating Music is organized sound. Melody has shape. Rhythm is the long and short of music. Improvising is creating in the moment. Composing high quality music requires a process. P erforming Performing requires creating and listening at the same time (e.g., blend, timing). Sound can be represented with pictures and movement. Different materials make different sounds. Responding Music likes and di slikes are individual. Active l istening is a skill that can be learned and practiced. Connecting Music is everywhere. Music has many purposes. Music is art; music is science. Creating What is music? Why do we make music? How are composition and improvisation different and how are they similar? How can I represent my music ? Performing How do musicians work together when performing? Are performances of the same song always the same? How is my body an instrument? How should a musician look and act in different settings? Responding Why do we listen to music? Why do we like the music we like? Is all sound music? Connecting Can I hear music in nature and/or everyday life? How do I use music in my life?

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19 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force developed the following foundation skills that should apply to all students in all disciplines. 1. Communication : individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently , strategically, technologica lly, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 2. Problem Solving : The iden tification of an obstacle or challenge and the subsequent application of knowledge and thinking processes, which include reasoning, decision making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using multiple pathways, even w hen no routine path is apparent. 3. Resource Access and Utilization : The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technol ogies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word pr ocessors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies. 4. Linking and Generating Knowledg e : The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transf er and elaborate on these proces ses. Transfer refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. Elaboration refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts . 5. Citizenship : The application of the understanding of the ideals, rights, and responsibilities of active participation in a democratic republic that includes working respectfully and productively together for the benefit of the individual and the communi ty; being constitutional, and statutory rights; and mentoring others to become productive citizens and lifelong learners. Note: These foundation skills are listed numerically in parentheses after each benchmark.

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20 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Creating Key: National Core Music Standards in green; anchor standards in black Louisiana Benchmarks K 4 in blue St. Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations in purple Click here for Kindergarten Assessment T ask and R ubrics Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work . Imagine a . With guidance, explore and experience music concepts (such as beat and melodic contour) . b . With guidance, generate musical ideas (such as movements or motives). Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) Explore and express basic elements of music through voice, musical instruments, electronic techn ology, or available media (3) Improvise with rhythm instruments to an existing melody or story Distinguish between and perform : o beat/no beat o high/low o sound/no sound Students use their hands like rollercoasters to show the ups and downs of recorded and teacher performed music . Sound, Noise & Music ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 28 30) 1 . Students explore classroom instruments and discuss their preferences. Discuss noise versus sound and whether store bought instruments are required for making music . Drum Circle ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 41 43). Students play various musical instruments, first with teacher provided rhythms (call and response) and then with groups and/or individuals improvising. Click here for an informational website about drum circles. Play freeze dance with students improvising the music on drums to practice beat/no beat and sound/silence. Students improvise background music to various stories (e.g. Little Miss Helpful 2 ). beat, no beat high, low music sound rhythm sticks , tambourine, triangle hand drum , maraca, cymbals, jingle taps, shaker Assessment Example High/L ow Assessment T ask, p. 1 Beat /N o B eat A ssessment T ask , p. 2

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21 Kindergarten, Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Plan and Make a . With guidance, demonstrate and choose favorite musical ideas. b . With guidance, organize personal musical ideas using iconic notation and/or recording technology . Recognize characteristics of music that make a musical selection appropriate for a particular purpose (4) Distinguish between o same/different o vocal and instrumental Give students many opportunities to represent sound with pictures and student created notation before using traditional notation. Even after traditional notation is used, continue to teach sound before sight 3 . Music and You Grade 3, p. 115) 4 and give students turns performing a call/response rhythm on the conga drum in between repetitions. Sing The sics , p. 116 117) 5 . As a class, come up with alternate lyrics using the same structure as the original (e.g., where the red beans boil all day where the jazz on the street gets you up on your feet ) . After performing several, s tudents pick their fav orite version and illustrate a picture to help remember it. Different versions may also be video recorded. Sing various songs and chants while moving Games, p. 24). 6 same different vocal instrumental steady beat Assessment Example Same/Different Assessment T ask , p. 3

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22 Kindergarten, Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr3 Refine and complete artistic work Evaluate and Refine a . With guidance, apply personal, peer, and teacher feedback in refining personal musical ideas. Present a. With guidance, demonstrate a final version of personal musical ideas to peers. Recognize that there are many possibilities and choices available in the creative processes of music (4) Recognize basic notational symbols and express vocabulary that conveys precise musical meanings (3,4) Distinguish between and perform short/long Compose heart rhythms. First, use toothpicks or popsicles sticks , then draw lines for the final copy. Click here for an example. Louisiana Foods ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 31 33). Students sing along with Johnette Today is Monday in Louisiana As an extension, they may then brainstorm favorite foods, (such as desserts) to create and perform a class version of the song. Students draw rainbows in the air for long notes and karate chops for short notes. This can be done with partners or the whole class copying. singing voice speaking voice short long Assessment Example Singing/S peaking Assessment Task , p.4 S hort/Long C omposition , p. 5 ( see example )

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23 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr4 Select, a nalyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. Select a . With guidance, demonstrate and state personal interest in varied musical selection s . Analyze a. With guidance, explore and demonstrate awareness of music contrasts (such as high/low, loud/soft, same/different) in a variety of music selected for perform ance. Interpret a. With guidance, demonstrate awareness of expressive qualities (such as voice quality, dynamics, and tempo) that support the Recognize and respond to concepts of beauty and taste in the ideas and creations of others through the study of music (1,4,5) Sing nursery rhymes and traditional songs of local and world cultures Unison echo sing with and without accompaniment Are You Sleeping? ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 1 and French . Students echo sing, echo clap, and analyze the meaning and patterns of the song. Music, lyrics, and recordings available in MATB materials and on this website. Here Comes Peter Cottontail ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 25 27). Students perform Cottontail how the music sounds in different sections. Students then respond to by Camille Saint Sa ë ns. Present students with options to guide them through making musical decisions (e.g., whether the teacher should accompany the given song with guitar or piano or whether or not a performance should include body movement ) . With each Music and the Brain (MAT B) 7 song, students should analyze same/different rhythms, phrases, and melodic contour. They should also perform each fast and slow, loud and soft, as ability allows. Other sources for songs to select, analyze and perform include The Silly Songbook 8 , Wee Sing In the Car 9 , Wee Sing Nursery Rhymes and Lullbies 10 , Songs We Enjoy 3 11 , and Sing, Clap, and Dance with Ladybug 12 . Conversational Solfege Level 1 13 is also a high quality investment. music sound hear (connect to study ing senses) stead y beat high/low loud/soft same/different Assessment Example Performance task: Student echo sings sol, la, and mi accurately by him or herself when prompted during a group game. (One chance during the game ; repeat task throughout the year ). Click here for an example of a song/game to use. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) 2. no ( )

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24 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr5 Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. Rehearse, Evaluate and Refine a . With guidance, apply personal, teacher, and peer feedback to refine performances. b . With guidance, use suggested strategies in rehearsal to improve the e xpressive qualities of music . Recognize and imitate simple melodies and rhythmic patterns using voice, musical instruments, or other sound sources (3) Distinguish between and use speaking, whispering, shouting, singing Match pitch Echo sing Play a non pitched classroom inst rument with proper technique o fast/slow o loud/soft o short/long Moving to the Beat ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 16 18). Students practice keeping a steady beat with their bodies and on instruments while singing familiar The Percussion Family ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 22 24). Students respond to the music of the per cussion family and learn to play classroom percussion instruments with correct technique. Give students many opportunities to make musical choices by taking turns leading the class in steady beat movements with rhythm sticks, beanbags, or their bodies . Students sing songs that include sections for singing and sections for speaking. See Kod á ly in the Classroom, P rimary for many appropriate chants and songs 14 . Students chant lyrics to a song before singing to help learn the words and rhythm. Video rec ord students performing and guide them to Students perform simple ostinato chants, while keeping the beat with their b odies or classroom instruments. speaking whispering shouting singing steady beat percussion drum maraca tambourine triangle cymbals Assessment Example S peaking, Whispering, S houting, a nd S inging P erformance T ask, p. 6

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25 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr6 Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work. Present a. With guidance, perform music with expression. b. Perform appropriately for the audience. Participate in organized musical activities including singing, playing, and movement (1,2,5) Recognize and demonstrate behavior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Perform: o loud/soft o fast/slow o using singing voice Bad Weather News ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 9 11). Students play musical instruments and/or body percussion to sound like a storm. As an extension, students may also make music to portray other types of weather (e.g., hot and sticky, cool and calm). Hush, L ittle Baby ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 19 21). Students explore the purpose of a lullaby and how to perform one. Songs include and Rock A Bye Baby Teachers may also read and discuss the book Hush Little Baby (trad . ) by Marla Frazee . S tudents s peak the chant, you go, y ! In between reciting the chant, a child gets a turn to hit a hand drum (or other small percussion instrument) fast or slow. The class tells which they heard and the performer says whether they are right or wrong and then passes the instrument to the next person . ( Music and You , Grade 3, p. 38) and discuss how they should sing it to make it sound scary. ( from Wee Sing Game s , p. 10 11 ). fast slow loud soft lullaby singing voice Assessment Example Loud/ S oft A ssessment T ask, p. 7 Fast/ S low A ssessment T ask, p. 8

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26 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re7 Perceive and analyze artistic work . Select a. With guidance, list personal interests and experiences and demonstrate why they prefer some music selections over others. Analyze a. With guidance, demonstrate how a specific music concept (such as beat or melodic direction) is used in music. Participate in guided inquiry into the b share personal feelings or preferences about music (1, 5) Devise criteria for evaluating music and music performances, and express opinions using basic music vocabulary (1, 2, 4) Distinguish between: Sound sources such as environmental, wooden , and metal ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 12 15). S tudents practice keeping a steady beat with their bodies through an exploration of military and patriotic music. Click here and here for John Philip Sousa biographies. Movement to Program Music the Animals by C. Saint Sa ë ns ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 34 36). Students respond with their bodies to various recordings from Carnival of the Animals. See Listening Resource Kit , L evel 1 15 for lessons to go with these pieces. Musical Patterns ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 37 41). Students identify classroom percussion instrume nts that are hidden from sight and then create patterns using cut out pictures of them. Take students on a sound walk through the school building to practice attentive listening skills and build sound awareness. Stud ents may also brainstorm sounds they hear at different times of the day and/or at different types of occasions. See Listening Resource Kit, Level 1, p. 19 21, for lessons using environmental sound discrimination. environment wooden metal steady beat , march sousaphone band composer loud, soft fast, slow smooth, separate Assessment Example Assessment task: Student s orts pictures of classroom percussion into wooden or metal groups Click here for free source of percussion instrument pictures to print and use for sorting . Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. successful ( ) all corr ect 2. developing ( ~) 1 2 incorrect 3. unsuccessful ( ) 3+ incorrect

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27 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re8 Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. Interpret a . With guidance, demonstrate awareness of expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) that expressive intent. Demonstrate awareness of where and how music is used in daily life and within the community (1, 4, 5) Understand and apply basic music vocabulary to describe aesthetic qualities of musical compositions (1,4) Distinguish between: v ocal and instrumental loud/soft f ast/slow s hort/long ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 3 5). Students respond to the and as they identify how the music makes them feel . unsharpened pencils as batons and a simple 2 pattern. Loud sections should be shown with big movements and soft sections with small movements. Students can identify various expressive elements of music by pointing to or holding up pictures, such as those in the Listening Resource Kit, Level 1, p. 7 9. Stu dents should experience and perform music for various functions, including dancing, remembering, calming down, etc. Students practice singing serious during serious songs and silly during silly songs (e.g., Amazing Grace from the MATB , p . 161 , and Songbook, p. 6 8). voice instrument composer loud , soft fast , slow short , long Assessment Example Assessment t ask: Student i dentifies recordings as vocal or instrumental by holding up or pointing to a picture of a person singing or a picture of instrument s . (3 chances) Record attainm ent of the skill with a checklist: 1. unsuccessful ( ) any incorrect 2. successful ( ) all correct

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28 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re9 Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. Evaluate a . With guidance, apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of music. Recognize characteristics of music that make a musical selection appropriate for a particular purpose (4) Recognize and demonstrate behavior appropriate for v arious musical environments (4, 5) Sing nursery rhymes and traditional songs of local and world cultures Modeling Audience Behavior ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 6 8). Students experience v arious types of music and role play accepted audience behavior for each. For pieces to use, see the rich collection at louisianafolklife.org . See also regional es (e.g., DSO , SFS , NYP , ASO , BRSO , RSO ). have lead students in a discussion of what make music good or bad in their opinions. rhyme composer performer musician audience Assessment Example Student contributes to partner discussions, finishing the prompt the music, because Students are given many opportunities to engage in this task and teacher observes a few at a time. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. Student contributes with support for opinion ( ) 2. Student does not contribute with suppor t for opinion ( )

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29 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn10 Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art. Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music. Recognize universal themes in music and how music communicates a universal language (1, 4) Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhyth mic patterns (1, 4) Sing with and without accompaniment Click here for many ideas for improvising feelings or scenes . Click here for fun improv isation ideas using feelings and sounds . Then, lead students in exploring sounds that Sing familiar son gs with mismatched sleepy. Grade 3, p. 16) and watch the Marvelous Toy As a group, the class then brainstorms sounds and creates a composition about a newly invented machine and the sounds it makes. Video record the final version. improvise lyrics feelings Assessment Example Improvisation Performance Task, p. 9 Improvisation Movement Task, p. 9

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30 Kindergarten , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn11 Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life. Recognize and discuss the function of music within historical and cultural contexts, including celebrations, ceremonies, and special occasions (1,4) Recognize musical styles representative of various cultures (4) Sing nursery rhymes and traditional songs of local and world cultures Cajun Songs and Dance ( Model Music Lessons , K, p. 44 46). Students learn a Allons Danser, Colinda ) and identify instruments used in most Cajun bands. Click here for a Cajun time for students to share personal experiences with this type of music. Click here for various Cajun recordings. Students learn to sing and play song games from various cu ltures (e.g., Kapulu Kane, Music and You, Grade 3, p. 165). Students learn various styles of dance (e.g. hula, country line dancing, circle dances, ballet) Students learn songs for a variety of occasions (e.g., holidays, work songs, song stories). Many a re available in Music and You, Grade 3. opinion holiday celebration Cajun triangle accordion fiddle Assessment Example Music in My W orld Assessment Task, p. 10

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31 Resources 1 Academic Curriculum. (2009, May). Academic c urriculum . Retrieved from http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/academic curriculum 2 Hargreaves, R. (1981). Little miss h elpful . Windermere, FL : Ottenheimer Publishers, Inc. 3 Specific applications to music i nstruction. (n.d.). GIML The Gordon Institute for Music Learning. Retrieved from http://giml.org/mlt/applications/ 4 Staton, B., Staton, M., Davidson, M., & Kaplan, P. (1988). Music and you: g rade 3 . New York , NY : Macmillan. 5 Appleby, A., & Pickow, P. (1993). The library of children's song c lassics . New York, NY: Amsco Publications. 6 Beall, P. C., & Nipp, S. H. (2006). Wee sing games, games, g ames . New York, NY: Price Stern Sloan. 7 Lercari, L. P. (2003). Music and the brain book one teacher's m anual . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 8 Nelson, E. L. (2002). The silly s ongbook . Studio City, CA: Players Press. 9 Beall, P. C., & Nipp, S. H. (2005). Wee sing in the c ar . New York: Price Stern Sloan. (Original work published 1999) 10 Beall, P. C., & Nipp, S. H. (2005). Wee sing nursery rhymes and l ullabies . New York: Price Stern Sloan. (Original work published 1985) 11 Crawford, B. (1980). Songs we e njoy . Pensacola, FL: A Be ka Book. 12 Sing, clap and dance with l adybug . (1993). Peru, IL: Carus Publishing Company. 13 Feieraben, J. (2005). Conversational solfege, level 1 teachers e dition . Chicago, IL: GIA Publications, Inc. 14 Rann, L. (2005). Kodaly in the classroom: a practical approach to teaching pitch and r hythm (Teacher's ed.). Milwaukee, WI : Hal Leonard Corporation. 15 Listening resource k it: Themes & v ariations . Red Deer, Alberta: C N .

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32 First Grade Music Curriculum Map proposed for St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana by Sarah Stevens 2014

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33 Introduction In f irst grade, students develop the habit of singing and playing instruments with correct technique. Circle games, dancing, and singing are common activities. At this age, students are able to greatly expand their understanding of music by listening to many different styles of music from various cultures, including folk and patriotic songs from the United States. Through such experiences , students develop specific vocabulary to describe the sounds they hear and produce . T hey are also able to improvise and compose music that s hows increasing variety and purpose and to represent sounds with student created and traditional notation . Students perform in class often and learn to watch each other and /or the conductor to stay together when performing and to sit still and politely wh en they are the audience . Established Goals Students will: R ecognize and perform music (loud/ soft, fast/ slow, high/ low ) . Keep a steady beat. Play pitched and non pitched classroom in struments with proper technique. Relate music to their preferences and feelings. Perform 2 part, 4 beat ostinati with voices and instruments as part of an ensemble . Recognize when music is the same or different.

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34 First Grade Essential Understandings Essential Questions Students will understand Creating Music is organized sound. Melody has shape. Rhythm is the long and short of music. Improvising is creating in the moment. Composing high quality music requires a process. P erforming Performing requires creating and listening at the same time (e.g., blend, timing). Rhythm and beat are different, but related. Sound can be represented with pictures and movement. Different materials make different sounds. Responding Music likes and dislikes are individual. Active listening is a skill that can be learned and practiced. Connecting Music is everywhere. Music has many purposes. Music is art; music is science. Creating What is music? Why do we make music? How are composition and improvisation different and how are they similar? How can I represent my music? Performing How do musicians work together when performing? Are performances of the same song always the same? How is my body an instrument? How should a musician look and act in different settings? Responding Why do we listen to music? Why do we like the music we like? Connecting Can I hear music in nature and/or everyday life? How do I use music in my life? Why does music sound different in different places?

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35 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force developed the following foundation skills that should apply to all students in all disciplines. 1. Communication : een individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently, strategically, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representi ng. 2. Problem Solving : The identification of an obstacle or challenge and the subsequent application of knowledge and thinking pr ocesses, which include reasoning, decision making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using multiple pathways, even when no routine path is apparent. 3. Resource Access and Utilization : The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using reso urce tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technologies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and pape r; audio/video materials, word processors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies. 4. Linking and Generating Knowledge : The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transfer and elaborate on these processes. Transfer refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a set ting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. Elaboration refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts. 5. Citizenship : The application of the understanding of the ideals, rights, and responsibilities o f active participation in a democratic republic that includes working respectfully and productively together for the benefit of the individual and the and others; learners. Note: These foundation skills are listed numerically in parentheses after each benchmark.

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36 First Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Key: National Core Music Standards in green; anchor standards in black Louisiana Benchmarks K 4 in blue St. Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations in purple Click here for First G rade Assessment T ask s and R ubrics Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work Imagine a . With limited guidance, create musical ideas (such as answering a musical question) for a specific purpose. b . With limited guidance, generate musical ideas in multiple tonalities (such as major and minor) and meters (such as duple and triple). Explore and express basic elements of music through voice, musical instruments, electronic technology, or available media (3) Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ide as, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) Recognize and perform s trong and weak beats (duple meter) Students experiment with musical conversation, improvising back and forth with a partner. Advanced students use question s that end asc ending and answer s that end descending. Sound E xploration : Students investigate the sound possibilities of various materials (e.g. a piece of paper, plastic bottle). For more improvisation ideas, see Campbell & Kassner, 2006, p. 252 255 1 . Students perform songs and chants ( Music and You , Grade 3, p. 154 155) 2 stomping on the strong beats and clapping or patting the weak beats. ( See The Complete Book by Silberg & Schiller 3 for over 700 chants and songs. ) Halloween Night Music and You , Grade 3 , p. 40 41), improvising in groups during the B section. Mirror D ancing : Students move their bodies to the music while a partner copies. Keep switching the style of music and which partner leads. Pentatonic Imp rov ( Model Music Lessons , p. 43 45) : 4 Students improvise on black tone bars. Various constraints may be applied. question answer strong beat weak beat echo sing improvise ostinato pentatonic Assessment Example Call and Response Improvisation, p. 1

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37 First Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Plan and Make a . With limited guidance, demonstrate and discuss personal reasons for selecting musical ideas that represent expressive intent. b . With limited guidance, use iconic or standard notation and/or recording technology to document and organize personal musical ideas. Recognize that there are many possibilities and choices available in the creative processes of music (4) Identify the music form (e.g., AB, ABA) and describe in simple terms how the elements of music are used in various works (1,4) Recognize , echo sing , and play melodies which include sol, mi, la and up/down / stay the same Perform and identify r hythm and beat Identify classroom rhythm instruments by sound and source Composing with Body Percussion: C lick here for an example . Ode to Joy Variation: After learning Ode to Joy, students collaborate on new version , changing the lyrics to pay tribute to something they love (e.g. Ode to Ice Cream) . See , p. 61 64) 5 . ounds, game for developing aural discrimination. Click here for directions. Skip to My Lou ( Model Music Lessons , p. 15 17 ). Students respond with their bodies to musical selections to show their understanding of same and by Ma u rice Ravel . Rollercoaster Oper ator: Students work in partners in which one partner improvises up and down movements with his/her body, while the other partner tries to play what i s shown on a melodic instrument (beginners only focus on ups and downs, more advanced students add expressi on and dynamics). Students improvise using high or low notes on the keyboard (or glockenspiel), switching from one to the other when signaled. To further understand high/low, students can order melodic instruments such as boomwhackers or hand bells from lowest to highest. up , down , stay the same choices lyrics same , different instruments rhythm , beat metal , wooden , shaker , drum Assessment Example Sound Songs, p. 2

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38 First Grade, Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr3 Refine and complete artistic work. Evaluate and Refine a . With limited guidance , discuss and apply personal, peer and teacher feedback to refine personal musical ideas. Present a. With limited guidance , convey expressive intent for a specific purpose by presenting a final version of personal musical ideas to peers or informal audience. Recognize basic notational symbols and express vocabulary that conveys precise musical meanings (3,4) Identify and demonstrate talking, whispering, singing, shouting as ways to use the voice. Read and perform: o quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest Oh, A Hunting We Will Go ( Model Music Lessons , p. 4 6 ) . Students predict rhymes in a storybook, exploring rhyming words with a grid, and creating a variation (different lyrics) of a well known song. Songs include, Twinkle, Little Star , and the song/story , Hunting We Will Go . BINGO ( Model Music Lessons , p. 18 20). Students perform BINGO, clapping to replace letters with each repeat. Then, that fit into the BINGO rhythm. BINGO written music available in MATB , p . 133 136 . Students use their own created notation, such as this graph ic notation or recording devices to document their compositions. Students can also use manipulatives, such as fraction bars or legos , to represent rhythm compositions. By using manipulatives, students are able to rework comp osed ideas, make choices, and then notate final drafts for presentation. voice whispering shouting singing talking song lyrics rhyme heartbeat Assessment Example Mein Hut Variation, p. 4 Performance Task: Student performs rhythms using instruments and body percussion within the context of a game (e.g., Around the World Rhythm). Students get 3 chances to perform. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all 3 correct 2. developing (~) 2 correct 3. no ( ) 0 1 correct

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39 First Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr4 Select, a nalyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. Select a. With limited guidance , demonstrate and discuss personal interest in, knowledge about, and purpose of varied musical selections. Analyze a. With limited guidance , demonstrate knowledge of music concepts (such as beat and melodic contour) in music from a variety of cultures selected for performance . b. When analyzing selected music, read and perform rhythmic patterns using iconic or standard notation. Interpret a. Demonstrate and describe (such as dynamics and tempo). Recognize and respond to concepts of beauty and taste in the ideas and creations of others through the study of music (1,4,5) Identify and demonstrate upward, repeated, and downward motion through body movement Students c reate and decode melodies using coins. Click here for an example that is great for centers and differentiation. Loud or Soft ( Model Music Lessons , p. 1 3) . Students respond with various hand e , Opposites ( Model Music Lessons , p. 7 9). Students use musical vocabulary to describe various songs, including, , Peer Gynt . Students move their bodies like rollercoasters and then draw the ups and Pantomime . Students respond to musical phrases, tempo, and dynamics, with streamer or ribbon dancing. up down stay the same ( repeat ) fast slow loud soft Assessment Example Melodic Contour, p. 4 Loud/ Soft Assessment Task, p. 5 Steady Beat Performance Task. Teacher observes multiple tasks (using instruments, body percussion, body movement). Repeat this task several times throughout the year. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) 2. no ( )

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40 First Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr5 Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. Rehearse, Evaluate and Refine a. With limited guidance , apply personal, teacher, and peer feedback to refine performances. b. With limited guidance, use suggested strategies in rehearsal to address interpretive challenges of music. Recognize and imitate simple melodies and rhythmic patterns using voice, musical instruments, or other sound sources (3) Sing in unison, use head voice, and attempt to match pitch Recognize, echo sing, and play melodies which include sol, mi, la and high/low/same Play a non pitched classroom instrument with proper technique Perform a steady beat accompaniment Read and perform : o quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest Day O: Calypso Call and Response ( Model Music Lessons , p. 27 29). Students practice call and response form, learn the history of Calypso music and the purpose of a work song. Students also make their own instruments from recycled materials. Watch on the Muppets. Click here for lyrics and here for a lesson on Calypso music. Click here for a website for practicing the skill of matching pitch ( requires speakers and a microphone) . Reading and Writing Music 1 ( Model Music Lessons , p. 55 57). S tudents notate familiar sol, la, mi songs on a musical staff with a manipulative (e.g. BING O Bounce High, Bounce Low . (See Kodaly in the Classroom, Primary , p. 20, 22, and 28) 6 . Students practice reco gnizing patterns using manipulatives , pictures, and/or worksheet such as this one . Once the y understand the concept of patterns, students may apply this concept to musical f orm. Patterns of Music Notes ( Model Music Lessons , p. 58 62). Involves recognizing patterns in rhythms using quarter notes, eighth note pairs, and quarter rests. A good worksheet for cutting out and completing patterns is on p. 61. Musical chants are another great source for this activity . perform call and response calypso steel drums recycle quarter note, eighth note pairs, quarter rest ( Model Music Lessons p. 58) Assessment Example Echo singing (sol, la, mi), p. 6 Assessment Task: Teacher prompts students to match pitch in the context of a speed game (each child gets three chances. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) performs all three correct 2. developing (~) 2 correct 3. no ( ) 1 or less correct

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41 First Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr6 Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work. Present a . With limited guidance, perform music for a specific purpose with expression. b. Perform appropriately for the audience and purpose. Participate in organized musical activities including singing, playing, and movement (1,2,5) Echo a 4 beat phrase (rhythms) Perform 2 part, 4 beat ostinati with voices and instruments Recognize phrases within a song Perform o loud/soft o short/long (staccato, legato) Going on a Picnic ( Model Music Lessons , p. 53 54). Involves singing a cumulative song about the food brought to a picnic. Students practice keeping a steady beat while singing and marching with Students respond to smooth (legato) music by gliding and separate (stac cato) music by tip toeing around the room. Students show phrases with streamers. Good songs to use for this 149). Students perform teacher and student created ostin atos that follow a theme (e.g. Vegetable R hythms, Halloween Rhythms). Scaffold by rehearsing first the words, then words with body percussion, then words with instruments, and finally only instruments. Music for Various Occasions (Model Music Lessons, p. 69 71). Students learn about different styles of music and how these relate attenti by by Paul Dukas, by Camille Saint Saëns . high low short long smooth separate form Assessment Example Ribbon Dancing, p. 7 Assessment Task: Students improvise on a drum within the context of a game. For each round of the game, the drum plays fast or slow and the group responds after a 1,2,3 count with which they think it was. The student then verifies if they are correct. After one round, the students can play staccato/legato or even feelings (e.g. sleepy, excited). Record attainmen t of the skill with a checklist: 4. yes ( ) performs fast or slow clearly 5. developing (~) performance inconsistently shows fast or slow 6. no ( ) student does not perform

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42 First Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re7 Perceive and analyze artistic work. Select a . With limited guidance, identify and demonstrate how personal interests and experiences influence musical selection for a specific purpose. Analyze a . With limited guidance, demonstrate and identify how specific musical concepts (such as beat or pitch) are used in various styles of music for a purpose. Demonstrate awareness of where and how music is used in daily life and within the community (1, 4, 5) Explain that music can tell stories using program music (eg., Peter and the Wolf) Identify : o AB, ABA form o classroom instruments by sound and source o voices as men, women, or children Students analyze elements of program music, such as Carnival of Animals and Peter and the Wolf (Listening Resource Kit, Level 1, p. 22 30 and 31 35) 7 . lives to celebrate holidays using both familiar songs ( Happy Birthday ) and unfamiliar songs ( see Wee Sing Around the Worl d 8 for ) . Chinese New Year ( Model Music Lessons , p. 30 32). Discuss one purpose of music: t o celebrate holidays. Compare how Chinese and American cultures celebrate the New Year to highlight that cultures may celeb rate the same holiday in different ways. Click here for several Chinese New Year Songs, here for drumming from a Chinese dragon dance , here for an ancient story about the Chinese New Year, and here for other customs surrounding the holiday. Students analyze the form of songs they perform and listen to (e.g. by Leroy Anderson , from the Nutcracker Suite, and Music and You , p. 97) In addition , students should analyze each MATB song they learn to play for same/different rhythms, phrases, and melodic con tour. They should also perform each fast and slow, loud and soft, as ability allows. steady beat instrument purpose New Year festival parade AB, ABA form pattern program music Assessment Example Secret Instrument Recognition, p. 8 Assessment Task: Students identify the different characters in program music by instrument plays. Click here for flashcard pictures and sound clips to use . Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 4. yes ( ) 6 7 correctly identified 5. developing (~) 4 5 correctly identified 6. no ( ) 0 1 correctly identified

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43 First Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re8 Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. Interpret a. With limited guidance , demonstrate and identify expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) that reflect intent . Evaluate a. With limited guidance, apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of music for specific purposes. Understand and apply basic music vocabulary to describe aesthetic qualit ies of musical compositions (1,4) Identify simple music events (e.g., dynamic change, meter change, same/ different sections) while listening to a work (2,4) Recognize universal themes in music and how music communicates a universal language (1, 4) Identify changes in tempo, dynamics, and timbre (wooden, metal) Distinguish between : b eat/ no beat loud/soft short/long (staccato, legato) ( Model Music Lessons , p. 24 26). purpose in having his music surprise the audience. They also create a listening map to expressive features, including dynamics. Click here for a kid friendly biography of Haydn. Click here Surprise. This CD also has a version with silly lyrics. What is a Conductor? ( Model Music Lessons , p. 63 65). Students watch Fantasia and discuss the role of the conductor. Students learn to conduct in 2, showing loud/soft and fast/slow. , Grand Old Flag , Various recordings avail able here . Click here for a clip of Bugs Bunny conducting. Students sing and dance to songs that speed up (e.g. , and Michael Finnegan, Kodaly in the Classroom , p. 10). Transportation songs can also be sung fast or slow. Click here for examples . music noise speed up , slow down louder , softer listening map conductor baton orchestra dynamics, tempo, beat, meter in 2 Assessment Example Assessment Task: Student respond to changes in dynamics, tempo, and pitch by holding up pictures to indicate one or the other. See Listening Resource Kit, Levels 1 and 2 for examples. Record attainment of EACH skill (dynamics, tempo, and pitch) with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) correctly identified 2. developing (~) identified with a couple errors 3. no ( ) did not correctly identify

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44 First Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re9 Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. Evaluate a . With limited guidance, apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of music for specific purposes . Devise criteria for evaluating music and music performances, and express opinions using basic music vocabulary (1, 2, 4) Participate in guided inquiry into and share personal feelings or preferences about music (1, 5) Recognize characteristics of music that make a musical selection appropriate for a particular purpose (4) A Tisket A Tasket ( Model Music Lessons , p. 21 23 , 37 39 ). Students compare their performance of . ( Model Music Lessons , p. 24 26). Students experience the element of surprise in music Symphony No. 94 . Students discuss what makes the song surprising (dynamic contrast). A great extension is for students to compose or improvise music with something surprising in it , trying perhaps more than one way of showing surprise (e.g. varying the instruments suddenly , getting faster) . Students respond to performances (recorded and of In doing this, students practice sharing respectful opinions backed with musical support. opinion (like, do not like) fast, slow loud, soft high, low short, long piano, forte style jazz solo mood Assessment Example Listening Journal, p. 9 Form and Movement , p. 10

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45 First Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn 10 Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art. Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and respondin g to music. Recognize and demonstrate behavior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Sing and play folk and traditional songs and repertoire from around the world, including American Patriotic Students Perform at multi cultural night (or during class for older students) . Sound Noise & Music ( Model Music Lessons , p. 33 36). S tudent s improvise on homemade instruments with the intent of exploring how various materials affect pitch and volume . Some activities in this lesson are too advance d for this age, but the teacher may adjust by offer ing demonstrations and having students explore with age appropriate instruments (e.g., triangles, voice) . Student watch the Magic Schoolbus Episode about sound, called available on Discovery Education ). The String Family ( Model Music Lessons , p. 40 42). Orchestra . Next, s tudents use rubber bands to make a shoe box harp on which they create original music. Teachers may set parameters, such as the inclusion of fast/slow, loud/soft sections, or the use of specific rhythmic notes. Students explore one purpose of music: to help memory . Include songs that students already use for memory, (e.g., the Alphabet Song and ) . Also teach new songs (coordinate with homeroom teachers to find out what students are studying and align memory songs to this). Click here for materials to make a sound story center. See also 101 More Music Games 9 , p. 122 129 , for sound stories. improvise perform pitch volume chant rhyme lyrics Assessment Example Improvisation Performance Task, p . 11

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46 First Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn11 Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the others arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life. Recognize and discuss the function of music within historical and cultural contexts, including celebrations, ceremonies, and special occasions (1,4) Recognize musical styles representative of various cultures (4) Identify voices as men, woman, or children Sing and play folk and traditional songs and repertoire Practice Audience Behavior at the Lou i siana Philharmonic . Click here for one See also materials provided by the LPO prior to their Young Explore Identifying Appropriate Behavior ( Model Music Lessons , p. 10 14). Students learn to identify appropriate audience behavior for different styles of music and also consider what to listen for/think about during a performance . Click here for a Louisiana Folkways collection of recordings and videos of musical performances in various local contexts (e.g., brass band, Mardi Gras Ind ians , church ) . Click here for a playlist of classical symphony orchestras. New Orleans Brass Bands ( Model Music Lessons , p. 46 48). Students experience second lining and the role of MATB , p. 97 100). See also popular brass bands (e.g. Hot Tamale Brass Band , Rebirth Brass Band ). Seasons of the World ( Model Music Lessons , p. 66 68). Students learn how music from several countries represent seasons in similar and/or different ways. Pieces include Four Seasons , Allegro ma non Troppo (First Movement), Appalachian Spring, Summertime , Peer Gynt Suite , Night on Bald Mountain , Saint Saën Danse Macabre , Sleigh Ride , from The Nutcracker . audience performer musician seasons countries Assessment Example Our Favorite S ong s P roject , p. 12 Identifying Appropriate Behavior Worksheet ( Model Music Lessons , p. 14). Students match appropriate with different styles of music.

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47 Resources 1 Campbell, P. S., & Kassner, C. (2006). Music in childhood: From preschool through the elementary g rades (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Schirmer. 2 Staton, B., Staton, M., Davidson, M., & Kaplan, P. (1988). Music and you: G rade 3 . New York, NY: Macmillan. 3 Silberg, J., & Schiller, P. (2009). The complete book and CD set of rhymes, songs, poems, fingerplays, and c hants . Beltsville, MD: Gryphon House. (Original work published 2002) 4 Academic Curriculum. (2009, May). Academic c urriculum . Retrieved from http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/academic curriculum 5 Lercari, L. P. (2003). Musi c and the brain book one teacher's m anual . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 6 Rann, L. (2005). Kodaly i n the classroom: A practical approach to teaching pitch and r hythm , Primary (Teacher's ed.). Milwaukee, WI : Hal Leonard Corporation. 7 Listening resource k it: Themes & v ariations , Level 1 . Red Deer, Alberta: CN . 8 Beall, P. C., & Nipp, S. H. (2006). Wee sing around the w orld (2006 ed.). New York, NY: Price Stern Sloan. 9 Storms, J. (2001). 101 more music games for children: New fun and learning with rhythm and s ong . Alameda, CA: Hunter House.

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48 Second Grade Music Curriculum Map proposed for St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana by Sarah Stevens 2014

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49 Introduction By second grade, students are able to read standard rhythm notation as well as a limited range on the musical staff. Students at this level are challenged to perform a musical part while different parts play or sing at the same time. As students become literate in the Western music tradition, they continue to develop th eir musical ears as they self assess whether or not their singing and playing is in tune, blending well with others, and expressive. In addition, students continue to explore sound sources as they begin to categorize and recognize instruments beyond the m usic classroom ( wind band and orchestra). Established Goals Students will: Support musical opinions with an expanded musical vocabulary. Use their music reading and aural skills to learn increasingly advanced pieces of music . Explore how music can communicate ideas. Recognize simple musical form. Identify and perform expressive elements of music .

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50 Second Grade Essential Understandings Essential Questions Creating Music has many purposes. Melody needs rhythm to move forward. Improvising is creating in the moment. Composing high quality music requires a process. M usicians notate and/or record music to communicate over time and distance. P erforming Performing requires creating and listening at the same time (e.g., blend, timing). Breathing an d posture affect sound. Every musician in an ensemble matters. Musicians who can read music and have trained their ears can learn new music all on their own. Responding Listening to music actively makes the experiences more meaningful. Musical opinions a re personal, but they can be supported by knowledge and/or experience. Timbre adds variety to sound. Connecting Music is a part of all cultures. Music connects us to the past, present, and future. Music is art; music is science. Creating What is music? How are composition and improvisation different and how are they similar? How can I represent my composition? How can I improve the music I create? Performing How is my body an instrument? Does this performance say something? How do musicians work together when performing? How should a musician look and act in different settings? How do you know if your performance is successful? Responding Why do we listen to music? Why do we like the music we like? Is all sound music? Why or why not? What makes instruments sound the way they do? Connecting Can I hear music in nature and/or everyday life? What is the purpose of music in my life? Why does music sound different in different places? How is sound made ? Can I experience it with all my senses?

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51 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force developed the following foundation skills that should apply to all students in all disciplines. 1. Communication : individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently , strategically, technologica lly, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 2. Problem Solving : The iden tification of an obstacle or challenge and the subsequent application of knowledge and thinking processes, which include reasoning, decision making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using multiple pathways, even w hen no routine path is apparent. 3. Resource Access and Utilization : The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technol ogies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word pr ocessors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies. 4. Linking and Generating Knowledg e : The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transf er and elaborate on these proces ses. Transfer refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. Elaboration refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts . 5. Citizenship : The application of the understanding of the ideals, rights, and responsibilities of active participation in a democratic republic that includes working respectfully and productively together for the benefit of the individual and the communi ty; being constitutional, and statutory rights; and mentoring others to become productive citizens and lifelong learners. Note: These foundation skills are listed numerically in parentheses after each benchmark.

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52 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Key: National Core Music Standards in green ; anchor standards in black Louisiana Benchmarks K 4 in blue St. Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations in purple Click here for Second G rade Assessment Task R ubrics Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work Imagine a. Improvise rhythmic and melodic patterns and musical ideas for a specific purpose. b . Generate musical patterns and ideas within the context of a given tonality (such as major and minor) and meter (such as duple and triple). Explore and express basic elements of music through voice, musical instruments, electronic technology, or availabl e media (3) Recognize that there are many possibilities and choices available in the creative processes of music (4) Play pitched and non pitched classroom instruments with proper technique Sing using good posture and breath technique Recognize, echo sing, and play melodies which include sol, mi, la and high/low/same Animal Sound Improvisation G ame Each student get s a secret index card with the name of an animal on it. The goal of the game is to make the sound of the ir animal and find three other s tu dents who are the same animal . Words are not allowed , but movement is . The game is over when all students have found their family. Music Solfege BINGO: Click here and scroll down for an example. Students listen to and discuss by Henry Cowell . Then, using classroom instruments, they improvise scary sound (Music and You, Grade 3, p. 39) 1 . Click here for an excellent website called Pata tap that turns a normal computer keyboard into an electr onic drum kit. Stu dents can improvise using this and then transfer their ideas to classroom percussion instruments or keyboards. improvise meter duple (move in 2) triple (move in 3) posture solfege sound effect Assessment Example Glockenspiel I mprovisation , p. 1

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53 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Plan and Make a. Demonstrate and explain personal reasons for selecting pattern s and ideas for music that represent expressive intent. b . Use iconic or standard notation and/or recording technology to combine, sequence, and document personal musical ideas . Participate in guided inquiry into the share personal feelings or preferences about music (1, 5) Recognize phrases as same/different. Notate using standard notation: o Quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note BUSTED: This game gives students practice building rhythms with standard notation Click here for directions. Rhythm BINGO : Students practice matchin g rhythms they hear with rhythms they see. Available in MATB materials. Rain, Rain, Go Away ( Model Music Lessons , p. 13 15) 2 . Students notate and perform familiar songs , Cobbler, Cobbler (Hunt the Slipper) , and . Extend by having students compose short piece s using similar rhythmic patterns. Musical Match Ups ( Model Music Lessons , p. 61 64). Students read traditio nally notated rhythms, explore their values w ith musical math, and compose new rhythms using known notes. Students create by arranging previously composed piece. Click here for a great interactive website in which students can choos e different instruments to play a piece. The concept could then be applied to classroom percussion instrument choices. rhythm form same different q uarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note steady beat forte/mezzo/ piano, allegro/mod erato/adagio lyrics Assessment Example Rhythm R ecognition Task: Students draw an x through the rhythm they think the teacher performed. Click here for an example. Record attainment of knowledge by percentage: 1. 91 100% ( + ) 2. 80 90% ( ) 3. 66 79% ( ~) 4. < 65% correct ( ) Themed Rhythm C ompositions, p. 2 Musical Match Ups ( Model Music Lessons , p. 61 64). Checklist on p. 64 may be used as a f ormative assessment of knowledge of traditional rhythmic notation

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54 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr3 Refine and complete artistic work Evaluate and Refine a . Interpret and apply personal, peer, and teacher feedback to revise personal music . Present a. Convey expressive intent for a specific purpose by presenting a final version of personal musical ideas to peers or informal audience. Recognize basic notational symbols and express vocabulary that conveys precise musical meanings (3,4) Notate using standard notation: o Quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note Sing in unison, using head voice, and attempt to match pitch and basic intervals (so, mi, la) Recognize line and space notes Perform 3 part ostinati Students work as a whole group to generate as many words within a theme as possible (e.g. desserts, sports). Then, the class uses these words to compose a simple ostinato based on a theme. After, students wor k in small groups to compose and perform an original 3 part ostinato based on different words or phrases in a theme of their choosing . Click here for the book Create a Song . This resource includes sequential lessons leading to group ostinato composition. Sample pdfs are available on the web page. Bowling with Notes : This is a game for practicing rhythmic note values . Reading and Writing Music II ( Model Music Lessons , p. 50 52). Students notate familiar songs with traditional staff compare the rh ythm and pitches of the last two songs. theme ostinato polyrhythm composer rhythm syllable Assessment Example Ostinato C omposition, p. 3 Sol, La, M i C omposition, p. 4 Line and Space Notes Mad Minute MATB T heory Papers, p. 22 29 3 . Each page has 40 notes to identify as line or space . Record attainment of knowledge by percentage : 1. 90 100% ( +) 2. 80 89 % ( ) 3. 66 79 % ( ~) 4. 65% or less correct ( )

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55 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr4 Select, a nalyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. Select a. Demonstrate and explain personal interest in, knowledge about, and purpose of varied musical selection s . Analyze a. Demonstrate knowledge of music concepts (such as tonality and meter) from a variety of cultures selected for performance . b. When analyzing selected music, read and perform rhythmic patterns and melodic phrases using iconic and standard notation. Interpret a. Demonstrate understanding of expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) and how creators use them to convey expressive intent . Perform and distinguish between changes in tempo, dynamics, and timbre Read, perform, and notate duple and triple meter Identify classroom instruments by name, as pitched or unpitched, and by medium and method played How Music Is Alike ( Model Music Lessons , p. 65 67). In the first lesson, students indicate their preferences for various styles of music , including pieces s Einstein on the Beach Water Walk . In the second lesson, they create a composition using found obj ects (or classroom instruments). Pieces are performed for and critiqued by the class. Each MATB keyboard piece should be analyzed for melodic contour, patterns, new music symbols, dynamics, and phrasing. Student should perfor m a variety of songs, and how this should affect the performance. Students learn conducting patterns for duple and triple meters and develop the skill of recognizing strong and weak beat patterns. Dancing is a gr eat way to do this. dynamics (piano, mezzo, forte) tempo ( adagio, moderato, allegro) melody form texture genre duple (move in 2) triple (move in 3) Assessment Example Click here for National Core Arts Standards Benchmark Assessment . See p. 8 of this document for song selection slip , p. 9 10 for anal yze and interpret documentation, and p. 13 for a self evaluation checklist .

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56 Second Grade, Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr5 Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. Rehearse, Evaluate and Refine a . Apply established criteria to judge the accuracy, expressiveness, and effectiveness of performances. b . Rehearse, identify and apply strategies to address interpretive, performance, and technical challenges of music. Perform simple 2 part roun ds (ex. Row, row, row your boat ( Frere Jacque) Perform a steady beat accompaniment Recognize that music can speed up and slow down Sing using good posture and breath technique Play classroom instruments using good posture and technique Read and perform using standard notation: o Quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note As a class, students create a ru bric for judging performances and p ractice using it with several sample performances that range in qual ity before deciding on a final version to use with their own performances. Click here for a blog post about singing posture . Click here for more ideas to guide students in building good singing habits. Rock, Paper, Scissors ( Model Music Lessons , p. 36 38). Students sing various songs, keepi ng the steady beat first with their bodies and then with instruments. Songs include Simon Says Rhythm Game ( Model Music Lessons , p. 58 60). Stude nts echo rhythmic patterns and then they take turns leading the group . They also practice rhythmic identification. When performing rhythm cards, students break into different groups (e.g. maracas, hand drums). Each group is assigned a rhyth mic note and only plays their note. Practice first without instruments, having different groups speak and stand during their note. Students take turns conducting the group performing a familiar song or keeping a steady beat with instruments. The class re dynamics, tempo, and articulation. Conductors and performers provide feedback to each other afterwards. See Wee Sing Sing Alongs for age appropriate rounds 4 . evaluate round /canon steady beat rhythm alle gro, adagio piano, forte staccato, legato Assessment Example Click here for National Core Arts Standards Benchmark Assessment. See p. 13 and 14 of this document for rehearse, evaluate, & r efine documentation . Assessment Task: Students match pitch and/or echo sing sol, la, mi phrases in the context of a speed game. Each child gets three chances. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect

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57 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr6 Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work. Present a . Perform music for a specific purpose with expression and technical accuracy. b . Perform appropriately for the audience and purpose. Participate in organized musical activities including singing, playing, and movement (1,2,5) Identify relationships among music, other arts, and disciplines outside the arts (1, 4) Perform 3 part ostinati Perform and distinguish between s taccato/legato Happy Talk ( Model Music Lessons , p. 22 24). Students compare the moods of different pieces of from South Pacific Adagio for Strings . Ha nukkah Festival of Lights ( Model Music Lessons , p. 31 33). Students explore various December holidays celebrated in the United States. A great extension is to have students compose a song to celebrate a silly, unofficial holiday (or make one up). Click here to read how to dance the hora and here for playing the dreidel game. 12 Days of Christmas ( Model Music Lessons , p. 34 35). Students perform the 12 D ays of Christmas and then make their own cumulative song to perform and share. Click here for lyrics. Students move their bodies to show articulati on (karate chops for staccato and wavy arms from legato). Students pick a feeling out of a hat and sing a familiar song trying to express that feeling. Students discuss strategies and how to tell which The point is to have students critically consider the intent of songs they are performing. staccato legato interpretation expression mood major, minor adagio, allegro lyrics perform musical (genre) cumulative song Assessment Example Make It Y ours, p. 5

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58 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re7 Perceive and analyze artistic work . Select a . Explain and demonstrate how personal interests and experiences i nfluence musical selection for specific purpose s . Analyze a. Describe how specific music concepts are used to support a specific purpose in music . Demonstrate awareness of where and how music is used in daily life an d within the community (1, 4, 5) Identify the music for m (e.g., AB, ABA) and describe in simple terms how the elements of music are used in various works (1,4) Recognize and identify introduction ABA, and AB form Recognize melodic contour as step, skip, or repeated Recognize that music can speed up and slow down Students e xplore different instruments and how their sound could be different characters. Guide students in thinking creatively about sounds by representing them through movement , words, and pictures. The Woodwind Family ( Model Music Lessons , p. 42 44). Students e xplore how reed instruments and flute s produce sound. Pieces include a review of Peter and the Wolf . Click here for resources for teaching Peter and the Wolf . Many orchestra sites have useful, interactive resources (e.g., DSO , NYP ) My Favorite Strings ( Model Music Lessons , p. 47 49) . Students explore the string instruments of the orchestra. Pieces include and The Four Seasons . Click here for pictures and sound clips of inst ruments. Same and Different (Model Music Lessons, p. 4 6). Students identify sections and phrases of music that are the same or different through movement and signals. Pieces and songs Trumpet Tune Round O Click here for an example of a dance, used to teach form. See also the Instrument Resource Kit, Level 2 5 . purpose melodic contour (step, skip, repeate d) speed up, slow down program music flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, saxophone woodwind strings violin, viola, cello, string bass, quartet Assessment Example Danse Macabre I nterpretation, p. 6

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59 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re8 Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. Interpret a . Demonstrate knowledge of music concepts and how they support expressive intent . Evaluate a. Apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of music for specific purposes. Recognize universal themes in music and how music communicates a universal language (1, 4) Identify simple music events (e.g., dynamic change, meter change, same/ diff erent sections) while listening to a work (2,4) Explain that music can tell sto ries using program music Identify and name the four instrument families Recognize high, middle, and low How Composers Tell Stories ( Model Music Lessons , p. 1 3). Students explore how music is used in cartoons to help tell a story. Pieces used include Peter and the Wolf . Click here for a ballet version , here for a storybook version , here for a useful website, and here for the Disney DVD . See also Listening Resource Kit, Level 1 6 p. 29 34. Another great symphonic poem appropriate for this age The Remarkable Farkle McBride . Click here for a recorded performance and here for the book. Surprise! ( Model Music Lessons , p. 10 12). Students explore how music can use expressive elements to Surprise Symphony . How Music Tells a Story ( Model Music Lessons , p. 54 56). Students analyze and interpret various pi eces, using a word grid. Pieces include 1812 Overture , Washington Post March , Mars , , Dukas, and Carnival of the Animals by Camille Saint Saëns. Click here for more Carnival of the Animals lesson ideas. sort themes narrator strings, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, French horns, timpani timbre Assessment Example Song S ort, p. 7

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60 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re9 Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. a (Evaluate) Apply personal and expressive preferences in the evaluation of the music. b appropriateness for the purpose. c (Evaluate) Evaluate the effectiveness of the specific musical performance. Devise criteria for evaluating music and music performances, and express opinions using basic music vocabulary (1, 2, 4) Recognize and respond to concepts of beauty and taste in the ideas and creations of others through the study of music (1,4,5) Distinguish between listening to a song with a melody alone and melody with accompaniment Express and opinion of and describe a selection of repertoire Click here for a variety of exit tickets, including instrument families. Rhythmic Improvisations, Native American Style ( Model Music Lessons , p. 16 18). Students perform and record rhyt hmic improvisations, then self critique the recording. Do not attempt to do this in a lesson unless drawing upon f urther contextualized study of a particular t ribe and, most effectively, a presentation from a member of that tribe ( in person or recorded) . opinion instruments of the orchestra instrument families (brass, woodwind, strings, percussion) same, different play party form fermata allegro/ adagio , fo rte/piano, legato/stacca to Assessment Example Listening Journals, p. 8 Instrument Sort Task: Students sort the instruments of the orchestra into the correct instrument families. Click here for an example ( with downloadable cards ). Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect

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61 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn10 Synthesize and r elate knowledge and personal experiences to make music. Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) Recognize characteristics of music that make a musical selection appropriate for a particular purpose (4) How Do You Get to Carnegie Hall? ( Model Music Lessons , p. 45 46). Students explore musicians of various o rchestras using online websites. S tudents s tudy different jobs musicians have. If possible, have guest musicians in from the community. Collaboration with the high school tech nical crew would also achieve this goal . Students pick their favorite storybook and create a song either using the exact text or summarizing the story. Video record final performances. Students commonly play hand games and playground chants outside of music class. Invite students to share hand games and chants that they already know. Confident students may even want to teac h their favorites to the class. Next, students should work in partners to create an original hand game. If hand games do not interest some students, provide alternative options, such as creating a chant that is said while passing a ball , jumping rope , or . musician performer orchestra rehearsal conductor practice Assessment Example Musicians at Work , p. 9

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62 Second Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn11 Relate musical ideas and works with varied context to deepen understanding . Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, an d daily life. Recognize and discuss the function of music within historical and cultural contexts, including celebrations, ceremonies, and special occasions (1,4) Recognize and demonstrate behavior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Experience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk and traditional songs and repertoire from local and world cultures We Love a Parade! ( Model Music Lessons , p. 7 9). Students experience several march and parade songs, through movement and performance. Preferences and context are , Locket , , March Past of the Kitchen Utensils , March of the Toys , March from the Comedians , South Rampart St reet Parade , and R. Haggart . Boats and Barges (Day O and Erie Canal) Work Songs ( Model Music Lessons , p. 19 21). Students explore the role of work songs as they learn and per form them Day O , Erie Canal , Whistle While you Work , and . Ready for the Stage ( Model Music Lessons , p. 25 27). Stu d ents role play audience members and performers . This is most effective in preparation for a real performance. Click here for various styles of Louisiana recordings . See these local symphonies for possible collaboration: LPO , RSO , ASO , BRSO , and the SSO . The Multicultural Nutcracker ( Mo del Music Lessons , p. 28 30). The Nutcracker ballet and critically discuss how the composer chose to represent different cultures. Zydeco Zeal ( Model Music Lessons , p. 39 41). Students learn about Zydeco music through th e music of Clifton Chenier . Click here sale . steady beat rhythm fast/slow, loud/soft culture march , parade worksong piggyback song West Indies, Calypso Zydeco , Creole , accordion audience , applaud , concert hall pantomime, actor/actress , role playing Assessment Example Family/Friends Music Interest S urvey, p. 10

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63 Resources 1 Staton, B., Staton, M., Davidson, M., & Kaplan, P. (1988). Music and you: G rade 3 . New York, NY: Macmillan. 2 Academic Curriculum. (2009, May). Academic c urriculum . Retrieved from http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/academic curriculum 3 Lercari, L. P. (2002). Music and the brain theory p apers . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 4 Beall, P. C. , & Nipp, S. H. (2002). Wee sing sing a longs . New York, NY: Price Stern Sloan. 5 Listening resource k it: T hemes & v ariations , level 2 . Red Deer, Alberta: CN . 6 Listening resource k it: T hemes & v ariations , level 1 . Red Deer, Alberta: CN .

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64 Third Grade Music Curriculum Map proposed for St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana by Sarah Stevens 2014

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65 Introduction In third grade, students apply an expanded musical vocabulary as they respond to and compose music. Students have developed the fine motor skills necessary to perform increasingly difficult pieces of music on many types of classroom instruments, including keyboards. They can also sing two part songs that span a wider vocal range and interpret musical notation using knowledge o f solfege, the treble clef, and the bass clef. Lastly, students develop advanced a ural discrimination skills by studying the timbre of orchestral instruments. Established Goals Students will: Identify instruments of the orchestra by sound and sight ( discriminatory listening skills). Make artistic decisions when composing as well as performing music written by others. Expand music vocabulary and refine performance techniques. Gain confidence when improvising. Use music notation to aid in learning new music and preserving original musical ideas.

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66 3 rd Essential Understandings Essential Questions Creating Music has many purposes. Melody needs rhythm to move forward. Improvising is creating in the moment. Composing high quality music requires a process. Musicians notate and/or record music to communicate over time and distance. P erforming Performing requires creating and listening at the same time (e.g., blend, timing). Breathing and posture affect sound. Every musician in an ensemble matters. Musicians who can read music and have trained their ears can learn new music all on their own. Responding Listening to musi c actively makes the experience more meaningful. Musical opinions are personal, but they can be supported by knowledge and/or experience. Timbre adds variety to sound. Connecting Music is a part of all cultures. Music connects us to the past, present, and future. Music is art; music is science. Creating What is music? How are composition and improvisation different and how are they similar? How can I represent my composition? How can I improve the music I create? Performing How is my body an instrument? Does this performance say something? How do musicians work together when performing? How should a musician look and act in different settings? How do you know if your performance is successful? Responding Why do we listen to music? Why do we like the music we like? Is all sound music? Why or why not? What m akes instruments sound the way they do? Connecting Can I hear music in nature and/or everyday life? What is the purpose of music in my life? Why does music sound different in different places? How is sound made? Can I experience it with all my senses?

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67 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force developed the following foundation skills that should apply to all students in all disciplines. 1. Communication : A process by which information is exchanged and through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently, strategica lly, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 2. Problem Solving : The identification of an obstacle or challenge and the su bsequent application of knowledge and thinking processes, which include reasoning, decision making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using multiple pathways, even when no rout ine path is apparent. 3. Resource Access and Utilization : The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technol ogies are essential to all learning processes. T hese resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word processors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies. 4. Linking and Generating Knowledge : The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transf er and elaborate on these processes . Transfer refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. Elaboration refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts. 5. C itizenship : The application of the understanding of the ideals, rights, and responsibilities of active participation in a democratic republic that includes working respectfully and productively together for the benefit of the individual and the community; being constitutional, and statutory rights; and mentoring others to become productive citizens and lifelong learners. Note: These foundation skills are listed numerically in parentheses after each benchmark.

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68 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Key: National Core Music Standards in green; anchor standards in black Louisiana Benchmarks K 4 in blue St . Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations in purple Click here for Third Grade A ssessment T asks and R ubrics Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work Imagine a . Improvise rhythmic and melodic ideas, and describe connection to specific purpose and context (such as personal and social). b . Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms and melodies) within a given tonality and/or meter. Explore and express basic elements of music through voice, musical instruments, electronic technology, or available media (3) Layer rhythmic patterns to create texture Identify the tonic (do) in simple phrases P artner puppets: Students improvise body percussion to Improvisation should use various tempi and dynamics. Click here for Bobby McFerrin doing something similar with a dancer. See also Yoyo Ma and the dancer Lil Buck here . Discuss how dance and music are related. Students take turns improvising repeated rhythms on a drum, cowbell, or another loud classroom percussion instrument while the rest of the clas s moves around the room to their rhythm. Students are encouraged to explore tempo and dy namics to see how their classmates respond through movement. As one possible version, at the sound of a triangle, students copy a picture of a silly pose. Improvisation Circle with Children Conductors: Click here for a description. Improvising Challenge for Advanced Students: Click here for a lesson on guiding studen ts to improvise on the keyboard with both hands. Drum Circle: Students layer repeating rhythms, improvising in After singing familiar songs and/or echoing solfege , students sing the tonic, improvise compose phrases purpose rhythm timbre texture space Assessment Example Improvisation Assessment Task, p. 1 Assessment Task: Students invent and recycled materials and perform an original piece written for the instrument. Click here for example projects, progress sheets, and a grading rubric.

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70 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Plan and Make a . Demonstrate selected musical ideas for a simple improvisation or composition to express intent, and describe connection to a specific purpose and context b. Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or recording technology to document personal rhythmic and melodic musical ideas. Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) Recognize that there are many possibilities and choices available in the creative processes of music (4) Sing in unison, use head voice, and attempt to match pitch and basic intervals (sol, la, mi, do, re) N ame the notes on treble clef staff Divide rhythms into measures using bar lines in 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 N otate, and c ompose using standard notation o q uarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note, dotted half note, whole and half rests Students compose melodies for the keyboard using finger numbers 1 5 (right hand, C position). Final copies may be written in standard notation and/or recorded. See MATB Theory Book , p. 141 162 1 . Students compose rhythm s and melodies using various manipulatives (e .g. coins on a laminated staff ) . Transfer to staff pape r with bar lines for revision. Click here for an example of manipulatives that can be made to help students learn the values of rhythmic notes. The Sound of Jazz ( Model Music Lessons , p. 16 18) 2 . Students learn about Louis Armstrong , syncopated rhythms, and Congo Square. Then, drawing upon jazz rhythms and style, they improvise using classroom percussion instruments. The song included is here for a book here for a kid friendly history of jazz, and here for info rmation about jazz for teachers. Reading and Writing Music III ( Model Music Lessons , p. 46 48). Students practice notating familiar songs with solfege on a five line musical staff. Songs Bang a Gong, Make a Song: Click here for a preview of this book, which includes sequential composition lessons. ph rase rhythmic value unison , head voice , pitch treble clef , bass clef improvisation , composition syncopation , jazz solfege, musical staff quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note, dotted half note, whole and half rests Assessment E xample Echo Singing and Decoding Solfege Assessment Task, p. 2 Rhythm Composition, p.3

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71 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr3 Refine and complete artistic work Evaluate and Refine a. Evaluate, refine, and document revisions to personal musical ideas, applying teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback. Present a. Present the final version of personal created music to others, and describe connection to expressive intent. Participate in guided inquiry into feelings or preferences about music (1, 5) Recognize melodic contour as step, skip, or repeated N otate, and c ompose using standard notation: o q uarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note, dotted half note, whole and half rests Composing with Phone Numbers: Click here for the lesson. Noteissimo: Click here for this amazingly logical online compos ition game/tool that can be used by students for composition. It uses a mixture of iconic and traditional notation. Practicing Rhythm Values: See MATB Theory Book p. 130 140 for practice with meters and p. 141 152 for musical math problems. Composing wit h Fraction Bars: Click here for Phil interactive website . The site includes several multimedia tools for compos ing with rhythms or pitch. All tools utilize moveable visuals such as fractio n pies, fraction bars, waveforms , and more . Students can compose using the website, then notate their work after ward for presentation , drawing valuable connections between notation and other domains (e.g. math) . Composing with Boomwhackers and Solfege: Cl ick here for directions and examples. Musical Bean Bags and Twister: Click here for directions for these games that get students to practice musical symbols. Melodic Contour Challenge: Students show with their bodies whether a teacher generated melody is moving up, down, or staying the same. revision criteria melody, rhythm, beat notation double bar repeat sign time signature quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note, dotted half note, whole and half rests Assessment Example Melodic Composition, p. 4 Click here for directions and materials. Identifies melodic contour in notated music (as step, skip, or repeated). U se MATB Theory Book p. 8 17. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect

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72 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr4 Select, a nalyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. Select a . Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is influenced by personal interest , knowledge , purpose, and context. Analyze a. Demonstrate understanding of the structure in music selected for performance. b. When analyzing selected music, read and perform rhythmic patterns and melodic phrases using iconic and standard notation. Understand and apply basic music vocabulary to descr ibe aesthetic qualities of musical compositions (1,4) Recognize basic notational symbols and express vocabulary that conveys precise musical meanings (3,4) Perform o q uarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note, dotted half note, whole and half rests Bow, Wow, Wow ( Model Music Lessons , p. 13 15). St udents experience several songs and then analyze their rhythms and melodies for As an extension, students compose using similar rhythms and/or m elodic patterns. Hilly and Gully Rider ( Model Music Lessons p. 26 28). Students explore the form of themes within the piece Hill and Gully Rider . Click here for background information about the song. As an extension , students experience more pieces with familiar themes, such as Ah, Vous dirai je Maman , Symphony 9 , and . Exploring the structure of songs to perform sho uld include analysis of repeated rhythms, upward and downward melodic phrases, etc. with a great variety of rhythms and melodic repetition ( Music and You , Grade 5 , p. 258 261 3 ). As students attempt to sight read rhythms/melodies in selecting songs to perform , they must have adequate practice reading traditional rhythmic notation. Rhythm BINGO (MATB materials ) and Swat That Rhythm are two fun games to help reach this goal. Also, click here for center ideas. dynamics tempo adagio, moderato, allegro accelerando, ritardando steady beat rhythm lyrics introduction transition Assessment Example Dynamics and Tempo Assessment Task, p. 5 Keyboard Performance Task #1 , p. 6

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73 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr5 Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. Rehearse, Evaluate and Refine a . Apply teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback to evaluate accuracy of ensemble performance. b. Rehearse to refine technical accuracy, expressive qualities, and identified performance challenges. Participate in organized musical activities including singing, playing, and movement (1,2,5) Recognize and imitate simple melodies and rhythmic patterns using voice, musical instruments, or other sound sources (3) Sing in unison, use head voice, and attempt to match pitch and basic intervals (sol, la, mi, do, re) Play instruments using good posture and technique Perform and distinguish between staccato/legato Identify double bar, repeat sign, and 2/4, 3/4, and 4/4 time signatures Fire in the Mountain ( Model Music Lessons , p. 23 25). Students play a game that involves keeping a steady beat using various classroom percussion instruments. Songs include Balance the Scales ( Model Music Lessons , p. 49 51). Students work with musical math and rhythm ic notes to practice rhythmic values . Playing the Autoharp ( Model Music Lessons , p. 58 61). Students explore how to use an Autoharp to perform an accompaniment to simple songs. Students sing unfamiliar melodies using solfege. See 150 American Folk Songs 4 and Kodaly in the Classroom 5 , for many songs organized for this purpose. Video record progress throughout the year. See Music in Childhood 6 , p. 160 163 for examples of ostinatos that help students practice feeling different meters. rehearse , posture staccato, legato melody , rhythm steady beat , cut off , ostinato vibrations , mouthpiece , resonating chamber Assessment Example Keyboard Performance Task #2, p. 7 Singing Technique Performance Task, p. 8 Formative Assessment: Model Music Lessons Balance the Scales Worksheet (p. 51). Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all 6 correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 2 incorrect 3. no ( ) 3+ incorrect Assessment Task: Students identify rhythms when played by the teacher by holding up cards reading A, B, C, or D to select one of the four different rhythms on the board. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect

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74 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr6 Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work. Present a . Perform music with expression and technical accuracy. b . Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for the context and venue. Recognize and demonstrate be havior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Sing partner songs using good posture and breath technique (silent breath, still shoulders) o Dynamic levels (including mezzo piano, mezzo forte, pianissimo, and fortissimo) o Dynamic changes (crescendo, decrescendo) o T empo (adagio, moderato, allegro) Vocabulary/Skills Baseball Review Game: Click here for directions. Rh ythm Tic Tac Toe: Click here for directions . Students This could easily be adapted to be played with partners after a whole class practice round. Keeping Behaviors in Check ( Model Music Lessons , p. 19 22). Students listen to different styles of music and discuss appropriate audience behavior. Angels! ( Model Music Lessons , p. 55 57). Students consider how to use dynamics and proper singing technique help express the intent of different songs about The Angel Band, Chatter with the Angels, All Night, All Day, and Swing low, Sweet Chariot . See Music and You, Grade 5 for many songs for stud ents to perform with expression. See the following list for just a few: 21 , 43 , p. 226 During rehearsal, give different students the opportunity to conduct the class or partners. Work on different patterns and how to show dynamics, tempo, and articulation. Video record students performing familiar songs with and without dynami c contrast. Discuss and critique the success of both performances. When recording in Audacity , students can also see the waveform get thicker and thinner with varying dynamic levels. expression etiquette dynamics pianissimo, piano, mezzo piano, mezzo, mezzo forte, forte, fortissimo, crescendo, decrescendo breath support phrase partner song spiritual (n.) Assessment Example Assessment Task : Students perform W Each student gets to clap 3 rhythm cards; if he or she performs the rhythms correctly, the cards count towards class point s . If any are incorrect, they cou nt towards the (make it a fun challenge). Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect

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75 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re7 Perceive and analyze artistic work Select a . Demonstrate and describe how selected music connects to and is influenced by specific interests, experiences, or purposes. Analyze a. Demonstrate and describe how a response to music can be informed by the structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as personal and social). Demonstrate awareness of where and how music is used in daily life and within the community (1, 4, 5) Identify relationships among music, other arts, and disciplines outside the arts (1, 4) Identify the music form (e.g., AB, ABA) and describe in simple terms how the elements of music are used in various works (1,4) Identify when music is speeding up or slowing down (accelerando, ritardando) Recognize and identify call and response, a round, and verse and refrain Read Quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, whole note, dotted half note, whole and half rests Colored F lashlights : Color the lens part of the flashlights with marker. Assign sections of a piece to different colors (e.g. A section is green). While lying on the floor in the dark, students c their flashlight s on the ceiling during their section. Paper P lates with William Tell Overture : Using paper plates like cymbals, assign different movements for each section. Pictures in Music (Model Music Lessons, p. 36 39). Students analyze various features of severa l pieces of music. Students should be able to move to the pieces, but also will record their analysis in a word grid (p. 39). Form/Rondo ( Model Music Lessons , p. 1 3). Students analyze the form of Zolt á n Kod á Viennese Musical Clock and perform an instrument play along. Click here for a listening map and here for a related activity sheet. A great extension would be to then create a class song in rondo form. See also Listening Resource Kit 7 , level 3, p. 25 26 for Viennese Musical Clock and p. 27 for Andante Allegro playalongs . Pop! Goes the Weasel ( Model Music Lessons , p. 52 54). Students explore the form of Pop! Goes the Weasel . elements of music form call and response round /canon verse and refrain rondo accelerando , ritardando Assessment Example Listening Map Assessment Task, p. 9 Formative Assessment: Model Music Lessons Word Grid (p. 39). For 6 pieces, assess whether tempo, dynamics, major/minor, mood, and instruments are correctly identified. Record identification for each of the following: tempo, dynamics, major/minor, mood, and instruments. 1. yes ( ) correctly identified in 5 6 pieces studied 2. developing ( ~) correctly identified in 3 4 pieces studied 3. no ( ) correctly identified in 1 2 pieces studied

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76 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re8 Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. a . Demonstrate and describe how the expressive qualities (such as dynamics and tempo) are used in interpretations to reflect expressive intent. Recognize universal themes in music and how music communicates a universal language (1, 4) Identify simple music events (e.g., dynamic change, meter change, same/ different sections) while listening to a work (2,4) Identify specific instruments within the four instrument families visually and aurally Ability to identify by humming or singing back the melody of a song Identify changes in tempo (adagio, moderato, allegro) Are Dem Bones Camille Saint Sa ë Bones? (Model Music Lessons, p. 62 65). Students explore the moods of various songs about bones. Songs include, Dry Bones Danse Macabre by Camille Saint Sa ë ns . Follow along to and discuss the dynamic s listening map for Entry March of th e Boyars ( Resource Listening Kit, Level 3, p. 30) . Bird Call: This game gives students practice picking out specific melodies amongst other distracting sounds. ( 101 More Music Games , p. 24 ) 8 . Students conduct with unsharpened pencils and/or ribbon dance to show the dynamics, tempo, and articulation of performances by David Garrett . Pieces include, Hungarian Dance, No. 5 and Csardas Gypsey Dance . Students work on sound differentiation by playing Instrument BINGO . Sorting instruments by timbre and family also helps with this skill. Click here and scroll down for printable instrument cards. The Brass Family (Model Music Lessons, p. 40 42). Students explore the role of brass instruments in several famous works and explore how these instruments produce sound. Students then creat e compositions using homemade mouthpieces. Pieces include Fanfare for the Common Man , Paul Fanfare , from La Peri and various performances by the Canadian Brass. timbre woodwind, brass, strings, percussion instruments of the orchestra: flute, piccolo, clarinet, oboe, bassoon trumpet, F rench horn, trombone, tuba violin, viola, cello, double bass, harp, piano timpani, bass drum, snare drum, cymbals saxophone, acoustic guitar adagio, moderato, allegro Assessment Example Music Inspired Poetry , p. 10 Students identify instruments of the orchestra by sight o n a written test (fill in their names) . Students identify instruments of the orchestra by sound on a written test (multiple choice with pictures) . Click here for an example. Record attainment of knowledge by percentage: 1. 91 100% ( + ) 2. 80 90% ( ) 3. 66 79% ( ~) 4. < 65% correct ( )

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77 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re9 Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. Evaluate a. Evaluate music al works a nd performance s , applying established criteria, and describe appropriateness to the context. Devise criteria for evaluating music and music performances, and express opinions using basic music vocabulary (1, 2, 4) Recognize characteristics of music that make a musical selection appropriate for a particular purpose (4) Recognize and respond to concepts of beauty and taste in the ideas and creations of others through the study of music (1,4,5) Express and opinion of and describe a selection of repertoire Several Tastes of Saxophone (Model Music Lessons, p. 32 35). Students explore various saxophones and share opinions of different styles of music played by saxophones. Pieces The Old Castle Pictures at an Exhibition and Take Five What Do You Call Music? (Model Music Lessons, p. 66 68). Students analyze and critique George Ancient Voice of Children Romeo & Juliet (Model Music Lessons, p. 69 73). Students explore the themes o f love and anger in music as they compare and contrast different musical interpretations of the story of Romeo and Juliet. Include versions of Rom e o et Juliet te by Berlioz, Prokofiev, West Side Story, and Romeo and Juliet: for Kids (Shakespeare can be Fun! ) . Students compare and contrast different performances of the same song. For example, original performance of Hit the Road Jack performed by Jordan Landers , and Joy and Paulo . critique sessions and analysis. opinion saxophone, jazz classical, orchestrate theme composer, cover song Assessment Example Listening Journals, p. 11 Formative Assessment: Opinionnaire Worksheet, Model Music Lessons p. 72 73.

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78 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn10 Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make music Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) Recognize professions in music a nd identify the roles of musicians in various cultures (4) Experience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk songs and traditional songs and repertoi re from local and world culture. Students improvise mus ic to accompany famous artwork and afterwards, write self reflections about the success of the improvisation, drawing upon musical vocabulary. If possible, improvisations should be video record ed for this purpose . Students improvise music to convey a particular feeling and/or scenario (e.g., sneaking into the kitchen in the middle of the night). Students improvise to accompany a spooky poem, Music and You p. 39). Who Writes Music? (Model Music Lessons, p. 10 12). Students explore a few famous composers and then compose their own melodic songs, using glockenspiels and/or keyboards using only letters of their names. Click here for the NY Philharmonic website, which includes information and sound clips for various composers. Students e xplore connections between music and movement. See Music In Childhood , p. 135 136 for samples of Dalcroze Eurythmics experiences and click here for a video of Lil Buck dancing at TED x Teen . Improvise sound effects using various classroom instruments to accompany stories. Reflect on how the use of music affects the stories. Use examples from v arious Disney movies and/or learn about John Williams. See librarians for access to appropriate books. culture experience composer melody harmony Assessment Example The Eyes and Ears of Art Composition Task, p. 12

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79 3 rd Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn11 Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life. Recognize and discuss the function of music within historical and cultural contexts, including celebrations, ceremonies, and special occasions (1,4) Recognize musical styles representative of various cultures (4) Recognize and demonstrate behavior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Experience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk songs and traditional songs and r epertoire from local and world cultures This Land is Your Land (Model Music Lessons, p. 43 45). Students This Land if Your Land United States to add context to their performance. Click here for a blank map of the US. Many covers of this song exist; students may compare and contrast some of these, defending their favorites with musical vocabulary. Read storybooks that contain musical elements and discuss how language can be musical (e.g. percussive consonants, rhymes). See librarians for book suggestions. Happy Birthday to You The $15 Million Dollar Song ( Model Music Lessons , p. 4 6). Students co mpare and contrast birthday traditions from various countries. Very Merry UnBirthday to You Click here for information about Play musical chairs, and possibly other party games, including Fuku warai from Japan. Take Me Out To the Ballgame! ( Model Music Lessons , p. 7 9). Students explore songs sung at various American sporting events. Take Me Out to the Ballgame Click here for history o Ballgam here for history of the Star Spangled Banner. As an extension, discuss other songs sung as traditions and/or creating one of their own. Music of the Mardi Gras Indians ( Model Music Lessons , p. 29 31). Students explore the context surrounding Mardi Gras Indian traditions and participate in popular call and response chants. If possible, have a member of a tribe visit the classroom (perhaps a family member). Click here for audio clips. Way Pocky context celebrations appropriate Assessment Example Picture Book, p. 13

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80 Resources 1 Lercari, L. P. (2002). Music and the brain theory p apers . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 2 Academic Curriculum. (2009, May). Academic c urriculum . Retrieved from http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/academic curriculum. 3 Staton, B., Staton, M., Davidson, M., & Kaplan, P. (1988). Music and y ou: Grade 5 . New York, NY: Macmillan. 4 Erdei, P., & Kom los, K. (1974). 150 American folk songs to sing, read, and p lay . New York, NY: Boosey & Hawkes. 5 Rann, L. (2005). Kodaly in the classroom: A practical approach to teaching p itch a nd r hythm , Intermediate (Teacher's ed.). Milwaukee, WS: Hal Leonard Corporation. 6 Campbell, P. S., & Kassner, C. (2006). Music in childhood: From preschool through the e lementary g rades (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Schirmer. 7 Listening resource k it: Themes & v ariations, Level 3 . Red Deer, Alberta: CN . 8 Storms, J. (2001). 101 More music games for children: New fun and learning with rhythm and s ong . Alameda, CA: Hunter House.

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81 Fourth Grade Music Curriculum Map proposed for St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana by Sarah Stevens 2014

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82 Introduction By fourth grade, students have developed strong preferences for music and many begin to relate music to their identity. At this age, students further develop their ability to respect different opinions, while comparing an d contrasting genres of music. In doing so , they further develop their understanding of the many purposes of music in their lives and throughout the world . Students at this level continue to attain music literacy through written notation and aural discrimination as they respond to, create, and perform m usic. Harmony is also explored for the first time in great depth. Established Goals Students will E xplore how the tonality of music ( major, minor) affects music. Explore the role of harmony in music (using voice and melodic instruments). Begin to ma ke connections between science, history, art, and music. Perform advanced, syncopated rhythms. Make expressive decisions when composing and performing music.

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83 4 th Essential Understandings Essential Questions Students will understand Creating Music is a form of communication. Creating high quality music requires developing skills and knowledge (e.g., elements of music). Improvisation is creating in the moment, without the intent of revising or recreating it. Composition is creating music with a process for refining musical ideas . Notational and aural skills empower independent musicians . Performing Performing requires creating and listening at the same time. Melody needs rhythm to move forward. Brea thing and posture affect sound (e.g. intonation, phrasing) Written and recorded music enable musicians to communicate over time and distance. Responding Mus ic preferences are personal. Timbre adds color and variety to sound. Music serves various purposes. Listening to music actively makes the experience more meaningful. Connecting Music connects us to the past, present, and future. Music is art; music is science. Creating What purposes drive people to make music ? How can I use the eleme nts of music to convey my ideas? How is sound organized to make music? What does it mean to be musically literate? Is it something How can I make my music interesting? Performing Is the audience an essentia l component of music ? How do you know if your performance is successful? Does this performance say something? How Responding Why do we listen to music? Why do we like the music we like? Is all music beautiful? Why do people share music with others? (e.g., via performance and/ or recordings). Connecting Does art define culture or does culture define art? Is music a universal language? How would a scientist/artist/historian explore music?

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84 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force developed the following foundation skills that should apply to all students in all disciplines. 1. Communication : en individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently , strategically, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best b e accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 2. Problem Solving : The identification of an obstacle or challenge and the subsequent application of knowledge and thinking pro cesses, which include reasoning, decision making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using multiple pathways, even when no routine path is apparent. 3. Resource Access and Utilization : The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resou rce tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technol ogies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper ; audio/video materials, word processors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies. 4. Linking and Generating Knowledge : The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transf er and elaborate on these processes. Transfer refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a sett ing or context other than that in which it was originally learned. Elaboration refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts. 5. Citizenship : The application of the understanding of the ideals, rights, and responsibilities of active participation in a democratic republic that includes working respectfully and productively together for the benefit of the individual and the community; be ing constitutional, and statutory rights; and mentoring others to become productive citizens and lifelong learners. Note: These foundation skills are listed numerically in parentheses after each benchmark.

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85 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Key: National Core Music Standards in green; anchor standards in black St. Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations in blue Louisiana Benchmarks K 4 in purple Click here for F ourth Grade Assessment Tasks and Rubrics Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work Imagine a . Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic ideas and explain their connection to a specific purpose and context (such as social and cultural) . b . Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms, melodies, and simple accompaniment patterns) within related tonalities (such as major and minor ) and meters . Explore and express basic elements of music through voice, musical instruments, electronic technology, or available media (3) Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) o quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, dotted half note, whole note, whole and half rest, s ixteenth notes, eighth note sixteenth note groupings, dotted quarter notes o Tied notes The Jug Band ( Model Music Lessons , p. 39 41 1 ). Students explore the cult ural context of jug band music and then improvise together using similar homemade instruments. See this website for great informati on on this type of ensemble . Beatbox Improvisation: In a circle, the class begins with one stud ent making a noise that repeats after which the next student adds his/her own sound . This continues until the whole circle is This can also be done with instruments and/or with one student keeping a steady beat on a drum. Singing the Blues ( Model Music Lessons , p. 69 72). Students analyze recordings of the blues, then use the popular form to impro vise 3 line blues lyrics. Songs include d are and , by Huddie Ledbetter . Click here for a book about blues and here for blues lesson plans . Listen to music of jazz greats such as Ella , Louie , as well as local New Orleanians such as Ledisi . See also this fantastic compilation of female singers scatting or anything with Bobby McFerrin . Students practice scatting over a blues accompaniment track (click here for one). impr ovise theme harmony phrases tonality meter Jug Band washboard, harmonica, banjo, jug, washtub bass, country, folk, jazz, blues Possible Assessment My Big Event Improvisation, p. 1 Mystery Tune Improvisation, p. 2

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86 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Plan and Make a . Demonstrate selected and organized musical ideas for an improvisation, arrangement, or composition to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context. b. Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or recording technology to document personal rhythmic, melodic, and simple harmonic musical idea s. Improvise or compose and perform simple musical ideas, such as echoing melody or short rhythmic patterns (1, 4) Recognize that there are many possibilities and choices available in the creative processes of music (4) Recognize basic notational symbols and express vocabulary that conveys precise musical meanings (3,4) Name the notes on the treble staff and perform a small range on an instrument This Land Is Your Land ( Model Music Lessons , p. 17 19). Students add additional verses to this familiar song, showing their grasp of figurative language in lyrical songwriting. Silent Movies, Jingles, and Such! ( Model Music Lessons , p. 46 47). Students explore common commercial uses of music and then compose their own jingles. Click here for information about silent films and here to Musical Math Symbols ( Model Music Lessons , p. 79 81). Students learn the value of various rhythmic notes and work with this knowledge in various musical and nonmusical ways to help solidify it. Incredibox: Click here for a free online tool for creating and ed iting loop based compositions. Rhythm Dice Games : Students practice recalling rhythmic note values within the context of a variety of board games and partner games. composition revision editing jingles piggyback songs Possible Assessment Melodic Composition for the Recorder, p. 3 Cup Composition, p. 4 Musical Math Symbols Equations Worksheet ( Model Music Lessons , p. 81). Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all 11 correct 2. developing ( ~) 8 10 correct 3. no ( ) 7 or less correct

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87 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr3 Refine and complete artistic work Evaluate and Refine a . Evaluate , refine, and document revisions to personal music, applying teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback to show improvement over time . Present a. Present the final version of personal created music to others, and explain connection to expressive intent. Understand and apply basic music vocabulary to describe aesthetic qualities of musical compositions (1,4) Play instruments with good posture and technique Read and perform: o quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, dotted half note, whole note, whole and half rest, s ixteenth notes, eighth note sixteenth note groupings, dotted quarter notes Music? Or N ot? ( Model Music Lessons , p. 20 22). Students e xplore and critique John Cage Water Walk , and then create their own compositions using found sounds and nontraditional notation. Variety is the Spice of Music ( Model Music Lessons , p. 26 28). Students explore theme Ah, vous dirai je, Maman Ode to Joy . S ee MATB recordings ( , p. 109 112 ) 2 . Video record student compositions for self critique and feedback from peers throughout the composing process. If possible, make this accessible to students outside of the music classroom ( privately on youtube , dropbox ). mood found sounds traditional notations nontraditional notatio n theme and variations quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, dotted half note, whole note, whole and half rest, sixteenth notes, eighth note sixteenth note groupings, dotted quarter notes Possible Assessment A D ay in the Life Composition, p. 5

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88 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr4 Select, a nalyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. Select Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is influenced by personal interest, knowledge, context, and technical skill. Analyze a. Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of music (such as rhythm, pitch, and form) in music selected for performance. b. When analyzing selected music, read and perform using iconic and/or standard notation. c. Explain how context (such as social and cultural) informs a performance. Interpret a. Demonstrate and explain how in tent is conveyed through interpretive decisions and expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, and timbre). Recognize and imitate simple melodies and rhythmic patterns using voice, musical instruments, or other sound sources (3) Identify a tonal center as major or minor Sing for Dr. Martin Luther King ( Model Music Lessons , p. 42 45). Students explore We Shall Overcome Click here for background information. See MATB materials for a wonderful recording from a march and also p. 113 116 for a song about Martin Luther King, Jr. Student s may be given the chance to select from a variety of protest songwriters (e.g. Guthrie , Seeger ) . Be sure to discuss context such as the d epression, dustbowl, unions, etc. As an extension, students find songs with similar messages in co ntemporary music and/or creat songs about personal experiences with inequality. Students select and analyze unfamiliar songs for rehearsal (see 150 American Folk Songs 3 , Kodaly in the Classroom 4 , MATB Book Two 5 , Wee Sing Fun and Folk 6 ). Students select and analyze a favorite piece from MATB S tudent Book Two to perform for the class. Possible analysis could include melodic contour, rhythmic patterns, or tona lity . Civil Rights Movement demonstrators protest segregation a c ap p ella Possible Assessment Click here for National Core Music Model Cornerstone Assessment 3 5. See p. 10 for an exit slip relating to selections. See p. 12 14 for guiding questions to help students analyze and interpret their chosen piece.

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89 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr5 Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. Rehearse, Evaluate and Refine a. Apply teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback to evaluate accuracy and expressiveness of ensemble and personal performance s . b. Rehearse and refine technical accuracy and expressive qualities, and address performance challenges. Participate in organized musical activities inclu ding singing, playing, and movement (1,2,5) Name the notes on the treble clef staff and perform a small range on an instrument Sing partner songs using good posture and technique (silent breath, still shoulders) Read and perform: o quarter note, eighth note , quarter rest, half note, dotted half note, whole note, whole and half rest, s ixteenth notes, eighth note sixteenth note groupings, dotted quarter notes Songs and Games (Model Music Lessons, p. 23 25). Students play several song games, drawing their attention to common pitches (using solfege). Songs Frere Jacque (Model Music Lessons, p. 59 61). Students prepare various rounds for performance and identify areas for self improvement. Songs Make a large floor staff with p Students stand on lines and spaces to show their knowledge of different notes. As an extension, students challenge each other to spell words as a team comp etition. See MATB Theory Papers , p. 78 103 for practice naming notes (those in C posit ion) . Click here for an alternative theory workbook series. Click here for an online game for practicing note na me recognition. Click here for several partner songs for practicing vocal technique and independence. Music Basketball: Click here for directions. This game can be played to practice knowledge of melodic note names or rhythmic note, or the ability to perform different rhythms. solfege partner song canon ostinato unison beat, rhythm Possible Assessment Click here for National Core Music Model Cornerstone Assessment 3 5. See 25 35 for various rubrics for self evaluation and p. 36 for a template to create student or class developed rubrics. Note naming MAD minute. See MATB Theory Book and/or the Recorder Resource Kit for examples.

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92 Fourth Grade Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr6 Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work. Present a . Perform music , alone or with others, with ex pression and technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation. b . Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for the context, venue, and genre. Recognize and demonstrate beha vior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Sing partner songs using good posture and breath technique (silent breath, still shoulders) Identify and perform : o S lurs and accents o Tied notes The Star Spangled Banner ( Model Music Lessons p. 13 16). Students prepare the song for performance by learning about the purpose, historical context, and meaning of the lyrics. A s an extension , students analyze and critique various performances (e.g. Whitney Houston ) . Discuss opinions of the practic e of pre recording Click here for a dramatic narrative telling the story of Francis Scott Key writing of the anthem. Christmas Around the World ( Model Music Lessons , p. 32 34). Students explore Christmas songs from around the world, through performance. We Come a Perfor mance Etiquette ( Model Music Lessons , p. 53 58 ) . Students role play app ropriate behavior for various musical contexts. Singing in a Round (Model Music Lessons, p. 29 for singing in a round (e.g., proper blend, phrasing). Next, students explo re more difficult rounds, applying technique s learned. Music in Childhood 7 ). mood , expression , phrase ¾ meter , steady beat anthem , lyrics tuneful singing introduction, transition Possible Assessment Same Piece, Different M ood, p. 6 Rhythm reading : Students perform rhythms during a group game. Each student gets to clap 3 rhythm cards; if he or she performs the rhythms correctly, the cards count towards class points. If any are incorrect, they count towards the Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect Performance Et iquette Checklist ( Model Music Lessons , p. 57). Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all 6 correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2+ incorrect

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93 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re7 Perceive and analyze artistic work . Select a . Demonstrate and explain how selected music connects to and is influenced by specific interests, experiences, purposes, or contexts. Analyze a. Demonstrate and explain how responses to music are informed by the structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as social and cultural). Identify the music form (e.g., AB, ABA) and describe in simple terms how the elements of music a re used in various works (1,4) Introduce coda and interlude Identify specific instruments within the four instrument families visually and aurally Identify soprano, alto, tenor, and bass voices by sound ( Model Music Lessons , p. 1 4). Students analyze the structure and Stars and Stripes Forever The Washington Post around the world and how music can and has been used to See Bach to Rock p. 51 73 8 for information on various Nationalistic Composers. ( Model Music Lessons , p. 62 63). Students describe qualities of patriotic songs and analyze the form and meaning of . Clic k here for a bulletin board to be used as a reference when teaching form. Reading and Writing Music IV ( Model Music Lessons , p. 65 67). Students compare and contrast the rhythm and s olfege present in simple songs, including . Click here for an extensive website highlighting each instruments of the orchestra. Reviewing different instruments not only helps students better perceive different sections of musical works, but also develops discriminatory hearing. genre , style context form and structure theme variations interlude coda Possible Assessment Genre Project, p. 7 Click here for examples . Identifying Form. Task: Students write down the form of a few different pieces to show their knowledge of musical form and li stening skills. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. yes ( ) all three correct 2. developing ( ~) 1 incorrect 3. no ( ) 2 3 incorrect

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94 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re8 Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. Interpret a . Demonstrate and explain how the expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, and timbre) are interpretations to reflect expressive intent. Recognize universal themes in music and how music communicates a universal language (1, 4) Identify simple music events (e.g., dynamic change, meter change, same/ different sections) while listening to a work (2,4) Identify relationships among music, other arts, and disciplines outside the arts (1, 4) Experience (sing, play, hear, move to) folk and traditional songs and repertoire from local and world cultures Music at an Exhibition ( Model Music Lessons , p. 9 12). Students analyze the expressive features of several famous pieces, including Bartholdy, and Students watch performances in various languages and take educated guesses regarding the topic of each song (what is being communicated) . Discuss how the voice and instruments can similarly convey meaning, especially when the words understood . See est Opera 9 for synopses and information about opera composers. Music as a Universal Language (Model Music Lessons, p. 73 music is used in international events, such as the Olympic and analyze the meaning of pieces that are sung in various languages. Music orchestral arrangement , a version sung in German, and a version sung in English . See MATB materials for recordings. tempo, dynamics meter, key mood , tone color, timbre instruments occasion/purpose opera , lyrics Possible Assessment Song Analysis: click here for National Core Music Model Cornerstone Assessment 3 5. See p. 10 for an exit slip relating to why the student selected a particular piece. See p. 12 14 for guiding questions to help students analyze and interpret their chosen piece. Song I llustration, p. 8 Model Music Lessons Musical Analysis Word Grid, p. 12. For 8 pieces, students identify the following: tempo, dynamics, major/minor, mood, and instruments. 1. yes ( ) correctly identified in 7 8 pieces studied 2. developing ( ~) correctly ident ified in 5 6 pieces studied 3. no ( ) correctly identified in 4 or less pieces studied

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95 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re9 Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. Evaluate a. Evaluate music al works and performances, applying established criteria , and explain appropriateness to the context . Devise criteria for evaluating music and music performances, and express opinions using basic music vocabulary (1, 2, 4) Recognize charact eristics of music that make a musical selection appropriate for a particular purpose (4) Participate in guided inquiry into the share personal feelings or preferences about music (1, 5) Express an opinion of and describe a selection of repertoire Battle of the Bands : Students rehears e , perform , and critique group rhythm ostinatos. Ov er the Rainbow ( Model Music Lessons , p. 5 8). Students listen to different versions of the same song, form opinions and offer defense of these using musical vocabulary. Possible v ersions include those of Israel Kamakawiwo'ole , Judy Garland , and Aretha Franklin . Students video record themselves and offer each other feedback. Students apply their knowledge of music vocabulary to write a written defense of their top 3 favorite artists or songs. criteria opinion Possible Assessment American Idol ( Minus the D rama ) , p. 9 Click here for National Core Music Mod el Cornerstone Assessment 3 5. See p. 36 for a template for student or class created rubric s.

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96 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn10 Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art. Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music. Demonstrate awareness of where and how music is used in daily life and within the community (1, 4, 5) In collab oration with English Language Arts teachers, students develop stories about their lives. Then, they create a soundtrack and/or background sound effects using available instruments. One possibility is to present puppet show s that include sound effects, if materials are available . Video record final versions. Students explore the science of music . Click here for various interdisciplinary lessons involving pitch, volume, vibrations, and sound waves. Students keep a journal for two weeks in which they record their interaction with music each day. Reflect on the results and d iscuss various purposes of music. soundtrack pitch volume sound waves, waveform Possible Assessment Personal Narratives and/or Poetry, p. 10

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97 Fourth Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn11 Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the others arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life. Recognize musical styles representative of various cultures (4) Recognize and demonstrate behavior appropriate for various musical environments (4, 5) Recognize professions in music and identify the roles of musicians in various cultures (4) Identify and ensemble as a band or orc hestra Music in the Family (Model Music Lessons, p. 35 Marsalis family. Click here for a video of Wynton talking about jazz. Expand to include other New Orl eans families, such as the Connicks, Nevilles, and Batistes. Students share about family members they have who are musicians. (Model Music Lessons, p. 48 52). Students explore various styles of Louisiana music to gain an unde rstanding of the culture from which they come and analyze musical features. culture society context composer symphony Possible Assessment Music Around the World Webquest Students acts as appropriate audience member s when listening to classmates perform during various experiences throughout the year. 1. yes ( ) 2. no ( )

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98 Resources Academic Curriculum. (2009, May). Academic c urriculum . Retrieved from http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/academic curriculum 2 Lercari, L. P. (2002). Music and the brain theory p apers . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 3 Erdei, P., & Komlos, K. (1974). 150 American folk songs to sing, read, and p lay . New York, NY: Boosey & Hawkes. 4 Rann, L. (2005). Kodaly in the classroom: A practical approach to teaching pitch and rhythm, a dvanced (Teacher's ed.). Milwaukee, WI : Hal Leonard Corporation. 5 Lercari, L. P. (2009). anual . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 6 Beall, P. C., & Nipp, S. H. (2002). Wee sing fun 'n' f olk . New York: Price Stern Sloan. (Original work published 1989). 7 Cam pbell, P. S., & Kassner, C. (2006). Music in childhood: From preschool through the elementary g rades (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Thomson Schirmer. 8 Kennedy, R. (2009). Bach to rock: An introduction to famous composers and their music, With related a ctivities (17th ed.). New Orleans, LA: Rosemary Corp.. 9 MacLean, A. A., & Henderson, M. (2003). The world's very best opera for kids -In E nglish! . Pickering, Ontario, CN : Children's Group.

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99 Fifth Grade Music Curriculum Map proposed for St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana by Sarah Stevens 2014

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100 Introduction In fifth grade, students build upon their previous understanding of harmony. They also explore ways of learning music independently (utilizing music notation and aural skills). Students at this level have the attention span and maturity to engage in significant composition assignments , to self critique their work , and provide valu able feedback to their peers . Students leave fifth grade with a well rounded sense of music literacy , a broad awareness and appreciation for music of the world and a command of the musical elements through composition and performance . Established Goa ls Students will Work together as an ensemble of musicians for a specific purpose Compose using a process of imagination, investigation, construction, and reflection. Synthesize their knowledge of science, history, math, and music by completing cross curricular projects that deepen their fundamental understanding of music. Perform advanced, syncopated polyrhythms. Sing 2 part songs with proper technique (breathing, pos ture, phrasing).

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101 5 th Essential Understandings Essential Questions Creating Music is a form of communication. Creating high quality music requires developing skills and knowledge (e.g., elements of music). Improvisation is creating in the moment, without the intent of revising or recreating it. Composition is creating music with a process for refining musical ideas. Notational and aural skills empower independent musicians. Performing Performing requires creating and listening at the same time. Melody needs rhythm to move forward. Breathing and posture affect sound (e.g. intonation, phrasing) Written and recorded music enable musicians to communicate over time and distance. Responding Music prefe rences are personal. Timbre adds color and variety to sound. Music serves various purposes. Listening to music actively makes the experience more meaningful. Connecting Music connects us to the past, present, and future. Music is art; music is science. Students will inquire: Creating What purposes drive people to make music? How can I use the elements of music to convey my ideas? How is sound organized to make music? What does it mean to be musically literate? Is it something How can I make my music interesting? Performing Is the audience an essential component of music? How do you know if your performance is successful? Does this performance say something? Responding Why d o we listen to music? Why do we like the music we like? Is all music beautiful? Why do people share music with others? (e.g., via performance and/or recordings). Connecting Does art define culture or does culture define art? Is music a universal language ? How would a scientist/artist/historian explore music?

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102 LOUISIANA CONTENT STANDARDS FOUNDATION SKILLS The Louisiana Content Standards Task Force developed the following foundation skills that should apply to all students in all disciplines. 1. Communication : individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently , strategicall y, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. 2. Problem Sol ving : The identification of an obstacle or challenge and the subsequent application of knowledge and thinking processes, which include reasoning, decision making, and inquiry in order to reach a solution using multiple pathways, even w hen no routine path is apparent. 3. Resource Access and Utilization : The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniqu es, and technologies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word pr ocessors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies. 4. Linking and Gene rating Knowledge : The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In order to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transf er and elaborate on these processes. Transfer refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. Elaboration refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts. 5. Citizenship : The application of the understanding of the ideals, rights, and responsibilities of active participation in a democratic republic that includes working respectfully and productively together for the benefit of the individual and the community; being constitutional, and statutory rights; and mentoring others to become productive citizens and lifelong learners . Note: These foundation skills are listed numerically in parentheses after each benchmark.

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103 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Key: National Core Music Standards in green; anchor standards in black St. Bernard Parish Grade Level Expectations in blue Louisiana Benchmarks K 4 in purple Click here for Fifth Grade Assessment Tasks and Rubrics Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr1 Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work Imagine a. Improvise rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic ideas, and explain connection to specific purpose and context (such as social, cultural, and historical). b. Generate musical ideas (such as rhythms, melodies, and accompaniment patterns) within specific related tonalities, meters, and simple chord changes. Improvise or compose and perform writte n music (1, 4) Explore and express basic elements of music through voice, musical instruments, electronic technology, or available media (3) Recognize chord changes Identify the tonal center as major or minor Identify and label the tonic (do) in simple phrases S tudents watch improvisations and discuss how he arpeggiates chords with his voice . Click here for a demonstration using the pentatonic scale and here for a full length concert. Give opportunities to play chords on various melodic instruments and identify chord changes aurally, then with roman numerals . Music Composition: Sound and Silence ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental, p.44 48) 1 . Students compose short melodies in groups and then attempt to take all of their melodies and tie them together as one cohesive piece. The use of s ilence as an important component of music is discussed . The World of Music ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental , p. 49 51). Students respond to and improvise music as inspired by different colors, exploring their voices, sound sources, and body movement. Students build triads on a variety of instruments (e.g. keyboa rds, glockens piels, tone bars, boomwhackers) and experiment with rhythm patterns to create a stylistic accompaniment. improvisation tonality , tonic, major, minor chord, triad tone color, balance, dark, bright, blend melodic contour time signature , meter measure , double bar line Assessment Example Pentatonic Scale Improvisation, p. 1 Chord Change Identification, p. 2

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104 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr2 Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. Plan & Make a . Demonstrate selected and developed musical ideas for improvisations, arrangements, or compositions to express intent, and explain connection to purpose and context. b. Use standard and/or iconic notation and/or rec ording technology to document personal rhythmic, melodic, and two chord harmonic musical ideas. Demonstrate awareness of various traditional and technological options pertaining to creative processes in music (1, 4) Interpret notational symbols and vocabulary that convey precise musical meanings (2, 3, 4) Apply knowledge of treble clef using an instrument, expanding range to 8 10 notes o quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, dotted half note, whole note, whole and half rest, s ixteenth notes, eighth note sixteenth note groupings, dotted quarter notes o Tied notes Create Music ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 13 15). Students make compositional decisions together as they work through the process of setting poetry to music. Students may also add dynamic s and other expressive elements and/or choose from a variety of po ems to compose a small group or individual composition. Elements, Form, and Analysis ( Model Music Lessons , p. 39 41 ). Using rhythm strips, students compose a short percussion piece in ABA form , choosing contrasting instruments and dynamics for each section . Other forms may also be used (e.g. rondo) or students may add an introduction and coda to a pre existing piece . Build simple ostinatos as a class, using rh ythm notes studied and tied notes. Discuss the use of different timbres for the various parts. Perform the same ostin ato with various instruments and share preferences , with musical support . Connect this to loop based composition experiences. See the fol lowing online games to practice note naming: classicsforkids musictheory.net vicfirth Click here and here for printable workshee ts. composition loop track treble clef , bass clef quarter note, eighth note, quarter rest, half note, dotted half note, whole note, whole and half rest, sixteenth notes, eighth note sixteenth note groupings, dotted quarter notes t ied notes Assessment Example Loop B ased Composition, p. 3 Assessment Task: On a written quiz, students identify notes of the treble and bass clefs. Click here for printable mad minute style worksheets to use. Grade by percentage: 1. 91 100% ( + ) 2. 80 90% ( ) 3. 66 79% (~) 4. less than 65% correct ( )

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105 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Creating Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cr3 Refine and complete artistic work Evaluate and Refine a . Evaluate, refine, and document revisions to personal music, applying teacher provided and collaboratively developed criteria and feedback, and explain rationale for changes. Present a. Present the final ver sion of personal created music to others that demonstrates craftsmanship, and explain connection to expressive intent. Understand and apply basic music vocabulary to describe aesthetic qualities of musical compositions (1,4) Identify the tonic (do) in simple phrases Students c ritique the work of various songwriters; consider their use of imagery, various forms of rhyme, hyperbole, etc. Click here for examples. As a group, find lackluster lyrics . Revise them using knowledge of literary devices to make them more effective. Discuss hooks. Watch this video. on Click here for a lesson plan . In addition, teach students to sing the melody first, so it is familiar. Model theme and variations on keyboard (use a common theme, such as Mary Had a Little Lamb ). The c lass brainstorms different ways to vary a theme (e.g., tempo, dynamics, rhythm, timbre, tonality, etc.) Listen to by Mozart as an example. critique revision standard notation barlines measures double bar repeat sign time signature Assessment Example Songwriting Unit , p. 4 Click here to see rubric and directions Theme and Variation , p. 5

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106 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr4 Select, a nalyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. Select a. Demonstrate and explain how the selection of music to perform is influenced by personal interest, knowledge, and context, as well as their personal and Analyze a. Demonstrate understanding of the structure and the elements of music (such as rhythm, pitch, form, and harmony) in music for selected performance. b. When analyzing selected music, read and perform using standard notation. c. Explain how context (such as social, cultural, and historical) informs performances. Interpret a. Demonstrate and explain how intent is conveyed through interpretive decisions and expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, timbre, and arti culation/style). Identify distinguishing characteristics of musical styles representative of various historical periods and cultures (1, 2, 4) Identify major works of great composers and recognize achievements of prominent musicians (4, 5) Identify soprano, alto, tenor, and bass voices by sound Predict the Performance ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 28 32). Students judge the quality of musical compositions by studying the score s . They also predict how different parts o f the piece will sound and then watch a recorded performance to assess both their Music Events and Elements ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 33 35). Students analyze features and elements of w ritten music in preparation of singing it. Studen ts select a favorite piece from MATB Student Book Two 2 to perform for the class. Students select and analyze unfamiliar songs for rehearsal (see 150 American Folk Songs 3 , Kodaly in the Classroom 4 , Wee Sing Fun and Folk 5 ). dynamics (fortissimo, forte, me zzo forte, mezzo, mezzo piano, piano, pianissimo, crescendo, decrescendo) tempo (adagio, moderato, allegro, accelerando, ritardando) articulation (staccato, legato) phrasing intent culture Assessment Example Artistic Choices, p. 6

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107 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr5 Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation. Rehearse, Evaluate and Refine Apply teacher provided and established criteria and feedback to evaluate the accuracy and expressiveness of ensemble and personal performances. Rehearse to refine technical accuracy and expressive qualities to address challenges, and show improvement over time. Recognize and demonstrate elements of music, using voice, musical instruments, electronic technology, or other available media (3,4) Apply appropriate v ocal technique to new songs, performing alone and with others Apply appropriate instrumental technique to new songs, performing alone and with others Read o s imple syncopation o 6/8 time signature o slurs and accents o flat and sharp notes Students l isten to various performances and judge using established criteria . Include videotaped rehearsals of the class. With pare nt permission, students create Y younger children about proper technique for singing and for playing the recorder and/or keyboard. Play rhythm performance games MATB Teacher Manual , p. x). Students decode and sight read simple melodies. This is a great practice to do before performing songs on the keyboards or recorders. (See The Recorder Resource Kit 6 for many simple songs to play). syncopation slurs accents flat note sharp note posture diaphragm vocal chords time signature Assessment Example Task: Students independently create thoughtful rubric s that include what they feel is important in judging a musical performance. These rubrics become the starting place in a class effort to create a performance rubric. Click here for a blank, pr intable rubric template. Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: 1. completed with effort ( ) 2. partially completed (~) 3. no t completed ( )

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108 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Performing Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Pr6 Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work. Present a. Perform music, alone or with others, with expression, technical accuracy, and appropriate interpretation. b. Demonstrate performance decorum and audience etiquette appropriate for the co ntext, venue, genre, and style. Demonstrate and discuss behavior appropriate for various musical environments (1, 4, 5) Understand and apply expanded music vocabulary to describe aesthetic qualities of musical compositions (1,4) Apply appropriate expressive musical elements Performers and Audience ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 1 3). Students reflect on their own experience as performers and audi ence members. See p. 3 for a quiz on audience etiquette. C lick here for another. The Universal Language ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 22 24; Instrumental p. 24 25). Students question whether music is universal or not through the study of songs from various cultures and h aving assorted purposes . Music Characteristics and Purposes Celebrating Change ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental , p. 26 27). Students prepare music for performance that is suited to different occasions. P erformances may take place within the school or in the community . Songs include Art Thou Troubled? by G. F. Handel ; Erie Canal , by Earlene Rentz ; Red River Dances , by Cristi Cari Miller ; Sh ena ndoah , arranged by Kevin Riehle ; Sing a Song of Peace , (This Is My Country) by Jill Gallina . musical elements interpretation genre graduation inauguration ceremony Assessment Example Instrument Performance Task, p. 7

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109 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re7 Perceive and analyze artistic work Select a. Demonstrate and explain, citing evidence, how selected music connects to and is influenced by specific interests, experiences, purposes, or context s . Analyze Demonstrate and explain, citing evidence, how responses to music are informed by the structure, the use of the elements of music, and context (such as social, cultural, and historical). Identify the music form (e.g., round, canon) and explain how the elements of music are used in works representing v arious genres/styles (4) Identify theme and variation Identify and label multiple sections of a song using letters A, B, etc Identify the tonal center as major or minor Identify coda and interlude Identify flat and sharp notes Identify and ensemble as a band or orchestra Influences of Famous Composers and Prominent Musicians ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental , p. 19 23 , Vocal , p. 16 21 ). Students explore the life and work of various composers/musicians and then present their findings to the class. Click here for a related Webquest. Also see Bach to Rock 7 and 8 . Elements, Form, and Analysis ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental , p. 35 37). Students con sider how form and musical elements contribute to a sense of tension and release in musical works. Students arrange MATB keyboard songs to include additional sections (e.g. introductions, codas). Alternatively, multiple keyboard songs may be combined to f ollow a given form. Students should justify their choices, drawing upon musical features common to both songs (e.g. similar rhythms, melodic style) . Students play the same song in major and minor. Using their ears, students attempt to transpose the song to another key, utilizing necessary flat and sharp notes . The song should Bir t h form , call and response , round/canon , verse and refrain coda, interlude major , minor flat, sharp tension, release balance interpretation Assessment Example Form Presentation, p. 8

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110 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re8 Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. Interpret a . Demonstrate and explain how the expressive qualities (such as dynamics, tempo, timbre, and and personal interpretations to reflect expressive intent. Describe the emotional and intellectual impact of music in various contexts (1, 4, 5) Identify and describe music events (e.g., entry of an instrument, meter change, return of refrain) while listening to a work (2, 4) Experience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk songs and traditional songs and repertoire from l ocal and world cultures Identify specific instruments within the four instrument families visually and aurally Music: Feeling and Thinking ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 36 38; Instrumental p. 33 34). Students study the Star Spangled Bann and discuss why it i s always sung at various occasions. Brainstorm and/or research appropriate occasions. Anthems from other countries may also be discussed and analyzed. Students analyze the expressive features of various classical pieces. See The World Best Opera for Kids 9 and The Listening Resource Kit, Level 5 10 . Also, see the many listening maps available on pinterest and this website. influence orchestral instrument names Assessment Example Interpreting Music , p. 9 Listening Map s , p. 10

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111 Fifth Grade, Artistic Process: Responding Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Re9 Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work. Evaluate a . Evaluate musical works and performances, applying established criteria, and explain appropriateness to the context, citing evidence from the elements of music. Use appropriate criteria and expanded m usic vocabulary to evaluate the quality of music and performances (1, 2, 4) Recognize that concepts of beauty differ by culture and that taste varies from person to person (1, 4, 5) Describe or explain characteristics of music in regard to suitability of m usical selections for specific purposes (1, 4) Express an opinion of and describe a selection of repertoires Experience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk songs and traditional songs and repertoire from local and world cultures Identify appropriate expressive musical elements Tone Production ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental p. 28 29). Students critique Y outube performances and then apply learned techniques to their own practice (e.g. with recorders) . The Beauty of Music ( Model Music Lessons , Voc al , p. 42 45). Students compare and from various cultures , reminded that within every culture there are different styles and opinions Kaval Sviri Dulaman Old Church Slavonic , The Spirit from South Africa, and more. What is Quality? ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 46 49). Students establish criteria from which to judge performances of themselves and others. criteria opinion fact purpose adjudication/adjudicator timbre , pitch, rhythm, balance, intonation, blend, musical expression, diction, stage presence Assessment Example During discussions student s s upport their opinions of music with music vocabulary (teacher assesses a few students each week through observation of partner or whole group discussions ). Record attainment of the skill with a checklist: O pinion s are : 1. Sophisticated ( + ) 2. Acceptable ( ) 3. Simple ( ~) 4. N ot supported with musical knowledge ( )

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112 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn10 Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences to make art. Demonstrate how interests, knowledge, and skills relate to personal choices and intent when creating, performing, and responding to music. Recognize and perform melodic and rhythmic patterns using voice, musical instruments, or other sound sources, both individually and in ensembles (1, 3, 4) Identify and discuss ways in which universal themes are revealed and developed in the music of diverse cultures and time periods (1, 4) Describe or explain characteristics of music in regard to suitability of musical selections for specific purposes (1, 4) Silent Movie Improvisation : Students discuss movies. W atch several scenes from cartoons such as the Lion King stampede. C lick here for many examples . A s an extension, students work in groups to choose a scene . With only a brief time period to experiment and choose instruments, students improvise new background music and sound effects for their movie scene. Students should plan certain elements, but not attempt to notate using traditional notation. Careers in Local and World Cultures ( Model Music Lessons , intr., p. 11 13 ; Vocal , p. 11 12 ) Explore various careers available in the field of music and also the lives of famous composers . Click here and here for lists of careers in music. solo ensemble universal composer technician Assessment Example Performs appropriately for a setting (e.g., graduation, pre k in class concert) 1. yes ( ) 2. no ( ) Acts as appropriate audience members when listening to classmates perform. 1. yes ( ) 2. no ( )

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113 Fifth Grade , Artistic Process: Connecting Learning Standards Strategies for Teaching Vocabulary MU: Cn11 Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding. Demonstrate understanding of relationships between music and the other arts, other disciplines, varied contexts, and daily life. Identify specific types and uses of musical instruments in various cultures (4) Demonstrate and discuss behavior appropriate for various musical environments (1, 4, 5) Experience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk songs and traditional songs and repertoire from local and world cultures Exp erience (sing, play, hear, or move to) folk songs and traditional songs and repertoire from local and world cultures History and Geography of Music ( Model Music Lessons , Instrumental , p. 4 5). Students compare performances using Medieval and Renaissance Instruments with modern ones. Draw connections between social studies and music timelines. Also, discuss how instruments evolve, especially since the rise of electronic technology. Characteristics of the Music We Sing ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 4 7). Students learn to sort songs based on common features of various time periods. Music in Time and Place ( Model Music Lessons , Vocal , p. 8 10 ; Instrumental p. 6 10 ). Students explor e the history of African American Spirituals and characteristics of Christmas music from around the world. etiquette context spirituals harmony, melody, tempo, rhythm culture Assessment Example Assessment Task: Listening Quiz. Students use prior knowledge to identify the origin of new pieces of music when listening to recordings from around the world. Click here and here for so urces of kid friendly music. Record attainment of the skill by percentage: 1. 91 100% ( +) 2. 80 90% ( ) 3. 66 79% ( ~) 4. less than 65% correct ( )

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114 Resources 1 Academic Curriculum. (2009, May). Academic c urriculum . Retrieved from http://www.louisianabelieves.com/resources/library/academic curriculum 2 L ercari, L. P. (2009). anual . New York, NY: The 42nd Street Fund. 3 Erdei, P., & Komlos, K. (1974). 150 American folk songs to sing, read, and p lay . New York, NY: Boosey & Hawkes. 4 Rann, L. (2005). Kodaly in the c lassroom: A practical approach to teaching pitch and r hythm, Advanced (Teacher's ed.). Milwaukee, WI : Hal Leonard Corporation. 5 Beall, P. C., & Nipp, S. H. (2002). Wee sing fun 'n' f olk . New York , NY : Price Stern Sloan. (Original work published 1989). 6 2009 ). The r ecorder resource k it: Themes & v ariations Vol 1 . Red Deer, Alberta: CN . 7 Kennedy, R. (2009). Bach to rock: An introduction to fam ous composers and their music, W ith related a ctivities (17th ed.). New Orleans, LA: Rosemary Corp.. 8 Henderson, B. (2000). The composer's specials teacher's guide: From the devine entertainment video s eries . Milwaukee, WI: Hal Leonard Corporation and Devine Entertainment. 9 MacLean, A. A., & Henderson, M. (2003). The world's very best opera for k ids -I n English! . Pickering, Ontario, CN : Children's Group. 10 Listening resource k it: Themes & v ariations , l evel 5 . Red Deer, Alberta: CN .

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 115 Appendix A Recommended Music Teacher Blogs http://missjacobsonsmusic.blogspot.com/ http://elementarymusicresources.blogspot.ca/p/favourite finds.html http://bethsmusicnotes.blogspot.com/ http://thepluckypianista.blogspot.com/ http://www.eartrainingandimprov.com/ http://katietraxler.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=69& Itemid=466 http://colorinmypiano.com/ http://mrskingrocks.blogspot.com/ http://www.mrsmiraclesmusicroom.com/ http://www.beatechie.com/ http://www.ti me.org/index.php?option=com_easyblog&view=blogger&limit= 2&Itemid=138 http://mustech.net/category/music education/ http://mustech.pbworks.com/w/page/21952707/FrontPage http://virtualpodium.blogspot.com/2010/01/imea conference 2010 day 1.html See these two for lists of even more music education links: htt p://cybraryman.com/music.html#online http://www.jamesfrankel.com/links.html

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 116 Appendix B Recommended Interactive Websites http://www.nyphilkids.org/main.phtml http://www.sfskids.org/ http://www.dsokids.com/ http://www.bso.org/brands/bso/education community/children families/bso kids.aspx http://www.bbc.co.uk/orchestras/learn/guidetotheorchestra/ http://www.sphinxkids.org/Composers_Gallery.html http://www.classicsforkids.com/ http://www.musi cgames.co/games by category/compose music games/ http://www.incredibox.com/ http://www.patatap.com/ http://www.philtu lga.com/resources.html http://pbskids.org/games/music/ http://www.musictechteacher.com/music_quizzes/music_quizzes.htm http://www.themusicinteractive.com/TMI/index.html http://www.joytunes.com/ http://audacity.sourceforge .net/ http://www.8notes.com/theory/ http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/fromthetop/video/season 2/ http ://www.toytheater.com/music.php http://listeningadventures.carnegiehall.org/ypgto/index.aspx http://www.inudge.net/ http://www.musick8kids.com/html/recorder_training.php http://www.storylineonline.net/ http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/schools/4_11/music/mm/intro.shtml http://www.musicracer.com/ http://www.metronomeonline.com/ http://www.thepuredrop.com.au/

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K 5 CURRICULUM MAPS 117 Appendix C School Board Presentation On June 10, 2014 , Activities. Her presentation informed its members of the newly released National Core Music Standards, walked them through e xamples of tea ching through the artistic processes, and shared a preview of her ongoing work building curriculum maps for K 5 music. To view the presentation, follow this link. To view the entire School Board Meeting, click here .


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